Page 1

MORE PIZZA FOR CHICO See CHOW, page 37

DIRTY

POLITICS See NEWSLINES, page 8

SAY CHEESE! See HEALTHLINES, page 12

SPECIAL REPORT: How Butte County is doing ‘whatever it takes’ to help the destitute

SUMMER STARTS ON PAGE Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

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Volume 35, Issue 38

See MUSIC, page 38

Thursday, May 17, 2012


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CN&R

Vol. 35, Issue 38 • May 17, 2012

1

OPINION

James S. Nagel, MD

Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 From This Corner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Would you go to a Chiropractor for heart surgery?

NEWSLINES Downstroke. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

HEALTHLINES The Pulse. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Appointments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

COVER STORY

20

ARTS & CULTURE

GREENWAYS EarthWatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 UnCommon Sense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 The GreenHouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Music Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Fine Arts listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Bulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Music. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 In The Mix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Arts DEVO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

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From The Edge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Fifteen Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 10

ON THE COVER: PHOTO BY TOM GASCOYNE DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Robert Speer Managing Editor Melissa Daugherty Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Calendar/Special Projects Editor Howard Hardee News Editor Tom Gascoyne Greenways/Healthlines Editor Christine G.K. LaPado Staff Writer Ken Smith Contributors Catherine Beeghly, Craig Blamer, Alastair Bland, Henri Bourride, Rachel Bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Jovan Johnson, J. Jay Jones, Miles Jordan, Leslie Layton, Mark Lore, Sean Murphy, Jaime O’Neill, Anthony Peyton Porter, Shannon Rooney, Claire Hutkins Seda, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Willow Sharkey, Alan Sheckter, Matt Siracusa, Scott Szuggar, Karl Travis, Evan Tuchinsky Interns Kyle Emery, Dane Stivers Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandra Peters Design Manager Kate Murphy Design Melissa Arendt, Brennan Collins, Priscilla Garcia, Mary Key, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Manager Alec Binyon Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Jamie DeGarmo, Laura Golino, Robert Rhody Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Advertising Coordinator Jennifer Osa Events Intern Alina Chavera

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Measure A’s a downer We’re aware that medical-marijuana cultivation often has little

An alternative to Facebook? Ihow much would it be worth in 2013 after everyone migrates to a competitor’s website that guarantees not to

s Facebook really worth $100 billion? And, if so,

invade their privacy?

Couldn’t any techie with a few computers and a case of Red Bull start up a nonprofit alternative to Facebook, legally promising in its charter full privacy protection for users and non-tracking of clicks, and yet with the identical ability to post and share photos, messages, and the like? And still make money on passive ads targeted to the by demographic of “people Tom Blodget who use social media” (i.e., ads for computers, The author is a local cell phones, cameras, etc)? educator and With 900 million people or musician who believes more, a nonprofit website in the commons. He could easily cover its costs is not a techie capable of starting a with the old-fashioned pascompeting website, sive ads—and no tracking. Wouldn’t this alternative cause curhe says. rent Facebook users to migrate en masse to this new site? All you have to do is tell your 466 friends on Facebook that there’s a place where you won’t have to worry about being spied on and “monetized,” and all make the leap in the same week. (Try censoring that, Facebook.)

Have you ever used Craigslist? Craigslist’s founders have led by example. They weren’t interested in “monetizing” the website so as to become insanely rich. They decided to make all their money on very small and defined subsets of ads (primarily job openings in New York City and other large metropolitan cities), leaving the rest to be free, as we all want them to be. And Craigslist’s founders are successful to this day, with enough money to retire many times over. And all with smiling service. Facebook is not rocket science. The technology employed is garden-variety stuff available to any of the millions of techies who want to replicate it. After all, what do people do on social media? They blab, post images, send messages, and hit “like” buttons. Have I forgotten anything? Facebook has no secret recipe, no “must have” patents, no brilliant technological innovation. And it certainly has a horrible track record for customer service. It doesn’t have to be the “only game in town.” The value of Facebook depends entirely on everyone believing that the emperor is wearing clothes, when in actuality the emperor is buck naked. Ω

Facebook is not rocket science. The technology employed is garden-variety stuff.

4 CN&R May 17, 2012

or nothing to do with medicine. We also know that marijuana gardens can be a nuisance to neighbors, and that the number of gardens has increased exponentially in recent years. And we understand that Butte County’s medical-marijuana-cultivation ordinance is an effort to lessen the nuisance factor. Unfortunately, however, the ordinance does not solve the fundamental problem: how to enable all qualified patients to grow their own. That’s a big reason why, following its passage on May 24, 2011, opponents quickly qualified a referendum petition and county supervisors were compelled to place Measure A on the June 5 ballot. The ordinance’s biggest shortcoming is that it forbids cultivation on parcels smaller than a half-acre. Many if not most of the parcels in the county are a half-acre or smaller, so the ordinance excludes a lot of qualified patients. (The county’s prohibition of medical-marijuana dispensaries excludes many others from obtaining their medicine legally, notably those living in apartments or renters whose landlords forbid growing.) Proponents of Measure A argue that “it sets up some simple rules to help people be good neighbors.” Well, maybe, but it does so by prohibiting many qualified patients from growing anything at all. The measure favors large-scale growers while forbidding the little guys from growing their six plants for personal use. The measure has other problems. It puts a burden on the county Department of Development Services, which would be tasked with collecting the doctor’s recommendations of all the people involved in the cultivation of more than six plants. Employees would have to be trained in privacy laws under the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. And it would require the county to hire additional code-enforcement officers to make sure that cultivation guidelines are being met. The Sheriff’s Office would be authorized to go on any cultivation site at any time, no warrant needed. Taken together, these flaws in the ordinance render it defective. Voters should tell the supervisors to start over by voting NO on Measure A. Ω

Affirming their humanity In the latest issue of Newsweek, Andrew Sullivan writes mov-

ingly about what he felt as he watched President Obama say on television that he supported gay marriage: “[T]he tears came flooding down. The moment reminded me of my own wedding day. … I was utterly unprepared for how psychologically transformative the moment would be. To have the president of the United States affirm my humanity—and the humanity of all gay Americans—was, unexpectedly, a watershed. He shifted the mainstream in one interview.” Was there political calculation behind it? Undoubtedly. As Obama said, Vice President Joe Biden had “got out a little over his skis” by earlier announcing his support for gay marriage. The president clearly believed he needed to take control of the issue. And, as those close to him have said, he was planning to take that stand in coming months, before the November election. But it’s wrong to say that his action was a cynical ploy designed to bolster his campaign. If anything, it was risky. Americans are split down the middle on this issue, so it’s impossible to say what the political impact will be, one way or the other. Certainly it’s energized Obama’s youthful supporters, and wealthy gay donors are opening their wallets, but at the same time Christian conservatives are incensed and are gearing up to support Mitt Romney, who is opposed to marriage equality. As Sullivan points out, Obama is someone who knows the healing power of marriage. Now he’s said all Americans should be able to enjoy it. The country is a better place because of the president’s action. Ω


by Robert Speer roberts@newsreview.com

Take a good look … within

Robert Speer is editor of the CN&R.

Re “Herger’s hot seat” (Newslines, by Ken Smith, May 10): Last year I retired as a professor of political science in Louisiana and my wife and I moved to Paradise. Having spent some 20plus years watching the carnival that passes for politics in the Bayou State, I was looking forward to a serious discussion of public policy in the upcoming California elections. After reading the summary of the “debate” by District 1 candidates for U.S. Congress in the Chico City Council chambers, I can only conclude that California Republicans (at least the candidates at the “debate”) have joined the Confederacy of Dunces. Qualifications for this club include but are not limited to a patronizing and essentially meaningless patriotism, a general lack of understanding of the nature and purpose of both the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, a dismissal of science on the grounds that it is “un-Godly” in some sense, and a total lack of understanding of what the American government can legitimately do to “provide for the general welfare.” The only candidate who made any sense was Jim Reed. Mr. Reed is a Democrat. I am a registered Republican. I will vote for Mr. Reed. ALEX AICHINGER Paradise

Ixnay on A We are less than a month away from the June 5 primary, and one of the most controversial issues on the ballot in Butte County is Measure A. The initiative would limit where and how much medical cannabis can be grown in Butte County. Our county would be better served if our supervisors could find the wisdom to quit throwing money down the war-on-drugs rathole. I want more music programs, more library hours, improvement of the general welfare. This is not what we get when we traipse down the path of prohibition. I encourage our supervisors to spend some time drafting a letter to send upstream recommending the complete legalization of cannabis. This is the only way out of the box canyon, Tonto. The utopian dream of a drugfree world has had enough time and money devoted to it. The results are in; prohibition is not the path. That would mean NO on A.

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I’ve heard from several readers that they thoroughly enjoyed Jerry Olenyn’s cover story last week, “A monk’s life,” about the Trappist monks of the Abbey of New Clairvaux in Vina. Several said they could see, reading the piece, why someone would become a monk. It’s a path that finds happiness not in external things like money, sex, fame and power, but rather in a kind of peace within, a clarity of mind and openness of heart that can be cultivated only when life is simple and quiet. You’d be surprised how many monasteries there are in Northern California. I did a quick Internet search and located at least six Catholic monasteries in the region, some for monks, others for nuns. And there are just as many, and perhaps more, Buddhist monasteries, including Shasta Abbey, just outside nearby Mt. Shasta City. One of the reasons I was happy to publish Jerry’s story was because I know most readers have never been to a monastery and don’t know what goes on there. They may even think monks and nuns are weirdoes who couldn’t make it in “the real world” and opted out. As Father Joseph, abbot of the Mt. Tabor Monastery in Redwood Valley, has written, “Monks are unknown or misunderstood or disdained or simply ignored by just about everyone, though they are appreciated and even loved by those who do understand.” Not that this matters one way or the other to the monks and nuns. They’ve found their calling, whether it’s to pray for all beings or to save them from suffering, and are focused on that and that alone. Many years ago I spent a long weekend at Shasta Abbey. I remember it vividly. I got up before dawn to meditate in the great zendo, sitting on my cushion shoulder to shoulder with dark-robed monks and nuns, all of us facing the wall. The sound of the huge bell resounded through the room. Later we took meals in silence, setting down our forks and bowls after every bite, which meant we ate very slowly. I noticed I enjoyed my food more but ate less when I ate slowly. When you spend several days mostly in silence, everything slows down and your mind starts to clear out all the chatter that’s usually there. You become deeply aware of what’s going on around and within you at that very moment. This is what Buddhists call mindfulness. In addition to several monasteries, there are dozens of retreat centers in Northern California where people who don’t want to be monks but would like to live like them for a weekend or a week can go to refresh themselves and clear their minds. I go on retreat at least a couple of times each year, and each time I come home feeling recharged and reoriented to what really matters in life: family, friends, community. My hope is that Jerry’s story will encourage others to become retreatants, whether at New Clairvaux or elsewhere. It’s helpful to stop our busy-ness now and then and take a good look within.

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Value of a vote Re “Schindelbeck misleads” (Letters, by Karen Laslo, May 10) and “Hot under the collar” (Newslines, by Tom Gascoyne, May 3): It’s good to see that Karen still gets off on reading her name in the paper and being extra good at being a “progressive liberalmachine-generated mouthpiece.” After reading her so-called facts, she obviously flunked her civics class all nine years of her high LETTERS continued on page 6

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school career. As for Tom, he’s the best boot-lickin’ sleight-of-hand journalist this side of the Sacramento River. He can shoot those truthful facts dead with both eyes closed while his brain is in neutral. For those who want the truth, budgets are approved by the City Council. It was Scott Gruendl who signed the MOU to boost the police and fire-protection employees’ salaries and pensions that have now caused the serious city deficits. The fire chief reacted to having his department’s budget being cut by the council who caused the mess in the first place, and Toby reminded your readership that the community doesn’t need a $60,000 a year, with benefits, arts director who, like Karen says, does nothing! That money should go to the Fire Department. Ah, but what’s a vote worth these days, $60,000? RICK CLEMENTS Chico

Bob’s the man Re “Religious eviction?” (Newslines, by Vic Cantu, May 3): Brother Bob Taylor was one of the first black men I met when I arrived in Chico. I was invited to his house. It was a gathering of interesting people, and I felt very welcome. Brother Bob is a very quiet man, intellectually strong, and has a quiet presence. People ask me why I don’t get so involved with the cultural scene in Chico. Perhaps I don’t want to be evicted from my home because a landlord perceives me as a strange artist. Great place to live part-time, but I prefer San Francisco and my studio there. Why do I continue to live here? It is quite simple—economics. JERRY HARRIS San Francisco/Chico

Say it ain’t so Doug LaMalfa and Sam Aanestad, both congressional candidates, took California taxpayers for a free ride—literally. Dave Palmer, watchdog at noethics.net, investigated a perk giving legislators a state-subsidized vehicle upon request. Taxpayers pick up 90 percent of the monthly bill. According to Palmer, “Shortly after assuming office in Dec. 2002, Doug LaMalfa was of the opinion that he was entitled to hose the public by ordering a 2003 Mustang Mach 1 at a cost to the public of $28,957. … From 2003 through 2008, it cost the taxpayers of California $65,584 to provide Doug LaMalfa with a “muscle car” to allegedly serve the best interests of

“As for Tom [Gascoyne], he’s the best bootlickin’ sleight-ofhand journalist this side of the Sacramento River. He can shoot those truthful facts dead with both eyes closed while his brain is in neutral.” —Rick Clements

his constituents.” Aanestad has a similar horror story. Sam purchased a 2003 Ford Expedition for $45,393.91 and Chrysler 300M in 2007 for $43,780.70. Palmer says, “From 2003 through 2008 the taxpayers were hosed to the tune of $165,286 to provide ol’ Sam with luxury rides of his choosing. This comes out to a yearly average of $27,048 a year.” Please, gentlemen, say it ain’t so. DONNA CALDWELL Cottonwood

No, no, RayRay RayRay Gallery has lost Dylan Telleson as one of its directors. He’s already missed! Last month the gallery launched the annual “Real Erotic Art” show, under new directors and location, with no press coverage. It failed miserably to allow many art patrons the chance to view some good erotica, since the show was up for a mere two nights. (Shows normally run one month.) Upon my trying to deliver my work for submission, I found the door wide open, assuming there was art work there unattended. I returned later to find the door locked, with notes from artists as to what was up. Red flag!? Ya think!? Finally an hour passed and I received a call informing me that someone was there to receive art. The night of the opening I discovered the title of my work was missing a word. I immediately inked it in. Works were to be done in 2012. I saw a piece that was executed in 2008. Hmm! Viewers were charged $10 to attend each night. Ker-ching! What happened to free viewing?! If they rent space from a

comedy club, they might just end up the laughing stock of Chico. Lessons learned. ESTEBAN ISMAEL DURAN Chico

Militarized America Re “Safeway at it again” (The Greenhouse, by Christine G.K. LaPado, May 10): There are many ways to measure how militarized (privileging everything military as though it was normal behavior) U.S. society is; camo clothes, Bush/Obama/ Seal Team military dolls, “khaki elections” (i.e., a bias for candidates with military “experience”), Star Wars-shaped soup noodles, requiring military recruiters be given access to high school student records, etc. Christine LaPado’s report on Safeway’s privileging only veterans, Boy/Girl Scouts to solicit funds in front of their stores only adds to the list. As a general (Eagle Scout) in the paramilitary, homophobic Boy Scouts, and committed to equal treatment for all, I object. Fortunately, there are shopping alternatives. BEAU GROSSCUP Cohasset

Editor’s note: In fairness, we note that the decision to give the boot to the kids from Rose Scott School was one assistant manager’s, and the Mangrove Safeway’s manager has since apologized and invited the school back to the store.

Corrections In last week’s Newslines report, “Big ‘ifs’ in Biggs,” author Robert Speer, having misread an email chain, mistakenly attributed the authorship of an email message quoted in the story to Tammie Loftin, president of the Biggs Unified Teachers Association. Christianne Langford, a teacher in the district, wrote the email message. Also, Christine G.K. LaPado’s report in her column, The Greenhouse, on the Mangrove Safeway’s refusal—or, rather, it’s assistant manager’s refusal—to allow children from the Rose Scott School to sell raffle tickets there, gave the wrong name for the store that did allow them to do so: It was Hello Beautiful, not Woman Beautiful. The errors have been corrected online.—ed. More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


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Congressional candidate Sam Aanestad, pictured on this website, claims the campaign of his rival, Sen. Doug LaMalfa (pictured below), is responsible for the website that severely criticizes Aanestad.

MORTGAGE SCAMMER SENTENCED

In federal court in Sacramento on Friday (May 11), William Baker of Chico was sentenced to 18 months in prison followed by three years of supervised release for his role in a Chico-based mortgage scam, according to a press release from the U.S. Department of Justice. Baker, 66, who pleaded guilty to mail fraud, caught a break due to his “frail health and other mitigating factors,” the press release said. The owner of Baker & Baker Construction was indicted in June 2010 for falsifying the sales price of five houses he built and sold in 2007. He kicked back money—$160,000 altogether—to his fellow conspirators after escrow closed on the houses. Others involved in the scam include local builder Anthony Symmes, who was sentenced last month to two years, 11 months, as well as Garret Gililland III and Shane Burreson, who have pleaded but not yet been sentenced.

WILDCATS STILL ALIVE

After finishing the year atop the California Collegiate Athletic Association (CCAA) for the first time since 2005, the Chico State baseball team was eliminated from the conference tournament after losing 9-1 to UC San Diego and 5-1 to Sonoma State on Friday, May 11. The Wildcats finished 36-14 overall and 2614 in the CCAA, good for a first-place tie with UC San Diego, according to a Chico State press release. The club appeared to have some momentum headed into the four-team double-elimination conference tournament in La Jolla, with wins in 10 of their final 12 games, including five in their final at-bat. But their hopes aren’t dashed yet—as one of the top-four teams in the West Region, the Wildcats will compete in the NCAA Championship Tournament in Salem, Ore., beginning today, May 17.

BUSTED BY HIS COLLEAGUES

A weeks-long undercover investigation by the offices of Butte County District Attorney Mike Ramsey and Sheriff Jerry Smith ended last Friday (May 11) with the arrest of one of Smith’s deputies, a lawman who faces allegations he intended to engage in lewd acts with a minor. According to the DA’s office, Earl Klapperich, 27, responded to investigators posing as a 14-year-old girl with text messages containing sexual content. Klapperich (pictured) then agreed to meet up with the girl at a location in Chico, where he was arrested by investigators. He contends he was meeting the girl to counsel her, not to have sex with her. A complaint last month that Klapperich had acted inappropriately toward the same girl and a 16-year-old girl who had been reported as runaways is what prompted the investigation. Klapperich was taken to Glenn County Jail, but has since posted bail. He will appear at Butte County Superior Court on June 1. 8 CN&R May 17, 2012

Web of deceit

Candidates tussle over Internet hit piece

CAanestad has charged that the campaign of his opponent for the 1st District seat and fellow ongressional candidate Sam

Republican, state Sen. Doug LaMalfa, has violated federal disclosure laws and by maybe even committed libel. Tom Gascoyne Aanestad, an oral surgeon from Grass Valley, says a webtomg@ newsreview.com site posted about a month ago questioning his professional background fails to disclose who is behind it. In a press release Tuesday (May 15) Aanestad said the site, Sam4Congress.com, which heavily criticized his record as a state assemblyman and senator, was paid for by LaMalfa’s campaign without proper disclosure. (The site has been taken down in recent days.) “In a clear violation of federal campaign finance disclosure laws, and verified yesterday by release of official Internet registry documents, Doug LaMalfa’s congressional campaign registered and built a negative website about Sam Aanestad, then posted the site on the Internet while disclaiming its contents to link with another candidate in the race, Republican Michael Dacquisto,” the release says. “The website, www.Sam4Congress.com, violates a number of campaign finance laws, including several illegal independent expenditures and conspiracy to improperly disclaim a federal campaign website.”

When first posted the site, which includes less-than-flattering photos of Aanestad, carried a disclaimer that said it was from a group called “Free Thinkers for D’Acquisto.” Dacquisto, an attorney in Redding, is another Republican candidate in the eight-member race for retiring Rep. Wally Herger’s seat. He said he had nothing to do with the website. “Yeah, Sam Aanestad called me several weeks ago and said somebody had a website up, and he basically said he was not happy,” Dacquisto said in a phone interview the day of the press release. “I told him I don’t do that, and he said, ‘I believe you.’ They didn’t even spell my name right.” The Aanestad campaign filed a lawsuit to try to determine who was behind the site and subpoenaed records from its host, Wix.com. On Monday (May 14) the campaign released the records, which show the site was registered on April 18 by Mark Spannagel, LaMalfa’s chief of staff and campaign manager. The next day LaMalfa consultant Dave Gilliard released this statement via email: “Neither Doug LaMalfa, nor the LaMalfa campaign, had any knowledge or involvement in the construction or

posting of the website in question, which just came to our attention this morning.” It also added this disclaimer about the role of humor in politics: “Political satire has a long history in American politics, something that thin-skinned candidates, or those trying to hide their record, sometimes have trouble fully appreciating.” Gilliard did not return a call

asking about Spannagel’s role in matter, but told The Sacramento Bee that Spannagel is working for LaMalfa’s campaign “on a part-time basis.” Dacquisto said Aanestad originally brought up the subject durng a candidates’ debate in Chester on May 4. At the time, he said, Aanestad asked about it and Dacquisto assured him he wasn’t behind it. LaMalfa’s only comment on the matter, Dacquisto said, was that he was not in favor of dirty politics. “This means either he’s lying or he has no idea what his chief of staff is doing, and I don’t know which is worse,” Dacquisto said. “And who’s paying the chief of staff to do this? The taxpayers?” At a press conference held outside of LaMalfa’s vacant Redding office,


Aanestad pointed to the information his Grass Valley attorney, Barry Pruett, had received via the subpoena, according to a story in the Redding Record Searchlight. “That shows a direct link to the LaMalfa campaign and the kind of deceitful, dishonest tactics they will go to win this election,” he said. “If they’re going to be deceitful and dishonest now, you wait until he’s entrenched as a congressman when no one can touch him.” Dacquisto echoed those words. “It is worse than disappointing,” he said. “It is despicable. I would never use someone’s name without their permission, and these kinds of hardball activities are an example of politics as usual, and it’s not what the voters want. Doug LaMalfa should fire anyone who was involved in this in any way, shape or form.” He questioned LaMalfa’s claims of ignorance about the matter. “If Doug LaMalfa didn’t say to his chief of staff, ‘Get Dacquisto’s name off of there,’ wouldn’t you think he would at least ask the guy, ‘What are they talking about? Why is this out there?’And then the chief of staff would either say, ‘Oh it’s nothing,’ or he would tell him the truth.” At some point the disclaimer on

the website changed from “Free Thinkers for D’Acquisto” to “100% TRUE, 100% VERIFIABLE, 100 % POLITICAL SATIRE.” An early posting questioned Aanestad’s professional background. “FYI Sam Aanestad is not an ‘Oral Surgeon’ or ‘Doctor’ as he claims,” it says. “He is only licensed as a dentist, did not to go medical school and does not have an MD. How important is this? Not very except as evidence of a long and deliberate habit of misleading voters of the district.” A later posting includes this message: “From opposing keeping hardened murders [sic] and gang members behind bar [sic] for life to granting taxpayer financed financial aid to illegal immigrants, Sam Aanestad isn’t the Principled Conservative he claims.” Spannagel and David Reade, LaMalfa’s chief of staff when he was an assemblyman, have both run afoul of the California Republican Assembly for their campaign tactics. Last July the CRA Board of Directors kicked Spannagel and Reade out of the conservative group after they were accused of manipulating the assembly to get its endorsement of Mitt Romney in the 2008 presidential primary. Reade is currently Assemblyman Jim Nielsen’s chief of staff. Reade was expelled from the CRA for 10 years and Spannagel for five. Aanestad backer Jim Ledgerwood, a local long-time activist in the Republican Party, said he too was disappointed by the news. “I’ve been around for a while, and I’ve never seen anything this dirty,” he said. Ω

This photo if Erik Taylor was taken several days after he was assaulted in the south-campus area on Sunday, April 29. Taylor is lobbying for more extensive street lighting in the student neighborhood.

Out of the darkness

PHOTO COURTESY OF ERIK TAYLOR

Student leader calls for street lighting after his attack After a night on the town, Chico State junior Erik Taylor awoke on the morning of Sunday, April 29, with a broken, swelling nose, two black eyes and a missing wallet. Taylor concluded he had been beaten and mugged on his walk home, but had no recollection of the attack. The night before, Taylor had been out with visiting friends. He drank, but not in excess, he said. He left The Banshee on Second Street alone around 2 a.m. Sunday. At some point during his walk home in the south-campus neighborhood, he was knocked unconscious. Taylor is the Associated Students’ director of legislative affairs and president of the Democratic Club on campus, and he was expected to attend two events that afternoon. Upon discovering two deep lacerations on the back of his head, however, he opted for a hospital visit instead. “One of the lacerations is really jagged,” Taylor said during a recent interview in downtown Chico. “My doctor thinks I was hit over the head with a bottle. He also thinks my head hit the concrete pretty hard, which probably led to my concussion.” The attack has prompted Taylor to take action. He plans to go before the City Council next fall and outline a proposal for more street lighting in the south-campus neighborhood. He’s organized a Facebook page, “More Lights Safer Nights,” dedicated to the cause. He said he is alarmed by the violent activ-

ity police have reported after the last several weekends, and he thinks many Chico State students share his concerns. “I started this because of what happened to me, but it’s not about me,” he said. “Most of the people I talk to on campus think there’s a problem.” Whether adding street lights to

crime-ridden neighborhoods actually reduces crime is a matter of debate. A UK study titled “The Influence of Street Lighting on Crime and Fear of Crime,” released by the Crime Prevention Unit in 1991, focused on crime rates in the London Borough of Wandsworth before and after new street lights were installed. “No evidence could be found to support the hypothesis that improved street lighting reduces street crime,” the study’s authors concluded. The researchers did note that fear of crime was eased by street lighting. “Here there was clear evidence that perceived safety of

SIFT|ER Taxing the poor California’s lowestincome families are paying the most in taxes when measured as a share of family income. The bottom 5th percent of California’s non-elderly families (with an average income of $12,600) spend 10.2 percent of their earnings on state and local taxes. The wealthiest 1 percent (with an average income of $2.3 million) spend 7.4 percent of their incomes on state and local taxes. Lower-income families pay a greater share of sales and excise taxes paid by businesses, while higher-income families pay a greater share of the corporate income tax.

