Issuu on Google+

CAN’T STOP

HUGH See MUSIC, page 32

FUSS OVER

FORESKIN See NEWSLINES, page 8

EMERGENCY

MAKEOVER See HEALTHLINES, page 16

PAGE

21

Blossoming folk quartet The Railflowers are among the bands to watch in 2012

HISTORY FOUND See ARTS FEATURE, page 26 PLUS:

NIGHTLIFE’S NEW LOOK See page 34

Chico’s News & Entertainment Weekly

Volume 35, Issue 23

Thursday, February 2, 2012


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CN&R

Vol. 35, Issue 23 • February 2, 2012

OPINION Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 From This Corner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

30

James S. Nagel, MD

Turn Your Husband’s

HEAD AGAIN!

NEWSLINES Downstroke. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sifter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

GREENWAYS EarthWatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 UnCommon Sense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Eco Event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 The GreenHouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

HEALTHLINES The Pulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Appointments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Weekly Dose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

12

COVER STORY

21

ARTS & CULTURE Arts Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 This Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Fine Arts listings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Bulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Chow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Reel World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Music. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 In The Mix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Arts DEVO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

REAL ESTATE

38

CLASSIFIEDS

41

BACKSTOP From The Edge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Fifteen Minutes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Brezsny’s Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 ON THE COVER: PHOTO OF THE RAILFLOWERS BY JESSICA SID PHOTO ILLUSTRATION AND DESIGN BY TINA FLYNN

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Robert Speer Managing Editor Meredith J. Graham Arts Editor Jason Cassidy Calendar Editor Howard Hardee Interim News Editor Tom Gascoyne Greenways/Healthlines Editor Christine G.K. LaPado Staff Writer Ken Smith Contributors Catherine Beeghly, Craig Blamer, Alastair Bland, Henri Bourride, Rachel Bush, Vic Cantu, Matthew Craggs, Kyle Delmar, Jovan Johnson, J. Jay Jones, Miles Jordan, Leslie Layton, Mark Lore, Sean Murphy, Jaime O’Neill, Anthony Peyton Porter, Claire Hutkins Seda, Juan-Carlos Selznick, Willow Sharkey, Alan Sheckter, Matt Siracusa, Scott Szuggar, Karl Travis, Evan Tuchinsky Interns Melissa Baxley, Kyle Emery, Dane Stivers Managing Art Director Tina Flynn Editorial Designer Sandra Peters Design Manager Kate Murphy Production Coordinator Sharon Wisecarver Design Melissa Arendt, Brennan Collins, Priscilla Garcia, Mary Key, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Advertising Manager Alec Binyon Advertising Consultants Brian Corbit, Jamie DeGarmo, Laura Golino, Robert Rhody Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Advertising Coordinator Jennifer Osa Events Intern Alina Chavera

Office Manager Jane Corbett Distribution Manager Mark Schuttenberg Distribution Staff Carly Anderson, Sharon Conley, Ken Gates, Bob Meads, Shelley O’Neil, Timothy O’Neil, Debbie Owens, Pat Rogers, James Roninger, Mara Schultz, Larry Smith, Bill Unger President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Senior Accountant Kevin Driskill Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Shannon McKenna, Zahida Mehirdel Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano 353 E. Second Street, Chico, CA 95928 Phone (530) 894-2300 Fax (530) 894-0143 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? (530) 894-2300, ext. 2245 or chiconewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Calendar Questions (530) 894-2300, ext. 2243 Classifieds/Talking Personals (530) 894-2300, press 4 Printed by Paradise Post The CN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available.

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the Chico News & Review are those of the author and not Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint portions of the paper. The Chico News & Review is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to edit letters for length (250 words or less), clarity and libel or not to publish them. Circulation 40,000 copies distributed free weekly.

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Send guest comments, 400 words maximum, to gc@ newsreview.com, or to 353 E. 2nd St., Chico, CA 95928. Please include photo & short bio.

Romney and taxes We can all be grateful that the raucous Republican primary

race has brought to the fore issues Republicans usually don’t like to discuss. One of them is the federal tax code, which is rigged to favor financial wheeler-dealers like Mitt Romney and his fellow private-equity multimillionaires and billionaires who pay lower tax rates than ordinary citizens do. For his part, President Obama has proposed what he calls “the Buffett rule,” after Warren Buffett, the multibillionaire who has publicly stated that it is wrong for him to be taxed at a rate that is much lower than his secretary’s. The Buffett rule would mandate that those making more than $1 million a year would pay at least 30 percent in taxes. Buffett and Romney, whose tax rate was less than 14 percent on earnings of more than $20 million in 2010, pay a lower rate because their earnings come mostly from investments, which are taxed at the current capitalgains rate of 15 percent, far less than the rate applied to labor income, which can be as high as 35 percent. They also pay less in payroll taxes because the Social Security tax does not apply to any income above $106,800. The capital-gains rate was set at 28 percent during the Reagan administration and went up to 29 percent early in the Clinton administration. Congress began lowering the rate in 1997, when Clinton agreed to a tax cut for the rich in return for creation of the Children’s Health Insurance Program. Then, in 2003, President Bush and an army of Wall Street lobbyists convinced Congress to adopt today’s ultra-low rates—the lowest since the Herbert Hoover era. The rationale was that doing so would free up more money for investment, spurring the economy. Obviously, it hasn’t turned out that way. In fact, analysis has shown that capital-gains tax cuts have little or no effect on economic growth. In his State of the Union speech last week, President Obama pointed out the illogic of these tax breaks for the rich. When wealthier Americans get tax breaks they “don’t need and the country can’t afford, it either adds to the deficit, or somebody else has to make up the difference—like a senior on a fixed income, or a student trying to get through school, or a family trying to make ends meet.” We can thank Mitt Romney for offering his case study on why this unfair tax situation has to change. Ω

Capital-gains tax cuts have little or no effect on economic growth.

Defend freedom of choice A ductive health care is essential to self-determination. Thirty-nine years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Roe v.

requiring unnecessary waiting periods, nonmedical ultrasound requirements that increase travel days for women and their docWade, making abortion legal across the land. One-third of all tors, and through insurance and other aborU.S. women will have an abortion by the tion bans in some states. age of 45. Such delays mean that women will be furAfter the Roe decision, we promptly ther along in pregnancy. They can push a opened nonprofit feminist clinics, with woman into the second trimester of her pregthe goal of offering all options for all nancy, making abortion more difficult or women and overcoming barriers to impossible to access, even here in California. health-care access. Our philosophy is that Sources of access problems include the people can make their own decisions barriers faced by rural women, poor women, about their lives and and women with lanreproduction. We provide Anti-abortion groups have increased guage difficulties: isolacommunity-based health and lack of transby efforts to stop women from making a tion portation. Another Eileen Schnitger care and information in a decision to end a pregnancy by creating source is the campaign nonjudgmental way. Anti-abortion groups barriers to abortion services. of lies, coercion and misThe author is the have increased efforts to information promoted by director of public “crisis pregnancy cenpolicy for Women’s stop women from making a decision to end a pregnancy by creters,” which exist to dissuade women from Health Specialists: obtaining abortion services. The Feminist Women’s ating barriers to abortion services. Access Health Centers of to clinics is essential, since clinics proSan Francisco recently passed a key ordiCalifornia vide 94 percent of abortion care in the nance regulating false advertising in these fake (www.womenshealth United States. (anti-abortion) clinics. Cities and counties specialists.org). This past year, a number of states should take the lead from the San Francisco have enacted a shocking threefold supervisors and support truth in advertising. increase in the number of abortion Women’s Health Specialists, along with restrictions, mostly impeding access. our pro-choice partners, work on all of these These new laws are the result of antifronts to increase access. We need your supabortion strategy to delay women’s port to make reproductive choices a reality access to care. The laws cause delays by for everyone. Ω ccess to abortion care and all sexual and repro-

4 CN&R February 2, 2012

Deadly distractions People are distracted. We’ve developed methods to shut down

our deeper cognitive processes in almost any situation. We crave superficial mental stimulation at all times, even when the distraction is dangerous to us. We’ve proven this with our addiction to texting while driving. Our unfounded belief that we can multitask was bad enough when it was just twisting the knob on the radio, but now we write entire tomes on a touch keyboard the size of a pack of playing cards. And it appears that even when faced with statistics that show that distracted driving is nearly as dangerous as drinking and driving, we continue doing it. Last week, the Internet journal Injury Prevention presented a study that went further, showing that triple the number of headphone-wearing pedestrians have been seriously hurt or killed near roadways and railways in the last six years. Most were young people listening to loud music who didn’t hear a train coming or that car barreling down on them. Our plea to you: Walkers, joggers and bicycle riders, don’t fill both ears with sound that can drown out important auditory clues about surrounding danger. And drivers, please put your cellphones away! Ω


FROM THIS CORNER by Robert Speer roberts@newsreview.com

Honoring Fred Korematsu Monday, Jan. 30, was Fred Korematsu Day in California. I suspect not many people celebrated it, though I hope it got some play in school classrooms. These days, with the president having signed an order allowing the indefinite detention of American citizens, it’s important to remember who Fred Korematsu was and what he accomplished. Korematsu was the most famous resister against the government’s forced internment of Japanese citizens during World War II, hiding out from the authorities and even having plastic surgery done on his eyelids to disguise himself as a non-Asian. When caught, he became the central figure in the American Civil Liberties Union’s legal challenge, Korematsu v. United States, to the mass internment. The case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which deemed the government’s exclusion order constitutional by a 6-3 vote. Years later it came out that the solicitor general, Charles Fahy, had suppressed evidence by keeping from the court a report from the Office of Naval Intelligence indicating that “there was no evidence Japanese Americans were disloyal, were acting as spies or were signaling enemy submarines.” In 1983, a federal judge overturned Korematsu’s conviction for evading internment, and in 1998 President Bill Clinton awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the country’s highest civilian honor. Shortly before his death in 2005, at the age of 86, Korematsu said, “I’ll never forget my government treating me like this. And I really hope that this will never happen to anybody else because of the way they look, if they look like the enemy of our country,” Wikipedia reports. In his Korematsu Day proclamation, Gov. Jerry Brown said, “Fred Korematsu was, in the best sense of both words, an ordinary hero. A native Californian, born and raised in Oakland and a welder by trade, he simply refused to accept his government’s order to relocate under the brutal and misguided policy of JapaneseAmerican internment during World War II. “Korematsu’s staunch determination to be treated like the loyal American citizen he was came to define his life story, in both his decades-long legal battle against internment and his later recognition as a leader in the cause of civil rights. On this 93rd anniversary of his birth, we remember him as one who resisted injustice during a dark chapter in our nation’s history, and later worked tirelessly to prevent its repetition.” A Chico icon passes on: Jacki Headley died Saturday, Jan. 28, at the age of 60, after battling brain cancer. She was in many ways the quintessential modern Chico business woman, creative, adventurous and utterly loyal to this community. She started Woof & Poof, a manufacturer of sewn gift products sold around the world, in 1975, and the local-centric retail outlet Made in Chico in 1982. I first met Jacki in 1980, when she was a leader in the effort to preserve the historic Nottleman Building from demolition to make way for a bank’s drive-up window. It’s fitting that Made in Chico is now located in that building. Our condolences go out to her husband of 33 years, Graham Hutton, and sons Christopher and Oliver Hutton.

Robert Speer is editor of the CN&R.

Send email to chicoletters @ newsreview.com

‘What a loss it would be’ Re “A history of ‘narrow escapes’” (Cover feature, by David Nopel and David Veith, Jan. 26): I thoroughly enjoyed the informative story on the history of Bidwell Mansion. My wife and I arrived here nearly six years ago from western New York, near Buffalo. We first toured the mansion during the Christmas season of 1966, and we were surprised to learn that John Bidwell was born in Chautauqua County, which is only about 70 miles from where we lived. What a loss it would be if the state were to carry through with its threat to close the mansion and transfer the contents to Sacramento. It’s a given that many of those items would never be returned to Chico. Such things have a way of becoming “lost.” And it’s anyone’s guess as to what would happen to the mansion and the grounds.

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More on Dolan’s new job Re “Jane Dolan’s new job” (From This Corner, by Robert Speer, Jan. 26): Your assessment is spot on. Jane’s commitment to the environment, to agriculture, and her decades of experience, plus her more recent experience as the executive director of the Sacramento River Conservation Area Forum, certainly qualify her for the position. I am confident she will balance the interests of the public, the agriculture community and the environment in conducting her work. WILLIAM SHERIDAN Chico

The flood will surely come? We live in a big bowl ringed by mountains that has flooded dozens of times over the years? Really, Mr. Speer, are you counting how many times River Road has flooded? I have lived here in the North Valley for almost 50 years, and I just don’t recall any catastrophic flood that has caused enough damage to require flood insurance. Only once in Durham in 1955, but that was before the Butte Creek levee was built. Yes, many levees are old and weak, but here in the North State a lot of them have been deemed sound, even though most water encroachments only get to the high-water marks and rarely touch the actual levees. The reason for my letter was not to take a stab at Jane Dolan, but only to affirm my belief that flood-insurance money benefits those who make money off of taxpayers. In this economy, it is very hard for a family to come up with $1,000 to $2,000 around Christmastime every year, when you know LETTERS continued on page 6

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damn well the chances of seeing water outside your front door are slim to none here. Of course, I know your column was only in defense of Jane Dolan and not directed at me. We all take care of each other; that is how she was handed this “retirement” job by our governor. Hopefully, we don’t see the construction of an ark on East Second Street, but just to be safe, Noah, maybe you should wear your swim vest to work. MICHAEL STRICK Durham

Jane Dolan’s Sac River job was handed to her by one of her rich closest friends, a progressive liberal. She’s an expert after a year on the job? Are you serious? Her appointment was a political payoff that Bob Mulholland got giving both of them those free taxpayer monies. Fat Cat City. Jane’s never had to apply for or go up against another qualified person for a job ever outside of politics. Democrats want us to pay more taxes to make her richer? RICK CLEMENTS Paradise

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Those perplexing plastic bags Re “Perplexing plastic” (Newslines, by Meredith J. Graham, Jan. 19): The proposed ban on plastic bags in Chico places an unfair financial burden on people who are on public assistance or fixed incomes. Also, I cannot see how such an ordinance can be enforced without wasting additional financial resources that the city of Chico does not have. Instead of banning plastic bags, I suggest the following strategies: 1.) Distribute Chico bags or similar reusable bags to residents of the city, targeting in particular the elderly and residents on public assistance. 2.) Offer financial incentives to bring plastic bags to the recycling center—for example, a penny for each bag returned. 3.) Encourage businesses to offer discounts to customers who bring their own bags. 4.) Create an educational campaign that shows the advantages of returning/recycling/ reusing plastic bags. I think that all of these would ultimately reduce the volume of plastic bags in the waste stream, and for a much lower cost than enacting legislation to ban bags. HOPE MUNRO SMITH Chico

Re “Bag ban’s bad impact” (Letters, by Michael Jones, Jan. 19): I have read Mr. Jones’ letters to both Chico newspapers with 6 CN&R February 2, 2012

“We all simply must begin to make changes to unnecessary, resource-consuming habits.”