Source: California Budget Project report of April, 2012

women when walking alone after dark had been improved in the treated area,” they wrote. Lt. Linda Dye of the Chico Police Department said there is no easy answer as to whether more extensive street lighting would suppress crime in the student neighborhood. “We’ve had some high-profile crimes the last couple weeks in well-lit areas,” she said. “It’s only part of the personal-safety equation. The other parts are being aware of your surroundings, how you’re presenting yourself and how intoxicated you are. We tell people to walk in well-lit areas, walk in groups, and make sure someone in the group stays sober.” For Taylor, the two weekends fol-

lowing his attack have served to strengthen his cause. A violent Cinco de Mayo weekend (see “Weekend Warriors,” Newslines, May 10) was followed by two more incidents during the early morning of Saturday, May 12. At 1 a.m., police attended to a 21-year-old female Chico State student who was severely beaten in her home on Mechoopda Street by an unknown male intruder. The assault has prompted an ongoing investigation. At 2 a.m., officers encountered two stabbing victims at the corner of Citrus and West Sacramento avenues. Two men in their early 20s were stabbed multiple times by two suspects, a man and woman, following an argument. Both victims were last reported in stable condition. “We’ll often see an increase in crime as the weather warms up, but these things have been somewhat random,” Dye said. “Alcohol has been involved in some cases, in others it hasn’t. In the case at Mechoopda Street, it was just a bad guy victimizing that young lady.” Despite what police say, Taylor maintains violence in the south-campus neighborhood is a growing problem. “It seems like crime is higher,” Taylor said. “People getting shot on Cinco de Mayo, people were jumped and stabbed this past weekend. It seems like every weekend there are a couple more students getting attacked.” When he goes before the council in the fall, Taylor hopes to convey that a violent reputation ultimately will hurt the university and Chico as a whole. “If this becomes a big deal and families across California start hearing about violence in the student neighborhood—where they assume their kid would live after their freshman year—they might not let them come here,” he said. “For the safety of students here now and students who will be here in the future, we need to protect our neighborhood.” —HOWARD HARDEE howardh@newsreview.com

NEWSLINES continued on page 10 May 17, 2012

CN&R 9


SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY & SSI Grads get mad

continued from page 9

“We help YOU through the System”

Students, faculty decry proposed cuts

You Pay ONLY when we win About three dozen Chico State faculty and to fund graduate proUniversity faculty members and grams,” said Kate Transchel, a prostudents gathered in the Trinity fessor of Soviet history at Chico Attorney at Law Commons area of campus last State. “They manage to find ways to Thursday (May 10) to speak out fund chauffeurs, presidential raises, Over 18 years of experience against funding cuts to graduate large mansions and travel accounts.” programs and other issues within “And fancy dinners!” COGS the CSU system. member Jake Fender cried out, a The event was organized by the phrase he would repeat throughout Council of Graduate Students and the protest. included representatives from the “What we’re seeing is the Students for a Democratic Union corporate model in action,” Tranand other student organizations. schel continued, “but the university Many of the professors in attenis not and should not be a business. dance wore California Faculty • 2 Hair Color Educators My education is not a commodity, Association T-shirts, and a small and neither is yours.” contingent representing the Acade• Over 30 years experience Transchel said a university edumic Student Employees Union cation is now catered toward the traveled from Sacramento State • Affordable, Expert Service needs of employers and that is one University to attend the event. reason the administration has COGS organized the rally in • Featuring local Art response to an announcement earli- begun cutting graduate programs. free gift 530.332.9393 “They don’t need programs that er this month that the geography in the for new clients teach beauty, poetry and how to master’s-degree program at Chico GARDEN WALK MALL appreciate the quality of life,” she State would be suspended for the said. next two years. Other programs Paul Adema, a social-sciences could also be on the chopping scan to see special offers graduate student, said that if the block this fall, said COGS event on our facebook page coordinator Maija Glasier-Lawson. school adopts the energy-conservation initiative recently passed as an Cuts to graduate programs are advisory measure during student the latest in a series of actions to elections, it will save $1.3 million offset a $750 million cut in state per year, money he suggested could funding this year, with another be used to salvage graduate pro$250 million in cuts expected in grams or meet other funding needs. January if voters fail to approve Gov. Jerry Brown’s tax measure on The energy initiative, ironically, was developed by Adema and other the November ballot. Chico State students in a graduate-level geograhas about 1,400 graduate students phy class that no longer will be participating in 25 programs. offered at Chico State. Though the immediate focus of COGS President Shane Morey the protest was graduate programs, recited an adaptation of Mario speakers took the opportunity to Savio’s 1964 “bodies upon the address other cuts, class sizes, gears” speech. Originally delivered tuition hikes, accusations of overn eby w sCalifornia & r e v i e State w b uUnis i n e s s uduring s e o nthe l y Berkeley Free Speech spending it eXeC likensamb students to versity ss administration, 03.03.11 Movement, designer issUeand dATethe ACCT administraapplication of a corporate model to products FiLe nAMe reVspit dATeout bynew lawofficesofbh030311r2 tion-run factories. public education. A May 8 letter state Sen. Ted W. advertisement Lieu (Dpleasefrom carefully review your and verify the following: Torrance) to CSU Chancellor Ad size (CoLUMn X inChes) Charles Reed criticizing his speLLing office’s spending of more than nUMbers & dATes $750,000 on “alcohol, unnecessary ConTACT inFo (phone, Address, eTC) meals, fancy dinners, and extravaAd AppeArs As reqUesTed gant transportation” circulated ApproVed by: through the crowd with a petition from COGS to save geography and other graduate programs. “If they really cared, they’d find ways to fund classrooms, to fund

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CSU political science professor Michael Coyle delivered the most enthusiastic (and enthusiastically received) speech of the afternoon; without the benefit of the bullhorn used by other speakers, he could be heard several hundred feet away and it was hard for passersby not to pay attention. “George Orwell once said the most difficult thing that there is to see,” Coyle began, “is the very fucking thing under your nose.” Coyle acknowledged Orwell didn’t actually drop the F-bomb, but noted “sometimes it takes a little bit of language for people to wake up.” He suggested that students today are “witnessing the murder of the social contract for education” that’s distinguished the CSU system in past decades. He criticized the system’s administration for denying its faculty “even inflation-level pay increases” and a state that places more importance on building prisons than funding schools. He said that 95 percent of prisoners don’t have a high school diploma. Coyle joined an impromptu “down with Reed” chant but stopped when it turned into “down with Zingg,” a shot at Chico State’s president, Paul Zingg. “I’ve got my problems with Zingg,” he said, “but I’m not quite there yet.” He said that while education is of obvious importance to students and educators, it’s also important to the whole of society. “Education is what promotes in an individual the demand for civil liberties and human rights. This is not a place where you come to learn how to make gadgets or go get a sales job next year,” he said. “This is a place where you come to become a human being, to fully contemplate what your responsibilities are.”

Graduate student Jake Fender, left, and political science professor Michael Coyle at a May 10 rally protesting the cutting of graduate programs at Chico State. PHOTO BY KEN SMITH

10 CN&R May 17, 2012

Grayscale

Check off after proofing: __ ■ ■ TG RS ■ JC ■

MD ■

_■

pg10CNR05.17.12

—KEN SMITH kens@newsreview.com


?

Patient or Criminal

‘Fanning the flames of fear’

Firefighters ask council to reopen Station 5 The Chico City Council wrestled with some controversial matters at its May 15 meeting—condemning corporate personhood, placing a modified phone tax on the November ballot, whether to allow the Town of Paradise to hook up to the city sewer. But the real fireworks came at the end of the meeting when the council was confronted by a council candidate and a firefighter upset by the recent closing of Fire Station 5 near the entrance to Upper Bidwell Park. Fire Chief Jim Beery shut down the station May 1 after being told by City Manager Dave Burkland to cut $95,000 from his budget. The station is set to reopen July 1, but firefighters and their supporters have protested the closing with pickets and by going door to door in neighborhoods near the station to spread the word of potential dangers from delayed responses. One of those neighbors is Toby Schindelbeck, business owner and candidate for City Council. Schindelbeck posted an online petition April 30 asking that the station be reopened. The petition says that, while the city is asking the department to cut $95,000 from its budget, the council spent “$74,000 on 5 paintings for City Hall.” In fact, that art work was not allocated by the current council but rather spent years ago from a specific fund for art work that was included in the 1995 construction of the City Municipal Center. A number of those who’ve signed the online petition have taken the current council to task for wasting money on art. One comment: “When your house is on fire call an artist to take a picture. Wise up.” Schindelbeck warned that closing the station will delay emergency response time. He also noted a dog was recently bitten by a rattlesnake in the park and asked the council to consider if that dog had been a person. He said he realized the council didn’t close the station but pointed out that the city manager and staff who recommended the cuts work for the council. He asked that the matter be put on the agenda for public discussion at the June 5 council meeting. Schindelbeck was followed by firefighter Ken Campbell, who also asked that the matter be scheduled for public discussion. “Let people tell you how they feel,” he said to the council. “Please find a way to fund police and fire services immediately.” Councilman Bob Evans, holding up a letter he’d received from a constituent, asked Campbell what firefighters told neighbors when they went door to door. The letter writer accused the council of closing the station. “That decision was made by the fire

VOTE

NO

Chico Fire Chief Jim Beery, left, approaches City Manager Dave Burkland at the end of the council meeting. Firefighter Ken Campbell, inset, addressed the council and asked that the closing of Fire Station 5 be discussed in a public forum.

ON

MEASURE

PHOTOS BY TOM GASCOYNE

chief,” Evans said. He said the letter he’d read was typical but that he’d also received threats. Campbell assured Evans the firefighters were not holding the council accountable for the closure but that the city manager had left Beery in a tough position. “Do you think that we were telling people to make death threats?” he asked. He apologized for the responses council members had received but not for going door to door. “As I respect just about all of you, I personally apologize,” he said. His coworkers didn’t mean to harass the council, he added. Campbell said it was more than a uniondriven effort. “We’re not protecting jobs; we’re protecting citizens,” he said. Mayor Ann Schwab pointed out the city had a $900,000 budget deficit that it had to solve in three months and that 78 percent of the city’s spending goes to public safety. Councilman Mark Sorensen called the firefighters’ tactics “ridiculous.” “All of these people,” he said gesturing to his fellow council members, “got hate mail based on a decision we didn’t make.” Vice Mayor Jim Walker accused the firefighters of “fanning the flames of fear in the community. I’m going to be really happy when July 1 rolls around.” Campbell assured the council: “Next time we’ll try to do a better job.” The council voted to agendize the issue for its June 5 meeting, two weeks before the annual budget meeting. In the other matters, the public will

vote in November on the revised telephonetax measure, which asks voters if they want to see that tax lowered from 5 percent to 4.5 percent. The corporate personhood issue will also be placed on the fall ballot. Finally, the council directed city staff to commence a feasibility study on allowing Paradise to run a wastewater trunk line down the Skyway to hook up to the city’s sewer system.

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May 17, 2012

CN&R 11


THE PULSE

HEALTHLINES

‘TELEMEDICINE ABORTIONS’ NO MORE?

A bill introduced and backed by Republican legislators would put an end to “telemedicine abortions.” On May 10, Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa) and 47 other House Republicans proposed legislation that would terminate federal funding for abortion clinics that prescribe the morning-after pill via video conferences, according to congressional newspaper The Hill. Supporters of the bill (HR 5731) maintain the pill, RU-486, allows Planned Parenthood and other abortion clinics to save money by avoiding the cost of a surgical procedure. King also noted that 8 percent of women who use the drug require surgical intervention to complete the abortion, putting them at “grave risk.” “Planned Parenthood’s ulterior motives must be made known,” King said. “Their aggressive promotion of the gruesome practice of abortion by video conference is expanding the destructive ‘abortion on demand’ culture in America—all in the name of increased profits.”

U.S. HEALTH CARE COSTLY, LACKS QUALITY

In comparison to 12 other industrialized nations, the United States spends the most on health care but lacks in overall quality, a report concludes. The Commonwealth Fund used data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development to determine that the U.S. spent about $8,000 on health care per person in 2009, according to Politico.com. Norway and Switzerland spent roughly two-thirds that amount per person, while Japan and New Zealand spent about one-third. The report’s primary author, David Squires, wrote that the “U.S. health-care system is variable and not notably superior to the far less expensive systems in the other study countries.” The report concluded the discrepancy is due to high prices for medications and medical services, use of expensive technologies, a high obesity rate and widespread overuse of costly surgeries.

PILL HELPS PREVENT HIV

A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panel recommended approval of Truvada, the first drug demonstrated to prevent HIV infection. On May 10, FDA panelists voted in favor of the daily pill as treatment for people at high risk for contracting HIV— homosexual and bisexual men, and heterosexual couples with one infected partner, according to SFGate.com. Truvada has been on the market since 2004, and is typically used in combination with other drugs as treatment for HIV patients. Studies have found the pill helps reduce the risk of infection in gay and bisexual men by 42 percent, and 75 percent in heterosexual couples with one infected partner. To date, the drug has been far less effective for women. A final decision is expected on June 15, and although the FDA is not required to side with the panel, it usually does. 12 CN&R May 17, 2012

In pursuit of pearly whites The pros and cons of teeth-whitening chemicals and procedures by

Melissa Knopper

I blinding, bright-white teeth. Now, cosmetic dentistry has gone mainstream.

n the past, only movie stars had

“As we baby boomers get older, it’s one of the easiest ways to look 20 years younger,” said Dr. Kimberly Harms, an American Dental Association (ADA) spokeswoman, of the current teeth-whitening craze. “You can’t do that with many other body parts.” Cosmetic dentistry has become a billion-dollar industry. Dentists have “smile boutiques” in their offices. They’re taking marketing courses and producing high-end toothpaste blends. Entrepreneurs are setting up teeth-whitening clinics in spas, hotels and drugstores. Women can get package deals on teeth whitening, lip plumpers and Botox. As many people sink their teeth into bleaching trays full of chemicals, consumers are left to wonder: Is this trend safe? According to Harms, most of the teethwhitening products contain some form of hydrogen peroxide, a common household chemical. “There’s no evidence that it’s unsafe for anybody,” Harms said. “But if you’re pregnant, it just makes common sense to wait.” But according to health experts, teethbleaching products have very little oversight. Since they are not classified as drugs,

the U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not regulate them, meaning long-term safety data don’t exist. When faced with the wide array of whitening products in the drugstore—from strips to trays to special toothpastes and mouth rinses—the ADA Seal of Acceptance is a helpful tool. The organization has conducted its own testing to make sure label claims are accurate. Most of the products contain hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide (hydrogen peroxide is the active ingredient). The products offered in a dentist’s office will have a higher concentration of chemicals. Not surprisingly, those in-office products also work faster and have longer-lasting results. And in the office, technicians make a special bleaching tray (similar to a mouth guard) that conforms exactly to a patient’s teeth. That means the bleaching

solution is less likely to leak into other parts of the mouth and tongue. Dentists often combine bleaching solutions with ultraviolet (UV) light, regular bright light or lasers in order to speed up the whitening process. With these in-office procedures, patients can expect their teeth to become eight shades whiter with just one treatment. The teeth stay white for about three months. Drugstore whitening rinses, by contrast, take approximately 12 weeks to whiten the teeth. The rinses and whitening pastes don’t get the teeth quite as white and don’t last as long. The most common side effect of

whitening is sensitive teeth. After bleaching, said Dr. Dan Peterson of Family Gen-

APPOINTMENTS DOULA WORKSHOP Attend a free workshop offered by Happy Pushing Birth Doula Services at La Casita Primera Preschool (2035 Esplanade) the first and third Thursdays of every month from 7 to 8 p.m. The doulas will illustrate the benefits of hiring a labor coach for guidance throughout pregancy. The next workshop will be held on Thursday, May 17. Call Anne Junge at 592-7887 for more info.

HEALTHLINES continued on page 15


From Research to Patient Care In the battle against cancer, new discoveries in medical science must move quickly from laboratories to the patient. Oncologist and Hematologist Dr. Martin Majer brings with him a long and extensive resume of experience in medical research that allows him to understand and apply to patients the latest in treatment advances. “Curing cancer is the hope of everyone,” he says, “but in the meantime patients need access to the latest medical advances.”

“There is a satisfaction in caring for people and curing people that I didn’t get doing research.” A native of the Czech Republic, Dr. Majer attended Charles University in Prague, a university founded in the year 1348. During his early career in Europe, Dr. Majer conducted research on Huntington’s disease and retroviruses. He came to the United States in 1992 and began research work

for the National Institute for Health, focusing primarily on diabetes. Over the years, he published many papers addressing diabetes and is also known for his published work dealing with melanoma, colon, and renal cancers – but the halls of academia and research weren’t fulfilling enough for Dr. Majer; he wanted to work with people and treat patients. “There is a satisfaction in caring for people and curing people that I didn’t get doing research,” Dr. Majer says today. At Oroville Hospital, Dr. Majer draws from his voluminous credentials and background as he treats patients afflicted with various kinds of cancer. “Most people are familiar with the different types of cancer, such as breast cancer, but there are also different molecular types of breast tumors,” Dr. Majer says, noting that the particular nuances between disease types and their attack strategies must be understood before a doctor can prescribe an effective form of treatment. “It’s very important to know the difference, so that you can treat them accordingly.” Many cancer patients, he says, also struggle with additional ailments – such as diabetes and hepatitis. Such complications can greatly affect how a patient should and can be treated. “How a doctor treats a cancer patient with diabetes is very different than how he or she treats a patient without

diabetes,” Dr. Majer explains. With expertise built upon a global career, and with experience working in multiple locations in both Europe and the United States, and after moving halfway around the world, Dr. Majer and his family are finally ready to put down roots in Oroville, California – and he says he is here to stay and serve the community. “I just love how beautiful this area is,” he says, “and the easy pace of living.”

2767 Olive HigHway • OrOville, Ca • (530) 533-8500 May 17, 2012

CN&R 13


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HEALTHLINES

continued from page 12

tle Dental Care in Gering, Neb., some patients’ teeth are more sensitive to hot and cold. Bleaching solutions also sometimes irritate the gums, so dentists do not recommend them for people with gingivitis. Other patients have experienced swollen and burned lips from bleaching equipment that uses UV light. The most serious red flag was raised in 2004, when Dr. Bruce Davidson, a Georgetown head and neck surgeon, presented a poster at an American Academy of Otolaryngology conference that drew a tentative link between overuse of the whiteners and the development of mouth cancer. Davidson grew concerned when two patients in their 20s developed cancerous growths on their tongues. The patients had very few of the normal Consult risk factors for the ADA: mouth cancer, but Go to both happened to www.ada.org /2754.aspx be zealous users of to find out over-the-counter more about tooth-whitening the various products with illteethfitting bleach trays whitening techniques. that could have leaked. Davidson raised

the question—could there be a link? He never conducted any further studies. “Given our small data set and inconclusive data, we did not pursue publication,” Davidson said. For those who are concerned about appearances but want to limit their chemical exposure, Peterson suggested an old home remedy: brush with a little bit of salt and baking soda. You can also add a few drops of hydrogen peroxide to that mixture as long as you don’t swallow it, he added. “Just a little bit of that on the toothbrush will whiten your teeth over time,” Peterson said (adding that fluoride toothpaste should still be used). New York dentist Dr. Adina Carrel suggested another popular home remedy for brighter teeth: crush a ripe strawberry and combine it with a half-teaspoon of baking soda. Leave this mixture on your teeth for just five minutes once a week. Any longer, and the acid in the berry could damage your enamel. In his quiet community, Peterson added, it’s not as much of a priority to have “toilet-bowl-white teeth” as it might be in more fashion-conscious cities. “It all depends on your mindset,” he said. Ω

WEEKLY DOSE Summer’s coming—so are the skeeters On May 7, Butte County Mosquito and Vector Control District began aerial surveillance of unmaintained swimming pools and other standing-water havens for mosquitoes to breed in, such as unused tires and boats. “It is crucial to locate these mosquito-breeding sources early in the mosquito season so that the District’s mosquito and vectorcontrol specialists can eliminate early-season mosquitoes to prevent larger populations in the summer, when [West Nile] virus is most active,” said Matt Ball, the district’s manager. Along those lines, here are some more tips to further protect oneself: • Avoid the outdoors in the early morning and early evening, when mosquitoes are most active. • Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants, socks and shoes. • Use some type of insect repellent. • Remove standing water every three to five days from bird baths, buckets, pet dishes, etc. • Making sure windows and doors have tight-fitting screens to keep mosquitoes out.

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To Benefit Chico Youth & High School Rugby Teams SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2012 3:00 Bike Ride leaves from CS&W (1350 E. 9th Street) Appetizers served mid-ride in Bidwell Park at 5-Mile 6:00 Wine & Rib Feast (after return to starting point)

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Report mosquito-breeding areas and mosquito problems to the district at 342-7350 or 533-6038. Go to www.bcmvcd.com to learn more. May 17, 2012

CN&R 15


ChiCo Velo thanks you! A big thanks to ALL the local volunteers, sponsors, vendors and riders who helped make the 2012 Wildflower a success. You are what makes Chico (and the Wildflower) great!

Sierra Nevada BrewiNg Co. eSt. 1980

Thanks to our Sponsors and Volunteer Groups: R.W. Knudsen Caffe Malvina Pullins Cyclery Greenline Cycles The Bicycle Shop North Rim Adventure Sports CycleSport Campus Bicycles

Sierra Nevada Brewery Rabobank Mt Shasta Spring Water Waste Management The Printed Image Lundberg Family Farms Chico News & Review G.E.A.R.S.

Ridge Runner Square Dance Group Boy Scout Troop 3 Girl Scout Troop 16 Alpha Sigma Phi KZFR Chico State University 125 Gamma Zeta Alpha Hammer Products

Sports Ltd Butte Bicycle Coalition Chico Chamber of Commerce RiskPro Insurance Services B-Line BCAG Chico Bike Music Festival River Jim’s Adventure Education

Thanks to these businesses and organizations: Guzzetti Consulting Upper Crust Bakery Steelhead BBQ Duffy’s Tavern Kona’s Sandwiches Great Harvest Bakery Glacier Ice

Pro Pacific Fresh North Valley Produce A&J Party Center Weezie Campbell & Massage Team First Responder Johnny On The Spot Toilet Rentals Costco

Chico U-Haul Center Silver Dollar Fairgrounds Honey Run Covered Bridge Association State of CA Parks & Recreation Department Paradise Unified School District Durham Unified School District Golden Feather Unified School District

Wildflower Rest Stop Captains: Paradise RS, and HR and Table Mtn Water Stops: Bill Shively, River Jim, Adventure Education Stirling City RS: Mike Thorpe, CSU Chico Oroville RS: Dax and Betsey Downey, Greenline Cycles Spring Valley School Lunch Stop: Steve O’Bryan, Pullins Cyclery Richvale (Flatflower) Lunch Stop: Sal Corona, Caffe Malvina Durham RS: Rich and Dana Briggs

California Highway Patrol City of Chico Chico Public Works Department Butte County Sheriff’s Office Butte County Public Works Town of Paradise Paradise Public Works Department

At the Fairgrounds: Art & Graphics: Scott Laursen, Brent Clark and David Hurst from The Printed Image, Alan Rellaford from CSU Chico, Ed McClaughlin

Volunteer Coordinator: Renee Johnson

Technical Support: The Bicycle Wheel, Campus Bicycles, CycleSport, Greenline Cycles, North Rim Adventure Sports, Sports LTD, The Wheel Peddler

Registration Coordinator: David Winzenz

Wildflower Store: Ann Schwab, Billie Kanter, Alec Fergusson from Tri-Counties Bank

Road Crew Leaders: Rodney Cox, Kirk Montfort, Geno Gruber, Luke Wentland

… and a SPECIAL thank-you to all Butte County residents for graciously ‘sharing the road’ with 4000 Wildflower cyclists!

Chico Velo Cycling Club 16

P.O. Box 2285 • Chico, CA 95927 • (530) 343-8356 CN&R May 17, 2012 www.chicovelo.com • chicovelo@aol.com

(530) 343-8356

P.O. Box 2285 • Chico, CA 95927 www.chicovelo.org • velo@chicovelo.org


EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS

KEYSTONE XL, REVISED

Canadian oil firm TransCanada has pitched a revised route of its controversial Keystone XL pipeline that would circumvent the environmentally sensitive Sandhills region of Nebraska. In January, President Obama rejected the oil company’s original proposal, which would have transported tar-sands oil from Alberta to Texas and over Nebraska’s critical Ogallala Aquifer, citing the need for further environmental review, according to SFGate.com. TransCanada submitted a new application to the State Department, proposing a route that would avoid the aquifer and connect with a hub in Steele City, Neb. From there, it would link with other TransCanada pipelines for transport to the Gulf Coast. The pipeline has become the subject of heated political debate between Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, who maintains the $7 billion project would create jobs.

Sustainable design Green architect Hyland Fisher Inset: A 3D computer rendering of the shading features Fisher incorporated into a Sierra Nevada foothills remodel.

MORE ELECTRIC-CAR PLUG-INS

In an effort to expand the availability of electric vehicles, the California Public Utilities Commission reached a settlement agreement with NRG Energy, Inc. to install a statewide charging infrastructure. The settlement—based on NRG’s alleged market manipulation and overcharging more than a decade ago—fines the energy provider $20 million and requires it to spend $100 million more to install 200 fast-charging stations and 10,000 plug-in units, according to GreentechMedia.com. Of the 200 fast-charging “Freedom Stations,” 110 will be installed in the Los Angeles Basin, 55 in the Bay Area, 15 in the San Joaquin Valley and 20 in San Diego County, with 20 percent of the stations located in low-income areas. The plug-in units will be installed in multifamily housing complexes, workplaces and public-interest sites. Additionally, $4 million of the settlement will go to car-sharing programs in underserved areas to provide an alternative to public transit.

NO BREAKS FOR FOSSIL-FUEL PRODUCERS

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minn.) have penned legislation that would prevent future subsidies for the oil, coal and naturalgas industries. For years, fossil-fuel industries have enjoyed such perks as tax breaks, financial assistance, royalty relief and federally funded research and development, according to The Huffington Post. The End Polluter Welfare Act, introduced on May 10, would save an estimated $110 billion in the next decade. The bill is supported by groups like Friends of the Earth, Taxpayers for Common Sense and 350.org. The Yale Project on Climate Change reported 70 percent of Americans opposed federal subsidies for fossil-fuel industries as of November 2011. “We ensure that never again can a company like BP take a tax deduction for money spent cleaning up its own mess in the Gulf of Mexico,” Sanders said.

Architect Hyland Fisher is committed to using his design skills in an environmentally friendly way story and photo by

Christine G.K. LaPado christinel@newsreview.com

Goriginally went to school in Detroit— the Motor City—to study transportation reen architect Hyland Fisher

design. “I thought I wanted to design cars,” said Fisher. “Turns out, I don’t really like cars that much. I found out you could be stuck just designing door handles. And I wasn’t passionate enough about cars to just be designing door handles.” Fisher, who is also a mountain-bike racer, currently drives “the least car-like car there is—a Prius,” which fits right in with his commitment to sustainability. The friendly 38-year-old Fisher got his architect license two years ago, after working in the architecture industry doing drafting and drawing for 12 years after leaving Michigan. Three years ago, he and his wife moved to Chico from Nevada City, where he worked under three architects who practiced sustainable architecture.

Fisher discovered the field of sustainable architecture while completing a bachelor’s degree, post-Detroit, in 2000 in applied design with a minor in architecture at Portland State University. While in Portland, Fisher interned with the Portland Energy Office (now the Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability), and helped design a house constructed from cob, an eco-friendly building material that is similar to adobe. He has done a number of residential and business green-building designs and “redesigns”—remodels—such as the work he did on a home in the foothills near Auburn. One of the welcome features he incorporated into the house was a roof for shade over a previously unusable west-

Call a green architect:

Hyland Fisher can be reached by calling 2638666 or emailing hyland.fisher@gmail.com. Go to www.hylandfisherarchitect.com to learn more.

facing porch and a trellis shade-structure over the south-facing windows. Fisher’s use of 3D computer renderings of his projects allows him to “confirm what a place looks like at, say, 3 p.m. during the summer equinox.” Here in Chico, Fisher recently worked on a green home remodel, adding cost-efficient elements such as reflective-backed roof sheeting—“plywood on trusses”—to “reflect back some of the heat so that the attic doesn’t heat up as much” in the hot Chico-summer months. “In a ‘normal’ house, at night, the attic continues to heat up after the sun goes down,” Fisher pointed out. “And it heats up during the day as the sun beats down. If you can limit the attic from heating up, then you can make the house more comfortable and reduce your energy use.” Fisher is also a big fan of passive ventilation, especially in two-story homes. “There’s nothing magical about it,” he said. “If you open doors on the bottom floor of the house, and open windows on GREENWAYS continued on page 18 May 17, 2012

CN&R 17


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the second floor, the warm air [in the house] rises and escapes out the top floor. It creates a vacuum and brings in cool air from [the open doors] down below.” whole-house fan, which mounts to the ceiling in a central location inside a home, and you’re really in business. “A whole-house fan is great because as it gets cooler outside than it is inside, you turn on the fan and it quickly evacuates the hot air from inside the house,” said Fisher. “It brings in cold air from the outside through the house, pushes it into the attic and pushes the hot air out of the attic.” Most conventional air-conditioning systems “draw air from inside the house and pump it back into the house, cold,” said Fisher. “You’re recycling the same air.” That might be all right if it’s, say, 100 degrees outside and 75 degrees inside, he said. “But, say it’s 80 degrees inside and only 70 degrees outside—it’s not efficient to cool the air inside your house. Bring the cooler air in from outside—it’s a lot more energy-efficient than cooling air and pumping it back into your house!” Of late, Fisher—who is a LEED-accredited Green Associate—has been collaborating with

ECO EVENT BIRD WORLD The Chico Creek Nature Center (1968 E. Eighth St.) is hosting a public talk focusing on bird infrastructure in East Park and Stony Gorge reservoirs and the core relationships between birds and other wildlife on Monday, May 21, at 6:30 p.m. Call 891-4671 or go to www.bidwell park.org for more info.

local green-building contractor Robin Trenda, owner of Chico Green Builders. He and Trenda currently are at work designing an eco-friendly home in Butte Creek Canyon. “I am doing the construction documents right now,” said Fisher. The canyon site “can’t take advantage of passive-solar design in terms of heating,” so Trenda and Fisher are instead “using techniques to reduce the cooling load, such as shading windows and doors with roof overhangs and shading devices.” The pair is also employing advanced framing—a “higher-evolved framing method that uses less resources and allows more room for insulation” and the house will be “earth-bermed.” Berming a house involves building

UNCOMMON SENSE Ticks and snakes and skeeters, oh my! Bidwell Park is now teeming with deer ticks (known Lyme-disease carriers), rattlesnakes and mosquitoes, and the city of Chico has a few tips for dealing with the critters. (For skeeter tips, see Weekly Dose, p. 15.) Call the Chico Park Division at 896-7800 for more info. For ticks • Stay on trails, away from brush and grass. • Wear light-colored long pants and tuck legs into boots or socks, and shirt into pants. • Use tick repellant. • Thoroughly check yourself and your children (especially at the hairline) and your pets for ticks. • To remove a tick, use tweezers and carefully grab, close to the skin, and pull straight out. Wash with soap and water. For rattlesnakes Wear hiking boots. Stick to well-used trails and avoid tall grass, weeds, rocks, logs and heavy underbrush. • Look ahead on the trail. • Hike with a companion and/ or a cell phone. • Call 911/seek medical attention if bitten.

• •

a section of it into a hillside in order to reduce heat loss and keep the house cool and at a consistent temperature without air-conditioning. “At a certain depth, the ground stays at a certain temperature, which is in the 50s,” Fisher said. “But you have to be careful to waterproof everything—the walls, the floor.” “The biggest thing you can do [when building a new green home] is site your house considering the orientation of the sun,” offered Fisher. “You don’t want any big, west-facing windows that will let in too much late-afternoon sun, and you want limited windows on the north side, because you’re only getting reflective light from the north—no solar gain.” A limited amount of north-facing windows also allows for less heat-escape in the wintertime, he said. On the contrary, “a big window facing south heats up the house in winter,” as the sun, which is low in the sky at that time passes by the window for much of the day and shines in plenty of warmth and light; “properly calculated” protective overhangs on south-facing windows shield that side of the house from scorching heat when the summer sun is higher in the sky. Fisher pointed out that he does not simply design a conventional building and then add green features to it; rather, a completed green building “starts from the very kernel of the design. And that not only includes the sustainable elements, but also the ‘regular’ things as well. “The critical thing about sustainability is you want to incorporate … passive solar and energy efficiency, for example, but it has to be low-maintenance, last a long time and perform well, just like any other building.” For instance, it cannot leak. If it does not perform up to the level of a conventionally designed building, “you’d have a dysfunctional green home,” Fisher said. Ω


G

THE

reen HOUSE by Christine G.K. LaPado christinel@newsreview.com

Home Improvement Directory A L o c a l D i r e c t o r y f o r Yo u r G r e e n H o m e I m p r o v e m e n t To - D o L i s t

CHIMNEY

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YOUR REMODELING RESOURCE

TOUR DE CUPCAKE Butte Bicycle Coalition is holding its first-ever Tour de

Cupcake on May 20, from noon-2:30 p.m. The ride is modeled on urban bikemessenger races—“a way for bike messengers to be challenged in knowing the quickest routes from point A to point B and so on,” wrote Laurie Niles. Maps will be given out on day of the ride; choose your route and score points (and cupcakes!) for checking in at bike-route stops. Awards given for best-decorated theme bike, most points gathered and fastest rider. Learn more and register at www.buttebicyclecoali tion.org (or sign up at Lyon Books, 121 West Fifth St.). The fundraiser costs $15 per rider, $5 each for kids and $25 for a family of four. Proceeds go to support Butte Bicycle Coalition. For more info, call Niles at 342-1995.

A TIDAL WAVE OF GRATITUDE Last week, a large, mysterious- and artistic-looking envelope arrived at the News & Review office, made from recycled grocery bags sewn together, and containing two little blue-satin bags each holding a penny with glitter glued on it and a number of cards of different sizes saying such things as, “Why not contribute to world peace today? Pass your unique kindness on to two people and ask that they do the same,” “The Universe is like a mirror of the soul. If you don’t like what you see, only you can change that. Thanks for being you!” and “Did You Really Do Everything Kind?” A handwritten letter advises that “we are the super human force behind www.gratitudetsunami.com,” and to “pass around these little thankyou cards to as many people in your office as possible.” A typed letter says: “I have taken a lot of time to make sure that every package is made with the most love and appreciation I am able to put into it. Please don’t just toss it out and disregard it. I would really like to put a smile on as many people’s faces as I possibly can.” Besides the CN&R, similar packages were sent to the San Francisco Chronicle, the Santa Rosa Press Democrat, the San Diego U-T and Santa Cruz’s Café Gratitude. Check out the Gratitude Tsunami website to learn more about this refreshing project. SAFEWAY APOLOGIZES Last week, I wrote about the negative experience I had at Safeway on Mangrove Avenue when I was helping the teachers and students of Rose Scott Open-Structured School sell raffle tickets to help pay for curriculum to help students—many of whom are on the autistic spectrum—with social skills. Despite having been given permission by store Manager Art Campion, we were unceremoniously given the boot by an assistant manager, as well as threatened with having our pictures taken and sent to Safeway’s corporate legal division, and given a “notice of trespass.” Turns out, Campion was on vacation at the time of the incident, and when he returned, he said it should never have occurred and that we were welcome to stand in front of his store to raise money. He apologized to school Director Cindy Carlson and gave the school a $150 Safeway gift card that will be used to fund Rose Scott’s year-end party. Rose Scott School will be selling raffle tickets (first prize is a goldand-diamond necklace designed and donated by local jewelry designer Geralyn Sheridan; second prize is an Apple iPad 2) in front of the Mangrove Safeway on May 18, 25 and 31, from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Tickets, which are $5 each or five for $20, may also be obtained by calling 354-3101. Go to www.rosescottschool.com for more info on Rose Scott Open-Structured School. EMAIL YOUR GREEN HOME, GARDEN AND COMMUNITY TIPS TO CHRISTINE AT CHRISTINEL@NEWSREVIEW.COM

Chico: (530) 891-0505 Paradise: (530) 872-9321 Oroville: (530) 533-6757 Lic. #547112

Now is the time to have your Chimney cleaned and inspected. Minimize odors, prolong flue life, assure your chimney is safe and ready this fall with no waiting for an appointment. Valley Contractors Exchange Let us help you find the contractor you need. www.vceonline.com (530) 343-1981

1100 E. 20th St. Chico Main: (530) 342-1887 Contractors: (530) 342-6335

www.KnightsPaint.com 2910 Hwy 32 #500 (530) 891-9700

2502 Park Ave. Chico (530) 899-2888 Lic. #908865

Upgrading your insulation not only saves you money and energy, it helps save the environment. It’s one of the most powerful sustainable choices you can make for your home.

Featuring Benjamin Moore’s Natura paint. Zero VOCs, virtually odorless, fast drying, and durable. Natura is designed to surpass environmental standards and provide premium performance.

Visit New Again Kitchen & Bath and get fresh ideas from skilled, experienced design consultants on counter tops as well as your full remodeling projects. We’re your budget friendly remodeling resource.

(530) 693-4328 Lic. # 925419

Your green building contractor. We do new construction, remodels, solar installation, and we are your full service insurance restoration builder. Save energy, save money, and have the job done right. Serving Butte County and the surrounding regions.

SERVPRo

PCI Computer Sales & Service

Your local green cleaning contractor specializing in carpet and upholstery. We use green cleaning products for janitorial, commercial, residential, and move outs. (530) 899-9141

We sell new, and repair used, lap top and tower computers. 225 Main St. Garden Walk Mall Sales: (530) 891-4152 Repair: (530) 891-4154

Butte Roofing Company

Dick’s Floor Covering

Keeping you covered since 1950. www.butte-roofing.com 8 Seville Rd., Chico (530) 342-6553 Lic. #567600

Ask about our carpet made with 25% recycled materials. www.dicksfloorcovering.com 5833 Skyway, Paradise (530) 877-5019 Lic.#766122

Campos Custom Woodworks Custom cabinetmaker & manufacturer since 1977. www.CamposCustomWoodworks.com (530) 342-8061

Four R Plumbing, Inc. $45 service calls. Complete service & repair. Established 1985. (530) 828-5545 Lic. # 686428

Floral Native Nursery 150 species of California native plants; trees, shrubs, herbaceous, grasses. 2511 Floral Ave. Chico (530) 892-2511

Finds Design & Decor by Brian Austin. Unique furnishings for your home 1341 Mangrove Ave, Chico furniturechico.com (530) 892-1905

New Again Kitchen & Bath At New Again Kitchen & Bath you’ll find great prices on a huge selection of counter tops. 2502 Park Ave. Chico (530) 899-2888

SPOTlighT On... All zero-VOC paints are not the same. Benjamin moore natura paint starts at zero-VOC and remains zero-VOC after tinting. Unlike many other manufacturers who add significant VOCs when tinting the paint. Benjamin Moore uses its patented Gennex colorant system which adds long lasting color but no VOCs and virtually no odor. Please visit us at Knight’s Paint and we’ll be happy to answer any of your questions.

DicKs floor covering is a full service floor covering store. We are an owner operator business, from sales to installation you deal with the owner directly. We have a large selection of in stock vinyl, carpet, and laminate. If you don’t see what you like in stock we have a large selection of samples to choose from. We Carry all major brands. We also have carpet made with 25 % recycled material. No job is too big or too small; from a throw rug to large commercial building we do it all!

Contact your CN&R Advertising Representative to be in this Directory: 530-894-2300 May 17, 2012

CN&R 19


Doing Treating the homeless mentally ill SPECIAL REPORT: The impacts of Proposition 63 on Butte County Homelessness is a huge problem in California, and when it’s combined with mental illness, it’s almost unsolvable. Almost. Fortunately, thanks to Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act passed in 2004, a steady stream of funding amounting to $1 billion annually is available statewide to provide mental-health services. In this special three-story package, we interview the author of Prop. 63, Senate Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, look at how the money is being spent in Butte County, meet some of the homeless men who hang around downtown Chico, and talk with the Jesus Center’s Bill Such about a new approach to doorway campers downtown.

Full disclosure:

In his role as CEO of the News & Review newsweeklies, author Jeff vonKaenel is in conversations with leaders in the mental-health-services realm related to possible creation of paid, client-based education publications. 20 CN&R May 17, 2012

Darrell Steinberg on how Proposition 63 helps the homeless mentally ill by

Jeff vonKaenel jeffv@newsreview.com

S

tate Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg’s Capitol office is, in a word, gigantic—more like a living room than an office. A desk here, a sitting area with couches there, some work stations against the wall. This is clearly a room where more than one thing goes on at once, where important stuff happens. Room 200 says a lot about its current tenant—the focus should be on the happening stuff, not the man. Steinberg is, in many ways, an unusual choice to head up the California Senate. He is from Sacramento, not Los Angeles or San Francisco, where there are more people and more campaign dollars. Well-liked and knowledgeable, Steinberg has been the author of many pieces of legislation that have significantly improved the operations of government. But his signature achievement is Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act, which put an extra 1 percent tax on Californians earn-

ing more than a million dollars, raising $1 billion per year for mental-health services in the state. As a member of the Sacramento City Council in the 1990s, Steinberg became acutely aware that many mentally ill people were not getting the help they needed and were ending up living on the streets. When he was elected to the Assembly in 1998, he decided to make mental illness and homelessness his cause. His first effort was Assembly Bill 34, which allocated $10 million to set up pilot programs in Sacramento, Los Angeles and Stanislaus counties. The programs enrolled 1,000 people in “integrated services” programs that sought to provide “whatever it took”—housing, mental-health and substance-abuse treatment, vocational assistance—to get mentally ill people back on their feet.


‘whatever it takes’ Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg’s signature achievement is Proposition 63, which put a 1 percent tax on Californians earning more than $1 million, raising $1 billion per year for mental-health services in the state. PHOTO BY JUSTIN SHORT

It was the first time such an inclusive approach was tried, and it was so successful that the next year it was allocated $55 million. In 2003, seeking to expand this “full-service partnership model” by adding strong prevention, early intervention and innovation elements, Steinberg and his allies in the mentalhealth-treatment field wrote Proposition 63. With health experts and agencies readying for the 2014 rollout of the national Affordable Care Act, now seemed a good time to begin a broad-ranging discussion with Steinberg about the achievements of Prop. 63, the future of mental-health services in California, and how it all ties into the implementation of health-care reform. It’s just the kind of far-reaching subject you might expect to hear discussed by a politician whose base of operation looks as expansive as Room 200. The following is an edited version of our conversation.

So Prop. 63 passed in November 2004… I raised the minimum amount of money necessary to go one week on TV, and we won, not overwhelmingly but with 53 percent of the vote. [One] reason we won was because this is an issue that affects everybody. Everybody knows somebody. As I campaigned around the state, the stories from people from all walks of life, all socioeconomic categories, all races and ethnicities, genders … everybody knows somebody with mental illness. So this thing touched a chord. The beauty of the Mental Health Services Act is that it’s not a one-time shot of money or one-time pilot. It repeats—the funding repeats itself every year. As great as this is now, it’s going to be even more significant a decade from now, 20 years from now.

When that $1 billion came into the system, it created a frenzy of different people wanting to get funding. Let’s talk about that process and what you’ve learned. The mental-health community—which is large and diverse and includes clients themselves who are very, very active—have felt excluded from the political process. And no one really expected that this opportunity would arise. Because for years what they dealt with were diminished funding, budget cuts and not much attention paid to this issue. One of the things we’ve said from the

beginning is that it shouldn’t be just a topdown decision as to how these funds are actually invested—the community and the clients need to be involved. There’s an estimate that, at one time, we had 100,000 people involved around the state in various stakeholder meetings to determine the act’s priorities. The first round of funding was a little bit slow as everyone sort of adjusted to this gift, really, and how to properly invest it. Once everything got off the ground it worked. I know 25,000 people have now benefited from full-service partnerships. … The counties are where to invest the money. Some are investing in the more traditionally homeless mentally ill population, some are focused on the ethnic communities that have been underserved for a long period of time, and some are investing in transition-age foster youth with serious mental illnesses. The counties are all defining how they want to spend the funds.

You’ve said the “whatever it takes” approach has been successful from early on. Do you mean in specific outcomes? And in reducing other kinds of expenses? Yes. We saw reduced hospitalization, days of homelessness and jail time. Those are three major indicators. You know, with politicians it’s become a bit of a cliché that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. There is no question. One of the things we did earlier … was we toured the county jail systems, which were renowned for being the biggest mental-health program in California. I mean, even conservatives were writing about the fact that we had criminalized the mentally ill in California, because the only place for anybody to get help was to get arrested, or to get in some kind of trouble, or find themselves on the street. The philosophy behind … Prop. 63 has always been about early intervention and case management. That means having one stop where someone can get the help they need and regain their lives.

Some people say that, especially at first, there was a very cumbersome process in terms of allocating the Prop. 63 money. True? Yeah, well, we were very concerned that if we were going to ask the public for this kind of money—and of course it was from million-dollar earners but still public money—that there be a real emphasis on accountability for the dollars. So we set up a process that had the counties, the state Department of Mental Health and an oversight and accountability commission as sort of co-equal partners in checking and balancing one another. What we found in the first round is that

the grant applications were just too cumbersome and it was taking too long to get the money out. So what we’ve done is essentially gotten the state out of the applicationreview process. The focus of the state is now on evaluations and outcomes. Counties are much happier now, because the money is flowing a lot easier. The other thing is, I wanted the money to go to counties, but I also wanted there to be a statewide focus on a couple of key issues. And that includes housing. I think there’s been a recognition that if we are really going to end or significantly reduce homelessness, supportive housing has got to be a lead strategy. If somebody is not in a safe place, all of the array of services will often go unused because the person is out on the street.

what we are doing slowly, is building one system. And it’s one system that is premised on a very different and better philosophy, which is recovery—doing whatever it takes, which is not just having people cycle in and out of clinics or in and out of institutional care and hospitals. To put the question a different way, given what has happened to the core system, where would mental-health services be today without the Mental Health Services Act? I mean, it would be horrible, because there would be so much less. So there are some challenges because we are trying to integrate an old system and a new system in a time where one pot of money is increasing and another is decreasing. But we are trying to integrate them; the goal is one system.

So getting housing for homeless people with mental illness is key?

You mentioned earlier how we’ve learned that people who are prone to schizophrenia generally have their first episode sometime in their late teens or early 20s. With early intervention and prevention, how much do you think we can actually reduce mental illness in California?

Yes. My push was to set $400 million aside for permanent supportive housing for people living with mental illness. And in a number of different instances that money is not the exclusive financing for housing, but it’s a major catalyst where units have been set aside for people living with mental illness. It’s not segregating them; it’s all integrated within a community. Right now we are at 1,800 [units] that are actually built and up and running. And more to come. If you think about it, 1,800 units— that’s 1,800 fewer homeless people on the streets. Obviously, though, there’s a lot more to do there. … We are also taking a statewide approach to suicide reduction, prevention and studentmental-health services where we now have programs in all three public-university systems to enhance their ability to provide help to young people. The college campuses are often where the first signs of schizophrenia turn up.

Prop. 63 requires that much of the funding go to new services. That’s caused some controversy, right? Well, this has been another challenge—the idea is that the money cannot be used to supplant. In other words, we didn’t want this new pot of money to come forward and have the state and counties then take the same amount out of their core system intentionally, leaving us with the same amount of money. … But what’s happened is … the bottom has dropped out on state and county finances. So, we’ve had this odd situation where the core system is being reduced while the whateverit-takes and prevention system is kicking in. Some have complained that some people are getting the Cadillac while the Hyundai is no longer working. Of course, I reject that. Because what we are attempting to do, and

Well, it’s earlier than college, even. For example, at the MIND Institute at the University of California at Davis, they’re doing a lot of research on some of the indicators for early onset schizophrenia. And it’s evolving, but they believe that as early as age 13 or 14—with the right kind of awareness and education—parents and pediatricians and school officials can know, or at least have some sort of suspicion, that a young person needs intervention. If we have the resources, over time we may not be able to absolutely prevent the onset of a biologically based, chemically based illness, but we can do a whole lot more to make sure it’s manageable. And then individuals can get the support they need to lead a regular life. That’s the goal. Mental illness does not have to be a life sentence of homelessness, hopelessness. It does not have to be.

What does the Mental Health Services Act do to address the stigma that’s often attached to mental illness? Well, the act was really premised on what we call “attaining cultural competency.” A lot of attention is now being paid to how best to serve the diverse communities of California. … There is stigma in the general society, and sometimes an even deeper stigma in [certain] communities, and so it’s a challenge how to approach and how to help people living with mental illness. In Sacramento County, for instance, some of the monies are going directly to multicultural centers that are focused on those sorts “PROPOSITION 63” continued on page 22 May 17, 2012

CN&R 21


SMOG CHECK

“PROPOSITION 63” continued from page 21

AIR CONDITIONING PERFORMANCE TEST

of outreach. … There’s also a real focus on the resources being spent in a client-centered way. In other words, it’s not about this is what we are going to do for you, because recovery is about the person living with mental illness being part of their own recovery. … There needs to be a whole lot more work on educating people on what those signs are so they can either get help for themselves or help a friend or help a family member.

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It’s probably not far off. We’ve done some work here in Sacramento on the emergency-room crisis and the fact that the emergency rooms are impacted by [the mental-health issue]. The police bring somebody to the emergency room, then the emergency room has to figure out how to treat the person. Just like the county jails, the emergency room shouldn’t be the primary place where people are referred for mental-health care. But that’s because we haven’t had an act like this before, with its focus on outreach, case management and whatever it takes.

How will the federal Affordable Care Act, which includes mental-health coverage, affect Proposition 63, with its emphasis on early intervention and prevention?

thank you

NOR R EE T -F

I’ve heard that 5 percent of Medi-Cal recipients use about 50 percent of total expenditures. And that about half of those expenditures involve some mental-health issue. Are we in the ballpark there?

“Smoke-Free North State”

www.Center4TobaccoPolicy.org/SFNS

Proposition 63 passed in 2004. It was way ahead of its time with its emphasis on early intervention and prevention. Both the Mental Health Services Act and the Affordable Care Act are very compatible working on similar principles. The real push in the Affordable [Care] Act is the creation of a medical home model. This is where each patient would have a medical home where many of their health needs were met, such as mental health, physical therapy and primary care. There would be different medical homes or community clinics that have different emphases.