—Robert W. MacKenzie

interest for years, and he has made some very good points on occasion. However, his letter concerning reusable bags is a total whiff. Everyone has room, both in their cars and their homes, for several reusable bags. Further, if one is careful loading and unloading one’s groceries, one needn’t wash ’em more than once per year. Think about the number of trips you make to grocery, convenience and hardware stores each year. How many bags is that? We all simply must begin to make changes to unnecessary, resource-consuming habits. Sorry, Michael, but this time you sound like just another lazy, stubborn, convenience-addicted American consumer. ROBERT W. MACKENZIE Chico

Re “Problem bigger than bags” (Letters, by Charles Donaldson, Jan. 26): Mr. Donaldson ends his letter by urging us to get rid of grocery plastic bags, but not to stop there. This retired chemistry professor agrees with Mr. Donaldson’s plea to get rid of grocery plastic bags. It is not clear what he means to not stop there. Yes, the problem is bigger if one realizes that all plastic material is manufactured from the fossil crude used in refineries to get the gas used in cars. The making of all plastic also releases greenhouse gases. Indeed, why should we not heed warnings not to add to the curse of fossil fuels? In that sense, yes, the problem is bigger than bags. BRAHAMA D. SHARMA Chico

A dangerous chemical Re “The cost of clean air” (Newslines, by Vic Cantu, Jan. 19): I was dumbfounded by the whiney story Dave Maurer and Jesse Meyers told about the new health and safety law protecting consumers. Formaldehyde is one very dangerous chemical that is a known toxin, allergen and carcinogen to avoid even in minute quantities. The International Agency for Research on Cancer and the National Toxicology Program have both classified formaldehyde as a known human carcinogen. Continuous exposure to formalde-

hyde is associated with the lethal diseases myeloid leukemia and nasopharyngeal cancer, according to the National Cancer Institute. A recent study has found a strong association between exposure to formaldehyde and the development of childhood asthma, which is the most common chronic disease among children in the United States. Almost 7 million children in the U.S. suffer from asthma, and children under 5 are experiencing the highest rate of increase, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). The CDC estimates asthma cost the U.S. about $50.1 billion in 2007. These greedy men are a threat to their customers’ health and to our community. Instead of trying to provide a safe and quality product, they whine and blame the government for exposing their dangerous merchandise. They show no respect for human life by knowingly selling sickening and toxic merchandise and vowing to repeal the consumer law protecting innocent customers. These men should be tarred and feathered and run out of town. DAVE GARCIA Oroville

Sweet and sour Re “Sugary-drink tax” (The Pulse, Jan. 19): The statistics from the UCSF study are really shocking, and I believe it is important to document how much of an impact sweetened beverages can have on your health and on the health of our communities. I work for the Network for a Healthy California, a program that encourages healthy lifestyles. One of our campaigns, ReThink Your Drink, focuses on this exact concern. The campaign educates and encourages individuals of all ages to make healthier beverage choices. Beverages with added sugar add calories with little nutrition and can cause tooth decay and weight gain. Water is always the smartest drink choice. It’s calorie free, fat free and sugar free! KATIE WILHELM Chico More letters online:

We’ve got too many letters for this space. Please go to www.newsreview.com/chico for additional readers’ comments on past CN&R articles.


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Well yes, I have been in a band for my church youth group before. I was the lead singer of it; we would sing every Wednesday at our youth group. That was last year, when I was in high school.

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Yes. We were sort of discordant at first, but as we got to know each other’s playing styles and our habits better, we started to work around those little wiggles and bumps. We never got paid for gigs or anything, we just enjoyed hanging out with others who had similar skills and interests. We played everything, from ska, to rock ’n’ roll, to punk, though we mostly did John Mayer and Clapton.

Michelle Calhoun unemployed

No, but I have sung downtown at that restaurant right there on the corner by the Senator on Thursday nights. It was a song by Edie Brickell and the New Bohemians.

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Yes, it was a long time ago in Mexico City. I was a college student, that’s when I learned music. I was going to be an engineer, but that didn’t happen …. Friends who played very well taught me to play. That was a little blues, a little rock ’n’ roll, and some romantic.

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CN&R 7


ANIMAL SHELTER PRIMES FOR CHANGES

The Butte Humane Society shelter in south Chico was closed Wednesday (Feb. 1) to allow the city time for transition to start running the operation. After years of calls to improve conditions at the stray-, abandoned- or forgotten-animal pokey, the city decided to move in. BHS will still run the adoption program, and its website says the city is not “taking over” but rather “collaborating” to help operations. For years shelter supporters and workers have tried to get the facility moved to a more-accommodating and higher-profile location than the city-owned building on Fair Street. But the city resisted and said it would make on-site improvements. Last year BHS opened a spay-and-neuter clinic and cat-adoption facility on nearby Country Drive, helping alleviate the cat population at the shelter.

Rabbi Mendy Zwiebel holds his infant son while a family friend reads a prayer and the mohel—a Jewish person trained to perform circumcisions— prepares for the bris ritual.

BUTTE CREEK LANDOWNER ENTERS PLEA

The Butte County District Attorney’s office announced this week that a Butte Creek Canyon property owner cited last year for grading large areas of ground near and along the creek without permits has signed a plea agreement stipulating that he pay to restore the land and pay a fine in exchange for avoiding a jail sentence. John Bessolo was cited last August after authorities were alerted to the work by neighbors. Bessolo is also accused of burying a stream that flowed across his property, which he will now have to uncover. He owns a wedding chapel on the site for which a patio and wall were illegally built into the creek, according to the state Department of Fish & Game. The DA investigation also revealed that Bessolo failed to pay transient-occupancy taxes to the county for the guests who have stayed at the chapel over the last three years. Bessolo was placed on probation, will be fined $4,000 and is ordered to reimburse the DF&G $2,041, the DA’s Office $4,732 and county counsel $42,000 for court costs.

PARENTS RALLY SUPPORT

A group dubbing itself Butte Parents for CPS and Court Reform is ramping up efforts to shed light on Butte County’s Children’s Services Department. The group, which meets weekly, has started a monthly protest outside the Butte County Superior Courthouse in Oroville. Some of the dozen or so waving signs on Tuesday (Jan. 31) have children in the foster-care system who they say were taken by CSD without cause. Others were protesting what they believe are prejudices on the part of CSD when it comes to disabled parents. The group’s immediate goal is to inform other parents in similar circumstances of their rights, and to shine a light on a system they see as corrupt. They’ve scheduled protests for the last Tuesday of every month starting at 8 a.m. outside the courthouse. Check the CN&R’s online calendar for updated information.

Ritual under fire The circumcision debate goes national, while in Chico a couple celebrate their newborn son’s rite of passage

A around Rabbi Mendy Zwiebel and his family last week as he held his 8-day-old son on a pilfew dozen friends and family huddled

low and invited loved ones to say prayers while a fellow rabbi organized his tools on a nearby table. The youngest by Zwiebel—he was yet to be Meredith J. named—was about to go Graham through one of Judaism’s most meredithg@ sacred rituals, the bris milah, newsreview.com more commonly known as circumcision. photo by Mitchell A. The room grew quiet as Gross Rabbi Gil Leeds of Berkeley approached the infant, first with a small cup of sweet wine, and then with a clamp and scissors. The baby cried and someone at the front of the room shouted assuredly, “Nothing’s happened yet!” Leeds moved in, affixed the clamp—meant to bring the foreskin up and over the tip of the penis—and, with a quick snip, off came that skin. Seconds later, the crying stopped, a few More on more prayers were said, mother circumcision: For links to the Chana Zwiebel whisked the articles and child upstairs for a lesson in reports cleaning the area, and it was celreferenced here, ebration time. go to the web The Zwiebels, who run the version of this Chabad Jewish Center at Chico story at State, were excited to share the www.news review.com/chico. celebration of their son’s rite of

passage with friends, family and this reporter. For those uninitiated into the Jewish tradition of male circumcision, a small booklet handed out before last Wednesday’s bris gives a succinct description: “The performance of Bris Milah is one of the most sacred rituals in Jewish life. Bris Milah is the tie that forever binds a Jewish boy to his Creator.” It goes on to explain that through circumcision “a boy identifies as a Jew at the source of life, forever linked to the source of all life.” It should not come as a big surprise, then, that last year, when San Francisco circumcision opponents rallied enough support to get a ban on the November ballot, Jews felt their religious freedoms were under attack. “It’s a religious right,” Leeds explained during an interview after the ritual. “For the Jewish people, circumcision dates back to our covenant with God.” Mostly because of San Francisco’s

proposed ban, male circumcision made major headlines last year and became a divisive issue in some communities. Opponents argued that the practice was unnecessary and barbaric—they termed it “mutilation” in many instances and even likened it to female circumcision. And they questioned parents’ right to alter their baby boys’ bodies without

their children’s consent. Circumcision, a religious rite for Jews and Muslims, is also widely practiced in hospitals throughout the world. In the United States, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data suggest the procedure hit its peak in 1999, when 62.5 percent of infant boys were circumcised. That number has fallen in recent years, and in 2010 the rate was 54.7 percent. A Time magazine report analyzing this trend points to an American Academy of Pediatrics statement in 1999, reaffirmed in 2005, that there was not enough information to recommend circumcision of newborn boys. This may have affected insurance coverage of the procedure, writes Time reporter Meredith Melnick. “However, the authors of the CDC report prefaced their findings by noting that recent evidence shows that circumcision greatly reduces the risk of HIV transmission through heterosexual sex,” Melnick writes. Some physicians, like Chico pediatrician Dr. John Asarian, choose not to perform circumcisions. Asarian, speaking to the CN&R on this topic in 2010, explained that he stopped performing the procedure in 2006 because of a lack of medical reasoning behind it. “I tell [the parents] it’s more of a social decision than a medical decision, because the evidence is not very clear-

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cut in the U.S.,” he said then. (He could not be reached for comment for this story.) “There is a small decrease in the number of infections in male babies who are circumcised compared to non-circumcised. You’d have to perform circumcisions on 300 to 400 babies to prevent one infection.” There are studies that have shown, however, that circumcision might have health benefits later in life. A 2009 Wall Street Journal story pointed to several studies that showed circumcision could help guard against STDs like herpes, human papillomavirus and HIV. “Circumcised heterosexual men are 35% less likely to contract human papillomavirus (HPV) and 25% less likely to catch herpes than their uncircumcised counterparts,” the Wall Street Journal reported. Leeds, the mohel—a Jewish person

trained to perform circumcisions—who presided over the recent bris milah in Chico, is no stranger to the debate. The leader of UC Berkeley’s Chabad Jewish Center actually was very much in the center of San Francisco’s recent uproar. As worded, that city’s bill would have made it “unlawful to circumcise, excise, cut, or mutilate the whole or any part of the foreskin, testicles, or penis.” One important thing to note, however, writes Time reporter Adam Cohen, was that the bill included no religious exemption, no differentiation from a procedure done in a hospital and one during a religious ritual like the bris milah described above. Muslims, whose circumcision ritual is called a khitan, also would have been banned from circumcising their young boys. Parents who chose not to comply could have faced a year in jail. The referendum came under much attack by religious groups, including Jews, Muslims and Christians—the Abrahamic faiths (circumcision dates back to Abraham)—who argued it violated their First Amendment right to freedom of religion. Ultimately, it never made it to the November ballot because the State Legislature stepped in, and in October Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill preventing laws banning circumcision in California. “Thankfully it was thrown out,” Leeds said of the referendum. He doesn’t believe the fight is over, however, to protect his religion’s tradition. A national group drafted the “Male Genital Mutilation Bill” and submitted it to Congress on Jan. 23. It would essentially “rewrite the U.S. Female Genital Mutilation Act of 1996 so that boys are also protected from genital mutilation (commonly referred to as circumcision).” Leeds countered. “The people who are against it call it ‘mutilation,’” he said. “That’s just a buzz word. Circumcision does have medical benefits.” Ω

Council incumbents say ‘no more’ Andy Holcombe and Jim Walker will not run again In what seems to be a fairly early point in the process, local political incumbents are expressing their plans to an inquiring media. Maybe it’s the fact that it’s a presidential election year and Newt and Mitt have the political pundits stirred up and that excitement is trickling down to the local level. Or maybe it was Congressman Wally Herger’s announcement last month, six months before the June primary, that he would not seek reelection after 13 terms in Congress. Here in Chico, with four incumbent City Council members up for re-election this year, two have announced no más, which could allow for a political shift in the seven-member council’s majority. Andy Holcombe, who has served two terms on the council, and Vice Mayor Jim Walker, in the final year of his first term, will not be running. In the meantime, Mayor Ann Schwab and Councilman Bob Evans say they will try to keep their seats on the council come election time this fall. Holcombe and Schwab are progressives, Walker falls somewhere in the moderate range, and Evans is a conservative. Walker, a physician’s assistant who works at Enloe Medical Center and was elected to the council in 2008, said he’s just not ready to commit the next five years of his life to the City Council. “I’m going to access what I want to do, what other adventures are out there,” he said. “I’ve enjoyed being on the council for the last three years. My decision-making has been without regard for how things might

play out in an election.” He said the job does take its toll on personal time, but that he feels appreciated even by those who disagree with his decisions. “You may think this is a thankless job,” he said, “but I have people coming up to me all the time saying, ‘I may not agree with you, but thanks for doing it.’ Walker noted that he has now put in 22 years of public service, including 10 years on the Planning Commission, eight years on the CARD board and what will end up being four years on the council. Sitting in his Ninth Avenue office,

Holcombe, an attorney, explained his decision, admitting he was perplexed by the timing. “Yeah, people have been asking me about it,” he said. “I haven’t been going out of my way to talk about my plans, but when asked I was forthcoming. I’m not sure why there is a flurry of interest right now because the election is still a long ways away. But it is Chico.” Four years ago, after a two-year stint as mayor, which he said was especially time consuming, Holcombe closed his law practice and went to work for Clients’ Rights Advocacy, whose mission is to protect the state’s disabled. Holcombe was born in New York, grew up in Pennsylvania, attended high school in New Jersey and college in Louisiana. He received his law degree from the University of San Diego. He came to Chico in 1978 as a volunteer with Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA). “We worked on self-help housing and farm-worker cooperative housing,” he said. In fact, part of his legacy will be the efforts he put forward on the behalf of lowincome housing, the future of which is in jeopardy with the state-mandated closing of

SIFT|ER ‘Chemical restraints’ in nursing homes More than 25,000 residents of California nursing homes—one in four—regularly receive antipsychotic drugs. Most of them are suffering from dementia, for which the drugs are not approved. But the medications do sedate patients and make them more manageable, which is why they are sometimes referred to as “chemical restraints.” Recently, the state Department of Public Health launched an Antipsychotic Drug Collaborative to inspect selected facilities with potential drugging problems. It found 147 violations in 24 facilities, an average of 6.1 deficiencies per facility. Here are the report’s chief findings regarding the surveyed nursing homes: • Percentage that had violated state rules regarding informed consent: 63 • Percentage that were guilty of unnecessary and excessive drugging: 71 • Percentage that had pharmaceutical services that were legally deficient: 79

Councilman Andy Holcombe outside his Chico law office. PHOTO BY TOM GASCOYNE

the city’s redevelopment agency. He reflected on his reason for running for council in the first place. “My epiphany was when I was at a City Council meeting speaking to the council on a low-income city housing issue,” he said. I remember thinking, ‘I can do this better than they can.’ I wanted to be on the other side, on the council side.” He defended his progressive approach to politics. “The council’s been a progressive majority since I’ve been on it because our community is a progressive majority,” he said. “I get criticized and I get incredibly ugly emails from what I like to think is a small spectrum of our community about my ‘socialist agenda.’ Frankly I don’t have an agenda other than to listen to the community.” In fact, it was Holcombe’s vote a year ago that landed Evans a seat on the council. A vacancy occurred when Larry Wahl was elected to the Butte County Board of Supervisors. Evans was the fourth-place finisher in the race for three open seats. Holcombe had nominated a man named Sor Lo. Seeing the deadlock, and wanting, he said, to head off what was becoming an ugly political stalemate, Holcombe changed his vote to confirm Evans’ appointment. He said a year from now, he hopes to be doing public-service work out of the country, perhaps in Central or South America. When he got out of law school in 1978, he said, he signed up for the Peace Corps and thought he was heading to Senegal to teach English. Instead he was asked to use his law degree domestically. “And I got sent to Chico,” he said. “I didn’t know where Chico was. I had to look it up on the map. But that was obviously a good move for me.” —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com

Source: CANHR

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them scientists, the others rangers at the Wrangel Nature Preserve, which includes the entire island and 24 miles of sea surrounding it. As it turned out, Baranyuk met his wife, Yana, a microbiologist, on the island when she visited as part of a scientific crew. That was propitious because she at least understands why he wants to spend four months at the end of the Earth each summer. This winter the two are traveling up and down the West Coast with their son, Vlas, 8, and daughter Sonya, 4, so Baranyuk can speak at gatherings like the Snow Goose Festival. I caught up with them at the wildlife center at Rancho Esquon, a 6,000-acre farm southeast of Durham, where he was giving a presentation. The farm is a good example of environmental stewardship: There are 4,000 acres in rice production, 800 in almonds, and 900 acres developed into a habitatrich wildlife refuge.

In the summer of 2010, Vasiliy Baranyuk spent 87 days without seeing another human being. He saw plenty of snow geese during that time, though, as well as musk oxen, polar bears, walruses, wolverines, reindeer, wolves, Arctic foxes and snowy owls. Baranyuk is a Russian biologist who for more than 30 years has been spending his summers on Wrangel Island, one of the two principal breeding grounds for the • Piano moving snow geese that travel the Pacific Flyway during migration. He was • residential, office in Chico last weekend to give two • locally owned for 22 years slide presentations as part of the • fully licensed & bonded Snow Goose Festival about the all- On Wrangel Island, life (cal - t180043) important role the island plays in depends on the weather, Baranyuk the lives of those geese. said. Snow geese begin nesting at Wrangel Island, part of the the end of May or during the first Russian Federation, is in the Arctic few days of June, and the more the Ocean north of far eastern Siberia snow has melted off, the more and the Arctic Circle. It’s a treeless, room they have for their clutches. starkly beautiful place, mountainLately the weather has been ous in the middle and cold even in warmer and spring has arrived earsummer, but it supports a wide lier. Last summer, scientists countrange of wildlife, including the ed 72,000 nests in the Tundra densest population of polar bears in River colony that produced more the world. The last wooly mamthan 150,000 birds. moths roamed the island only Snow geese tend to locate their 3,500 years ago, and their tusks nests near snowy owls’ nests can be found there to this day. because the owls can fight off the Baranyuk, a compact man in his Arctic foxes that are the greatest 50s with a silver-gray beard, first danger to both species’ nests. went to Wrangel in 1981, fresh out Baranyuk, who’s an excellent phoof state university in Moscow. tographer, showed several dramatic Such was its pull on him that he’s images of airborne owls attacking been going n e w back s & revery e v i e summer, w b u s i n e s s uthe s e foxes. o n ly and is now the senior scientist on Shortly after the goslings are designer ss issUe dATe 03.03.11 ACCT eXeC amb the island. born, the geese make an epic walkFiLe nAMe lawofficesofbh030311r2 reV dATe of more newthan 60 These days there are rarely ing migration more than a dozen people on miles from their nesting area in a pleaseWrangel carefullyatreview your advertisement and verify the following: any one time, half of mountain valley to feeding

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grounds on the island’s northern plain. Then, in late August, the snow geese and their surviving offspring begin leaving Wrangel Island. They go in two directions, with about half following the Pacific coastline toward the Skagit-Fraser estuaries south of Vancouver, B.C., and the rest following an inland migration route to California’s Central Valley on their way to wintering grounds in the Southwest and northern Mexico. Snow geese mate for life and raise three to four young each year. The offspring stay with their parents until they are 4 or 5 years old, learning the migration route and how to survive from the older birds. One of the problems Baranyuk has been noticing is that, because of the warmer weather and larger hatches, there are too many younger birds, they aren’t being educated properly, and they’re making mistakes—going in the wrong direction, resting in the wrong places, that sort of thing. He made it sound like an avian generation gap. Another result of the warmer weather is that it’s become easier to get to Wrangel Island by boat. Until recently the only way in was by helicopter, but now ice-breaking ships can reliably reach the island from mid-July to September, and some companies have established tours to the area. Baranyuk himself works for the New Zealand-based Heritage Expeditions, giving presentations and guiding short tours on land when a ship arrives. He says he enjoys the opportunity to share his “lifetime’s work.” From Chico the Baranyuks went on to the Davis area and then up to Washington, where they were planning to visit the Skagit River and Fraser River estuaries. Thousands of waterfowl on the way back to Wrangel Island are gathering there at this very moment. —ROBERT SPEER roberts@newsreview.com


Mark Sorensen on election night 2010. CN&R FILE PHOTO

No conflict here Fair Political Practices Commission says local energy contracts OK The state Fair Political Practices Commission has weighed in on the legalities of a $400,000 grant from Pacific Gas and Electric Co. aimed at helping Chico homeowners make their houses more energy efficient. The grant request was written in part by two of the city’s Sustainability Task Force members, who were subsequently awarded contracts from that grant. Jon Stallman, who was appointed to the task force by Mayor Ann Schwab to represent Butte College, got $60,000, and member Scott McNall, representing Chico State, was awarded a $10,000 contract. The contracts were designed to help educate homeowners and create a workforce trained in the ways of energy efficiency. The FPPC, in response to an inquiry from City Attorney Lori Barker, says it does not appear that STF members meet the definition of “public officials” under the state’s Political Reform Act, and as such there is no conflict of interest. “The test is whether the task force has independently influenced an agency with power,” said Barker. In this case the agency with power is the City Council. “I focused on recommendations [STF] has made since it was formed and the council’s reactions. There’s nothing really that they have done independently.” City Councilman Mark Sorensen disagrees. He says Barker’s inquiry did not detail or even mention the PG&E grant. He said he thinks there is clearly a conflict of interest here.

“We are talking about the PG&E program which [the task force] completely drove,” he said. “The council never approved it; the task force just did it.” Sorensen said a few years ago, when a vote came before the council on whether to allow a disc-golf course in Hooker Oak Park, he couldn’t vote on the matter. “I just barely lived within 500 feet of the park, and this [vote] could in theory have an impact on the value of my house,” he said. If that’s a conflict, he said, how is the PG&E grant with its subsequent contracts not? Barker sent her inquiry to the FPPC on Dec. 21 and received her reply Jan. 26. Sorensen sent his own requests for information to the FPPC on Dec. 28 and Jan. 9, detailing the PG&E grant and related contracts. He said he is still awaiting a response. “The program itself is not the issue,” he said. “It was the process. Who knows how this might end up? I guess we’ll find out eventually.” Schwab, who helped create and chairs the STF, said Sorensen is misguided in his efforts and that she was pleased with the FPPC response sent to Barker. “Well, it reassures me that the task force was operating as it should and was not outside the guidelines for the FPPC,” she said. “I’m appalled that Mark went ahead with his requests from the FPPC before the city attorney had a chance to do the proper research. Now I feel like the good work Jon Stallman and Scott McNall have performed has been tainted in the community. “They are creating jobs, training the workforce, and saving everyday people money by lowering their electric bills. Mark is looking at things in isolation—he needs to see the bigger picture.” —TOM GASCOYNE tomg@newsreview.com

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EARTH WATCH

GREENWAYS

NEW AUTO EMISSIONS RULES

The California Air Resources Board passed the toughest auto-emissions laws in the nation on Jan. 27 with an eye on a 75 percent reduction in smog-forming pollutants and a 50 percent reduction in greenhouse-gas emissions by 2025. The new rules, called the Advanced Clean Car program, will ensure that one in seven new cars sold in the state will produce zero tailpipe emissions, according to ABC News. Many automakers like Ford Motor Corp., Chrysler Group LLC and General Motors Co. supported the new standards in testimony, while detractors like the California New Car Dealers Association said CARB is overestimating consumer demand for “clean” vehicles and the regulations will force the price of all cars higher. “Our research shows a $1,400 to $1,900 car price increase,” said CARB spokesman David Clegern. “But over the life of the vehicles, the owners save $6,000 in reduced fuel and maintenance costs.”

MORE HOT WATER FOR PG&E

Pacific Gas and Electric Co. is facing more fines after conceding it failed to reclassify a total of 300 miles of pipeline running through suburban areas. PG&E previously admitted to losing track of 172 miles of pipeline that once ran through rural areas that have since experienced suburban development, but on Jan. 24 they revealed an additional 140 miles of pipeline running through populated areas that should have been regularly inspected, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. PG&E is already facing the possibility of hundreds of millions in fines from the California Public Utilities Commission for flawed record keeping and misclassification of pipelines, which was exposed following the 2010 San Bruno pipeline explosion that killed eight people and destroyed 38 homes. PG&E has not revealed the location of the misclassified pipelines in their 5,700-mile transmission system.

UBEHEBE READY TO BLOW?

Death Valley’s Ubehebe volcano “could erupt at any time,” according to geologists who have used new techniques to recalculate when the volcano’s first eruption took place. Scientists originally hypothesized the blast that formed the Ubehebe Crater (pictured) took place 6,000 years ago by dating Native American artifacts found at the site, according to SF Gate. However, a team from Columbia University dated the element beryllium found in pieces of sandstone and quartzite expelled by the explosion and concluded Ubehebe last erupted 800 to 1,200 years ago. Such geologic youth suggests the volcano is primed for action, as scientists feel there is still enough groundwater and magma to trigger an eruption similar to the original blast. Ubehebe, along with all of California’s many volcanoes, is constantly monitored by the U.S. Geological Survey in Menlo Park. 12 CN&R February 2, 2012

Josh Albrecht, at just 9 years old, recently saved up enough money to buy these Nigerian Dwarf Goats.