What’s the end result of combining Prop. 63 and the Affordable Care Act? To help people get healthy without the experience of a dramatic life event or more serious illness is the goal. It is one of the primary goals of the Affordable Care Act, and it is the primary goal of the Mental Health Services Act. Ω


The homeless among us Putting a face on the dispossessed by

Tom Gascoyne tomg@newsreview.com

Above: Eric Grealish spent years on the streets of Modesto, as depicted in this photo from the winter of 2008. PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MODESTO BEE

Left: Grealish only recently came to Chico. Below: The Jesus Center’s Bill Such says there are positve ways to aid the downtown homeless population and the surrounding businesses. PHOTOS BY TOM GASCOYNE

H

oping to put a face or two on Chico’s downtown homeless, in recent weeks I approached a number

of those who appear to fit the description. I spotted the tall, thin, bearded man who looks almost biblical and can be seen on downtown city sidewalks carrying a blanket while repeatedly muttering the word “die.” I’d encountered him before when he asked me for money as I walked along Second Street near Chronic Taco. I gave him a buck. He took the money and said “motha-fucka.” I took no offense; it was his way of saying “Thanks.”

I crossed his path a few weeks later while he was bumming a cigarette off a guy standing in front of Bella’s Sports Pub on Broadway. I gave him two bucks and said I’d like to talk with him. He took a step back, scowled and shook his head. “What’s your name?” I asked. “I don’t want to tell you,” he said, looking away. “I’m just trying to do a story, you know, on how you maybe can get some help…” “I don’t need no help,” he said, and tried to hand back the money. I told him to keep it, that I’d be bugging him again. He picked up his belongings and stomped away. I saw him a few hours later, waiting to cross the intersection at Second and Main streets. When he saw me, he quickly turned and walked away. Some of Chico’s homeless sit peacefully against buildings and ask for change and/or cigarettes, offering a blessing regardless of the response. Some sleep in store alcoves, others in the park or on the banks of creeks. Some walk the sidewalks, carrying their possessions, talking to an unseen presence and gesturing wildly to make their point. To a lot of us they are a faceless nuisance, something to be avoided as we go about our daily errands. It’s easy to ignore our common humanity and the “HOMELESS” continued on page 26 May 17, 2012

CN&R 23


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CN&R 25


your Shopping & Dining Map to Chico

Celebrating 29 Years!

SICILIAN CAFE Since 1983

Fine Women’s Clothing

Tues thru Fri 11-2pm

Dinner 7 Nights/Week @ 5pm Reservations Recommended

Call 345-CAFE

1020 Main Street Chico

Jewelry • Accessories • Purses • Hats Gifts • Home Accents & more

247 Main St. • Chico 530.892.2228

Est.1938

With the Best Chinese

A True Chico Tradition

Chico’s Only Homemade Ice Cream & Candy Store.

Open 7 days for Lunch & Dinner All Credit Cards Accepted

Chinese Restaurant

180 Cohasset Road • (Near the Esplanade) 893-2574 or 893-5068

4 10

3. Birkenstock

2

333 Broadway (530) 345–4880

6 9 11

1722 Mangrove, Ste 38 (530) 636–4368

5

13. Oriental Massage

178 East 7th St. Chico • 342-7163 www.shuberts.com 9:30am-10pm Mon - Fri 11am-10pm Sat - Sun

2540 Esplanade, Ste 6 (530) 899–0888

5. Happy Garden

14. Sensible Cyclery

180 Cohasset Rd (530) 893–2574

2505 Esplanade (530) 343–4580

12

2234 Esplanade (530) 343–7000

Clark Rd Paradise 872-0812

Downtown Chico 345-4880

Mountain Sports 176 East Third Street Downtown Chico • 345-5011

EXTREME Street Wear

Great food

1020 Main St (530) 345–2233

17. The Graduate

344 W 8th Street (530) 343–2790

Key

9. Katie’s Corner

18. Tortilla Flats

247 Main Street (530) 892–2228

2601 Esplanade (530) 345–6053

Quality - Affordable - Original Specializing in MMA

C L O T H I N G

available for purchase at

facebook.com/pages/Warborn-Clothing/ 226058744089012?sk=wall&filter=12

2005 - 2011 Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Cocktails • Beer • Wine 2234 The Esplanade 343-7000 Banquet Room Open 7 days a week, 6am–11pm

2525 Dominic Dr., 342-7771 Outdoor Patio Open 7 days a week, 6am–10pm

19. Warborn Clothing

16

S tyle * C omfort * E co- F riendly

Great times!

Since 1965

16. Sicilian Cafe

8. Italian Cottage

2525 Dominic Drive (530) 342–7771

2005-2011

...and more

178 E 7th Street (530) 342–7163

17

7. Italian Cottage

in the Crown

15. Shubert’s Ice Cream & Candy

15

231 Main St (530) 343–5686

• Secret Pocket

176 E 3rd Street (530)345–5011

12. Oriental Massage 7

• Ventilation in Crown

11. Mountain Sports

13

14

• Insured Against Loss

246 W 3rd Street (530) 891–0880

1

18

3

6. Home ec

Repels Rain

10. Kirk’s Jewelry

250 Vallombrosa (530) 891–1881

You HappY

2002-2010

(Detail)

4. Christian & Johnson

Let us Make

HappY Garden

not to wear out

2. Airmid Organics 130 W 3rd Street (530) 343–3578

• Guaranteed for Life • Floats &

40 Declaration Dr, Ste 100 (530) 345–0226

Small to Plus Size

Serving Lunch

Downtown Chico

1. Agua Azul Day Spa

NEW for SPRING

facebook.com/pages/WarbornClothing/226058744089012

A COMPLETE ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS SHOP

Grad Gifts & More Fresh Flowers & Beautiful Plants

100% O rganic, S ustainable & R ecycled

See More at ChristianAnd Johnson.com

N E W S & R E V I E W B U S I N E S S U S E O N LY

American Made & Fair Trade

3.

$

99

Mon.-Fri.

ALL DAY!!! 1/4 lb. Jr Grad Burger & fries or salad

Quick & Cheap ! Lunch or Dinner

FIND US ON FACEBOOK.

4

JOIN US $ 99 . FOR YOUR Sunday GRADUATION! 1/2 lb. Grad

We’ve got room for parties of any size, kindergarten to college. We’re the spot for your graduation!

DESIGNER PG ISSUE DATE 04.28.11 FILE NAME KATIESCORNER042811R1

130 West 3rd Street - Chico 530.343.3578

Burger, Turkey or Garden Burgers & fries or salad

Great Deal, Great Burger!

24 CN&R May 17, 2012

JLD NW

8

250 Vallombrosa, Chico - A Century of Quality Since 1907

PLEASE CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR ADVERTISEMENT AND VERIFY THE FOLLOWING: AD SIZE (COLUMN X INCHES)

SPELLING Graduation NUMBERS & DATES Celebration CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ADDRESS, ETC) N E W S & R E V I E W B U S I N E S S U S E O N LY

featuring all day AD APPEARS AS REQUESTED BY: MM DESIGNER specials ISSUEAPPROVED DATE 03.31.11 drink & more! FILE NAME SHUBERTS033111R1 Tuesdays

1Tacos!

$

You’ll Leave Relaxed Swedish • Relaxing • Deep Tissue

Oriental Massage

ACCT EXEC JLD REV DATE 03.19.11

donate your unwanted bicycle

of 2012! AD SIZE (COLUMNClass X INCHES) SPELLING Banquet NUMBERS & DATES Room CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ADDRESS, ETC) Available! AD APPEARS AS REQUESTED APPROVED BY:

designer mm issUe dATe 05.19.11 FiLe nAMe 2601Happygarden051911r1 Esplanade ~ 345-6053 Mon–Thurs 10am–10pm ~Fri–Sat 10:30–11pm ~ Sun 8am–11pm

Sensible Cyclery is owned & operated by Caminar, a local non-profit organization.

246 West 3rd St. • Downtown Chico o n ly 530-891-0880 • KirksJewelry.com ACCT eXeC ljg reV dATe 05.20.10

LOCALLY OWNED SINCE 1975

please carefully review your advertisement and verify the following: Ad size (CoLUMn X inChes) speLLing nUMbers & dATes

Congratulations Class of 2012!

Ask about our Graduation Specials • Day Spa Packages • Gift Certificates Available

We recondition and sell quality used bicycles at an affordable price to provide meaningful vocational opportunities for individuals with disabilities.

PLEASE CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR ADVERTISEMENT AND VERIFY THE FOLLOWING: Congratulations

news & review business use “Families Always Welcome” 344 W. Eighth Street • 343.2790 • Open Daily @ 11am

ACCT EXEC REV DATE

1HR RELAXATION MASSAGE ONLY $35 1HR SWEDISH ONLY $45

08

08 08

Cannot be combined with other offers.

1722 Mangrove, Ste 38 • (530) 636–4368 2540 Esplanade, Ste 6 • (530) 899–0888

08

Bikes staring at $50

530.343.4580 • 2505 EsplanadE

Call 345-0226 Visit www.a2oasis.com 08

May 17, 2012

CN&R 25


“HOMELESS” continued from page 23

COLUSA CASINO RESORT PRESENTS

recognition that these people all have stories about what brought them to this place. And their numbers are expanding. Last year’s Butte County homeless survey showed there are 1,043 homeless in Chico, which accounts for 59 percent of the county’s homeless and is up from 865 the year before. Of those, 16 percent are chronically homeless, 43 percent have been so for more than a year and 30 percent live in a car, on the street or in a park. More than half, 52 percent, say they are homeless because they are unemployed and 31 percent cite mental illness as the reason. Across Second Street a shoeless man was sitting on the sidewalk with his back against the Zucchini & Vine store. He had a blanket, unkempt hair and a long beard. I told

“I’ve been eating real good. ... And I take a bath every day at the creek. Chico is very, very nice. I kind of feel like I don’t deserve to be here.” –Eric Grealish

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him I was doing a story and asked him if he would talk to me. He said he would, and that began a series of conversations that took place over the next few days. Eric Grealish, 49, said he’s been in Chico for only the past few weeks, having arrived from Modesto, where he’d lived on the streets for the past few years and suffered an addiction to crack cocaine. He said he was born in Anchorage, Alaska, and moved to Salt Lake City with his family when he was 2 years old. Grealish talks in a sort of theatrical stream of consciousness that occasionally contains a concrete observation. He said he’s been treated well for the most part during his stay in Chico and that it’s tough to ask for money knowing others are suffering in this poor economy. “This one dude threw a can of beer at me and it popped open and sprayed back on him,” he said with a slight laugh. Then he got very serious. “A lot of people look at you and see their life’s problems.” He said he was diagnosed in 1985 as “100 percent manic-depressive bipolar” and a year ago suffered an ankle injury when sideswiped by a semi on a Texas highway. He said he’s been a session guitarist who has recorded in studios in San Francisco, Los Angeles and London. He receives Supplemental Security Income, is covered for health and dental but no longer takes his antidepressant medication. “I stopped doing them because if you’re just a little bit allergic to the pill, and the psychiatrist didn’t know about it, it’s like you get higher off of those than the street drugs,” he said. “I ended up in Doctors Hospital in Modesto. I threw the whole bottle, the rest of them, down the toilet.” He said his mother passed away years ago and he does not know whether his

This man, referred to at the beginning of the story, agreed to having his photo taken as long as the photographer didn’t, in his words, “take my soul.” PHOTO BY TOM GASCOYNE

father is still alive. “I got a brother who lives out in Salt Lake, and I got two sisters,” he said. “My aunt and my uncles might still be alive. But, you know, my dad was 34 when I was born, so he’d be 83 this year. I went through a lot of child abuse. So did my brother and my sisters. The last time I talked to my dad was in ’89. We kind of got along a little bit. We didn’t have no arguments, and everything seemed to be better than average.” The last time I saw Grealish he had new pants from the Free Store, which is run by the Jesus Center off Park Avenue and serves free meals to the local homeless. “I’ve been eating real good,” he said. “Three meals a day and getting clean clothes over at the Free Store, and spare change enough to wash my blankets. And I take a bath every day at the creek. Chico is very, very nice. I kind of feel like I don’t deserve to be here.” The Jesus Center is run by Bill Such, a guy who, not surprisingly, carries a lot of empathy for the plight of the homeless. “HOMELESS” continued on page 28


2012 District 1 U.S. Representative ~ Candidate Questionnaire Prepared by the Chico Chamber of Commerce In preparation for the June 5th Primary Election, the Chico Chamber of Commerce asked all District 1 U.S. Representative Candidates to address some of the top issues impacting local businesses and our community. Responses are printed in full.

To read all Q&A between the Chamber and the Candidates, please visit www.ChicoChamber.com What are your top 3 legislative priorities if elected? NATHAN ARROWSMITH 1) Water storage 2) More efficient water delivery systems. 3) Water conservation measures to secure water for all of California. JIM REED Saving Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid (MediCal). These programs are underfunded and can be saved by uncapping the payroll tax. Social Security and Medicare are funded by the payroll tax (just under 8% of employee’s paychecks [FICA] matched by the employer). However the payroll tax is capped at $110,000 and people earning more than that amount in a single year do not have any further payroll tax deducted from the paycheck. The middle class therefore pay the greatest amount of the payroll tax and the higher earners are given a huge tax break. The Ryan plan intends to make huge cuts in Medicaid, a program that spends 60% of its money on keeping people in nursing homes; are we going to throw these seniors out on the street? The Ryan plan will eliminate Medicare, replacing it with private health insurance partially paid with government vouchers; a terrible idea. SAM AANESTAD Balance the budget by immediate review of every department, every program, and every agency for immediate and deep spending cuts. Jump start the economy through immediate repeal of Obamacare and repeal of all other pending job killing regulations, mandates and fees. Also, immediate cut of corporate and individual tax rates. Immediate opening up of US oil and energy reserves for exploration. That includes building the Keystone Pipeline and making other immediate and necessary moves that will allow American to again become energy independent. GREGORY CHEADLE My top legislative priorities are: 1) A complete audit of the federal government in order to shine the light on fraud, waste, and abuse of taxpayer funds. 2) Rein in government by bringing back the checks and balances of the constitution, eliminating unnecessary departments, and 3) Support legislation such as the Reins

Act to cut down on burdensome taxation. MICHAEL DACQUISTO 1) The federal deficit and federal debt are killing this country. I would not increase the federal debt. This will force the government to cut its spending and live within its means, just like all American families. 2) Obamacare needs to be repealed as soon as possible. 3) The tax code needs to be drastically changed. I would replace the entire income tax code with a flat national sales tax on everything except food, medicine and medical services. This would increase revenue by collecting from those not paying into the system. Under our present system, the more you work and more successful you are the more is taken from you in taxes. You have no choice in this. Under a flat national sales tax system, the decision on whether and how much tax to pay would be entirely your choice. You could choose to buy something and pay the tax or choose not to buy, to save your money, and not to pay the tax. The money you did not spend would be saved or invested. That would allow banks or companies to use those invested funds for loans or expansion, all without the involvement of the federal government. DOUG LA MALFA 1) Rein in spending. America has a 16 trillion dollar deficit and now borrows 43 cents of every dollar we spend. Much of that money is from foreign countries hostile to our freedom and way of life. We must cut federal spending across the board and root out the fraud and waste rampant in a bloated over reaching federal bureaucracy. 2) Eliminate needless regulations: Government cannot and should not do everything for everyone. From Obamacare dictating your health decisions to the National Labor Relations board telling companies where they have to do manufacturing we must roll back these crushing regulations, litigation and laws. The constitution was designed to limit government power and we need to follow that successful blueprint. 3) Promote an America First energy policy: American needs a coherent energy policy that promotes domestic production. Five-dollar gas and seven-dollar diesel will crush our economy. America has plentiful oil reserves we just have to get the federal government to let us use them. I am also a strong believer in

Hydroelectric power which is cheap, and provides many benefits such as water for Ag and people, flood control, recreation as well as water for fish. PETE STIGLICH 1) Significantly cut spending and balance the nation’s budget 2) Reduce the size of the federal government, including eliminating many federal regulations 3) Stop illegal immigration that violates our law, threatens national security and drains America’s resources GARY ALLEN OXLEY Stop supporting International organizations and other countries before taking care of our own people and our own country. If we do not take care of us then we are not going to be able to help others. Congress has authority over immigration. We must make sure that those who want to come to America will become American citizens, speak our language, be productive working citizens and support and defend our Constitution. We must control our borders from people entering illegally. Americans want and need to work. We must make employment opportunities for our citizens here in America before out sourcing them to other countries. Globalization and out sourcing American jobs did not happen by accident. Our elected members of Congress created the rules and U.S. corporations took the opportunity that was given to them.

There are many small businesses in Chico and the surrounding areas. What are you planning to do to help small businesses succeed in these challenging times? NATHAN ARROWSMITH I WILL be your watchdog at the congressional level, I will red flag any regulation harmful to small business and help to mobilize support against burdensome business regulation. JIM REED We need to continue stimulating our economy. I believe the Federal Government needs to invest now in infrastructure and education. Although giving money to people does stimulate the economy when they spend the money, it is not an investment in the future. I believe the stimulation of the economy should only be made if it is an investment

in the future. Infrastructure repair and improvement must be done sometime, and it should be done now to create jobs and improve the overall economy; it will save money in the long run because the cost will only increase. Education likewise will result in tax money coming back in the future as higher educated students will have better paying jobs to generate the tax revenue. SAM AANESTAD We must immediately cut mandates, regulations, taxes and fees. That’s how we get small businesses moving again. Ronald Reagan showed us how potent the American free market can be if it is allowed to be truly free. That’s what I’ll fight for. I’ll fight to immediately repeal Obamacare and to freeze any other pending job-killing regulations. I’ll also fight for an immediate cut in corporate taxes. We cannot be competitive with the rest of the world if much needed capital and other resources flee our country because we have one of the world’s highest corporate tax rates. We must get a handle on the national debt. Businesses cannot operate with certainty and stability with the debt looming over our economy. We must have a viable plan in place now to reduce spending and solve this debt. I will also fight for real, meaningful tort reform so businesses are no longer subject to aggressive trial lawyers and their extortion tactics. That includes reforming the Americans with Disabilities act so it’s no longer used as a hammer on businesses, and it includes passing a “right-to-repair” tort reform law that protects business owners and dissuades trial lawyers. GREGORY CHEADLE On the federal level, I will work to decrease taxation and the burdensome regulations that strangle business. Where possible, I will work with local governments to encourage a business an industry friendly environment that would encourage growth in these sectors. MICHAEL DACQUISTO The best thing the federal government can do to help small business is to get out of the way and let the private sector innovate, grow and generate jobs under the free market system. Reducing taxes and cutting spending, to actually balance the federal budget would generate terrific confidence in the economy. It would grow dramatically. Drastically cutting the regulations that cover all areas of one’s

business would be a big help. I will work to achieve all these things. The role of the federal government is not to create jobs by throwing money at a certain area or sector of the economy or by providing subsidies to certain select businesses or industries. The government is not in the venture capital business. Because each business is unique and faces challenges specific to its own market there is not one solution for everyone, but these general principles would help. DOUG LA MALFA As a business owner myself I know first hand the difficulties in dealing with government regulations and the heavy burden of taxes and fees. These are the issues that spurred me to run for office in the first place. Business owners need some degree of certainty and stability regarding the regulatory climate and taxes they face. When Government changes the rules every few months it harms the confidence of business that may expand and adds harmful stress to those that may open or are struggling. I will continue to be a fighter against increased taxes, fees and regulations that harm business. PETE STIGLICH Small businesses in the US are the engine of our economy, creating approximately 80% of all jobs. Excessively burdensome regulations and agency oversight are preventing an economic recovery. Immediate steps must be taken to cut regulations, cut taxes and stop the anti-business agenda of the National Labor Relations Board. GARY ALLEN OXLEY The Constitution gives Congress power over commerce and taxes. As your representative, creating an environment that supports business growth is one of my essential goals. Over taxation and additional fees charged to small business and consumers needs to stop. Large corporations need to pay their share of supporting our economy and your government (federal, state and local) must not spend more than it collects in taxes. My focus as your representative will be on America first and foremost with a priority given to helping our small business owners succeed. Imagine how successful your small business could be, if Congress created the same business environment for your company as it does our large corporations. Which by the way, in our current economy they are thriving with many paying little if no taxes at all.

V O T E T U E S D A Y, J U N E 5 T H May 17, 2012

CN&R 27


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He mentioned that the Downtown Chico Business Association has been discussing plans to clean up the downtown area, which, according to a letter addressed to downtown property owners, would include “addressing unwanted behaviors by the transient community.” Such said the DCBA has been in contact with the Jesus Center and the Chico Police Department. He said businesses have expressed concern to the DCBA “presumably about the problems of people who are irrational, yelling, pan-handling, sleeping in the alcoves and doorways at night and so forth.” He said he has an idea based on how the problem is handled in Sacramento: through an “ambassador” program. “What if we got three people from the Jesus Center, people recovering from whatever their substance abuse was or who can’t get jobs and are trusted and responsible and know the streets? If they were trained by the Chico PD, they could go downtown in the mornings and find those who are sleeping off alcohol or whatever.” Such said the three-member team could wake up the sleepers and invite them to breakfast at the Jesus Center, transport them via the center’s van and then direct them to the other services available. His plan includes a uniform and equipment to clean the sidewalks sullied by the overnight stay. “In other words,” he said, “it’s a N Eway W S of & dealing R E V I E Wwith B U the SINESS USE ON positive DESIGNER ISSUE DATE ACCT. EX problem.” 05.03.12 JLD He saidMA he’s sketched out some REV. DA figuresFILE and NAME thinks the program 07.28 couldHUGHESSKIHUT050312R2 be run for about $3,000 a month. He said he asked theSELECTION) InterUSP (BOLD faith Council, of local PRICE a/ collection ATMOSPHERE / EXPERT / UNIQU churches, synagogues and mosques, CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR if they wouldPLEASE be interested in ADVERTISEMENT AND VERIFY THE FOLLO launching the program, and has SIZE (COLUMNS receivedAD positive feedback.X INCHES) SPELLING “It could be tried for three & DATES months, NUMBERS and if it works we could go CONTACT INFO ETC to the businesses or the(PHONE, DCBAADDRESSES, and ADisAPPEARS REQUESTED say, ‘This working.ASWhat about APPROVED you taking over theBY: funding?’” The important thing, Such said, is recognizing these people are fellow human beings. “There are a lot of people who just can’t get work, who are out on the street for whatever reason, including those who’ve made some terrible decisions. Even they need the affirmation of us saying, ‘You are part of who we are.’ “To some degree the health of this community in Chico is dependent on how we treat the people you might call the least among us.” Ω


A new era in mental-health care Proposition 63 helps establish myriad programs in Butte County by Ken Smith kens@newsreview.com

ince Proposition 63 passed in 2004, Butte S County has received about $32 million of the more than $7.4 billion raised by the Men-

tal Health Services Act. That money has been used to form more than a dozen programs and physical sites, including wellness centers in Chico, Paradise and Oroville and the 6th Street Youth Drop-In Center. “While some counties have had trouble receiving MHSA funds for numerous reasons, we’ve been able to acquire and implement every dollar,” said Betsy Gowan, program development manager and MHSA coordinator with the Butte County Department of Behavioral Health. In addition to providing funds, the MHSA also helped usher in a new era in mental-health care. “Even before Proposition 63, there was a movement away from the traditional ‘talk-to-a-doctor-for-50 minutes, get-your-medications-refilled’ approach toward a more integrated, clientbased model,” said Anne Robin, director of Behavioral Health. “There’s also more of a focus on promoting wellness, recovery and helping people become active, productive members of society. “The MHSA really boosted that effort by spelling it out in the language that was used to write the bill.” Specifically, the goals of the initiative were a transformation of each county’s mental-health system to become “consumer and family driven, recovery oriented, guided by best practices, and informed by outcomes.” Additionally, the MHSA mandate “whatever it takes” has led to unprecedented partnerships between county and community agencies to ensure people have access to as

sive programs. Local MHSA programs are currently undergoing a review and comment period, including stakeholder meetings. A public hearing ended this week. Gowan said that Behavioral Health’s objective at the moment is to stay the course, allowing new programs to develop and improve while more quantitative data are collected to evaluate successes and failures. The MHSA also requires that percentages As issues of homelessness and of the funding go toward specific goals: commental illness are so entwined, munity services and supports (CSS), prevenmany MHSA programs attempt to tion and early intervention, workforce educaaddress the needs of the homeless tion and training, housing, innovation, and population and help people into capital facilities and technology. permanent housing. SEARCH Eighty percent of MHSA funding is (Support, Employment, Assismarked for CSS, and Gowan and Robin said tance, Recovery, and Consumer Butte County has been especially successful Housing ) is an MHSA-funded in this area. A Crisis Stabilization Unit, where program Gowan said has been consumers in crisis can stay for 23 hours as an successful in providing increased alternative to hospitalization, served 828 peoaccess to employment opportunities, medicaple between June 2010 and June 2011; 75 per- tion management and housing. cent of adults and 65 percent of youths treated A newer Peer Partner Program is a collaboat the CSU were discharged to their homes rative effort among Behavioral Health, the and families rather than Torres Shelter and Catholic hospitalized. Family Services. Through it, Other CSS propeople who have dealt with For more information: grams include the mental illness, addiction and A report titled “The Mental Health North Valley Talk homelessness themselves visit Services Act and Its Benef its to Butte Line, a free, consumerthe shelter to help its guests County” provides overviews of many more local MHSA-funded programs, and peer-run telephone obtain needed services. as well as statements from service offering nonRobin said the department consumers who’ve utilized them. Go to emergency support has seen a rise in people expewww.tinyurl.com/buttehealthreport and referrals, and riencing first-time psychiatric to view the report. numerous youth-intenbreaks as a result of the econmany available services as possible. A number of MHSA-funded programs focus on cooperation between Behavioral Health and the local Department of Rehabilitation, whose main concern is helping the disabled obtain permanent employment. Other local MHSA-funded programs are based on cooperative efforts among Behavioral Health and the Jesus Center, the Butte County chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, the Torres Community Shelter, Caminar and others.