Milk goats 101

PHOTO BY KYLE EMERY

Carol Chaffin Albrecht gives the straight poop on raising dairy goats by

Christine G.K. LaPado christine.lapado@gmail.com

“T offered Carol Chaffin Albrecht, local healthful-food activist and co-owner

hey’re like miniature cows,”

of Oroville’s Chaffin Family Orchards, speaking of goats. “They’re ruminants— which means they have four stomachs.” Who knew? Turns out, Chaffin Albrecht has a whole lot of information (borne of years of experience raising livestock) to offer anyone thinking about raising dairy goats, which, if you’ve paid any attention at all to the burgeoning movement encompassing self-sufficiency, back-to-the-land living and a desire to eat healthful, natural foods, seems to include a fair number of people. The widely acknowledged health benefits of drinking fresh goat milk (not to mention eating goat cheese, or chèvre) are many, including that it contains “a more easily digestible fat and protein content than cow milk,” according to the American Dairy Goat Association, and “can success-

fully replace cow milk in diets of those allergic to cow milk.” Additionally, goat milk has been found to be effective in the treatment of ulcers. It is also widely reported to be the milk of choice for the majority of people in the world; only in the West is cow milk more widely consumed than goat milk. As Chaffin Albrecht put it, “Fresh goat’s milk is a whole, nutritional food.” So you’re thinking about raising a

dairy goat: What are some of the key things you need to know? First of all, you shouldn’t have just one. “One goat is cruel,” Chaffin Albrecht said. Goats, she said, are social animals that like to stay together in their “mother groups”— any combination of mothers, grandmoth-

Milk-it-yourself:

To learn more about unprocessed, full-fat milk from pasture-fed dairy goats and cows, go to http://realmilk.com. Additionally, Storey’s Guide to Raising Dairy Goats , by Jerry Belanger, is an excellent, widely available reference book for anyone wishing to raise dairy goats.

ers, aunts, sisters and babies. “I have a flock of goats, and I won’t ever buy a single goat because they’ll be an outcast. You have to buy two.” Second, you’ll ideally need about an acre of pasture—slightly less if you are going to supplement forage with feed, such as high-quality hay. But, stressed Chaffin Albrecht, “dry-lotting”—the common practice of maintaining a goat in a small corral in which it is fed hay but not allowed to forage—is inadvisable. “I can’t recommend it ethically,” she said. “That’s where all the modern diseases come from.” Chaffin Albrecht recommends rotational grazing between demarcated areas of pasture: “It’s important to move your goats every two weeks or less—you’re going to outrun your parasites [such as roundworms] that way. If a doe poops on one pasture area, if you leave her there three weeks, she will become re-infected.” Plus, to make sure the goats do not run out of forage, “you need some pasture that is just native grass that is green in the winter, plus some irrigated pasture for the summer.” Also, she noted, goats “have been created to make use of forage that we as


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taste of the milk as well. “You want to have the bucks away from the does, or … have your doe bred” by a buck that is hired specifically for that purpose but does not stay on the property. Also, Chaffin Albrecht strongly advises not taking the baby goats away from the mother until they are ready to be weaned just to get more milk. “The modern way of milking goats is to rip the babies off as soon as they are born,” she lamented, referring to goat milk that comes from mainstream, large-scale goat dairies. “When you buy [goat] milk at the grocery store, that’s how it’s done.” GREENWAYS continued on page 14

UNCOMMON SENSE Touchdown!

With Super Bowl Sunday upon us, many people are probably thinking more about lil’ smokies and bean dip than how much water they use when they brush their teeth. Still, there’s room in your game-day plans for a little conservation. Just look at 1st & Green, an Internet program developed by the 2012 Super Bowl Host Committee to help offset carbon emissions and water consumption associated with the big game. On their homepage (www.1stand green.com), you can check their progress—and sign up to contribute to the total. Here are some of the factors they measure:

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people cannot digest or utilize,” such as grass, brush and woody plants. Eating the bark from woody plants—which contains the plant’s minerals—allows goats to consume more minerals than a species such as the cow that just eats grass. The downside of this, though, Chaffin Albrecht advised, is that “you can’t pasture them without protecting your woody plants if you want them [the plants] to live.” Three wooden pallets arranged around a tree, for instance, “will protect them at goat level.” Goats also need more shelter than cows, as they are less tolerant of cold weather. Depending on the breed, a dairy goat (as opposed to a meat goat, which is bred specifically to have more fat and muscle, and less milk than a dairy goat) will produce from one quart to two gallons of milk per day (as compared to a cow, which produces from about three to five gallons a day). Which brings us to milking. A dairy goat must be bred annually in order to produce milk. Enter the notoriously stinky billy goat. “The bucks stink—they stink really bad,” Chaffin Albrecht offered. “If you keep bucks on your property, they’ll make the milk stink,” and negatively affect the

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If so, we’re ready to read it! You are welcome to submit up to three stories, as long as each entry comes in its own e-mail or on its own piece of paper, with your name, address and daytime phone number clearly printed. CN&R editors, along with a guest judge, will choose the best 59-word stories to be printed in our March 8 issue, and the top three entries in each age category will receive prizes from Lyon Books.

THE RULES

Stories can be on any topic, but must be exactly 59 words. Count carefully because we’ll have to disqualify even the best entries if they go over or under by so much as one word. Only three entries per person. Hyphenated words are not considered one word; i.e., “one-stop shop” comprises three words. Exceptions are words that don’t become free standing when the hyphen is removed, as in “re-examine.” Contractions count as one word. The story title will not be included in the word count.

For complete rules and an online entry form, check www.newsreview.com/Fiction59

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continued from page 13

Rather, Chaffin Albrecht recommends that “a more natural way is leaving the babies with the mother and ‘stealing’ some milk on the side while she is still nursing them, or temporarily penning the babies to get some milk [regularly].” Chaffin Albrecht also recommends rotating two does for milking purposes, with each being bred yearly, six months apart. Thus, a doe is providing milk for human consumption for only half the year. This rest period, and extra feed during lactation, helps to keep the female goat from becoming too physically taxed. There really is quite a bit to learn when it comes to raising dairy goats. “I would advise that they spend a day or two at a goat farm helping out, in order to learn about raising goats,” said Chaffin Albrecht of anyone wishing to raise dairy goats. That’s what Chaffin Albrecht—who has many years experience with goats—and her 9-year-old son Josh did recently, when Josh purchased his new little flock of Nigerian Dwarf Goats with money he had saved. “That’s the only way you’re going to learn,” she said. “You may end up mucking stalls for two days, but you’ll come away with a wealth of knowledge. … I do that with any new breed.” Ω

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Entries can also be submitted to fiction@newsreview.com, or by mailing them to: Fiction 59, CN&R, 353 E. Second St., Chico, CA 95928. Please specify your age category in the subject field. Note kids and teens are now split up by grade: preschool through fifth grade, sixth through eighth grades, and high school. Everyone else fits into the adult category.

Deadline: Thursday, Feb. 23, at 5 p.m.

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GREENWAYS

SPANISH BROOM SWEEP The Forest Ranch Broom Education and Eradication program is in need of volunteers to help pull invasive and fire-prone Spanish broom from public and private lands in the Forest Ranch area on Saturday, Feb. 4, at 9 a.m. Meet at the Forest Ranch post office (15517 Nopel Ave.) with weather-appropriate clothing to carpool to the work site. Call Dulcy at 892-8726 for more information.

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I WANT TO KNOW MORE I received an email the other day announcing the

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upcoming annual eco-visionary Bioneers Video Series to be held on three Thursdays in February starting at 7 p.m. at the Chico Women’s Club (592 E. Third St.). The series, according to www.chicowomensclub.net, introduces the annual Bioneers Conference in Marin County to the community. On Feb. 9, the evening’s intriguing program, titled “New Energy, New Medicine & New Design,” will feature “a fabulous short film by Louie Schwartzberg”; mycologist/author Paul Stamets discussing the benefits of fungi; environmental scientist/writer Amory Lovins talking about new energy sources; and astrologer/radio host Carolyn Casey “connecting shamanism with transportation, or how slime mold redesigned the Tokyo subway,” according to the Women’s Club’s Rosemary Quinn. Up Feb. 16 is “Youth, Food Justice & Computer Games,” featuring Anim Steel, director of national programs at Boston’s Food Project, “mobilizing students for the real food challenge”; digital-media and cultural-relations strategist Joshua Fouts explaining “how 12-year-olds with computers can solve The slime mold that did not eat Tokyo’s subway system. real problems”; and Karen Brown, creative director at the Center for Ecoliteracy in Berkeley, “with her mini-turbine emphasizing the importance of sustainability in K-12 classrooms.” And on Feb. 23 is “Scaling Up”: Kenny Ausubel, co-CEO and founder of Bioneers, “reminds us that self-deception is our Achilles heel”; United Steelworkers assistant legislative director Roxanne Brown unites the communities of steel workers and sustainability; and Chinese-American journalist/filmmaker John Liu presents his spectacular film detailing “the revitalization of a dead zone the size of France.” I’m intrigued and I want to know more, and as soon as I get the further scoop from Rosemary, I will share it with readers. For those wanting more info right away, Rosemary Quinn can be contacted at 892-8191. See http://tinyurl.com/slimetokyo for more on the fascinating relationship between slime-mold growth and the rail system in Tokyo!

MARK YOUR CALENDAR “Dear Gardening Friends,” writes the inimitable, knowledgable permaculture educator/practitioner Carla Resnick in a recent email, “I will be giving a presentation as part of the Chico Organic Gardening Series.” Her presentation, scheduled for Monday, March 5, 6:30-8:30 p.m., will cover Downspout Gardens—Home-Scale Water Harvesting, and Fruit Tree Guilds— Using Plants and Animals to Benefit Your Fruit Trees. “These topics are deeply rooted in permaculture principles, and I hope you will come to the presentation. Here is a link to the website on which the series is organized. Many other classes are being made available too: www.meetup.com/Chico-Organic-Gardening.” Resnick added that she’s been blogging Downspout gardening. about permaculture since 2008. Her blog can be found at www.permaculturezone.net. Cost for Resnick’s class, held at Matthew’s Café (1600 Mangrove Ave., #175), is $12 at the door. Gee, it’s nice to be back in Chico.

“I think the environment should be put in the category of our national security. Defense of our resources is just as important as defense abroad. Otherwise what is there to defend?”—Robert Redford, Yosemite National Park dedication, 1985

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February 2, 2012

CN&R 15


THE PULSE

HEALTHLINES

INDIA’S INCURABLE TB

Strains of tuberculosis completely resistant to antibiotics have been reported in India for the first time. Patients infected with the lung disease, which is the world’s second-deadliest disease after HIV, are typically cured after six to nine months of antibiotic treatment, according to BBC News. However, doctors in Mumbai, India, have reported 12 patients have contracted an incurable form of the disease totally resistant to a wide array of drugs. All of the patients came from a slum area of the city, where close quarters means disease spreads quickly. Three of the patients have already died. This is not the first time drug-resistant strains of tuberculosis have appeared—similar cases have been reported in Italy and Iran, where outbreaks have been documented in impoverished areas since 2003. Such cases are often the result of patients not finishing their lengthy treatment period, which allows the bacteria to battle back and mutate into a tougher strain.

GETTING STUDENTS MOVING

In an effort to reduce the rate of overweight children in south Butte County elementary schools, Chico State’s Center for Nutrition and Activity Promotion will use a $623,863 grant to enhance the physical-education programs in Palermo and Oroville school districts. The grant, awarded by the U.S. Department of Education, will include seven schools where classroom teachers are responsible for the physical education of about 3,100 students, according to a Chico State press release. The program, called Get Moving South County, will recruit and train Chico State students as “play coaches,” who will work with students during recess and lunch breaks. In addition to reducing obesity rates, the program also aims to increase fruit and vegetable consumption and to improve fitness scores. “With new PE equipment, district-wide training, community collaboration and support from Chico State students, elementary school students will have many more opportunities for physical activity throughout the day,” said Michele Buran, the Get Moving program director.

SHAKEN BABY DOLL

Enloe Medical Center’s Mother & Baby Education Center was presented with a simulation doll to aid in Shaken Baby Syndrome education by the Rotary Club of Chico. When shaken, the RealCare Shaken Baby (pictured) cries and measures the force on the “brain,” illustrating damage done to specific areas with LED lights, according to an Enloe press release. Shaken Baby Syndrome is the result of intentional child abuse in which the baby is shaken, often as a result of a parent’s frustration and irritation, which can lead to blindness, brain damage, spinal damage, delayed development and even death. It is estimated that of the 1,200 to 1,400 babies or children in California treated for such abuse each year, 25 percent to 30 percent die from their injuries. 16 CN&R February 2, 2012

Feather River Hospital offers a sneak peek of new emergency facilities. PHOTO COURTESY OF FEATHER RIVER HOSPITAL

Bigger and better Feather River Hospital’s new emergency department more than triples the size of its ER capacity with new, 17,000-square-foot facility by

Christine G.K. LaPado christine.lapado@gmail.com

“T the numerous, prominent banners hanging in various spots at the well-attendhe wait is over,” announced

ed Jan. 26 open house of the new, state-ofthe-art Emergency Department at Feather River Hospital in Paradise. Fifteen months of construction and $40 million later, the 17,000-square-foot-plus, state-of-the-art facility is complete, and scheduled to open this month pending a few signatures from the necessary inspecting agencies. A happy Melissa Barnard, Feather River’s Emergency Department director, stopped to chat briefly before moving on to continue greeting the hundreds of people—mostly senior citizens—coming, going and milling around the various food and drink tables in the large tented area in front of the entrance to the spanking-new facility. Most of those in attendance were awaiting their turn to go on one of the many 10-minute-long tours being held offering a glimpse of the interior of the spacious new ER. “We’re not opening yet,” Barnard said. “We’ve finished construction, and we’re putting on the last finishing touches before all inspecting agencies will sign off.” “We are really excited about the expanded space—it’s a little more than

three times the size of the current ER,” said Maureen Wisener, assistant vice president for foundation and communications at Feather River. “The wonderful thing about it is that it allows us to go from seven licensed beds in the [current] ER to 18 licensed beds. That’s more than double the number of licensed beds.” Presently, the space that Feather River has in its ER is a little more than 4,000 square feet, Wisener said. “We will go to just under 18,000 square feet in the new space,” she added excitedly. Feather River Hospital gets approximately 12 to 14 ER patients at a time, said Wisener. “What we have done [in the past] is we have created spaces to accommodate the volume of patients that we see. The challenge might be that there is just a cubi-

cle curtain separating one patient from the next.” The new Emergency Department, with its 18 separate rooms, she pointed out, “gives each patient a private room with actual doors!” In addition to being generally thrilled with its spaciousness and increased capacity, Wisener spoke of three aspects of the hospital’s new Emergency Department that she is particularly excited about. First, said Wisener, “there will be a dedicated room for patients who require immediate care for life-threatening illnesses or accidents. It will be one of the 18 treatment rooms, but a larger one, to accommodate more equipment and staff.” HEALTHLINES continued on page 18

APPOINTMENTS FOOD PYRAMID IS NO MORE Chico State’s Nutrition and Food Science Association hosts a free presentation explaining ChooseMyPlate, the new symbol the USDA has unveiled to replace the famous food pyramid. Sunday, Feb. 5, 10 a.m., at the Chico branch of the Butte County Library, 1108 Sherman Ave. Visit www.choosemyplate.org for more info.


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HEALTHLINES continued from page 16

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Also, a “decontamination room” will be available for patients who may have been exposed to toxic substances, “such as any chemical—dry or liquid,” Wisener said. “If a patient is filthy from some situation they’ve been put in, there will be a separate room for them to be decontaminated in prior to being placed in a treatment room.” Previously, such cases have had to be dealt with outdoors, near the entrance to the emergency room, so as not to contaminate people inside. Having a designated, indoor decontamination room “allows us to privately care for patients and allows us to keep them isolated in that room,” she said. Finally, Wisener mentioned the “beneficial” location of the ambulance entrance to the new ER, which unlike the current ER setup at Feather River, is a rear entrance that is separate from the front entrance for the general public. “It’s less disruptive,” Wisener pointed out of the new arrangement. “Previously, everyone [including ambulances] entered in the front. Everyone could see everything. It was very, very visible.” A separate entrance for ambulances offers “more privacy for patients in ambulances, as well as less disruption for anybody in the waiting area.” Near a decorative fountain

in a pretty garden area adjacent to the new emergency-room facility, Feather River Hospital foundation project manager Carrie Lambert spoke to the tour group she was about to lead inside the building. “The existing ER would fit in onethird of the new ER,” Lambert offered proudly, before adding that Emergency Department nurses will be tracked on a computer screen showing the location of every nurse and technician, “partly for noise control. You can’t yell out someone’s name [like in the old ER]—the new building is just too big.”

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18 CN&R February 2, 2012

Learn more:

Feather River Hospital is located at 5974 Pentz Road in Paradise, and can be reached at 876-7208. Volunteers are being sought to help with distributing warm blankets, answering questions, etc., at the hospital’s new emergency-room facility; see www.frhosp.org/careers/ volunteers/index.php for more details.

Feather River Hospital foundation project manager Carrie Lambert leads a tour of the new ER. PHOTO BY CHRISTINE G.K. LAPADO

Lambert also announced that a “navigator” will be on hand at the entrance to the new facility 16 hours per day to provide such services as assisting people with wheelchairs and acting as a gobetween for patients and their family members. Five more registered nurses will be added to the ER staff, as well as a charge nurse “to keep the flow going,” she said. ER nurses will also be carrying wireless phones that will enable patients to contact them directly from their bed if they need assistance. Inside the building, which had that distinct new-building smell,

numerous groups of people led by tour guides bustled past each other; individuals stopped and peered over yellow caution tape into an empty room containing an as-yetunused bed or down a hallway to another section of the circularly arranged emergency-department rooms. “The new ER is one big circle,” said Lambert. The less-sick people will be housed in one section of the circle, the sicker in another section, not visible to the others. “It’s not about the building. It’s about the care you’re going to receive,” Lambert said. Ω

WEEKLY DOSE How much rock is too much? When listening to one of Chico’s obnoxiously loud rock bands in one of Chico’s small venues, your ears are likely to take an epic beating. While the ringing sensation will usually subside shortly after a show, the damage done to the 30,000 tiny hair cells in your inner ear can be permanent, leading to irreparable hearing loss. As a general rule of thumb, doctors recommend a listener wear ear protection for any noise reaching or exceeding 85 decibels. For those of you who don’t bring a decibel meter to concerts, any rock band with a live drum kit and electronic amplification will usually exceed 85 decibels by a healthy margin. So if you want to continue enjoying loud music well into old age, don’t abuse your eardrums. At risk of looking like a big dork, bring some ear plugs next time you head out to a metal show. Your ears will thank you.


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CN&R 19


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NOTICE OF BUTTE COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS HEARING Butte County General Plan 2030 – Draft Zoning Ordinance Notice is hereby given, that the Board of Supervisors will hold a hearing on February 14, 2012 at 1:00 pm to consider items for a General Plan Amendment, to be initiated by Butte County, and additional recommendations from staff concerning the Draft Zoning Ordinance and Map. The hearing will be held in the Butte County Board of Supervisors’ Room, County Administration Center, 25 County Center Drive, Oroville, California; all members of the public are invited to attend. The purpose of this hearing is to review several changes to the adopted General Plan that have been identified since its adoption on October 26, 2010. These changes include amending the General Plan Land Use Map to conform to changes made on the Draft Zoning Map, amending the General Plan Land Use Map to include a change in General Plan designation from Agriculture to Rural Residential for several unincorporated areas near the cities of Biggs and Gridley and the community of Palermo. Additionally, various text and related map amendments to the General Plan will be reviewed involving the inclusion of a Public Housing Overlay and a Military Airspace Overlay in the General Plan; updating the Unique Agriculture Overlay to apply to the Agriculture, Foothill Residential, and Rural Residential designations; correcting Land Use Element Policy LU-P13.4 to include the Very Low Density Residential zone; updating Table LU-2 by removing the lower range of allowable density from the VLDR, LDR, MDR and MHDR designations; amending Conservation and Open Space Element Policy COS-P2.3 to provide an alternative to LEED –Silver Certification or equivalent for smaller, non-public county building projects; amending Conservation and Open Space Element Policy COS-P3.7 to provide that alternative energy facilities are encouraged in all designations throughout the county; and, amending Water Resources Element Policy W-P2.2 supporting the development of the Northern Sacramento Valley Integrated Regional Water Management Plan. Various other minor edits and clean-ups are also proposed to the General Plan. A complete list of all proposed changes will be posted at www.buttegeneralplan.net prior to the hearing. The Board will review this information and provide direction to begin the process to formally amend the General Plan and to initiate the preparation of a Supplementary Environmental Impact Report (EIR) pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). During the Board’s review of the Third Draft Zoning Ordinance and Map that took place on December 6 and 13, 2011, several items were discussed that required additional staff follow-up. Several additional items have since come to the attention of staff that need Board direction. The Board will be presented with recommendations concerning: Section 24-13, correcting the “Commercial Recreation, Outdoor” from conditionally allowed to not permitted in the Agriculture zone; Section 24-22, changing “Residential Care Homes, Large” use in the General Commercial zone from a use that is not allowed to a conditionally allowed use; amendment of Section 24-74 regarding Camping and the inclusion of sanitation requirements per the Environmental Health Division; amendment of Section 24-109 to conform to the State’s Model Water Efficient Landscaping Ordinance; amendment to Section 24-157 concerning Animal Keeping by allowing for the keeping of hens in residential zones; amending Section 24-166 concerning the regulation of Mobile Home Parks to conform to State law; and amending Section 24-173, concerning the removal of House Concerts from the Temporary Uses section. For further information, call Dan Breedon, (530) 538-7629 (Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) or visit www.buttegeneralplan.net . You may also look-up current and proposed zoning and General Plan information for your property at http://sk.chicomapworks.com/ Comments regarding this hearing may be submitted in writing at any time prior to the Board of Supervisors hearing at the Butte County Department of Development Services, 7 County Center Drive, Oroville, via email to dsgeneralplan@buttecounty.net or orally at the hearing. 20 CN&R February 2, 2012

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Six local bands (and one thriving metal scene) to keep an eye on in 2012

C

hico is a pretty great place for music lovers. In addition to the touring musicians coming to places like the university, the Senator Theatre and the Sierra Nevada Big Room, there are original local bands from every genre playing in town at a dozen or more bars, clubs and cafés several times per week. If there is a cover charge, it’s as cheap as the beer, and you’ll usually get to see at least three bands. And every year, thanks in large part to the influx of new students coming to Chico State, new bands are born to replace the ones that break up or move away. There’s always something new to experience and way too many shows to make it to them all. It’s a good problem to have. In this annual celebration of local musicians, we try to highlight a handful of bands from a variety of genres that will likely be contributing some of the most interesting songs to the soundtrack of the coming year. For 2012, we’ve chosen six acts, plus the area’s vibrant metal scene, on which to shine the spotlight.

The Railflowers: (from left) Emma Blakenship, Ellen Knight, Beth Knight and Hannah Knight. PHOTO BY JESSICA SID

Sibling harmony

The Railflowers Not much of a secret to Chico anymore, The Railflowers are beginning to share their soothing brand of folk outside of the Chico area, including Austin, Texas, this March for a slot in the famed South by Southwest Conference. But before all of that, the quartet of local ladies will, on Feb. 18, unveil their second fulllength CD, a collection of 10 new, original songs, with a celebratory night of music and frolic at Chico’s Origami Lounge. “The CD was produced by Nat Keefe of Hot Buttered Rum at Light Rail Studios in San Francisco,” said Hannah Knight, one of three sisters who front the band. “We are thrilled to have his creative vision umbrella this project.” Since their first gig, as a warm-up act before a Shakespeare in the Park performance in Bidwell Park in 2006, the sisters Knight have done their due diligence, crooning and plucking their way across the North State. The Railflowers’ folk/bluegrass/gospel/Americana fusion occupies the genteel side of the aural rainbow, both on CD and onstage, with a thriving repertoire of ballads, porch songs and campfire sing-alongs. Offering an array of perceptive lyrics, lilting voices and pleasing accompaniments on songs such as “Fly” and “By Candlelight” (off their debut album), The Railflowers bring a harmonious breath of fresh air to any venue or festival. It is true that Beth (mandolin), Hannah (banjo) and Ellen Knight (guitar) have sung together since they were little girls, but The Railflowers, which now also includes stand-up bassist Emma Blankenship, began as a collaboration between two sisters. “It actually started out with Beth and Ellen learning cover songs from some of our favorites, including Emmylou Harris, Joni Mitchell and The Avett Brothers,” Hannah said. “We decided to make it the three sisters when we realized three-part harmonies are better than two!” In addition to their Railflowers duties, Beth also formerly sang for Mossy Creek and Hannah is a top-notch local actress. The band is cutting a similar path to success that local acoustic duo MaMuse has blazed over the past few years. “We have been very lucky to have MaMuse as a guiding force in our musical venture,” Hannah said. “They are becoming dear friends, and we admire them so much.” And what do The Railflowers hope to give their listeners? “We want the audience to hear our music and have it reflect something in themselves that they may feel but may not be able to describe,” Hannah said. “We find a joy in creating songs that are a common language for every soul.” The Railflowers’CDrelease show happens Saturday, Feb. 18, 8 p.m., at Origami Lounge. www.facebook.com/therailflowers —Alan Sheckter alsheck@comcast.net

LOCAL MUSIC continued on page 22 February 2, 2012

CMYK

CN&R 21


LOCAL MUSIC continued from page 21

Fresh jams

Soul Butter

playing Lost on Main’s annual Harvest Ball), and now want to make a mark with a recording followed by a raising of their profile with more gigs around town. Even though they’ve been together less than a year (with drummer Ricky Atallah having been with them only since August), with their funky chops and youthful enthusiasm, Soul Butter appears to have the potential to join the fine tradition of party-friendly Chico bands—Brut Max, The Hips, Electric Circus, Swamp Zen, et al.—that have come before. Soul Butter performs with Alli Battaglia & The Musical Brewing Co. Friday, Feb. 24, at LaSalles. www.facebook.com/soulbutterband