Betsy Gowan and Anne Robin of Butte County’s Department of Behavioral Health. PHOTO BY KYLE DELMAR

omy, and that she sees a correlation between this and a rise in homelessness in Butte County and beyond. “There’s also a section of the community that, as mental-health professionals, we only have so much power to help,” she said. “It takes a lot of trust before we’re able to help some people, and it’s just impossible to move forward when you can’t establish that. “Sometimes ‘whatever it takes’ just isn’t enough.” Ω

May 17, 2012

CN&R 29


Arts & Culture ‘The fragrance of magnolias’ North State Symphony brings to life the exquisite Concierto de Aranjuez

Soloist Matthew Greif rehearsing Joaquín Rodrigo’s classicalguitar masterpiece in Laxson. PHOTO BY MATT SIRACUSA

J Concierto de Aranjuez is one of those works, like oaquín Rodrigo’s

30 CN&R May 17, 2012

17

most concerto settings would be overwhelmed by the orchestra, but Rodrigo’s concerto is exquisitely designed not to overpower the guitar and instead to intertwine melodies in a continuing musical conversation between soloist and orchestra. From my seat in the balcony, however, there were a few moments when the sound of the guitar got lost. Otherwise, though, it was a superb performance. I’ve listened to many different recordings of the Concierto de Aranjuez by major orchestras, and the North State Symphony’s version was as good as any of them. The Adagio, in particular, had a haunting beauty that began as melancholy and built to a passionate climax, and it was utterly thrilling. I’m sure I wasn’t the only person with tears in his eyes. The other two works on Sunday’s program,

Richard Wagner’s The Flying Dutchman Overture and Robert Schumann’s Symphony No. 4, are both grand pieces full of emotional highs and lows, changing tempos and intense harmonies. If a listener’s tendency with the Rodrigo piece was to close his eyes and let the music wash over him, with these pieces it was to watch conductor Kyle Wylie Pickett lead his musicians through these dramatic works. Wagner’s overture, which began the program, is both an introduction to and summary of his The Flying Dutchman opera of 1841, the first major work in which he developed the grand style that was to mark his career henceforth. As such, it was a wonderful warm-up for the NSS, who got to shake it loose with a piece that was as big in sound as it was short in length before entering the subtle, nuanced world of the Rodrigo concerto. The lovely Schumann symphony is similarly grand, a big, fat romantic work remarkable not only for the drama and emotions it embodies, but also for its refusal to interrupt the music between its four movements. This gives it a seamless flow that follows themes introduced in the beginning throughout the work. Again, the NSS gave it a spirited performance that was as powerful as it was precise. Ω

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THURS

FRI

Special Events

Special Events

CHICO STATE COMMENCEMENT: Various Chico

ˆ

Dvorák’s Symphony from the New World or Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 3, that are familiar to people who don’t even listen to classical music. It’s been recorded by so many artists, in so many versions and styles (perhaps most notably by Miles Davis on his great album Sketches of Spain), that it pops up on the by radio and as film background Robert Speer music all the time. It’s inescapable. roberts@ Which is a good thing, for as the newsreview.com North State Symphony’s performance of it Sunday, May 13, reminded the audience in Laxson Auditorium, it’s quite simply one of the REVIEW: most beautiful pieces of music ever North State written, particularly its second Symphony’s Across the Seas, movement, the Adagio. It’s also the From Ages Past , most successful evocation and mixSunday, May 13, ing of the folk and classical musical Laxson traditions of Spain. The first time I Auditorium. heard it, a couple of years after returning to California from a yearlong sojourn in Madrid, I cried because it brought back my experience so vividly and movingly. Rodrigo, who was blind from the age of 3, was living in Paris when he wrote the piece, in 1939. It was first performed when he returned to Spain, in 1940. He said it was inspired by the Royal Palace of Aranjuez, the spring resort a few miles south of Madrid, and that “it should sound like the hidden breeze that stirs the treetops in the parks” and should “depict the fragrance of magnolias, the singing of birds and the gushing of fountains,” all images a blind man would appreciate. For its performance Sunday, the last of the 2011-12 season, the symphony brought in guitarist Matthew Greif, a member of the Grammy-winning Los Angeles Guitar Quartet and a veteran solo performer. Greif is a fine player, but I thought at times he played too softly—that, or he was miked too low. The Spanish guitar is a gentle instrument and in

THIS WEEK State venues will host three days of commencements for graduating seniors. Go online for a complete schedule. 5/17-5/19. California State University, Chico, CSUC, (530) 898-4636, http://tinyurl.com/c448cl9.

THURSDAY NIGHT MARKET: Downtown Chico’s weekly marketplace with local produce, vendors, entertainment and music. This week: family-friendly dance rock with Alice Peake, a jazzercise workout demonstration, Roundhouse Ronny the Balloon Clown and solo classic rock with Jeff Pershing. Th, 6-9pm. Prices vary. Downtown Chico; www.downtown chico.net.

Theater A CLOCKWORK ORANGE: A stage adaptation of the controversial novel and film following Alex, a teenager in dystopian future Britain whose primary interests include “rape, ultra-violence and Beethoven.” Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 5/26. $10-$15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroom theatre.com.

CHICO STATE COMMENCEMENT: See Thursday. California State University, Chico, CSUC, (530) 898-4636, http://tinyurl.com/c448cl9.

COMEDIAN ALEX KNOLL: Knoll’s comedic style is unpredictable and bizarre. He’s also two-time San Francisco Regional Air Guitar Championship winner. 5/18-5/19, 7 & 8:30pm. $10. The Last Stand Comedy Venue, 167 E. Third St., (530) 354-1936, www.laststand comedy.com.

ONE NIGHT IN NEW YORK CITY: A celebration of the city that never sleeps with fine dining paired with wine and spirits. F, 5/18, 6:30pm. $75-$140. Rolling Hills Casino; 2655 Barham Ave. in Corning; (530) 528-3500; www.rolling hillscasino.com.

Art Receptions FERROUS RECEPTION: A reception for sculptures by Ulises Meza and Doug Rathbun focusing on post-World War II America. F, 5/18, 5-7pm. Free. 1078 Gallery; 820 Broadway; (530) 3431973; www.1078gallery.org.

Music CITIZENS FOR COMPASSIONATE USE CONCERT:

FERROUS RECEPTION Friday, May 18 1078 Gallery

SEE FRIDAY, ART RECEPTIONS

Eat, drink and dance to music by M.I.P., The Resonators, Soul Union and Second Hand Smoke at this concert to benefit CCU and


FINE ARTS I WISH: A modern-day “Wizard of Oz” musical

HOOKED ON FISHING, NOT ON DRUGS Saturday, May 19 Horseshoe Lake

SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

19

SAT

Special Events

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: GRAVYBRAIN: The weekly concert series kicks off with local funk fusion band Gravybrain. F, 5/18, 7-8:30pm. Free. Chico City Plaza; 400 Main St.

HOPE CENTER BENEFIT CONCERT: Acoustic music with Todd Agnew and Jonny Diaz to benefit the Hope Center. F, 5/18, 6pm. $20. Oroville State Theatre; 1489 Myers St. in Oroville; (530) 5382470.

HOT BUTTERED RUM: Originally a bluegrass act, Hot Buttered Rum now specializes in “fiddleaccented Americana rock.” Alli Battaglia & the Musical Brewing Company open. F, 5/18, 9pm. $13-$15. El Rey Theatre; 230 W. Second St.; (530) 342-2727.

SING FOR A CURE: A musical benefit for Relay 4 Life featuring Paisani, Ha’ Penny Bridge, Chris Hutchins and Rhett Spears, David Zink and more. Call for more info. F, 5/18, 7-11pm. $10. Paradise Grange Hall; 5704 Chapel Dr. in Paradise; (530) 877-7500.

Theater CINDERELLA: The Northern California Ballet

presents the classic fairy tale. 5/18-5/19, 7:15pm; Su, 5/20, 2:15pm. $12-$20. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunnelly Rd. in Paradise, (530) 872-8454, www.paradise performingarts.com.

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE: See Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

LEADING LADIES: Two actors fall on hard times

Juliet presented by the Blue Oak seventh graders—with the Capulets as Goths and the Montagues as jocks. Sa, 5/19, 2pm. $8-$10. Blue Room Theatre; 139 W First St.; (530) 6805399; www.blueroomtheatre.com.

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ANGELOS CUCINA TRINACRIA: Sal Casa Gallery, some of Sal Casa’s early work depicting classic Sicilian culture. Ongoing. 407 Walnut St., (530) 899-9996.

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: Natural & Crafted Worlds, photography by Michele Miller and Karma Ganzler. Through 5/19. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

COMEDIAN ALEX KNOLL: See Friday. The Last

Special Events

CHICO ART CENTER: Naomi Tatum, large-scale

Stand Comedy Venue, 167 E. Third St., (530) 354-1936, www.laststandcomedy.com.

FARMERS MARKET 5K RUN/WALK: As part of the celebration of the opening of Oroville’s downtown farmer’s market, this 5K run and walk will begin at the theater and through Bedrock Park. Call or go online for more info. Sa, 5/19, 7am. Oroville State Theatre; 1489 Myers St. in Oroville; (530) 538-2401; www.underthesun events.org.

HOOKED ON FISHING, NOT ON DRUGS: The lake will be stocked with 8,000 pounds of channel catfish for anglers under 16 to try and land. Free rods and reels are available, but families are invited to bring their own. No fishing license required. Call for more info. Sa, 5/19, 7am-1pm. Free. Horseshoe Lake; Upper Bidwell Park; (530) 891-4757.

Music ONE LOVE CONCERT: Live reggae music all day with Yami Bolo, X Sample, Ginjah, Roundhead and more. Also includes food, vendors and activities. Sa, 5/19, 12-9pm. Free. Martin Luther King Jr. Park; 2921 B St. in Oroville; (530) 282-2346.

GUITAR PROJECT: Warren Haskell’s showcase of

local and visiting classical guitar masters. Sa, 5/19, 7pm. $5-$10. 1078 Gallery; 820 Broadway; (530) 343-1973; www.1078gallery.org.

Theater CINDERELLA: See Friday. Paradise Performing

HELP ME PAINT MY FUTURE FUNDRAISER: A tamale dinner and arts and crafts fair to support art classes, food baskets and field trips for Guatemalan village children. Music provided by Jo Chavez and traditional Mexican ensemble Los Caballitos del Cancion. Su, 5/20, 5-9pm. Chico Womens Club; 592 E. Third St.; (530) 894-1978.

TOUR DE CUPCAKE: The Butte Bicycle Coalition is hosting a bike challenge. Get your map and find the mini cupcakes. Register at www.tour decupcakechico.eventbrite.com, or beginning at 11 a.m., day-of, at the Nature Center. Su, 5/20, noon. $5/kids; $15/adults; $25/family. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

Music FROM BACH TO POULENC: Performances of classical pieces by Phil Frankenberg, Barbara D’Augelli, Lloyd Roby and more to benefit the Torres Community Shelter. Su, 5/20, 2pm. Donations. First Christian Church; 295 E. Washington Ave.; (530) 345-2131.

Theater CINDERELLA: See Friday. Paradise Performing Arts Center, 777 Nunnelly Rd. in Paradise, (530) 872-8454, www.paradiseperformingarts.com.

Garcia. Ongoing. 225 Main St. D, (530) 8953282.

work of Naomi Tatum, a prolific mixed media artist from New Mexico. Through 5/19. 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 895-8726, www.chicoart center.com.

CHICO CITY MUNICIPAL CENTER: Joel Collier

Photography, a display of Joel Collier’s photography on all three floors of the City Municipal Center building. Through 7/13. 411 Main St. City Hall, (530) 896-7200.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Dragonflies and Damselflies, a photo exhibit by Robert Woodward. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHICO PAPER CO.: Marilynn Jennings, the qualities of the four elements are captured through color and texture in oil paintings and adjacent fiber cylinders. Through 6/1.Monuments, works by Bill DiGrazia, who manipulates photographs to detach the structure from recognizable surroundings. Through 6/1. 345 Broadway, (530) 891-0900, www.chicopapercompany.com.

HEALING ART GALLERY: Current exhibits, by Northern California artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Currently featuring watercolors by Amber Palmer. Ongoing. 265 Cohasset Rd. inside Enloe Cancer Center, (530) 332-3856.

HUMANITIES CENTER GALLERY: Make it Work, an exhibition of remade and appropriated objects produced by Cameron Kelly and Rouben Mohiuddin. Through 5/20. 400 W. First St. CSU, Chico, Trinity Hall.

JAMES SNIDLE FINE ARTS AND APPRAISALS:

Passion: Lois Cohen Art Work, a celebration of the late and great local artist Lois Cohen with a gallery of her life’s work. Oils, watercolors, pastel figure drawings and etching prints. Through 5/31. Free to the public. 254 E. Fourth St., (530) 343-2930, www.james snidlefinearts.com.

SALLY DIMAS ART GALLERY: Celebrating the

Figure, an exhibition of of pastels, chalk, pencil, water color, acrylic paints and various inks from 12 local artists. Through 6/30. 493 East Ave. #1, (530) 345-3063.

THE VAGABOND ROSE GALLERY & FRAMING: Will Chiapella Photography, “lost” B&W film images and digital photographs from abroad on display. Through 7/31; Tu, 7/31, 10am-5pm. 236 Main St., (530) 343-1110.

Call for Artists ART INSPIRED BY CHICO: The Chico Museum is planning a multi-media exhibit (including poetry, art, videos, sculptures, textiles and music) of original creations inspired by Chico. Go online for submission guidelines. Through 7/1. Chico Museum, 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336, www.chicomuseum.org.

Museums BOLTS ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Kitchen

Gadgets, a new display featuring kitchen gadgets past and present. M-Sa, 10am3:45pm; Su, 11:45am-3:45pm. $2 adults/kids free. 1650 Broderick St. in Oroville, (530) 538-2497, www.boltsantiquetools.com.

CHICO MUSEUM: The Bicycle: Life on Two

Wheels, an exhibition that will explore world of cycling, from the history of the bicycle, the science of staying upright and the benefits of riding. F through 6/22. $2-$3. 141 Salem St., (530) 891-4336.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Toys: The Inside

Story, an exhibit featuring 12 hands-on stations illustrating the simple mechanisms found in most toys. W-Su. $3-$5. 625 Esplanade.

VALENE L. SMITH MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY: Cradleboards: Carrying on the Traditions, an exhibition of cradleboards, commonly used by many Native American cultures to carry and protect infants. Through 6/15. CSUC Meriam Library Complex.

THIS WEEK continued on page 33

Arts Center, 777 Nunnelly Rd. in Paradise, (530) 872-8454, www.paradise performingarts.com.

Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 5332473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

Thursday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blue roomtheatre.com.

LEADING LADIES Friday-Sunday, May 18-20 Birdcage Theater, Oroville

SEE FRIDAY-SUNDAY, THEATER

Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

ROMEO AND JULIET WITH A TWIST: Romeo and

tures by Ulises Meza and Doug Rathbun focusing on post-World War II America. Th, 5/17, 5-7pm. 820 Broadway, (530) 343-1973, www.1078gallery.org.

BOHO: Stay Up Fly On, artwork by Christian

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE: See

FREE LISTINGS!

1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

1078 GALLERY: Ferrous, an exhibition of sculp-

SUN

and attempt to impersonate the long-lost

nieces of a dying millionairess. F, Sa, 7:30pm; Su, 2pm through 5/20. $7-$15. Birdcage

LEADING LADIES: See Friday. Birdcage Theatre,

Art

California State University, Chico, CSUC, (530) 898-4636, http://tinyurl.com/c448cl9.

CHICO STATE COMMENCEMENT: See Thursday.

their campaign to vote “no” on Measure A. F, 5/18, 6-11:30pm. $5. Arc Pavilion; 2040 Park Ave.; (425) 273-6409.

fantasy performed by 60 school children. Sa, 5/19, 2pm. $3-$5. Oroville State Theatre; 1489 Myers St. in Oroville; (530) 538-2470.

Now’s the time when we dance There is no Chico band better suited to kick off the DCBA’s Friday Night Concert series on Friday, May 18, than GravyBrain. The fun-loving funk-fusion crew will start super-hot and won’t let up until everyone at City Plaza is dancing in the fountain to cool off. The concerts will continue through Sept. 7, and will feature an eclectic schedule of EDITOR’S PICK local acts—everything from the Afro-Cuban Latin jazz of Los Papi Chulos to the horn-heavy blues of Big Mo & The Full Moon Band.

—JASON CASSIDY

May 17, 2012

CN&R 31


32 CN&R May 17, 2012


THIS WEEK continued from page 31

LEADING LADIES: See Friday. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

21

MON

Music CALIFORNIA HONEYDROPS: Soulful vocal harmonies, creative instrumentation and a funky, New Orleans dance style. M, 5/21, 7:30pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room; 1075 East 20th St.; (530) 345-2739; www.sierranevada.com/ bigroom.

22

TUES

Poetry/Literature JEFFREY LOBOSKY LECTURE: Local doctor and

author Jeffrey Lobosky discusses his book, It’s Enough to Make You Sick, a documentation of the origins of the U.S. health-care system. Tu, 5/22, 7pm. Free. Lyon Books; 121 W. Fifth St.; (530) 891-3338; www.lyonbooks.com.

BULLETIN BOARD Community CHICO FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sa, 9:15-11:30am. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary.

if you are eligible for assistance. F, 5/18, 10am. Free. Legal Services of Northern California, 541 Normal Ave., (530) 345-9491.

and uplifting group dances honoring many of the world’s spiritual traditions. Third Sa of every month, 7-9:30pm. $5-$10 donation. Subud Hall, 574 E. 12th St., (530) 891-8789.

DOULA MINI-WORKSHOP: A workshop illustrating the birthing services five local doulas offer. Call for more info. First and third Th of every month, 7-8pm. Free. La Casita Primera Preschool, 2035 Esplanade, (530) 592-7887.

lecture about bird infrastructure at East Park and Stony Gorge reservoirs and core relationships with other wildlife. M, 5/21, 6:30pm. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

gluten sensitivities or other types of food

intolerance are causing bowel problems. Th, 5/17, 4:30-5:30pm. Allergy & Digestive Relief Center, 2639 Forest Ave. 100, (530) 899-8741.

HOW TO STAY CALM, COOL & COLLECTED: Exercises including bilateral movement, breathing, meridian balance and visualizations. Su, 5/20, 2-4pm. Free. Center for Spiritual Living, Downtown Chico, 830 Boadway St., (530) 894-8115.

FOLK DANCING: Teaching during the first hour, followed by request dancing. No partners necessary. Call for more information. F, 8pm through 5/25. $2. Chico Creek Dance Centre, 1144 W. First St., (530) 345-8134.

MAIDU MEDICINE WALK: Naturalist Wes Dempsey leads a tour of roughly 30 native plants used by local Maidu for medicine, crafts and food. Call for more info. Su, 5/20, 9am. Free. Horseshoe Lake, Upper Bidwell Park, (530) 342-2293.

NONVIOLENT COMMUNICATION WORKSHOP: A half-

Special Events COMEDY NIGHT: Weekly comedy night on Wednesdays inside Spirits Lounge at Gold Country Casino. W, 8pm. Free. Gold Country Casino; 4020 Olive Hwy at Gold Country Casino & Hotel in Oroville; (530) 534-9892; www.gold countrycasino.com.

day session discussing experiences of living spiritual lives and sharing the steps of nonviolent communication. Su, 5/20, 1-5pm. Sliding scale $40-90 None will be turned away for lack of funds. Sky Creek Dharma Center, 120 Three Oaks Ct., (530) 893-8088, www.skycreek dharmacenter.org.

duati Weeken on d!

2760 Esplanade @ Lassen • 530.809.1640 • Panighettis.com OPEN Monday–Friday 11am–9pm • Saturday & Sunday 9am–9pm

MAIDU MEDICINE WALK

1/2 off Entree

Sunday, May 20 Upper Bidwell Park

Buy 1 Entree + 2 drinks and receive the 2nd Entree of equal or lesser value 1/2 off

SEE COMMUNITY

(Not valid with delivery. Exp 6/14/12)

seling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. Next to Long’s Drugstore in Paradise, 8727085.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free you spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 895-4707.

For Kids 10 weekly sessions of naturalist-led education camps for children ages 5 to 11. Children will participate in outdoor recreation activities designed to foster awareness of nature. Call or go online for more info. Through 6/4. Chico Creek Nature Center, 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHILDREN STORY TIME SERIES: Reading events

sponsored by Lyon Books. Every other Th, 3pm. Free. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-3338, www.lyonbook.com.

DAY CAMP FOR KIDS: Hosted by Oroville’s YMCA, this day camp is intended to get kids outside and to begin developing healthy life-long habits. Call for more info. M-F, 6:30am-6pm through 8/17. Oroville YMCA, 1684 Robinson St. in Oroville, 533-9622, www.orovilleymca.org.

530.345.8862 • 530.345.3927

Best Mexican

Food in Chico

Volunteer BIDWELL PARK VOLUNTEERS: Help the park by volunteering for trash pick-up, invasive-plant removal, trail maintenance, site restoration, water-quality testing and more. Ongoing; check Friends of Bidwell Park website for dates and locations. Ongoing. Call for location, www.friendsofbidwellpark.org.

ROSE GARDEN TOUR: A tour featuring the gar-

basic medical care and mental-health coun-

(In Almond Orchard Shopping Center)

Classes for kids hosted by Earth Girl Art. Go online for class schedule. Ongoing. Earth Girl Art, 3851 Morrow Ln., (530) 354-2680, www.earthgirlart.com.

Gateway Science Museum volunteer docent. Volunteer commitments range from three hours a month to three hours or more a week. Tu, 5/22, 12:15-1:15pm; Sa, 5/26, 10:3011:30am. Gateway Science Museum, 625 Esplanade, (530) 898-3273, www.gateway science.org.com.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free

Authentic Chinese Cuisine 2201 Pillsbury RD. Suite 100, Chico, CA 95926

SEWING, KNITTING & CRAFTS CLASSES FOR KIDS:

VOLUNTEER AT GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM!: Be a

Used book sale. Every other Sa, 10am-3pm. Prices vary. Butte County Library, Paradise Branch, 5922 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 8726320, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary/ Paradise.htm.

We Deliver!

CAMP CHICO CREEK: Registration is open for

PARADISE FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE:

dens of seven members of the Rose Society. Ticket price includes membership. Call for more info. Sa, 5/19, 9am. $20. Call for details, (530) 893-8098.

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 40

NOW RESERV TAKING ATIONS FOR Gra

EAST PARK AND STONY GORGE RESERVOIRS: A

GLUTEN INTOLERANCE SEMINAR: Learn whether

23

Sat/Sun e gn Champa Brunchm 9am-2p

DANCES OF UNIVERSAL PEACE: Simple, meditative

honey, fruits and veggies, crafts and more. Sa, 7:30am-1pm. Chico Certified Saturday Farmers Market, Municipal Parking Lot on Second and Wall streets, (530) 893-3276.

WED

Limit two coupons per table. No other discounts. Expires 6/28/12. Not valid Fri or Sat after 5pm.

drop your mind, free your feet and your spirit. Call for directions. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, 891-6524.

FARMERS MARKET - SATURDAY: Baked goods,

SEE TUESDAY, POETRY/LITERATURE

Buy one entree & two drinks, get the second of equal or lesser value half off.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle,

Vegetable Project’s weekly sale of freshpicked greens of chard, kale, cabbage, flowers, herbs, veggies, farm-fresh eggs and more in the campus plaza. W, 11am-2pm. Chico State, W. First St. Plumas Hall.

Tuesday, May 22 Lyon Books

FUL

BARL

CREDIT CARD DEBT CLINIC: Call ahead to find out

FARMERS MARKET - CHICO STATE: The Organic

JEFFREY LOBOSKY BOOK SIGNING

HALF–OFF ENTREE Voted B est Ne w Restaurant 2010

MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.

5.95

$

3 TACO PLATE

SPECIAL (Special does not include fish or shrimp) Mon-Sat 10am-7:45pm Sun 10am-6pm

530-809-0370 Corner of 9th & Wall May 17, 2012

CN&R 33


D

2.75 SIZE

CIN7NR_5.17

THUR 5/17 RUN DATE FRIDAY 5/18 – ThuRsDAY 5/24 BATTLESHIP (Digital) (PG-13) (10:25AM*) 11:30AM 1:30PM 2:30PM 4:30PM 5:30PM 7:30PM 8:30PM 10:30PM CHIMPANZEE (Digital) (G) 12:00PM DARK SHADOWS (Digital) (PG-13) 11:15AM 12:40PM 1:55PM 3:20PM 4:40PM 6:05PM 7:20PM 8:45PM♣ 10:00PM

PIRATES! BAND OF MISFITS (Digital) (PG) 11:55AM 2:10PM 4:45PM

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING (Digital) (PG-13) 11:35AM 2:10PM 4:45PM 7:20PM 9:55PM (SPECIAL SHOWING) GOTTERDAMMERUNG: MET OPERA RING CYCLE ENCORE (Digital) (NR) Sat. 5/19 12:00PM

FIVE-YEAR ENGAGEMENT, THE (Digital) (R) 11:00AM♠ 1:50PM♠ 4:40PM♠ 7:30PM 10:20PM

(SPECIAL SHOWING)PHANTOM WEEK - PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (Digital) (NR) Mon. 5/21 7:30PM

HUNGER GAMES, THE (Digital) (PG-13) 12:55PM 4:05PM 7:15PM 10:25PM

(SPECIAL SHOWING)PHANTOM WEEK - LOVE NEVER DIES (Digital) (NR) Wed. 5/23 7:30PM

MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (3D) (PG-13) 12:30PM 1:10PM 3:45PM 4:30PM 5:20PM 7:00PM 7:50PM 10:15PM MARVEL’S THE AVENGERS (Digital) (PG13) (10:20AM*) 11:10AM 2:00PM 2:50PM 6:10PM 8:40PM 9:30PM

(MIDNIGHT SHOWING) - CHERNOBYL DIARIES (Digital) (R )Late Nite Thurs. 5/24 12:02AM (MIDNIGHT SHOWING) - MEN IN BLACK 3 (3D) (PG-13) Late Nite Thurs. 5/24 12:01AM

Showrimes listed w/ (*) shown Sat. & Sun. ONLY Showrimes listed w/ ♠ NOT shown Sat. 5/19 Showrimes listed w/ ♣ NOT shown Mon. 5/21

I vant some maple syrup.