Listening to Soul Butter at a recent rehearsal as they worked up a sweat on a lively jam called “The Bills,” it was impossible not to think of the early sounds of Chico faves The Mother Hips. The soulful jam featured great vocal harmonies and some of those funky well-timed crowd-friendly breakdowns, with instruments dropping out and the riffs returning in unison distorted and very muscular. “[It was] the first one that really came off,” said rhythm guitarist Jesse McDermott about the impressive song. And the rockin’ song really does come off, as do the other tunes in the band’s eclectic repertoire—from the all-hands-ondeck ’70s rocker “The Situation” to the reggae-ish slow jam “Better That Way,” which highlights vocal interplay between co-frontmen guitarist/vocalist Chris Miller and ukulele-player/vocalist Julian Ruck (who used to be in Hear for Now with McDermott). Miller’s is the more melodious of the two voices, but in conjunction with Ruck’s soulful rasp, the combination works really well. Overall, it’s a very Chico sound—groovy but not jammy, very catchy, and with a grittiness sweetened by the harmonizing voices. “While we’re trying to make it funky, it’s still sounding really ear-friendly, and we’re not trying to shove 12-minute jams down people’s throats,” said McDermott. “It’s composed,” added bassist/guitarist Jeff Spanier (who used to play guitar in local rapper Eye-Que’s band Live Assist). Spanier is also the engineer for the EP the band is currently recording at its rehearsal space, and which it hopes to have ready in time for the next show, Feb. 24, at LaSalles. “My goal is four-to-five, at least three songs,” said Miller, “something to start giving to people so they can actually go away from a show and put something into a CD player.” The band is at that first turning point, where they’ve played enough to start building a following (opening shows for the likes of Nevada City’s rootsy jammers Dead Winter Carpenters and

—Jason Cassidy jasonc@newsreview.com

As with many young bands, the challenge for Furlough Fridays wasn’t necessarily producing and performing good material—it was solidifying an unstable lineup. More specifically, their challenge was finding a regular drummer. If you attended one of the alt-rock quintet’s energetic live shows in Chico over the past four years, you saw one of four different drummers who have played alongside vocalist Linda Bergmann, bassist Meagan Yates, rhythm guitarist Adam Yates and lead guitarist Brian Larson since their formation. With a fundamental position in the band in constant flux, it was difficult to focus on recording and writing new material. Enter 22-year-old Sam Casale, the bespectacled stickman formerly of Sacramento indie outfit Stasis Burden who has held down the Furlough kit for the past five months. Casale left Sacramento to attend Chico State, at which point the band made its move. “We found out he was moving here so we stole him, and now we love our Sam,” said Meagan Yates. With a lineup they hope to maintain for a good long while, they are in the process of recording two full albums worth of music at a couple of Chico recording studios— Strange Seed Studios and Origami Lounge. For a band with an uncertain recent history, they believe taking on such a substantial project (or “going all Smashing Pumpkins,” as Adam Yates put it) will allow them to progress creatively.

Gentlemen’s Coup

Local musician/producer/musician’s friend Scott Barwick has kept his head in the ’60s over the past few years, first with garagerock powerhouse Candy Apple, and now with his latest psychedelic pop band Gentlemen’s Coup. The Chico five-piece doesn’t dive too deep into obscure, dusty record bins, but has

cultivated a sound that pulls from Pink Floyd, The Beatles and, even more so, the post-Beatles work of Lennon and McCartney. “I’m not even that obsessed with The Beatles,” Barwick admitted. “But back in the day I definitely dropped some LSD while listening to The White Album.” Gentlemen’s Coup has been years in the making, as

Soul Butter: (from left) Julian Ruck, Jeff Spanier, Ricky Atallah, Chris Miller and Jesse McDermott.

Barwick has been taking his time with the material. It was shortly after the breakup of Candy Apple that he wrote “Angeline,” a song that morphs the darker, emotional angst found on 1970s John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band with McCartney’s quirkier, latter-day ramshackle pop.

PHOTO BY MATT SIRACUSA

(From left) Scott Barwick, Summer Maroste and Branden Smith of Gentlemen’s Coup.

Barwick insists he’s not so much obsessed with a certain time period as he is with specific instruments. While Candy Apple relied heavily on Farfisa, Gentlemen’s Coup pushes Mellotron and piano to the forefront. Barwick kept writing, while at the same time working on getting his recording space/venue Origami Lounge up and running. Though the songs got pushed aside, they didn’t go away. “I don’t know why I held onto [the songs] for so long,” he explained. “I guess I was just waiting for the right group of people.” That group eventually came together in the form of bassist Branden Smith, Iestin Roughton (aka Dr. Yes!) on keys, drummer Dan Olny and former Candy Appler Summer Maroste, who plays Mellotron samples and tambourine. The band’s shows are usually a mix of to-the-point pop tunes and what Barwick calls “psychedelic ramblings,” which is what he expects to bring to the first Gentlemen’s Coup record. The rough versions sound promising. “Carnival” gets a lift from a grandiose Queen-inspired chorus, while “Crystal Flowers” veers off into space running on a single, elongated guitar line topped with echo-y vocals. (LSD would probably work with this one.) “For myself, I need to focus and get this record out,” said Barwick, although he’s not about to rush things. “With this band it’s been not about rushing, but waiting for the right moment. These songs are like babies to me.” www.gentlemenscoup.com —Mark Lore

PHOTO BY KYLE DELMAR

The young mathematicians

Hail the Sun

‘Going all Smashing Pumpkins’

Furlough Fridays

Vintage pop and psychedelic ramblings

“There have been songs that stuck around and haven’t, and we’re kind of at the point where we’re done with [the older material],” Casale said. “With the two albums we’ll kind of close that chapter. Let’s just be steady now and work out what we want to do as a band rather than working through the hardships of forming in the first place.” The members have been influenced by a variety of musicians and styles, but they all shared an interest in the ’90s alternative scene—bands that were on the fringe of rock music but still maintained a pop sensibility. Indeed, Furlough Fridays like making loud, fuzzy noises, but they also don’t shy away from the catchy hook. “We’re not really a screamin’ band, but this new album has a lot of the grungy, alternative sound with a lot of distorted tones,” Adam Yates said of Sliver, the first of two planned releases this spring and summer. “The other one [New Growth] has a lot of more poppy songs.” The group hopes to embark on two mini-tours of the West Coast over the summer, city-hopping north to Seattle in June and then south to San Diego in August. Furlough Fridays performs Saturday, Feb. 11, with The Noetics, Dumpster Dandies and The Deaf Pilots, at Babylon Community Arts Center. www.reverbnation.com/furloughfridays —Howard Hardee howardh@newsreview.com

22 CN&R February 2, 2012

Furlough Fridays: (from left) Meagan Yates, Linda Bergmann, Sam Casale, Adam Yates and Brian Larson. PHOTO BY MICHELLE CAMY

When drummer Donovan Melero was 19 years old he went to Slim’s in San Francisco to see now-defunct math-rockers The Fall of Troy, featuring one of his musical heroes, guitarist Thomas Erak. That night, while standing in the audience, the precocious young Melero found himself standing next to Erak and turned and shouted to him over the noise, “One day my band is going to tour with your band.” Today, Melero is a newly graduated Chico State music major whose band Hail the Sun specializes in a high-energy brand of math rock of its own. And, as you might have already guessed, he and the band are indeed going to be touring with Erak’s band—Seattle progressive post-punk crew Just Like Vinyl—on a seven-show West Coast jaunt next month that will stop at Chico’s Origami Lounge on Feb. 24. “Opening for them is going to be very exciting,” said Melero during a recent interview at his workplace, Woodstock’s Pizza, with bassist John Stirrat. The tour with JLV is due to the hard work of Melero, who set up the shows and convinced JLV to pair up with his band. And that industriousness is indicative of the DIY spirit at the heart of Hail the Sun over its two-plus years. Since 2009 they’ve gone on tour six times. “Since our junior year, we’ve been OK to give up our breaks to tour,” Melero said. In between classes and road trips the band

has found the time to put its frenetic brand of constantly shifting post-punk onto one album (Pow, Right in the Kisser) and one single (“Will They Blame Me if You Go Disappearing”)— both of which are available for free download at www.hailthesun.bandcamp.com. And co-frontmen Shane Gann and Aric Garcia are right now putting the finishing touches on new songs that the band will be recording for an EP to be released in the spring. The funding for the EP came courtesy of a successful Kickstarter.com campaign that raised $2,500, thanks in part to an irreverent video starring the band’s hilarious bassist. “We just kind of improvised,” Stirrat admitted. With its commitment to get out of town, Hail the Sun has always been as much a band of the road as a Chico band (a blueprint more young local bands would be smart to emulate), but with everyone having graduated, after this school semester home base will shift to SoCal. Chances are, though, that Chico will be on the schedule of many more tours to come. Hail the Sun performs with Just Like Vinyl, Final Last Words and Cinematic Projections Friday, Feb. 24, at Origami Lounge. www.facebook.com/hailthesun —Jason Cassidy

Hail the Sun: (from left) Donovan Melero, Aric Garcia, John Stirrat and Shane Gann. PHOTO BY ALI CRANE

LOCAL MUSIC continued on page 25 February 2, 2012

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LOCAL MUSIC continued from page 21

Fresh jams

Soul Butter

playing Lost on Main’s annual Harvest Ball), and now want to make a mark with a recording followed by a raising of their profile with more gigs around town. Even though they’ve been together less than a year (with drummer Ricky Atallah having been with them only since August), with their funky chops and youthful enthusiasm, Soul Butter appears to have the potential to join the fine tradition of party-friendly Chico bands—Brut Max, The Hips, Electric Circus, Swamp Zen, et al.—that have come before. Soul Butter performs with Alli Battaglia & The Musical Brewing Co. Friday, Feb. 24, at LaSalles. www.facebook.com/soulbutterband

Listening to Soul Butter at a recent rehearsal as they worked up a sweat on a lively jam called “The Bills,” it was impossible not to think of the early sounds of Chico faves The Mother Hips. The soulful jam featured great vocal harmonies and some of those funky well-timed crowd-friendly breakdowns, with instruments dropping out and the riffs returning in unison distorted and very muscular. “[It was] the first one that really came off,” said rhythm guitarist Jesse McDermott about the impressive song. And the rockin’ song really does come off, as do the other tunes in the band’s eclectic repertoire—from the all-hands-ondeck ’70s rocker “The Situation” to the reggae-ish slow jam “Better That Way,” which highlights vocal interplay between co-frontmen guitarist/vocalist Chris Miller and ukulele-player/vocalist Julian Ruck (who used to be in Hear for Now with McDermott). Miller’s is the more melodious of the two voices, but in conjunction with Ruck’s soulful rasp, the combination works really well. Overall, it’s a very Chico sound—groovy but not jammy, very catchy, and with a grittiness sweetened by the harmonizing voices. “While we’re trying to make it funky, it’s still sounding really ear-friendly, and we’re not trying to shove 12-minute jams down people’s throats,” said McDermott. “It’s composed,” added bassist/guitarist Jeff Spanier (who used to play guitar in local rapper Eye-Que’s band Live Assist). Spanier is also the engineer for the EP the band is currently recording at its rehearsal space, and which it hopes to have ready in time for the next show, Feb. 24, at LaSalles. “My goal is four-to-five, at least three songs,” said Miller, “something to start giving to people so they can actually go away from a show and put something into a CD player.” The band is at that first turning point, where they’ve played enough to start building a following (opening shows for the likes of Nevada City’s rootsy jammers Dead Winter Carpenters and

—Jason Cassidy jasonc@newsreview.com

As with many young bands, the challenge for Furlough Fridays wasn’t necessarily producing and performing good material—it was solidifying an unstable lineup. More specifically, their challenge was finding a regular drummer. If you attended one of the alt-rock quintet’s energetic live shows in Chico over the past four years, you saw one of four different drummers who have played alongside vocalist Linda Bergmann, bassist Meagan Yates, rhythm guitarist Adam Yates and lead guitarist Brian Larson since their formation. With a fundamental position in the band in constant flux, it was difficult to focus on recording and writing new material. Enter 22-year-old Sam Casale, the bespectacled stickman formerly of Sacramento indie outfit Stasis Burden who has held down the Furlough kit for the past five months. Casale left Sacramento to attend Chico State, at which point the band made its move. “We found out he was moving here so we stole him, and now we love our Sam,” said Meagan Yates. With a lineup they hope to maintain for a good long while, they are in the process of recording two full albums worth of music at a couple of Chico recording studios— Strange Seed Studios and Origami Lounge. For a band with an uncertain recent history, they believe taking on such a substantial project (or “going all Smashing Pumpkins,” as Adam Yates put it) will allow them to progress creatively.

Gentlemen’s Coup

Local musician/producer/musician’s friend Scott Barwick has kept his head in the ’60s over the past few years, first with garagerock powerhouse Candy Apple, and now with his latest psychedelic pop band Gentlemen’s Coup. The Chico five-piece doesn’t dive too deep into obscure, dusty record bins, but has

cultivated a sound that pulls from Pink Floyd, The Beatles and, even more so, the post-Beatles work of Lennon and McCartney. “I’m not even that obsessed with The Beatles,” Barwick admitted. “But back in the day I definitely dropped some LSD while listening to The White Album.” Gentlemen’s Coup has been years in the making, as

Soul Butter: (from left) Julian Ruck, Jeff Spanier, Ricky Atallah, Chris Miller and Jesse McDermott.

Barwick has been taking his time with the material. It was shortly after the breakup of Candy Apple that he wrote “Angeline,” a song that morphs the darker, emotional angst found on 1970s John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band with McCartney’s quirkier, latter-day ramshackle pop.

PHOTO BY MATT SIRACUSA

(From left) Scott Barwick, Summer Maroste and Branden Smith of Gentlemen’s Coup.

Barwick insists he’s not so much obsessed with a certain time period as he is with specific instruments. While Candy Apple relied heavily on Farfisa, Gentlemen’s Coup pushes Mellotron and piano to the forefront. Barwick kept writing, while at the same time working on getting his recording space/venue Origami Lounge up and running. Though the songs got pushed aside, they didn’t go away. “I don’t know why I held onto [the songs] for so long,” he explained. “I guess I was just waiting for the right group of people.” That group eventually came together in the form of bassist Branden Smith, Iestin Roughton (aka Dr. Yes!) on keys, drummer Dan Olny and former Candy Appler Summer Maroste, who plays Mellotron samples and tambourine. The band’s shows are usually a mix of to-the-point pop tunes and what Barwick calls “psychedelic ramblings,” which is what he expects to bring to the first Gentlemen’s Coup record. The rough versions sound promising. “Carnival” gets a lift from a grandiose Queen-inspired chorus, while “Crystal Flowers” veers off into space running on a single, elongated guitar line topped with echo-y vocals. (LSD would probably work with this one.) “For myself, I need to focus and get this record out,” said Barwick, although he’s not about to rush things. “With this band it’s been not about rushing, but waiting for the right moment. These songs are like babies to me.” www.gentlemenscoup.com —Mark Lore

PHOTO BY KYLE DELMAR

The young mathematicians

Hail the Sun

‘Going all Smashing Pumpkins’

Furlough Fridays

Vintage pop and psychedelic ramblings

“There have been songs that stuck around and haven’t, and we’re kind of at the point where we’re done with [the older material],” Casale said. “With the two albums we’ll kind of close that chapter. Let’s just be steady now and work out what we want to do as a band rather than working through the hardships of forming in the first place.” The members have been influenced by a variety of musicians and styles, but they all shared an interest in the ’90s alternative scene—bands that were on the fringe of rock music but still maintained a pop sensibility. Indeed, Furlough Fridays like making loud, fuzzy noises, but they also don’t shy away from the catchy hook. “We’re not really a screamin’ band, but this new album has a lot of the grungy, alternative sound with a lot of distorted tones,” Adam Yates said of Sliver, the first of two planned releases this spring and summer. “The other one [New Growth] has a lot of more poppy songs.” The group hopes to embark on two mini-tours of the West Coast over the summer, city-hopping north to Seattle in June and then south to San Diego in August. Furlough Fridays performs Saturday, Feb. 11, with The Noetics, Dumpster Dandies and The Deaf Pilots, at Babylon Community Arts Center. www.reverbnation.com/furloughfridays —Howard Hardee howardh@newsreview.com

22 CN&R February 2, 2012

Furlough Fridays: (from left) Meagan Yates, Linda Bergmann, Sam Casale, Adam Yates and Brian Larson. PHOTO BY MICHELLE CAMY

When drummer Donovan Melero was 19 years old he went to Slim’s in San Francisco to see now-defunct math-rockers The Fall of Troy, featuring one of his musical heroes, guitarist Thomas Erak. That night, while standing in the audience, the precocious young Melero found himself standing next to Erak and turned and shouted to him over the noise, “One day my band is going to tour with your band.” Today, Melero is a newly graduated Chico State music major whose band Hail the Sun specializes in a high-energy brand of math rock of its own. And, as you might have already guessed, he and the band are indeed going to be touring with Erak’s band—Seattle progressive post-punk crew Just Like Vinyl—on a seven-show West Coast jaunt next month that will stop at Chico’s Origami Lounge on Feb. 24. “Opening for them is going to be very exciting,” said Melero during a recent interview at his workplace, Woodstock’s Pizza, with bassist John Stirrat. The tour with JLV is due to the hard work of Melero, who set up the shows and convinced JLV to pair up with his band. And that industriousness is indicative of the DIY spirit at the heart of Hail the Sun over its two-plus years. Since 2009 they’ve gone on tour six times. “Since our junior year, we’ve been OK to give up our breaks to tour,” Melero said. In between classes and road trips the band

has found the time to put its frenetic brand of constantly shifting post-punk onto one album (Pow, Right in the Kisser) and one single (“Will They Blame Me if You Go Disappearing”)— both of which are available for free download at www.hailthesun.bandcamp.com. And co-frontmen Shane Gann and Aric Garcia are right now putting the finishing touches on new songs that the band will be recording for an EP to be released in the spring. The funding for the EP came courtesy of a successful Kickstarter.com campaign that raised $2,500, thanks in part to an irreverent video starring the band’s hilarious bassist. “We just kind of improvised,” Stirrat admitted. With its commitment to get out of town, Hail the Sun has always been as much a band of the road as a Chico band (a blueprint more young local bands would be smart to emulate), but with everyone having graduated, after this school semester home base will shift to SoCal. Chances are, though, that Chico will be on the schedule of many more tours to come. Hail the Sun performs with Just Like Vinyl, Final Last Words and Cinematic Projections Friday, Feb. 24, at Origami Lounge. www.facebook.com/hailthesun —Jason Cassidy

Hail the Sun: (from left) Donovan Melero, Aric Garcia, John Stirrat and Shane Gann. PHOTO BY ALI CRANE

LOCAL MUSIC continued on page 25 February 2, 2012

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LOCAL MUSIC continued from page 23

Metal-pedia One hairy guitarist’s guide to local metal bands The metal genre is no longer merely “heavy.” There are so many subgenres and blendings of styles that it’s hard for even fans of the heavy stuff to keep up with the variations among the many different sounds blasting from the full stacks of speakers in the bustling local metal scene. To help provide a little guidance, we turned to Jake Hollingsworth—a 21-year-old devoted local metal fan and the hair-whipping guitarist of Paradise metal crew Aberrance—to create this easy-to-reference Local Metal Encyclopedia. And he starts with an explanation of his own fun, fierce and very hairy fourpiece …

Miracle Mile: (clockwise, from left) Ken Lovgren, Colby Mancasola, Kelly Bauman and Jason Willmon. PHOTO COURTESY OF MIRACLE MILE

Vintage Nor Cal

Miracle Mile

“Straight and Narrow”—the first song from Chico oldies but newbies Miracle Mile—is a breezy number that brings to mind the mid-tempo twang of Gas Food Lodging-era Green on Red. Much of the song’s country vibe comes from guitarist/lick-meister Jason Willmon, who moonlights with Portland-by-way-ofChico honkey-tonk weirdos Flash Flood & the Dikes. The impetus for Miracle Mile, however, is Kelly Bauman, known around these parts as a founding member of noise-pop legends Deathstar. Bauman recently re-entered Chico’s atmosphere after more than a decade in the Pacific Northwest, and wasted little time getting to work. “It’s really comfortable to settle back into playing with people I’d played with before,” said Bauman, who joined up with former Deathstar bassist Ken Lovgren and drummer Colby Mancasola, who spent years in indie-rock heroes Knapsack. Miracle Mile joins the forces of four musicians who cut their teeth in bands while growing up in the sun-hammered plot of Redding. Back then, Willmon, Lovgren and Mancasola all played in For Pete’s Sake, while Bauman was delivering the goods in Case for Radio. Miracle Mile is a band raised on the glorious noise of The Replacements and Superchunk, and the com-

bined mileage under their belts only adds to their pop smarts. While the genteel demo “Straight and Narrow” is the only thing listeners currently have at their disposal, the new material is shaping up to be a little more rambunctious, which, given their pedigrees, seems like a no-brainer. “It’s a Replacements-like version of what I was doing in Portland,” said Bauman, who released the stunning jangler Gomorrah in 2009. As for the band’s slight country bent: “I don’t want it to be all whiskey and wallet-chains. You want it to be smarter than the average bear.” The members of Miracle Mile hit Chico’s Origami Lounge with Portland musician/producer Mike Coykendall, who’s manned the boards for M. Ward and Blitzen Trapper, among others. Bauman says the session will likely produce five songs, which should see the light of day this spring, with more shows to follow. Perhaps it’s Chico’s warm and cozy vibe that brought these guys back together. “It’s kind of funny—20 years later and we’re all in the same room,” Bauman said. Whatever the reason, it’s going to benefit the discerning ears of those paying attention. www.facebook.com/pages/MiracleMile/233979743343572

• Aberrance: A weird mixture of death metal, thrash metal, a bit of progressive metal, and sprinkles of every other kind of music that your parents don’t want you listening to. Then take that monster and make it listen to hip-hop from the ’90s. • Amarok: The sound of taking a mythological titan and pouring it out through speakers until the beast resonates through your bones. The doomiest doom, slow and very powerful. The band commonly shakes picture frames off walls and glasses off counters. • Armed for Apocalypse: A sludgy, thrashy, dirty, brutal metal band that is all about the money riffs. It’s hard to place them. It’s music that needs to be head-banged to, and that’s about all that matters. • Atreum: Like listening to all the classic metal bands in a newer metal fashion. Lots of grooves and solos. Classic guitar music. • The Castless: Vikings from the tundra of Sweden who grew up in Butte County and listened to a lot of melodic Swedish metal, then got into the sound of metalcore breakdowns. Viking metalcore, if you will. • Epitaph of Atlas: A two-piece that lathers its sound with as much distortion as possible and plays some of the most groovin’ sludge-doom I’ve ever laid ears upon. • Esoteric: A mixture of heavy hard rock and metal, with some reggae thrown into the mix. It’s definitely intriguing and deserves a listen. • Every Hand Betrayed: Heavier than the sounds of heavy things. Extremely hardcore, seven-string guitars, brutal breakdowns, 808 drops. If it’s heavy they do it. • Hearses: Some of the eeriest doom metal out there. The sound of lighting a candle in a cemetery at night. • Helm of Cerberus: The dirtiest of all grind playing in the North State. Dirty, grimy, loud, and really fast. • A Holy Ghost Revival: A really melodic metal band that incorporates keyboards for a unique version of melodic hardcore and metal. Lyrics about positivity and spirituality— looking to take metal into a more positive, enlightening realm. • Into the Open Earth: Really hard to place. A little bit of sludge, a little bit of thrash and a whole lot of originality. Great live show. • A Plague Upon Her: Pretty straightforward metalcore band. Very heavy. • Reverse Order: Great old-school death metal. Just brutal and straightforward. • Teeph: The sound of your subconscious grinding your teeth in your sleep. Expect grimacing faces and a whole lot of curse words at their live shows. Just angry, angry music. • Tome of Goetia: Great technicality and death metal mixed together. The stuff I can’t begin to imagine playing on guitar— lightening-quick arpeggios and evil riffs— and whirling-circle head banging that was way more impressive when they still had long hair.

—Mark Lore mark@daysof lore.com

Aberrance

’s Jake Hol

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February 2, 2012

Grayscale

pg25CNR02.02.12

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Arts & Culture “Florence Jones and Friend,” circa 1915-20. The young lady on the right is Florence Jones (later Clark). Her companion has not been identified.

Lens on history

PHOTO COURTESY DOUGLAS KEISTER COLLECTION

THIS WEEK

Local photographer’s century-old negative collection is a Nebraska state treasure

E tologist digging through dusty, forgotten corners of the British Geological Survey stumbled upon

arlier this month, an English paleon-

a collection of 314 slides collected, mounted and signed by Charles Darwin and his by inner circle of scientists. Popular Ken Smith history is full of these kinds of stokenswagger@ ries, the old Rembrandt-in-the-attic gmail.com fantasy fueling folklore, film, and an ever-growing cadre of cable programs (Storage Wars, Pawn Stars, Cajun Pawn Stars, et. al). PREVIEW: Amazingly, such a story plays a Black and White in part in a photography exhibit runBlack and White is on display through ning in February at Chico State in Feb. 24 at the honor of Black History Month. Humanities Center Black and White in Black and Gallery. Reception White is a collection of several with talk by dozen photographs of mostly Douglas Keister Tuesday, Feb. 7, African-American citizens of 5-7 p.m. Lincoln, Neb., taken between 1910 Also, presentation and 1925. by Ed Zimmer in The prints were made from a Rowland-Taylor collection of 280 glass negatives Recital Hall Wednesday, owned by local author and photogFeb. 8, 7 p.m. rapher Douglas Keister. The negatives were given to Keister in 1965 Humanities by a friend who’d purchased them Center Gallery at a yard sale. At the time, Keister Chico State, Trinity 100 was a junior in high school in 898-6341 Lincoln, and a burgeoning photogwww.csuchico.edu/ rapher who used them to make hfa/hc/gallery.html some of his first prints in a homemade darkroom. “The first prints I made were from the negatives that were city scenes of Lincoln because they were familiar to me,” Keister said. “I somehow knew the negatives were important and luckily held onto them. Every so often I’d make a print or two and marveled at the quality, but without any other information about them I didn’t explore further. “Nowadays a person can scan/digitize a negative and post or email it for quick and wide dissemination. Before the digital age one would have had to make prints and then figure out where to send them. Thus, even though the pictures were important, there was little practical way of sharing them. However, throughout the years I kept plugging away and exploring ideas and venues.” In 1999, another Lincoln student happened upon 36 more glass negatives, which were determined to have been taken by John Johnson, a native Lincoln

laborer-cum-itinerant photographer and son of a black Civil War veteran, and his assistant, Earl McWilliams. This prompted Keister to contact the Nebraska State Historical Society, which named Keister’s collection a state treasure. Since then, the photos and their story have appeared in numerous newspapers and magazines, and Keister co-authored a book—Lincoln in Black and White: 1910-1925—with Ed Zimmer, historic preservation planner for the Lincoln/Lancaster Planning Department. The Chico State exhibit will be showing the photos publicly. Because of the large size and well-preserved state of the negatives, the pictures are displayed on a large scale, some as big as 40-by-60 inches. At the time they were taken, Lincoln was the second-largest city in Nebraska and had the state’s second-largest black population. The photos depict people—both black and white—from all walks of life in various contexts. Some are portraits in formal dress, others are slice-of-life shots taken against the backdrop of the city. “The photos open a door to what life was like for African-Americans and immigrants in the Midwest in early 20th-century America,” Keister said of their artistic and historic value. “Even when the setting is less than desirable and the people’s clothes are ragged, never are the people depicted as downtrodden or ‘less than.’ To a person, they are pictured as ennobled.” Keister explained the exhibit, enhanced with objects seen in the photos and a camera contemporary to that used in their creation, is designed with an eye toward a visceral, empathic experience on the part of the viewer: “Seeing a photo of a woman holding an August 1918 copy of The Ladies’ Home Journal and also seeing the actual magazine make it more real; more accessible. I’ve also included an actual glass negative in the display since most people have never seen one.” Keister is currently working to complete a novel and working on another book about Paris cemeteries. He’s written 40 books on subjects as wide-ranging as Victorian architecture, cemeteries and Airstream trailers. He’s even penned a children’s book in Chinese. As for the future of the photos, Keister said Joel Zimbelman, dean of the College of Humanities and Fine Arts at Chico State, is helping to find funding to take the display on the road, and other officials in cities he’s spoken with are very interested in bringing the exhibit to their town. Ω

26 CN&R February 2, 2012

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THURS

Art Receptions BIENNIAL NATIONAL PRINT COMPETITION RECEPTION: Franklin Sirmans of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art will speak in room 150 of the Student Services Center followed by an awards reception in the Turner Print Museum at 6:30 p.m. Th, 2/2, 5:30pm. Chico State; 400 W. First St.; (530) 898-6333; www.chicostatebox office.com.