ATT: bully WILL

Fri/Sat 6:30pm Sun 2pm mon-thurS 8pm

THINK LIKE A MAN (Digital) (PG-13) 7:20PM 10:10PM

DICTATOR, THE (Digital) (R) 11:20AM 1:30PM 3:40PM 5:50PM 8:00PM 10:10PM

LUCKY ONE, THE (Digital) (PG-13) 2:10PM 4:55PM 7:25PM 9:55PM

both films friday NAMEstart OF FILE SENT5/18 one week only

academy award nominee

footnote Fri/Sat 8:30pm Sun 4pm • mon-ThurS 6pm

6701 CLARK ROAD

872-7800

www.paradisecinema.com

ALL SHOWS PRESENTED

IN

S HOWTIMES G OOD F RI 5/18- T HUR 5/24

BATTLESHIP

 12:45 3:40 6:30 *9:30PM

WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU'RE EXPECTING [PG-13]

 1:40 4:15 7:00 *9:25PM

[PG-13]

 1:00 3:00 5:25 7:35 *9:45PM

THE DICTATOR [R]

DARK SHADOWS [PG-13]

THE RAVEN

 12:30 3:00 5:05 7:20 *9:40PM 1:20 4:00 6:40 *9:20PM

[R]

THE AVENGERS IN IN

[PG-13]

: 1:30 4:30 7:30 *9:15PM 2D: 12:30 3:30 6:30 *9:30PM

*L ATE S HOWS

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A LL S HOWS B EFORE 6PM ARE B ARGAIN M ATINEES  INDICATES NO PASSES ACCEPTED

Goth soap opera Tim Burton is in his element with fun remake of old daytime vampire TV series

Tmaker for me. While I’ve enjoyed some of his offerings—Ed Wood, Mars Attacks! and Beetlejuice—I haven’t

im Burton has always been a problematic film-

otherwise succumbed to his Hot Topic spell. Personally, I found Edward Scissorhands (among others) to be overbearingly twee. And over the past by Craig Blamer decade his Skittles palette has overwhelmed the Goth, which really isn’t to my taste. But when he plays to his strengths, he can really deliver. And with his reboot of the cult late-’60s, early-’70s vampire soap opera Dark Shadows, he swings the bat and really connects. Dark Shadows With a prologue that seductively nails the Starring Ann Radcliffe atmosphere of gothic romance, Johnny Depp, Burton and lead Johnny Depp establish the Michelle Pfeiffer, Eva Green, Bella backstory of one Barnabas Collins, scion of an Heathcote and 18th century New England fishing magnate Helena Bonham who uses his position to sample the galley Carter. Directed maids as he bides his time until he can hook up by Tim Burton. Cinemark 14, with someone worthy of his affluence. And Feather River when he finds that soul mate in one big-eyed Cinemas and Josette (Bella Heathcote, a perfectly gothic Paradise Cinema name), he shatters the dreams of manor scut 7. Rated PG-13. Angelique (Eva Green), who just happens to be a witch. A real one. And so, after a bit of toil and trouble over a cauldron, we end up with Josette dead and Barnabas undead, chained up Poor in a coffin and buried away for eternity. Well ... the eternity of a couple centuries as a bunch of workman backhoe up his prison and unleash his bad vampire self into 1972. And Fair Barnabas is very, very thirsty. After tapping the workmen, he flops like a fish-out-of-water through hippy-era Collinsport, Maine, on his way back home and Good finds his descendants essentially squatting in the decayed grandeur of Collinswood castle: matriarch Elizabeth (Michelle Pfeiffer), spoiled cad Uncle Roger (Jonny Lee Miller) and young Very Good siblings Carolyn (Chloë Grace Moretz) and David (Gulliver McGrath). There’s also a creepy caretaker (Jackie Earle Haley) to play the Renfield-like Willie and the tippling house Excellent

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34 CN&R May 17, 2012

headshrinker Dr. Julia Hoffman (Helena Bonham Carter) filling in for Van Helsing. Of course, they all have their secrets. The years have not been good for the Collins family, as Angelique has applied her witchy skills to wresting control of Collinsport from Barnabas’ descendants. The thing is, Angelique isn’t all that disturbed about the return of Barnabas. There’s just the complication of a love triangle with the Collins family’s governess, Victoria Winters (Heathcote again). Yeah, it’s pretty much an arch soap opera, but the material really plays to Burton’s strengths. The humor isn’t as broad as the trailer for the movie threatened, and while a lot of the gags are obvious (playing on Barnabas’ encounters with 20th century mores and technology), they still feel organic to the material. It also helps that the ensemble cast appears to be thoroughly enjoying their vamping, especially Green, who gets her Veronica Lake on in a perfectly villainous—and yet ultimately sympathetic—turn as the absurdly sexy witch. Ω

For weird’s sake Damsels in Distress

4

Ends tonight, May 17. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13.

by Juan-Carlos Selznick The convoluted comic/satirical wit of

Whit Stillman’s Damsels in Distress is a prime virtue but also something of a problem in this charming but perplexing entertainment. The ironically titled Damsels might be characterized, at least in part, as a “campus comedy.” Most of its characters are enrolled at the fictional Seven Oaks College, a private East Coast institution with a vaguely Ivy League air about it. Central-most is a small


clique of “popular girls” who follow the lead of a tall blonde named Violet (a vividly convincing Greta Gerwig) in their own peculiar brands of socializing and cultural activism. Rose (Megalyn Echikunwoke) and Heather (Carrie MacLemore) are two kinds of clueless co-ed snob, while newcomer Lily (a beguiling Analeigh Tipton) becomes a wary comrade in their cockamamie crusade. The gospel of Violet includes the notion that she and her cohort should date only guys who are their inferiors in appearance, behavior and personal hygiene—with the declared aim of leading them to a more enlightened state. Violet’s erstwhile boyfriend, an amiably immature doofus named Frank (Ryan Metcalf) is exhibit No. 1. Other Seven Oaks males include a couple of clean-cut klutzes who are still learning to spell and identify colors, as well as Xavier (Hugo Becker), a French graduate student who prefers the sexual practices of the ancient Cathars, and the moderately mysterious Fred (Adam Brody) who takes on a second identity when he’s picking up women in bars.

Reviewers: Craig Blamer, Rachel Bush and Juan-Carlos Selznick.

There’s a complicated roundelay of shifting alliances among the couples and friends in all this, much of it mixing offbeat romantic comedy with something darker and not so funny. Violet and friends also operate the campus Suicide Prevention Center, where dorm-room interventions and prescriptions of doughnuts and dance therapy effectively hold sway. Violet’s desire to create a transformative “dance craze” leads the film to an amusing climactic sequence—something like a Fred Astaire routine reimagined by Godard, Truffaut and the French New Wave. It’s Stillman’s first film in over a decade, but the three that he made in the 1990s—Metropolitan (1990), Barcelona (1994) and The Last Days of Disco (1998)—established him as an unusually gifted writer/director of wry, literate social comedies about young adults. While the new film continues in that smart, beguiling vein, it is also couched in a kind of nonchalant eccentricity that seems certain to puzzle most audiences. Ω

and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

4

Bully

Opening this week Battleship

You sunk my battleship … with a giant special-effects alien space craft? Somehow, this space-aliens-versus-the-U.S.-Navy battle— starring Alexander Skarsgård, Liam Neeson and Rhianna—is a spin-off of the old board game. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

The Dictator

In his latest raunchy modern satire, Sacha Baron Cohen plays a dictator forced to move to America after democracy comes to his faux North African country. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

Footnote

A father and son’s relationship is increasingly put to the test by their individual ambitions in their shared field of Talmudic studies. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG.

What to Expect When You’re Expecting In the same vein as other recent fluffy ensemble rom-coms (see: Valentine’s Day, New Year’s Eve), a ton of recognizable faces (J-Lo, Cameron Diaz, Dennis Quaid, Chris Rock, Elizabeth Banks, etc., etc.) fall into a bunch of interconnected roles—this time in the form of five couples all dealing with the ups and downs of having babies. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Now playing

4

The Avengers

Once Black Widow (Scarlett Johanssen) starts kicking some ass about 11 minutes in, this superhero flick shifts gears and begins to get more awesome as it howls along. What we get next are a few origin stories, about the recruitment of the Avengers—Black Widow, Captain America, Iron Man, the Hulk and eventually Thor and Hawkeye—as a team. As a stand-alone, it could be confusing. But if you kick back and go with the flow, that’s over soon enough and they band together to fight a common threat that has followed power-hungry god Loki to Earth. Tony Stark/Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) is pretty much the center of the movie, but director Joss Whedon has also made the Hulk interesting. Helping to sell the package is Mark Ruffalo as Hulk’s alter-ego, turning in a performance that echoes Bill Bixby (the original live action Bruce Banner) while making the character comfortably his own. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas

This fine, gentle, moving documentary takes on what has become an urgent national issue—bullying, sometimes with drastic consequences, among American school children. It makes no definitive statement on the issue signaled in its title, but it does give us some valuable glimpses inside a handful of specific cases. Filmmakers Lee Hirsch and Cynthia Lowen build their study around bullied kids and their families in Iowa, Georgia, Oklahoma and Mississippi. A bright gawky 14-year-old in Iowa, an openly gay 16-year-old gal from Oklahoma and a 14-year-old honor student and basketball star (jailed for pulling a gun on her tormentors in a school bus) in Mississippi are the film’s foreground figures. But the parents of two school-boy suicides, one in Georgia and another in Oklahoma, also loom large particularly in the part of the film that is concerned with burgeoning grass-roots movements to raise awareness on these issues. A school principal in Iowa and a sheriff in Mississippi provide some troubling signs of institutional breakdown, but Bully makes no sweeping indictments. Small-town provincialism recurs, but those same environments yield up some beacons of enlightenment—the parents of those suicides in particular, but also the surviving best friend of the Oklahoma suicide, who identifies himself as a reformed bully. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

4

Damsels in Distress

Ends tonight, May 17. See review this issue. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

4

Dark Shadows

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

The Five-Year Engagement

Jason Segel teams up again with writer/director Nicholas Stoller (director of Forgetting Sarah Marshall and writer of 2011’s The Muppets), starring with Emily Blunt in this comedy about a couple who keep extending their engagement. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

3

The Hunger Games

The Hunger Games commences with a grim vision of a dystopian America a few generations down the road, where proles abide in Appalachian squalor after the world seemingly bankrupts itself during the course of a war on terror. These folks have it bad, and everyone just sits in doorways and looks miserable. Except for Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) who stalks the woods hunting for sustenance for her

hungry family. To keep the edgy populace in line, the elite aspects of society have provided them with a little circus called The Hunger Games, where contestants set out to kill each other until the last one stands victorious. Guess who ends up as a contestant? The Hunger Games is leisurely paced, allowing its characters to naturally develop, with an eye for the communication of body language and subtextual manipulation. Although, it is a little too sluggish at times and the content has apparently been homogenized for better mass appeal. However, most viewers might find that the biggest downside is having to wait until November of 2013 for the next episode. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

4

The Pirates! Band of Misfits

Britain’s Aardman Animations, creators of the superb Wallace & Gromit films, have come up with a delightfully comical pirate adventure. The story, adapted by Gideon Defoe from a novel in his Pirates! series, has an amiably hapless pirate captain named The Pirate Captain who, in his ongoing (and mostly hopeless) quest for Pirate of the Year honors, crosses paths with Charles Darwin and the voyage of The Beagle. Darwin is especially impressed by The Pirate Captain’s “parrot,” which the great scientist recognizes as a (supposedly extinct) dodo. That discovery takes the pirate, the scientist and the parrot/dodo into the rambunctiously oppressive company of the Royal Academy and, worst (or best) of all, a farcically tyrannical Queen Victoria. Aardman’s exquisitely detailed stop-motion animation, directed here by Peter Lord and Jeff Newitt, makes for nonstop comedy pleasure throughout nearly 90 minutes of fancifully facetious storytelling. A sterling cast of actors is on hand to provide the animated characters’ voices: Hugh Grant (The Pirate Captain), Martin Freeman (The Pirate with a Scarf), Imelda Staunton (Queen Victoria), David Tennant (Charles Darwin), Jeremy Piven (Black Bellamy), Salma Hayek (Cutlass Liz), among others. Cinemark 14. Rated PG —J.C.S.

Still here

3

Chimpanzee

Cinemark 14. Rated G —R.B.

The Lucky One

Cinemark 14. Rated PG.

3

The Raven

Cinemark 14 and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.S.

Think Like a Man

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

May 17, 2012

CN&R 35


DID YOU KNOW... • The Butte County Library has no budget to buy books • 550 Books were purchased for the 2012 “Children’s Summer Reading Program” with the funds raised by the 2011 Links for Literacy golf tournament • One persons entry fee will purchase 4 books for the library • Children who participate in the “Children’s Summer Reading Program” do better in school

A MUDDY GOOD TIME.

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June 15-17, 2012


Chef Jonathan Turney slides a Community Garden pizza out of Grana’s wood-fired oven.

RESERVE NOW FOR FATHER’S DAY & GRADUATION

PHOTO BY MATT SIRACUSA

Teppanyaki

Hai!

Into the fire New downtown eatery adds its tasty wood-fired pies to Chico’s crowded pizza scene

Owhere most locals can list their top three established favorites at the drop of a hat, is a mighty big gamble. But pening a pizza joint in a town like Chico,

then again, Grana is a far cry from your typical pizza joint. This is first evident upon stepping through the doors into the restaurant’s cavernous, modernly appointed main dining area. Copper-colored, oxidized metal by Ken Smith sheets riveted together cover the entire far wall with a viewing space from the seckens@ ond-floor dining area cut into it. The floor newsreview.com is dark concrete and the whole place is lit with chandeliers that look something like electrified jellyfish. It’s not uninviting, just distinctly more urban than some might ★★★★ expect stepping off of Second Street. This is offset by the beautifully renovatGrana ed, tiled wood oven taking up an entire cor198 E. Second ner behind the bar. To further soften the Street post-modern atmosphere, a slightly altered 809-2304 version of the red-and-white logo of a previwww.grana ous similarly named tenant—the old Grand chico.com Auto store—is emblazoned on one wall. Hours: On my first visit, my dining companion Tues.-Thurs., and I decided to split a salad, appetizer and 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; a pizza, settling on The Wedge ($8), House Fri., 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; Made Meatballs ($8) and Pesto with HarSat., 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; vest Veggies Pizza ($14). Sun., 11 a.m.-8 pm.; The salad was delicious, fresh butter closed Mon. lettuce topped with ample amounts of blue cheese (dressing and crumbles) and hand-cut bacon. It was a bit on the small side for sharing, but would’ve been perfect for one, and luckily the meatballs ★★★★★ EPIC were soon to follow. Wonderfully seasoned with a touch of spiciness and ★★★★ AUTHORITATIVE smothered in delicious tomato sauce and ★★★ Pecorino Romano cheese, it was tough to APPEALING save a meatball to garnish our otherwise ★★ meatless pizza. HAS MOMENTS With each bite of the pizza, Grana’s ★ décor and atmosphere made much more FLAWED sense. Basil pesto and Farmstead Cream-

ery fromage blanc blended magnificently with delectably cooked shallots, tomatoes and sweet red onions, all atop crispy thin crust. The altogether effect is a complex, succulent mix of flavors, refreshingly new and traditional at once. It is a bit urban and a bit Chico in their use of local, organic and fresh vegetables. Adding bits of meatball—concentrated bundles of flavor unto themselves—really sent the taste buds into overdrive. There are only nine pizzas on the regular menu, but no shortage of toppings and promising pies. I look forward to trying the White (mozzarella, Pecorino Romano, guanciale, spring onion and egg, $16) and Meat and Potato (tomato, chorizo, arugula, breadcrumbs, sherry vinegar, teardrop tomatoes and more, $13) in particular. Interesting toppings like egg and duck bacon can be added to any pizza ($3 and $4, respectively). I returned the very next day to check out the lunch, facing off against an open-faced sausage sandwich ($8). The visit reaffirmed my opinion that Grana is making delicious food, and revealed a seemingly much more informal vibe than in the evening. Outdoor seating is also available and a nice contrast to the metropolitan interior. An added bonus to eating outside (as if we need one here) is that buckets of beer are available for enjoying on a beautiful day. Grana also has an excellent selection of beer and an ever-changing wine list. Grana is an excellent addition to downtown, more of a complement to its neighbors than direct competition, and should fare well. It’s different enough to be a refreshing change of pace, but familiar enough to remain comfortable. The prices are mid-range—we paid $30, not including tax, for a meal for two— and well worth it in service, portion size and flavor. Great for a quick lunch, casual dinner or a date. Ω

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CN&R 37


PHOTO BY ALAN SHECKTER

June 1-2, Gundlach Bundschu Winery, Sonoma Featuring: Beachwood Sparks, Papercuts, The Donkeys, Little Wings, Cotton Jones, Sea of Bees and more. Tickets $75-$240 for a variety of choices of one- to twoday passes that include just music, or music and farm-to-barrel-totable dinners, plus VIP options. Info: www.huichicamusic festival.com

A clip-out guide to Nor Cal’s spring and summer music festivals by

Jason Cassidy jasonc@newsreview.com

A tles here at the top the north valley, Chicoans start to get that

s the heat rises up and set-

familiar itch to flee to the hills and coast for relief, and hopefully for some groovy tunes as well. Festival season is upon us, and for the next three months, Northern California features plenty of musical getaways for a variety of musical tastes. Gone this year, after a 33-year run, is the peace-loving Harmony Fest in Sonoma, but another, smaller, younger fest—the Huichica Music Festival—is debuting in Sonoma in its absence. Here’s a simple guide to the biggest offerings for 2012.

Strawberry Music Festival May 24-28, Camp Mather, Groveland (near Yosemite National Park). Featuring: Alison Krauss and Union Station, Brown Bird, Joan Osborne, Robert Earl Keen, Ruthie Foster, The California Honeydrops and more. Tickets $190-$200 for three- to four-day passes (includes camping), $65 for single day (no camping). Info: (209) 984-8630, www.strawberrymusic.com

Freedom Dance May 25-27, Tehama Gold Ranch, Flournoy Featuring: The B-Side Players, Moksha, Dylan’s Dharma, Perpetual Drifters, Ira Walker, Soul Union and more. Tickets $85 for three-day pass (includes meals, quantity limited). Info: 833-0119, www.facebook.com/freedomdance

June 15-18, Belden Electronic music festival featuring: MartyParty, Figure, VibeSquaD, Signal Path, Black Rock City All-Stars, Coop Da Loop and tons more. Tickets $160$200, plus $111 parking (carpooling encouraged). Info: www.the bouncefestival.com

Sierra Nevada World Music Festival June 22-24, Mendocino County Fairgrounds, Boonville Featuring: Jimmy Cliff, Luciano, Israel Vibration, Third World, Locos Por Juana and many more. Tickets $160 for three-day pass, $60-$70 for single days. Camping is available (extra fees apply). Info: (916) 777-5550, info@snwmf.com, www.snwmf.com

Wild Mountain Faire June 30-July 1, Concow Campground, Concow Featuring: Prezident Brown, Dehli 2 Dublin, Spark ’n’ Cinder, Swamp Zen, Alli Battaglia & The Musical Brewing Co., Soul Union, Twisted Strategies and more. Tickets $50 for three-day pass (includes camping), $20 singleday. Parking passes required

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Craven Trio, MaMuse, The Railflowers, plus kids’ games and programs and many more performers. Tickets for children and adults range from $35-$160 for single- or multi-day passes and camping, and from $15-$140 without camping (4-under free). Info: (530) 8914098, info@worldfest.net, http://worldfest.net

Kate Wolf Memorial Festival

The Bounce Festival

Festival season

($5/day). Info: wildmountainfaire @ymail.com, www.wildmountain faire.com

Huichica Music Festival

June 29-July 1, Black Oak Ranch, Laytonville Featuring: K.D. Lang & The Siss Boom Bang, Lucinda Williams, Marcia Ball, Jimmy LaFave, Leftover Salmon, MaMuse, Tim & Nicki Bluhm and many more. Tickets for children and adults range from $40-$185 for many choices of single- or multi-day passes (some with camping, some without). Extra charge for vehicles. Children 9under are free. Info: (415) 2568499, www.katewolfmusic festival.com

Reggae on the River July 16-17, Benbow Lake State Recreation Area, Garberville Featuring: Toots and the Maytals, Pato Baton & the Now Generation, Midnite, Calypso Rose, Fantan Mojah and more. Tickets: $110 for two-day pass (single-day tickets available at the gate). Info: www.reggaeontheriver.com

Vans Warped Tour

The Gaia Festival

June 23, the lot at AT&T Park, San Francisco Featuring: Newfound Glory, Taking Back Sunday, Yellowcard, The Used, Senses Fail, and tons more. Tickets $36 (general admission). Info: www.warpedtour.com

Aug. 3-5, Black Oak Ranch, Laytonville Music and sustainable-living festival featuring: Michael Franti & Spearhead, Yonder Mountain String Band, Kinky, Orgone, David Lindley, MaMuse and many more. Plus, sustainability and health speakers and workshops. Tickets for children and adults range from $40-$185 for many choices of single- or multi-day passes (some with camping, some without). Extra charge for vehicles. Children 11-under are free. Info: info@thegaiafestival.com, www.thegaiafestival.com

High Sierra Music Festival July 5-8, Plumas-Sierra County Fairgrounds, Quincy Featuring: Ben Harper, Matisyahu, Built to Spill, Toots and the Maytals, Galactic, S2S9, The Slip and more. Tickets $160$199 for two-, three- & four-day passes (includes camping), $40$99 for several options of teen (1316) and kid (5-12) passes (4-under, free). Info: (510) 547-1992, www.highsierramusic.com

California World Fest July 12-15, Nevada County Fairgrounds, Grass Valley Featuring: Ani Difranco, Cake, Tommy Emmanuel, Delhi 2 Dublin, Fishtank Ensemble, Joe

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Outside Lands Aug. 10-12, Golden Gate Park, San Francisco Neil Young & Crazy Horse, Jack White, Beck, Big Boi, Norah Jones, Metallica, Regina Spektor, Explosions in the Sky, Thee Oh Sees and many more, plus food, wine and art. Tickets $225 for three-day pass. Info: www.sfout sidelands.com

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“We’re Going to Jon & Bons!”

She Is

FREE Buy 1 small or larger yogurt, and get 1 small yogurt FREE or $1 OFF any smoothie.

Kyle Williams Self-produced

MUSIC

—Alan Sheckter

Kyle Williams’ CD-release party is Saturday, May 19, 7-10 p.m., at Paradox Fitness & Martial Arts, 986 East Ave.

Ask about our Frequent Buyer program!

www.newsreview.com

Offering 10 new acoustic songs about life and love, Kyle Williams’ sophomore effort, She Is, is anything but sophomoric. Three years after releasing the five-song Shades of Grey demo, Chico resident Williams’ maturity, in life and song, is apparent in this pleasing collection of musical musings, excellently produced by renowned local music professor and guitarist Dave Elke. Williams’ thoughtful worldview is delivered with gentle, expressive articulations backed by crafty, understated arrangements, which include featured interludes by locals Elke (guitar), Jamie Hector (upright bass), Terry Smith (keyboards), Martha Boyle (fiddle) and Bob Littell (harmonica). On the title track, Williams—winner of Best Folk/Acoustic Act at this year’s CAMMIES—displays his optimism and humility when it comes to romance, singing, “Can’t believe I get to kiss her goodnight—and then again in the morning. … I can say without a doubt/ that anything she doesn’t have is something I can live without.” And “She”—Williams’ wife, Carrie— sings back-up on one of the tracks. If you like melodious modern crooners like Amos Lee, Jason Mraz or even local balladeer John Paul Gutierrez, you’ll surely enjoy She Is.

2 Chico Locations 300 Broadway (Downtown), 899-9580 In the Phoenix Building 1722 Mangrove Ave., 899-0484 In Mangrove Square Open 7 dAys A week, 11AM - Midnight

Taste & see that the Lord is good: Blessed is the man that trusteth in him. Psalm 34:8

invites You to Join Us in the Big room

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Rize of the Fenix

Chris Cain Band

Tenacious D

w/ special guest

Columbia Records One look at the album art—a penis and testicles soaring on fiery phoenix wings—and we can gather Tenacious D is still sexually deranged. So what’s changed since Jack Black and Kyle Gass released 2006’s The Pick of Destiny? Aside from the usual references to their other-worldly musical and sexual abilities and how awesome their friendship is, Rize of the Fenix features a ballad dedicated to roadies (“Roadie”), a satirical attempt at being environmentally conscious that turns into a exposé on how cool owning a spaceship would be (“Deth Starr”) and a history of rock music packed into a little less than two minutes (“Rock is Dead”). As always, the duo does an excellent job making a mockery of hard-rock clichés, while making you nod your head in the process. But some of the album’s best moments are during the skits, in which Jack poses as an excessively physical classical guitar teacher and Kyle reveals he has been sneaking into the studio to “lay down flute tracks.” Be warned: this album is not for those with a refined sense of humor. Or taste in music. Or album art.

Laurie Morvan Band the blues rock twin bill of the season!!

MUSIC

—Howard Hardee

Wulfram Fellwoods At War With False Noise While heavy rock has shown a recent resurgence in America, it never really went away across the pond. Fellwoods are a relatively new band, but they’ve quickly made an impression in Europe while still remaining relatively unknown in their home base of Portland, Ore. After getting some digital ink from a few European metal blogs, Scottish label At War With False Noise rightfully scooped up the four-piece and released their debut LP, Wulfram (the vinyl version will come out this month on Swedish imprint Bear Trail Records). Taking their cue from bands with records that typically lurk deep within musty bins, Fellwoods connect the psychedelic wizardry of Sir Lord Baltimore with the Camaro-tested proto-metal of Rocka Rolla-era Judas Priest. Fellwoods guitarist-vocalist Adam Burke lets loose his banshee wail over wiry blues riffs that he describes as so dumb a 3-year-old could write them. While it’s clear the members are able musicians, there is still a loose, punk-rock energy in songs like “Widow Trakk” and “Crown.” And despite the fact that these might be the most genteel individuals to don head-to-toe denim, Fellwoods will still kick yer arse. —Mark Lore

MUSIC

Opening this killer blues rock twin bill is the Laurie Morvan Band. “Scary good. Get out of the business good. Why everyone doesn’t know about this woman and her rocking blues band is beyond me!” – Bill Scheft, head writer for the David Letterman show. Closing the show will be Chico and Big Room favorite, The Chris Cain Band. Close your eyes and you’ll swear you’re listening to a living blend of B.B. King, Albert King and Freddy King. And as San Jose Mercury News music reviewer John Orr writes, “more than anyone else, anywhere, Chris Cain represents the future of the blues.” This is the blues twin bill of the season. The dance floor is open and be sure to get your tickets early.

Tickets $20 On sale Saturday, 5/19 in the gift shop or online at www.SierraNevada.com Doors open at 6pm • Music starts at 7:30pm

Special concert Dinner available - $12.50

Join the Big Room e-mail list by visiting www.sierranevada.com 1075 E. 20th StrEEt • ChiCo • 896-2198 all ages Welcome at each Show May 17, 2012

CN&R 39


NIGHTLIFE

THURSDAY 5|17—WEDNESDAY 5|23 ENVELOPE PEASANT, TEEPH & KYLE WILLIAMS CD-RELEASE PARTIES Saturday, May 19 & Wednesday May 23 Origami Lounge & Paradox Fitness SEE SATURDAY & WEDNESDAY

Theatre; (530) 514-8888; http://live atflo.weebly.com.

17THURSDAY

JOHN SEID: John Seid and friends, featuring Larry Peterson and Steve Cook playing an eclectic mix of tunes all night. Th, 6:30-9:30pm. Free. Johnnie’s Restaurant; 220 W. Fourth St. inside Hotel Diamond; (530) 895-1515; www.johnniesrestaurant.com.

AARON RICH & FRIENDS: Country music round-robin. Third and First Th of every month, 9pm. Free. Crazy Horse

Saloon & Brewery; 303 Main St.; (530) 894-5408.

guitarist Matteo plays film scores and light classics. Th, 6pm. Free. Angelos Cucina Trinacria; 407 Walnut St.; (530) 899-9996.

midnight. Lynns Optimo; 9225 Skyway in Paradise; (530) 872-1788.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo; 319 Main

OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians welcome. Th, 7-10pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria; 501 Main St.; (530) 894-3033; www.hasbeans.com.

St.; (530) 892-2473.

THE GOLDEN GHOSTS: Local psych-rockers Gentlemen’s Coup with LA acts The Golden Ghosts and The Downtown Train. Th, 5/17, 9pm. $7. Origami Lounge; 7th and Cherry streets.

OPEN MIKEFULL: Open mic night to benefit Earthdance. Refreshments on sale.

First and Third Th of every month, 7pm. $1. Paradise Grange Hall; 5704 Chapel Dr. in Paradise; (530) 873-1370.

HUSH: A funky jam band heavy on

grooves. Th, 5/17, 6pm. Free. LaSalles; 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891.

of bluegrass, Balkan music, punk rock and vaudeville. Michelin Embers opens. Th, 5/17, 8pm. $5. Monstros Pizza & Subs; 628 W. Sacramento Ave.; (530) 345-7672.

18FRIDAY

MATTEO PLAYS FILM SCORES: Classical

BLUES JAM: Weekly open jam. Th, 8pm-

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

THEE HOBO GOBBELINS: A spooky hybrid

RUTT N BRIGGS: An acoustic happy hour show. Th, 5/17, 5-7pm. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant

AUDIOBOXX: Rock covers from Billy Idol

to Metallica in the brewery. F, 5/18, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino; 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

BUCK FORD BAND: Live country originals and covers. F, 5/18, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino; 4020 Olive Hwy at Gold Country Casino & Hotel in Oroville; (530) 534-9892; www.gold countrycasino.com.

CITIZENS FOR COMPASSIONATE USE CONCERT: Eat, drink and dance to music by

Second Hand Smoke at this concert to benefit CCU and their campaign to vote “no” on Measure A. F, 5/18, 611:30pm. $5. Arc Pavilion; 2040 Park Ave.; (425) 273-6409.

FRIDAY NIGHT CONCERT: GRAVYBRAIN: The weekly concert series kicks off with local funk fusion band Gravybrain. F, 5/18, 7-8:30pm. Free. Chico City Plaza; 400 Main St.

HOPE CENTER BENEFIT CONCERT: Acoustic

JOHN TRENALONE: Jazz and Broadway

standards. F, 6:30-8:30pm through 10/26. Free. Johnnie’s Restaurant; 220 W. Fourth St. inside Hotel Diamond; (530) 895-1515; www.johnniesrestau rant.com.

RETROTONES: Classic rock covers. F, 5/18, 9pm. Tackle Box Bar & Grill; 375 E. Park Ave.; (530) 345-7499.

grass act, Hot Buttered Rum now specializes in “fiddle-accented Americana rock.” Alli Battaglia & the Musical Brewing Company open. F, 5/18, 9pm. $13-$15. El Rey Theatre; 230 W. Second St.; (530) 342-2727.

IRISH MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradi-

country music. F, 5/18, 9:30pm. Free. Colusa Casino Resort; 3770 Hwy. 45 in Colusa; (530) 458-8844; www.colusa casino.com.

TRIPLE TREE: Down-tempo electronica. F, 5/18, 6pm. $5. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre; (530) 514-8888; http://liveat flo.weebly.com.

SING FOR A CURE: A musical benefit for Relay 4 Life featuring Paisani, Ha’ Penny Bridge, Chris Hutchins and Rhett Spears, David Zink and more. Call for more info. F, 5/18, 7-11pm. $10. Paradise Grange Hall; 5704 Chapel Dr. in Paradise; (530) 877-7500.

music with Todd Agnew and Jonny Diaz to benefit the Hope Center. F, 5/18, 6pm. $20. Oroville State Theatre; 1489 Myers St. in Oroville; (530) 538-2470.

HOT BUTTERED RUM: Originally a blue-

TOM DRINNON: A night of honky-tonk

SLY FOX: Classic rock covers in the

lounge. F, 5/18, 8:30pm. Free. Feather Falls Casino; 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfalls casino.com.

SPY PICNIC: Classic rock covers from

tion: Friday night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffys Tavern; 337 Main St.; (530) 3437718.

19SATURDAY ONE LOVE CONCERT: Live reggae music all day with Yami Bolo, X Sample, Ginjah, Roundhead and more. Also includes food, vendors and activities. Sa, 5/19, 12-9pm. Free. Martin Luther King Jr. Park; 2921 B St. in Oroville; (530) 2822346.

BUCK FORD BAND: Live country originals

Queen to the Beatles. F, 5/18, 8pm. $5. LaSalles; 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891.

and covers. Sa, 5/19, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino; 4020 Olive Hwy at

THE GOLDEN GHOSTS

THE JEFF PERSHING BAND: Chico’s master of worldly funk. F, 5/18, 8pm. The End

Tonight, May 17 Origami Lounge SEE THURSDAY

Zone; 250 Cohasset Rd.; (530) 345-7330.

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NIGHTLIFE

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 30 LOS CABALLITOS DEL CANCION: A traditional nine-piece Mexican music ensemble featuring an all-star lineup of local musicians. Hot Potato opens. Sa, 5/19, 7pm. $10. Paradise Grange Hall; 5704 Chapel Dr. in Paradise; (530) 873-1370.

THE RETROTONES: Classic rock covers. Sa, 5/19, 9pm. Studio Inn Cocktail

Lounge; 2582 Esplanade; (530) 3430662.

SLY FOX: Classic rock covers in the

lounge. Sa, 5/19, 8:30pm. Free. Feather Falls Casino; 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfalls casino.com.

HOT BUTTERED RUM Friday, May 18 El Rey Theatre SEE FRIDAY

Gold Country Casino & Hotel in Oroville; (530) 534-9892; www.gold countrycasino.com.

ENVELOPE PEASANT & THE SCIENTIFIC ORCHESTRA: CD-release party for the acoustic quartet fronted by prolific local songwriter Sean Harrasser. Portland’s Run On Sentence, Crashed Giraffe and Broken Rodeo open. Sa, 5/19, 8pm. $7. Origami Lounge; 7th and Cherry streets.

GUITAR PROJECT: Warren Haskell’s showcase of local and visiting classical guitar masters. Sa, 5/19, 7pm. $5-$10.

1078 Gallery; 820 Broadway; (530) 343-1973; www.1078gallery.org.

HOPELESS JACK & THE HANDSOME DEVIL: A “roots ’n’ roll” two-piece

band from Portland. Sa, 5/19, 7pm. $5. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre; (530) 514-8888; http://liveatflo.weebly.com.

THE JEFF PERSHING BAND: Chico’s

master of worldly funk. Sa, 5/19, 5pm. Scooters Cafe; 11975 State Hwy. 70 in Oroville; (530) 534-4644.

KYLE WILLIAMS: Singer-songwriter Kyle Williams performs with a full band to celebrate the release of his album She Is. Lish Bills, Sean Martin and Jackie Daum open. Sa, 5/19, 7pm. $10-$12. Paradox Fitness & Martial Arts; 986 East Ave.

TOM DRINNON: A night of honky-tonk

country. Sa, 5/19, 9pm. Free. Colusa Casino Resort; 3770 Hwy. 45 in Colusa; (530) 458-8844; www.colusa casino.com.

ZAC & JAY: Live country music. Sa, 5/19, 9pm. Free. Rolling Hills Casino; 2655 Barham Ave. in Corning; (530) 5283500; www.rollinghillscasino.com.

20SUNDAY JAZZ: Weekly jazz. Su, 4-6pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria; 501 Main St.; (530) 894-3033; www.hasbeans.com.

POST EVENTS ONLINE BY REGISTERING AT

newsreview.com/chico

21MONDAY CALIFORNIA HONEYDROPS: Soulful vocal harmonies, creative instrumentation and a funky, New Orleans dance style. M, 5/21, 7:30pm. $15. Sierra Nevada Big Room; 1075 East 20th St.; (530) 3452739; www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: Carey Robinson hosts a jazz happy hour every Monday. M, 5-7pm. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre; (530) 514-8888; http://liveatflo.weebly.com.

22TUESDAY AARON JAQUA: An open singer-song-

writer night. Tu, 7-9pm. Free. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre; (530) 514-8888; http://liveatflo.weebly.com.

GravyBrain open. W, 5/23, 9pm. $3. LaSalles; 229 Broadway; (530) 893-1891.

OPEN JAM NIGHT: Join the jam. Drum kit, bass rig, guitar amp and PA system are provided, bring your own instruments. All ages until 10. W, 7pm. Free. Italian Garden; 6929 Skyway in Paradise; (530) 876-9988; www.my space.com/theitaliangarden.

kicks off their national tour at Origami. Into the Open Earth, Hearses and Cold Blue Mountain open. W, 5/23, 8pm. $5. Origami Lounge; 7th and Cherry streets.

THIRD SEVEN: Ambient, experimental acoustic music. Texas and Ole Tone open. W, 5/23, 7:30pm. $5. Bustolinis Deli & Coffee House; 800 Broadway St.; (530) 892-1790.

SALSA BELLA: Live Salsa music in the

restaurant. W, 8-11pm. Tortilla Flats; 2601 Esplanade; (530) 345-6053.

SOLO JAZZ: Every Wednesday with Carey Robinson. W, 4-7pm. Free. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre; (530) 514-8888; http://liveat flo.weebly.com.

TEEPH: The experimental metal band

MOETAR

Wednesday, May 23 LaSalles SEE WEDNESDAY

23WEDNESDAY TRIPLE BILL: Acoustic folk with Kate

Tansey, Aamir Malik and Loki Miller. W, 5/23, 8pm. $5. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre; (530) 514-8888; http://liveatflo.weebly.com.

MOETAR: Chico’s prog-iest sons Clouds on Strings kick off their summer tour with a one-night stand at Lasalles. Oakland’s MoeTar and locals

May 17, 2012

CN&R 41


treat yourself to gift certificates up to

75% off

ARTS DEVO Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

NOT TOO CALIENTE TO PARTY Arts DEVO’s pale skin

was not made to come in contact with the sun’s rays. What would have been minimal exposure for most mortals has turned into more than one trip to the hospital over the years of my life. (Like the time I thought I didn’t need sunscreen while snorkeling for an hour at the lake and two days later had to lie in a bathtub filled with ice to keep from going insane from pain.) Poor me. Pass the SPF 500. It’s too bad, too, because I really do love the hot weather. It reminds me of the long Redding summers of my childhood, riding my bike for days across town, or driving out to the rope swing at Whiskeytown Lake, sticking to the red vinyl in my uncle’s black Dodge Rambler. I especially enjoy it when everyone is out in the heat together, and this past 90-plus Saturday, after a morning of yard-sale hopping, Mrs. DEVO and I braved the mid-afternoon brightness with a few hundred locals gathered at the old Matador Motel for the second annual Arts Fiesta. It was the perfect pre-summer shindig, browsing a big collection of local arts and crafts spread out across the grounds. Especially fun were the individual artist galleries that took up residence in the funky motel’s rooms (out of the path of the sun’s poison), many with intricately tiled showers that were as impressive as any art on display. Favorite stops included Pat Collentine and Susan Larsen’s room with its plants and critters laser-etched onto wood, and Sea Monster’s fantasyland of paintings, photos, tiny motel beds, and interactive typewriting and label-making.

DISPENSING PROPER RECOGNITIONS It is about time I printed kudos to some locals who are making things happen, both inside and outside the Chico bubble:

Tacos Mary

Wok ‘n Roll

•Way to go, Vanessa Larsen, for representing Chico as one of the 100 amateur chefs on MasterChef, the Fox reality show where Gordon Ramsey runs contestants through various cooking challenges. See how she does during the season premiere: Monday, June 4, at 9 p.m. •Big ups to tattoo artist Zac Black of Red Room Tattoo for selling his handmade tattoo machines all over the country. Check out his Z Machines at www.facebook.com/zmachines and contact the Z himself at zmachines13@live.com for info on ordering one of his badass designs for yourself. •A hearty “Hell yes!” to local writer/performer/mortician Kyle Bowen for reading his work on National Public Radio during what have become regular appearances on the storytelling program Snap Judgment. Search Zac Black’s tattoo machines. “Kyle Bowen” at www.snapjudgment.org to hear his stories, like the one about the apprentice embalmer’s first time spending the night alone with a dead body. (And, hear him live at The Last Stand—May 25-26.)

View dozens of choices available now at

•Congrats and good luck to some new/newish businesses being creative for Chico: “Metaphysical/New Age books” at 100th Monkey Bookstore (830 Broadway). Yoga and art (yog-art?) at the Rise Yoga Movement studio (1441-C Park Ave.)—visit www.facebook.com/riseyoga movement for yoga info. Used clothing boutique and local art at the new home of Boho, in the Garden Walk. (And that’s not to forget the already repped new thrift/consignment shop Funky Trunk at First and Mangrove avenues and the should’ve-been-more-repped-long-ago Cocoon resale boutique at 1431 Park Ave.)

GIFT CERTIFICATES FROM RESTAURANTS, RETAIL, SALONS, GOLF, VACATIONS & MORE

•A huge “Yeah!” and heartfelt thank you to Shigemi Minetaka and CN&R colleague Christine LaPado for their soulful, keyboard-and-standupbass, sundown, jazz duet in the City Plaza last Thursday—from the shadows of the barely lit plaza stage, providing the perfect transitional soundtrack from the winding-down Thursday Night Market to the encroaching downtown nightlife.

www.newsreview.com 42 CN&R May 17, 2012


Find Us Online At:

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HOUSES

APARTMENTS/DUPLEXES/TOWNHOUSES

this paper.$400

Location

Bd/Ba

1339 1/2 Magnolia Ave Studio 1161 Citrus Ave #E 1/1 1001 Sycamore St #A 1/1 1149 Olive St #10 2/1

Rent

Dep.

$550 $550 $675

$500 $650 $650 $775

Location

Bd/Ba

803 W. 2nd Ave #1, 8 2270 Notre Dame Blvd #5 1175 E. 8th St. #3 1245 Esplanade Ave. #12

4/2 2/1 1/1 1/1

Rent

Dep.

$850 $700 $575 $550

$950 $800 $675 $650

Location

Bd/Ba

Rent

2404 North Ave #A 3/1 $1100 9546 Cummings (Durham) 3/1.5 $1450 2320 Floral Ave. 3/2 $1100 1515 E. 1st Ave 3/2 $1300 368 E. 8th St. 2/1 $850 802 Walnut Ave 3/1 $975 2404 North Ave #A 3/1 $1000

Dep.

$1200 $1550 $1200 $1400 $950 $1075 $2000

1382 Longfellow Ave. Chico

RELIABLE

PRoPeRty MAnAgeMent

895-1733 | www.reliableproperty.com Info subject to change. Please do not disturb tenants. We will schedule the appointment.

Amazing Views of Chico

Private setting on 5 acres, just 20 minutes out of Chico. Three bed, two bath. $298,000

Alice Zeissler

www.AtoZchico.com

518-1872

new listing

Steve Kasprzyk (Kas-per-zik)

Sweet set up in Butte Meadows. Get out of the heat in the summer or use as base for winter activities. Beautifully redone cabin that sleeps 8 and a bunk house or shop. 7550 watt generator, rv pad with power and dump, 20x8 storage container,and much more. Only $175,000.00. Owner will carry.

Homes Sold Last Week SQ. FT.

Steve Kasprzyk 530-518-4850

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

2643 Chantel Way

Chico

$325,000

3/ 2

2139

1882 Bedford Dr

Chico

$190,000

3/ 2

SQ. FT. 1312

4316 Keith Ln

Chico

$247,000

4/ 3

1792

66 Oak Dr

Chico

$159,000

3/ 1

1222

721 Lawn Dr

Chico

$228,000

4/ 2

1730

1014 Sheridan Ave

Chico

$136,000

3/ 2

1785

21 Quista Dr

Chico

$224,000

4/ 2

1792

1419 Chestnut St

Chico

$134,000

2/ 1

855

19 Marci Way

Chico

$215,000

3/ 2

1391

422 Hickory St

2 Tilden Ln

Chico

$208,000

3/ 2.5

1318

9032 Goodspeed St

13200 Hamilton Nord Cana Hwy

Chico

$193,000

3/ 1.5

1888

8 Delaware Dr

Chico

$192,500

4/ 2

1727

2135 Mansfield Ct

Chico

$190,500

3/ 2

1215

1825 Indiana St

Chico

$115,500

2/ 1

781

Durham

$555,500

4/ 3

2917

4690 Via Patricio

Forest Ranch

$165,000

3/ 2

1609

15442 Forest Ranch Way

Forest Ranch

$165,000

3/ 2

1690

Gridley

$230,000

4/ 2

2478

May 17, 2012

CN&R 43


Home Week of tHe

OPEN

HOUSE CENTURY 21 JEFFRIES LYDON Sat.11-1, 2-4 115 Zinnia (X St: W. 11th Avenue) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 2300 sq. ft. $375,500 Brandon Siewert 828-4597 Mark Reaman 228-2229

Sat.11-1, 2-4 & Sun.11-1 2680 Guynn Avenue (X St: Henshaw) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1787 sq. ft. $325,000 Mark Reaman 228-2229 Brandon Siewert 828-4597 Ron Kelly 521-3629

Sun.11-1 21 Redeemers Loop (X St: Godman) 4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1916 sq. ft. $320,000 Becky Williams 636-0936

6177 toms trail • $340,000 • magalia

Sat.2-4 & Sun.11-1, 2-4

3/bd 2/ba 1,893 sqft built 1991 3.25 ac. CB1748 Lovely rural property with charming home. Beautiful vaulted redwood greatroom ceiling. Efficient woodstove ( Abundant Black Oak timber on 3.25 acres ). Spacious kitchen opens to living area and dropdown dining room. Convenient split bedroom floorplan. Master bedroom just off kitchen. Large tiled entry with two sliding doors across greatroom with view towards the canyon. Kitchen and both bathrooms feature custom tile work. Covered porch at front to watch the sunrise and nice deck at back to watch the sunset. Inviting hot tub stays with property. Room to park all your toys. Small dog run off garage. Just enough landscaping to give this mountain home a distinctive appeal. Property is almost level and would be easy to develop if desired. PA12059927

278 Pinyon Hills Drive (X St: Lakewest) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 2369 sq. ft. $319,000 Brandi Laffins 321-9562 Ronnie Owen 518-0911

Tom Gagne | 872-5410 | Coldwell Banker | Ponderosa Realty

Sun.2-4 4525 Wilder Drive (X St: Al Road) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1410 sq. ft. $298,000 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Sat.11-1 2965 Kennedy Ave. (X St: Muir Ave.) 3 Bd / 2 Bd / 1518 sq. ft. $298,000 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

Sat.11-1, 2-4 & Sun.11-1, 2-4 33 Edgewater Court (X St: Amanecida Common) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1318 sq. ft. $259,000 Paul Champlin 828-2902 Kimberley Tonge 518-5508 Johnny Klinger 864-3398

Sat.11-1 1951 Belgium Ave. (X St: Zachary) 3 Bd / 2 1/2 Ba, 1366 sq. ft. $224,300 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

CENTURY 21 SELECT-PARADISE

Sat.11-1, 2-4 & Sun.11-1, 2-4

Sun. 1-4

822 Teagarden Court (X St: Winkle Drive) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1780 sq. ft. $309,000 Emmett Jacobi 519-6333 Kimberley Tonge 518-5508 Steve Kasprzyk 518-4850

78 Silverado Trail (x St. Bald Rock Rd) Berry Creek 3 Bd /2Ba. 1600 sq. ft. $189,900 Ginny Snider 872-6814

Country 3bd/2ba on .49 ac $199k 3bd/2.5ba on 1.6 ac Keifer Area $399k!

GREAT PRICE FOR A BUILDABLE LOT IN CORNING... $28,500 All Utilities & Sewer

894-4503

SMILES ALWAYS

Russ Hammer

HAMMERSELLS@SBCGLOBAL.NET

JOYCE TURNER 571-7719

jturner@century21chico.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of April 30, 2012 — May 4, 2012. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

730 Flyway Ct

Gridley

$170,000

4/ 2.5

SQ. FT. 2093

3474 Glen Ave

ADDRESS

Oroville

$142,000

4/ 2.5

SQ. FT. 2099

508 W Liberty Rd

Gridley

$123,000

3/ 2

1210

46 Skyline Blvd

Oroville

$132,000

3/ 2.5

1354

6153 Showdown Cir

Magalia

$180,000

3/ 1.5

1644

1380 10th St

Oroville

$110,000

3/ 2

1276

6454 Firhaven Dr

Magalia

$115,000

2/ 1.5

1450

315 Lodgeview Dr

Oroville

$105,000

3/ 2

1573

12 Gleness Dr

Oroville

$243,500

4/ 3

2185

5968 Maxwell Dr

Paradise

$430,000

2/ 1

800

2910 Foothill Blvd

Oroville

$187,000

3/ 1.5

2291

6161 Cliff Dr

Paradise

$250,000

2/ 2.5

1743

168 Lodgeview Dr

Oroville

$184,500

3/ 2

2042

6660 Shay Ln

Paradise

$208,000

3/ 2

2745

2530 Oro Quincy Hwy

Oroville

$150,000

3/ 1.5

1969

6130 Berkshire Way

Paradise

$121,500

2/ 1.5

1333

30 Hunter Dr

Oroville

$149,500

3/ 2

1583

925 Wagstaff Rd

Paradise

$110,000

2/ 1

1033

44 CN&R May 17, 2012


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95928. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: RODRIGO QUINTERO Dated: April 18, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000602 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2012

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FAMILY PLANNING PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (AAN CAN)

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SEEKING MUSICIANS Journeyman Drummer/ Percussionist Backbeat pocket-style. Have rehearsal space, looking for others to jam. 331-4639

INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE Wanted Older Guitars! Martin, Fender, Gibson. Also older Fender amps. Pay up to $2,000. 916-966-1900

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES MAKE $35,000/YEAR Sign company avail on easy terms. Half off current value, 40 years same phone#, 20 years same location. Great client base, no ads or cold calls required. Owner will carry, interest free. Call Charles, 343-2543 MAKE $35,000/YEAR Sign company avail on easy terms. Half off current value, 40 years same phone#, 20 years same location. Great client base, no ads or cold calls required. Owner will carry, interest free. Call Charles, 343-2543

ROOMS FOR RENT ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN) SHARE LARGE HOME Enjoy large bedroom, large private bath, living room, storage, private entrance, share kitchen & utilities with owner, ret. prof. man at other end of house. $350. Additional small bedroom avail for additional $100. Ideal for single parent and child. 530-566-1092

APARTMENT RENTALS ChicoApts.com

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Pine Tree Apts 893-8616 Oak Meadow Apts 898-1450 Mission Ranch 892-0400 Villa Risa 636-4622 Built, Owned & Managed by MWSproperties.com

1983 Full-sized Chevy Blazer. All original. Most factory options. Very well kept condition. 530-895-8171 Audi 1996 A6 Quattro 4WD, automatic, 4door, CC, PW/PD, CD, ski storage, new tires, runs great, $4900. 186K mi. 530-570-5113 New Prius Are Here! 50 MPG, best warrantee, 2 year service free, call Lee McKim, Hybrid Specialist, at 530-354-7782 at Chuck Patterson Toyota.

CLASSICS 1970 MGB Classic Convertible Restored, pristine condition. All records. $8,995.00. 530-345-9373 Days or Evenings.

$25 special. Full-body Massage for Men. In-Calls, Out-Calls Now avail. By Appointment. CMT, 530-680-1032

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in a warm tranquil studio. w/ Shower, $35 deal. Appts. 530-893-0263 11am-8pm

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FT Customer Service trainee position starting at $10hr, no experience needed. Type 25wpm, Knowledge of html a plus. 894-6441 Help Wanted!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.theworkhub.net (AAN CAN)

AUTOS

ITEMS FOR SALE GREENSTAR JUICER Used 12 times $125. 342-6827

FURNITURE HANDCRAFTED PINE TABLE By David Easley, 72Hx20WX17D, $135. 342-6827 SOLID LIGHT OAK TABLE 2 chairs, 25x28 expands to 39x28, excellent condition, $55. 342-6827

WANTED TO BUY CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CLEAR WATER POOL at 3012 California Park Dr. Chico, CA 95928. TOM ESTRELLA, 3012 California Park Dr. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: THOMAS ESTRELLA Dated: April 20, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000613 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ECOMAX CALIFORNIA at 25 Chaparral Dr. Oroville, CA 95966. BARRY DEDITCH, 25 Chaparral Dr. Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: BARRY DEDITCH Dated: April 3, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000514 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NORTHERN CALIFORNIA SOCIAL SECURITY ADVOCATES at 341 Broadway #405, Chico, CA 95928. MARY MARGARET GALVIN, KEVIN MARK HENDREN, 318 Flume St. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: MARY GALVIN Dated: April 11, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000558 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NOVA DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES, NVDS INC at 1494 Arch Way, Chico, CA 95973. NORTH VALLEY DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES INC, 1494 Arch Way, Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: GARY GREEN Dated: April 16, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000584 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JACKS FAMILY RESTAURANT at 540 Main St. Chico, CA 95928. MARTIN GARCIA, TELMA GARCIA, MTG MANAGEMENT, 5 Sterling Ct. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: TELMA GARCIA Dated: April 12, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000566 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as IRON HORSE STATION, IRON HORSE STATION AND STORE, IRON HORSE STORE at 3688 Durham Dayton Hwy, Chico, CA 95927. DALE OWENS FREEMAN, 1818 Nord Ave. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: Dale Owens Freeman Dated: April 16, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000581 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GRUB GROWN at 1525 Dayton Rd. Chico, CA 95928. SHERRI SCOTT, 1525 Dayton Rd. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: SHERRI SCOTT Dated: March 23, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000464 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TRUNK INSURANCE SERVICES at 4061 Port Chicago Hwy, Suite H, Concord, CA 94520. ALLIED RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE SERVICES INC, 4061 Port Chicago Hwy, Suite H, Concord, CA 94520. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MYSTI MATTHEWS Dated: April 12, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000565 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as TACOS TONAYA NO 2 at 244 Walnut #C, Chico, CA 95928. MARIA G QUINTERO, RODRIGO O QUINTERO, 1372 Humboldt Ave. Chico, CA

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BEYOND THE BARN at 2279 Nord Ave. Chico, CA 95926. LAURA MARIE HAZEL, 1785 Heron Lane, Chico, CA 95926 This business is conducted by

this Legal Notice continues

this Legal Notice continues

an individual. Signed: LAURA M HAZEL Dated: April 11, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000561 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name EMPIRE COFFEE at 434 Orange St. Chico, CA 95928. ANDREW TERRELL, MEREDITH KELLEY, 454 E 8th St. Chico, CA 95928. This business was conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: MEREDITH KELLEY Dated: April 23, 2012 FBN Number: 2008-0001443 Published: April 23, May 3,10,17, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as EMPIRE COFFEE at 434 Orange St. Chico, CA 95928. LINDSAY BROTHERS, 925 Arbutus Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: LINDSAY BROTHERS Dated: April 23, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000619 Published: April 26, May 3,10,17, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as INDAY’S at 1490 Heritage Oak Dr. Chico, CA 95928. ETHEL CABAHIT GEIGER, JOHN DAVID GEIGER, 1490 Heritage Oak Dr. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: ETHEL C GEIGER Dated: March 9, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000380 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as IKE’S SMOKE HOUSE at 13670 Anderson Bros. Dr., Chico, CA 95973. ISAAC WARREN ANDERSON, KRYSTIN ANDERSON, 805 Oak Lawn Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: ISAAC ANDERSON Dated: April 27, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000652 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DELLIPROOF at 1134 W 5th St. Chico, CA 95928. ALEX THOMAS FORTIS, 1134 W 5th St. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: ALEX FORTIS Dated: April 9, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000550 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AUSTIN BROTHERS at 3217 Cohasset Rd. #120, Chico, CA 95973. CEA INVESTMENTS LLC, 6154 County Road 200, Orland, CA 95963. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: RANDAL W AUSTIN Dated: April 20, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000616 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SOLID TATTOO MACHINES at 319 Main St. #200, Chico, CA 95928. BEN LUCAS, 31 Dean Way, Chico, Ca 95926. CHRISTOPHER PEPLOW, 985 Salem #1, Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: BEN LUCAS Dated: April 23, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000618 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as FIESTA BELLA at 36 Birdwing Ct. Chico, CA 95973. MARIA DELGADO, 36 Birdwing Ct. Chico, CA 95973. AURORA GUZMAN, 262 Via Mission Dr. Chico, CA 95928 SANDRA C JAUREGUI, 4572 Bell Rd. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: AURORA GUZMAN Dated: April 2, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000503 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ZEN BOTANICALS at 84 Via Morro Ct. Chico, CA 95928. JANIE KUOCH, 84 Via Morro Ct. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: JANIE KUOCH Dated: April 5, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000531 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as FINISHING EDGE at 3150 Highway 32, Chico, CA 95973. ROBERT KONECEK, 1218 Yosemite Dr. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: ROBERT KONECEK Dated: April 24, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000626 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as YOUNG LOVE OUTFITTERS at 2622 Navarro Dr. Chico, CA 95973. KENNETH SWAIN, 2622 Navarro Dr. Chico, CA 95973. DAVID ZOPPI, 1604 Laburnum Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: DAVID ZOPPI Dated: April 25, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000635 Published: May 3,10,27,24, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ANGELS IN STONE at 28 Jordans Pl. #600, Chico, CA 95973. LARRY A ATKINS, 28 Jordans Pl. #600, Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: LARRY A ATKINS Dated: April 24, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000625 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO IT SOLUTIONS at 48 Bellarmine Ct. #80, Chico, CA 95928.

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PAYDEN WOMACK, 6581 Rocky Lane, Paradise, CA 95969. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: PAYDEN WOMACK Dated: April 18, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000596 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name CHICO IT SOLUTIONS at 2260 St. George Lane #2 Chico, CA 95926. ESLEY JEROME SHAFFER, 6403 Corning Ct. Magalia, CA 95954. This business was conducted by an individual. Signed: ESLEY SHAFFER Dated: April 18, 2012 FBN Number: 2008-0001099 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE KALE LEAF at 1083 Sierra Vista Way, Chico, CA 95928. PRAIRIE Y FRANCIA, 1083 Sierra Vista Way, Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed PRAIRIE Y FRANCIA Dated: April 13, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000570 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as HOUSING TOOLS at 815 Alice Lane, Chico, CA 95926. JAMES ROBERT COLES, 815 Alice Lane, Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: JAMES COLES Dated: May 4, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000683 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as VIVA ROLLER DERBY at 2636 Burnap Ave. Chico, CA 95973. NICOLA BEATTS, 657 E 6th St. Chico, CA 95926 BRITTANY MICHELS, 1670 Kenford Way, Paradise, CA 95969. BRITTNEY MURRAY, 1550 Springfield Dr. #63, Chico, CA 95928. WENDY WILSON, 2636 Burnap Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: BRITTNEY MURRAY Dated: April 10, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000556 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MERIAM PARK at 539 Flume St. #200 Chico, CA 95928. THOMAS DIGIOVANNI, 578 Vallombrosa Way, Chico, CA 95926. JEFF FLEEMAN, 565 Connecticut St. San Francisco, CA 94107. This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. Signed: THOMAS DIGIOVANNI Dated: April 20, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000615 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012

CLASSIFIEDS

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May, 17 2012

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name CHICO NATURAL SOLUTION FOR CHRONIC CONDITIONS at 4D Williamsburg Lane, Chico, CA 95926. JAMES H SCHWARTZ, 1603 E Lassen Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business was conducted by an individual. Signed: JAMES H SCHWARTZ Dated: May 4, 2012 FBN Number: 20-7-0002054 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TWIN CREEK COMPANY at 11706 Centerville Rd. Chico, CA 95928. DEBRA HALL FREEMAN, 11706 Centerville Rd. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: DEBRA FREEMAN Dated: April 3, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000434 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DIAMOND DETAIL at 1005 Liberty Lane, Chico, CA 95928. DONNA MORGADO, 1005 Liberty Lane, Chico, Ca 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: DONNA MORGADO Dated: April 24, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000628 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as RICO’S MEXICAN FOOD at 900 Cherry St. Chico, CA 95928. JOSE ANTONIO FLORES, 900 Cherry St. Chico, CA 95928. EDWARD DANIEL ZUNIGA, 901 Walnut St. Corning, CA 96021. This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. Signed: Jose Antonio Flores Dated: May 2, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000673 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GOODWIN INVESTMENT GROUP LP at 647 W 4th Ave. Chico, CA 95928. DAN OSTRANDER 475 Lakeshore Blvd. #4, Incline Village, NV 89451. This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. Signed: DAN OSTRANDER Dated: May 1, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000669 Published: May 10,17,24,32, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ELAINE PEGG ADULT DAY CENTER at 5325 Black Olive Dr. Paradise, CA 95969. THE ARC OF BUTTE COUNTY INC. 2030 Park Ave. Chico, CA 95928 This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MICHAEL MCGINNIS Dated: April 25, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000637 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as HONEY RUN

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46 CN&R May 17, 2012

QUILTERS at 2418 Cohasset Rd. Chico, CA 95926. CATHY ANN JENKS, DANIEL SCOTT JENKS, 14444 Richardson Springs Rd. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: DAN JENKS Dated: April 6, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000539 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PLANET LANDSCAPE at 2586 Ludlum Ave. Palermo, CA 95968. SHAWN WAYNE DAVIS, 2586 Ludlum Ave. Palermo CA 95968. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: SHAWN DAVIS Dated: April 25, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000643 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as LAKE HOUSE MEDIA LLC at 500 N Rainbow Blvd. #300A, Las Vegas, NV 89107. LAKE HOUSE MEDIA LLC, 500 N Rainbow Blvd. #300A, Las Vegas, NV, 89107. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DUSTIN KRAUSE Dated: April 18, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000603 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as NUTRISHOP CHICO EAST AVE at 855 East Ave. #220, Chico, CA 95926. BURTON AND SHEPPARD LLC, 1208 Bidwell Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: DARCI BURTON Dated: May 9, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000709 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as DRINK DOTS at 645 Betty Belle Lane, Chico, CA 95973. JOHN SHERN, 645 Betty Belle Lane, Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: JOHN SHERN Dated: April 25, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000641 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PUBLIC SCHOOLS UTILITY BUYERS’ GROUP at 4139 Willow Landing, Chico, CA 95928. CLIFF JOHNSEN, 4139 Willow Landing, Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: CLIFF JOHNSEN Dated: May 7, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000695 Published: May 17,24,32, June 7, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WESTERN PACIFIC CAFE AND CATERING at 2191 High St. Oroville, Ca 95966. AMANDA CORONA, 2925 S Villa Ave. Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: AMANDA CORONA Dated: May 8, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000707 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons is doing business as GRINDSTONE OUTFITTERS at 3114 Michael Way Chico, CA 95973. Brendan Christopher Smith 3114 Michael Way, Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: BRENDAN SMITH Dated: May 9, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000708 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2012 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as CHICO COMPUTER CLINIC at 1304 Mangrove Ave. Chico, CA 95926. KYLE M SILLIMAN, 3456 Hackamore Lane, Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: KYLE SILLIMAN Dated: April 18, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000597 Published: May 17,24,31, June 7, 2012

NOTICES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JANELLE ST.CLAIR and THOMAS PEET filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: Jacob Nathaniel Crosthwaite Proposed name: Jacob Nathaniel St.Clair THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 8, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Robert Glusman Dated: April 20, 2012 Case Number: 156523 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2012 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner JAMES CHRISANTO SALAZ filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: JAMES CHRISANTO SALAZ Proposed name: JAMES JETT GREYWOLF THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

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NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 1, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Robert Glusman Dated: April 30, 2012 Case Number: 156458 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner CARLI PEARL SMITH filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: EMMA MARIE LARABEE Proposed name: EMMA MARIE JOHNS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: June 1, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Barbara Roberts Dated: April 16, 2012 Case Number: 156548 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: GINGER A HARLOFF aka GINGER MATHIS aka GINGON HARLOFF, an individual, and Does 1-100, inclusive. YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: PERSOLVE, LLC, A Limited liability company, dba, ACCOUNT RESOLUTION ASSOCIATES. NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal

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CITATION FOR PUBLICATION UNDER WELFARE AND INSTITUTIONS CODE SECTION 294 CHILDS NAME: XMG Case Numbers: J-35747 To: JIMMY P PALMER and anyone claiming to be a parent of XMG born on September 24, 2010 at Enloe Hospital, Chico, CA. A hearing will be held: Date: July 5, 2012 at 8:30 a.m. Dept: TBA Room: TBA The address of the court is Superior Court of California, County of Butte, Juvenile Branch 1 Court Street, Oroville, CA 95965. At the hearing the court will consider the recommendations of the social worker or probation officer. The social worker or probation officer will recommend that your child be freed from your legal custody so that the child may be adopted. If the court follows the recommendation, all your parental rights to the child will be terminated. You are required to be present at the hearing, to present evidence, and you have the right to be represented by an attorney. If you do not have an attorney and cannot afford one, the court will appoint an attorney for you. If the court terminates your parental rights, the order may be final. The court will proceed with this hearing whether or not you are present. Dated: April 27, 2012 Signed: Kimberly Flener Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: RICH W MILLER aka RICHARD W MILLER aka RICHARD H MILLER, an individual, and Does 1-100, inclusive. YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: PERSOLVE, LLC, A Limited liability company, dba, ACCOUNT RESOLUTION ASSOCIATES. NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court.

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There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: BUTTE COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Alaine Patti-Jelsvik PERSOLVE, LLC dba Account Resolution Associates 9301 Winnetka Ave. Suite B Chatsworth, CA 91311 (818)534-3100 Dated: July 21, 2011 Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 154297 Published: May 10,17,24,31, 2012

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SUMMONS

requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The Court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: BUTTE COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT 655 Oleander Avenue, Chico, CA 95926 The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is: Alaine Patti-Jelsvik PERSOLVE, LLC dba Account Resolution Associates 9301 Winnetka Ave. Suite B Chatsworth, CA 91311 (818)534-3100 Dated: July 20, 2011 Signed: Kimberly Flener Case Number: 154291 Published: May 3,10,17,24, 2012

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): Is

there a difference in sound quality between relatively inexpensive modern violins and the multi-million-dollar violins created by master craftsmen in the 1700s? In research done at the Eighth International Violin Competition, most violinists couldn’t tell them apart. (Read more at http://tinyurl.com/violinresearch.) In accordance with the astrological omens, Aries, I urge you to do comparable tests in your own sphere. There’s no need to overpay for anything, either with your money, your emotions, your energy, or your time. Go with what works, not with what costs the most or has highest status.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If we thought of your life as a book, the title of the next chapter could very well be “In Quest of the Primal.” I encourage you to meditate on what that means to you, and then act accordingly. Here are a few possibilities: tapping into the mother lode; connecting to the source; communing with the core; returning to beginnings; seeking out the original; being in tune with the pulse of nature. Does any of that sound like fun? According to my reading of the astrological omens, you have a mandate to be as raw as the law allows—to be the smartest animal you can be.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A Russian

woman named Marija Usova decided to go skydiving even though she was eight months pregnant. “I wanted my baby to have the beautiful feeling of flying through the air and free-falling before it was born,” she said. Soon after she jumped out of the plane and opened her parachute, she went into labor. Luckily, her daughter waited until she landed to be born. What does this have to do with you? I don’t recommend you do anything even remotely like what Usova did in the next few weeks. But do be alert for healthier, saner approaches to the basic theme, which is to be adventurous and wild and free as you birth a new possibility.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You spend

nearly one-third of your life sleeping. For one-fifth of that time, you’re dreaming. So pretty much every night, you watch and respond to as much as 90 minutes worth of movies created by and starring you. Much of this footage is obscure and confusing and not exactly Oscar-worthy, which is one reason you may not recall many of the details when you wake up. But according to my astrological analysis, the immediate future could be different. Your dreams should be full of riveting entertainment that reveals important information about the mysteries of your destiny. Please consider keeping a pen and notebook near your bed, or a small recording device.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): It’s Oxymoron

Season for you. That means you’re likely to encounter more than your usual share of sweet and sour paradoxes. The logic-loving areas of your brain will almost certainly have to seek assistance from your nonrational wisdom. I’ll give you a heads-up on some of the lucid riddles you should be ready to embrace: 1. a humbling triumph; 2. a tender rivalry; 3. a selfish blessing; 4. an opportunity to commune with risky comfort; 5. an invitation to explore a relaxing challenge; 6. a chance to get up-close and personal with a long-distance connection. For best results, Leo, memorize these lines from Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass and recite them periodically: “Do I contradict myself? / Very well then I contradict myself. / I am large, I contain multitudes.”

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): There’s at least

a 50 percent chance that the coming days will be over-the-top, out-of-the-blue, and off-the-record. I’m half-expecting florid, luscious, and kaleidoscopic events, possibly even rococo, swashbuckling, and splendiferous adventures. Are you ready for all this? Of course not. That’s the point life will be trying to make: nudging you to learn more about the fine art of spontaneity as you

Glass master

by Rob Brezsny improvise your way through unpredictable lessons that will lead you toward the resources you’ll need to succeed.

story and photo by Vic Cantu

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Obsessions.

vscantu@sbcg lobal.net

Enchantments. Crushes. Manias. Fetishes. Some astrologers think you Libras are mostly immune from these indelicate but sometimes delightful modes of human expression. They seem to believe that you love harmony and balance too much to fall under the spell of a bewitching passion that rivets your focus. I disagree with that view. It may be true that you’re better able than the other signs to be objective about your fixations. But that doesn’t necessarily dilute the intensity you feel when they rise up and captivate your imagination with the force of a thousand love songs. My advice? Have fun and stay amused.

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SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “The chains

that bind us most closely are the ones we have broken,” said Scorpio poet Antonio Porchia. In other words, the oppression from which we have freed ourselves may continue to influence us long after we’ve escaped. The imprint it left on our sensitive psyches might keep distorting our decisions and twisting our emotions. But I’m here to tell you, Scorpio, that you’re entering a time when you have an enhanced power to dissolve the lingering taint your broken chains still impose. You finally have the resources and wisdom to complete the liberation process.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In

the coming weeks, you will have an excellent chance to develop more skill in the art of high gossip. High gossip has almost nothing in common with the mindless prattle that erodes reputations and fosters cynicism. It’s not driven by envy, pettiness, or schadenfreude. When you engage in high gossip, you spread uplifting whispers and inspirational hearsay; you speculate about people’s talents and call attention to their successes; you conspire to awaken generosity of spirit and practical idealism. High gossip is a righteous approach to chatting about the human zoo. It might not flow as easily as the cheap and shabby kind—at least at first—but it lasts a whole lot longer and creates connections that help keep your mental hygiene sparkling clean.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

Sometimes I have a dream that seems cryptic or meaningless when I first wake up, but a few days later I realize it was a brilliant insight into what I most needed to transform about my life. If you don’t recall many of your dreams, that might not be a familiar experience for you. But you’ve probably had waking-life experiences with a similar arc. I predict you will be given at least one of those in the coming week. It may confound you while you’re in the midst of it, but will eventually reveal choice clues that have the power to change your life for the better.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You may

not have heard about the “forbidden colors.” And you certainly haven’t seen them, even though they exist. They’re reddish green and yellowish blue, which the cells of your retina are not built to register. However, scientists have figured out a trick by which these hues can be made visible. A few lucky people have actually caught a glimpse of them. I bring this to your attention, Aquarius, because I suspect you are close to experiencing a metaphorical version of this breakthrough—seeing something that is supposedly impossible to see. (If you’d like to read more about the forbidden colors, visit http://tinyurl.com/forbidden colors.)

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “There’s no

such thing as a wrong note,” said jazz pianist Art Tatum. “It all depends on how you resolve it.” Jazz trumpeter Miles Davis had a similar philosophy. “It’s not the note you play that’s the wrong note,” he said. “It’s the note you play afterwards that makes it right or wrong.” I think that’s an excellent understanding for you to keep in mind during the coming weeks, Pisces. Be wary of coming to premature conclusions about alleged mistakes. Wait to hear the entire song and see the bigger picture.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Are you really the only person who can erase these ugly scratches?

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of May 17, 2012

Yes. As far as I know I’m the only person from Yuba City to the Oregon border who does this. It’s odd because I counted over 90 downtown businesses that have these scratches. I buff them out, then polish the glass. You can only notice it if you look at the window sideways; then you can see a slight wavy area. I’m sure I’ll have competition soon but I’m not worried.

Why do people scratch windows? Some are random or juvenile nonsense. Dogs even scratch home windows trying to get in. But most of them are gang symbols to mark territory. It makes the tagged businesses seem like they’re advertising for gangs. People use rocks, rings or diamond tools. I’m doing my best to keep downtown clean.

How did you get started? I heard about it being done in big California cities, so I handed out 40 cards to scratched

downtown businesses. Thirty said they were interested, so four months ago I got a loan and bought a kit to do it. So far I’ve done seven businesses, like Fleet Feet Sports, Trucker, Cyclesport and The Fashion Lounge. Chico’s graffiti eradication unit even hired me for a job. I’ve been a window washer for 15 years and now split my time between both. My years of hard work and perseverance are finally paying off. When I get busier I’ll hire another window cleaner and want to expand to surrounding counties.

How do people hear about you? I hand out business cards but it’s mostly by word of mouth. I lined up several jobs when people saw me doing Fleet Feet.

What are the advantages of repairing windows instead of replacing them? It’s “green” because every year over 1 million tons of glass are put into landfills that could be recycled. Plus, it takes lots of energy to make new glass. So this is green, saves businesses money and puts a little money in my pocket to help me raise my two young kids.

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter himself@anthonypeytonporter.com

Reality I’ve been having more and more difficulty writing this column. I only have a few ideas, I feel like I’ve worn them out, and ideas don’t interest me much anymore. I can’t concentrate. I could say stuff about the presidential campaigns and all of that, or medical cannabis or nuclear power or our local goofs or even meditation or love or tolerance or consciousness or forgiveness, except when I try to formulate a thought, let alone a sentence, I remember how sick Janice is. Sick doesn’t begin to describe her experience. After tens of thousands of dollars, ours and yours, she’s in constant pain, and the tumor in her brain is starting to affect her vision. At the cancer clinic in Arizona I was with her most of the time. During our second stay I’d sometimes find something to do—often involving Thai food or a thrift store—while she was getting some therapy or other, but mostly I was with her. I just wanted to be there—and still do—although there’s precious little I can do to help her and nothing I can do to make a big difference. I can’t fix her. I’ve never felt more helpless than I do now. I can’t do shit.

Well, not exactly. I can drive her around and carry stuff and run errands and wash dishes and make her alkalizing juice and flush her IV and tell her that I love her, so I do. Big deal. What she needs is a miracle. I’m working on one. I’ve heard that serious illness can be a blessing. I know that blessings can have some of the best disguises, so I suppose that’s possible. Janice’s illness has brought us closer together, and that’s a good thing. It has also made most quotidian bothers fade into the background. I even don’t think nearly so much about what my sons want as I used to. They weren’t asking me to think about them anyway, and letting them fend for themselves means I assign myself fewer tasks, Janice gets more of my limited energy, and they grow up faster. Nice. One cliché I’ve verified is that life-threatening illness clears up what’s important and what isn’t. That’s one reason I don’t pay much attention to politics anymore. I don’t care who wins the presidential election, because there’s not much difference between Obama and Romney anyway, and the clueless public schools have kept most of us ignorant enough to go along with whatever the big boys want for years to come. Politics is just a story. Reality is at home. May 17, 2012

CN&R 47


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Closing Date: 5/15/12 QC: CS

Pub: Chico News

Trim:10x11.5 Bleed: none Live: 9.5x11

C-2012-05-17  

SAY CHEESE! STARTS ON PAGE 20 SPECIAL REPORT: How Butte County is doing ‘whatever it takes’ to help the destitute FESTIVAL GUIDE Chico’s New...

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