Theater THE LADIES MAN: A comedy revolving around a doctor’s frantic efforts to keep his young wife from learning about an indiscreet meeting he has with a female patient. Th-Sa, 7:30pm through 2/12; Su, 2/5, 2pm; Su, 2/12, 2pm. $12$16. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

MY FAIR LADY: The classic musical about a London linguist who wagers he can transform a working-class girl into an elegant, mannered lady. Th-Sa, 7:30pm; Su, 2pm through 2/5. $12$20. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheater company.com.

3

FRI

Special Events COMEDY CLUB GRAND OPENING: Two nights, four shows and non-stop laughs for the opening weekend at Chico’s new comedy club. Two shows each night, featuring a variety of local and touring comedians. F, 2/3, 7 & 8:30pm; Sa, 2/4, 7 & 8:30pm. $10. The Last Stand, 167 E. Third St., (530) 354-1936, www.thelaststand comedy.com.

Music MELVIN SEALS & JGB: Former Jerry Garcia Band keyboardist Melvin Seals and his band JGB will follow Alli Battaglia and the Musical Brewing Co. F, 2/3, 8pm. $18. El Rey Theatre; 230 W. Second St.; (530) 342-2727.

MONOPHONICS: The Monophonics, a San Francisco funk and soul group, will appear alongside Sacramento’s ZuhG and DJ Dan K. F, 2/3, 9pm. $8. Lost On Main; 319 Main St.; (530) 891-1853.

Theater DEAD MANS CELL PHONE: A witty comedy by

MARDIS GRAS CELEBRATION

Saturday, Feb. 4 Paradise Ridge Senior Center SEE SATURDAY, SPECIAL EVENTS

Sarah Ruhl following a woman who is pushed out of her introverted lifestyle upon answering a dead man’s cell phone. F, Sa, 7:30pm


FINE ARTS Art

HUMANITIES CENTER GALLERY: Black and White

1078 GALLERY: Joe Meiser & Michael Arrigo, works by object-based sculptor Joe Meiser and multi-media artist Michael Arrigo on display. 2/2-2/24. 820 Broadway, (530) 3431973, www.1078gallery.org.

RUTHIE FOSTER & PAUL THORN Monday, Feb. 6 Sierra Nevada Big Room

ANGELOS CUCINA TRINACRIA: Sal Casa Gallery, some of Sal Casa’s early work depicting classic Sicilian culture. Ongoing. 407 Walnut St., (530) 899-9996.

in Black and White, large-scale historical photos of predominantly African American citizens of Lincoln, Nebraska between 19101925 on display. Through 2/24. 400 W First St. CSU, Chico, Trinity Hall.

NAKED LOUNGE TEA AND COFFEEHOUSE: Art by

Carob, colorful portraits of people local artist Carob finds particularly inspiring. Through 2/29. Gallery hours are Open daily.. 118 W. Second St., (530) 895-0676.

SEE MONDAY, MUSIC

AVENUE 9 GALLERY: Uptown-Downton Pacific

Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 5332473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

through 2/4. $10-$15. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroom theatre.com.

THE LADIES MAN: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

MY FAIR LADY: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

Natural Foods, 360 Ecotique, and Lyon Books, $18 at the door. Chico Women’s Club, 592 E. Third St., (530) 894-1978.

Art Receptions STEVE ROSENFELD ART OPENING: New art by Steve Rosenfeld accompanied by musician Martin Purtill. Sa, 2/4, 8pm. Free. Bustolinis Deli & Coffee House; 800 Broadway St.; (530) 892-1790.

SYLVIA: A canine-centric comedy detailing the relationship between a man, his dog and his wife. F, Sa, 7:30pm; Su, 2pm through 2/5. $7-$15. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

Theater DEAD MANS CELL PHONE: See Friday. Blue Room Theatre, 139 W First St., (530) 895-3749, www.blueroomtheatre.com.

4

SAT

THE LADIES MAN: See Thursday. Theatre on the

Special Events

MY FAIR LADY: See Thursday. Chico Theater

Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-5760, www.totr.org.

CHICO AQUAJETS CRAB FEED: The public is invited to this dinner and auction to benefit the Chico Aquajets, the region’s oldest competitive swim program. Sa, 2/4, 6pm. $45. Chico Masonic Life Family Center; 1110 East Ave. Between Guynn Ave. & Nord Ave.; 5187946.

COMEDY CLUB GRAND OPENING: See Friday for

info. F, 2/3, 7 & 8:30pm; Sa, 2/4, 7 & 8:30pm. $10. The Last Stand, 167 E. Third St., (530) 354-1936, www.thelaststandcomedy.com.

MARDI GRAS CELEBRATION: Big Mo and the Full Moon Band provide the entertainment for this Paradise Center for Tolerance and Nonviolence benefit. A silent auction, door prizes, best costume awards and a no-host bar round out the festivities. Sa, 2/4, 7pm. $15$20. Paradise Ridge Senior Center; 877 Nunneley Rd. in Paradise; (530) 877-1733.

Music KIDS & CREEKS 5TH ANNUAL BENEFIT CONCERT: Central California country/Americana crew The Good Luck Thrift Store Outfit and kneeslappin’ locals Poa Porch Band lead the party. Sa, 2/4, 7-11pm. $15 in advanced at Chico

Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

SYLVIA: See Friday. Birdcage Theatre, 1740 Bird St. in Oroville, (530) 533-2473, www.birdcagetheatre.net.

5

SUN

Post your event for free online at www.newsreview.com/calendar. Once posted, your CN&R calendar listing will also be considered for print. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Deadline for print listings is one week prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Music RUTHIE FOSTER & PAUL THORN: Ruthie Foster and Paul Thorn, on tour together for the first time, bring their combination of thoughtful songwriting and blues virtuosity to the Big Room. M, 2/6, 7:30pm. $28. Sierra Nevada Big Room; 1075 East 20th St.; (530) 345-2739; www.sierranevada.com/bigroom.

8

WED

Special Events COMEDY NIGHT: Weekly comedy night on Wednesdays inside Spirits Lounge at Gold Country Casino. W, 8pm. Free. Gold Country Casino; 4020 Olive Hwy at Gold Country Casino & Hotel in Oroville; (530) 534-9892; www.goldcountrycasino.com.

Theater OFF THE CUFF: Bi-monthly improvisational performances. Every other W, 7:30pm. $5 advance/$8 door. Blue Room Theatre; 139 W First St.; (530) 895-3749; www.blueroom theatre.com.

BUTTE COLLEGE ART GALLERY: The Voodoo

Hills, pictures by Rachelle Montoya. Through 2/24. 3536 Butte Campus Dr. Inside the ARTS

Building in Oroville, (530) 895-2208.

CHICO ART CENTER: Uptown-Downton Pacific

Flyway Exhibit, art featured as part of the Snow Goose Festival’s Uptown-Downtown Pacific Flyway exhibit, hosted by the Chico Art Center and Avenue 9. Through 2/12. 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 895-8726, www.chicoartcenter.com.

CHICO CITY MUNICIPAL CENTER: Joel Collier

Photography, a display of Joel Collier’s photography on all three floors of the City Municipal Center building. Through 7/13. 411 Main St. City Hall, (530) 896-7200.

CHICO CREEK NATURE CENTER: Dragonflies and Damselflies, a photo exhibit by Robert Woodward. Ongoing. 1968 E. Eighth St., (530) 891-4671, www.bidwellpark.org.

CHICO PAPER COMPANY: Monuments by Bill

DiGrazia, works by DiGrazia, who manipulates photographs to detach the structure from recognizable surroundings. Through 6/1.Jake Early Ca. Mountain Series, an exhibition of the “California Mountain” series, a collection five years in the making. Through 4/30, 9:30am-6pm. 345 Broadway, (530) 8910900, www.chicopapercompany.com.

HEALING ART GALLERY: Current exhibits, by Northern California artists whose lives have been touched by cancer. Currently featuring watercolors by Amber Palmer. Ongoing. 265 Cohasset Rd. inside Enloe Cancer Center, (530) 332-3856.

SATORI COLOR & HAIR DESIGN: Michael

Mulcahy Paintings, bright bold works of pop art, figures, animals, landscapes, and abstracts. Through 3/15. 627 Broadway St. 120.

TURNER PRINT MUSEUM: Biennial National

Print Competition Exhibition, works by emerging artists past their academic careers who are pushing the boundaries of traditional printmaking, also on display at the University Art Gallery. Through 3/4. 400 W First St. Meriam Library breezeway, CSU, Chico.

UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY: Biennial National

Print Competition Exhibition, works by emerging artists past their academic careers who are pushing the boundaries of traditional printmaking, also on display at the Turner Print Museum. Through 3/4. 400 W First St. Taylor Hall, CSU, Chico.

UPPER CRUST BAKERY & EATERY: Simple

Images, photos from the travels of Marianne Werner on display. Through 2/29. 130 Main St., (530) 895-3866.

Museums BOLTS ANTIQUE TOOL MUSEUM: Kitchen

Gadgets, a new display featuring kitchen gadgets past and present. M-Sa, 10am3:45pm; Su, 11:45am-3:45pm. $2 adults/kids free. 1650 Broderick St. in Oroville, (530) 538-2497, www.boltsantiquetools.com.

CHICO MUSEUM: Amazing Grains, the story of

rice in California and beyond. Through 2/29. $3 adults/$2 students and seniors/kids 14 and under free. 141 Salem St., (530) 8914336.

GATEWAY SCIENCE MUSEUM: Toys: The Inside

Story, an exhibit featuring 12 hands-on stations illustrating the simple mechanisms found in most toys. W-Su, 12-5pm. $3-$5. 625 Esplanade.

Theater

John Ross

MY FAIR LADY: See Thursday. Chico Theater Company, 166 Eaton Rd. Ste. F, (530) 894-3282, www.chicotheatercompany.com.

for more Music, see NIGHTLIFE on page 34

Chazz Hawkins

THE LADIES MAN: See Thursday. Theatre on the Ridge Playhouse, 3735 Neal Rd. in Paradise, (530) 8775760, www.totr.org.

SYLVIA: See Friday. Birdcage

JOE MEISER & MICHAEL ARRIGO

FREE LISTINGS!

6

MON

Flyway Exhibit, art featured as part of the Snow Goose Festival’s Uptown-Downtown Pacific Flyway exhibit, hosted by Avenue 9 and the Chico Art Center. Through 2/12. Free.Bling Fling, an artists’ Valentines jewelry show. 2/3-2/12. 180 E. Ninth Ave., (530) 879-1821, www.avenue9gallery.com.

Shows through Feb. 24 1078 Gallery SEE FINE ARTS

Are you ready to laugh? Chico, you have been waiting for this: a real, honest-to-all-that-is-good-andwrong comedy club. This weekend, Comedy from the Couch honcho John Ross will open his new downtown venue, The Last Stand, EDITOR’S PICK with four shows in two nights packed with the comedy stylings of both visiting and local comedians. Night one, Friday, Feb. 3, the bill includes Ray Molina (SF Punchline), Sac’s John Alston and Johnny Taylor, plus The Last Stand’s house improv team, Bonetown. And night two, Saturday, Feb. 4, it’s Chazz Hawkins (SF Punch Line), Bryan Yang (For the People Comedy Tour), Nick Aragon (Sac’s Stand-up Shoot-out champ) and Josh Vigil. See Friday & Saturday, Special Events for more info.

—JASON CASSIDY February 2, 2012

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Treat yourself to gift certificates up to 75% OFF! Visit www.newsreview.com

BULLETIN BOARD

ACADEMIC DECATHLON

Community

Saturday, Feb. 4 CUSD Center for the Arts

ACADEMIC DECATHALON: Students from five high schools in Butte County will put their knowledge to the ultimate test. A fast-paced question and answer relay will cap the competition and will be followed by an awards ceremony. Sa, 2/4, 1:15pm. CUSD Center for the Arts, 1475 East Ave. corner of East and Ceanothus, 5325761.

SEE COMMUNITY

FARMERS MARKET - SATURDAY: Baked goods,

honey, fruits and veggies, crafts and more. Sa, 7:30am-1pm. Chico Certified Saturday Farmers Market, Municipal Parking Lot On Second And Wall Streets, (530) 893-3276.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: Regularly scheduled

meeting. Every other Tu, 9am. Board of Supervisors Chambers, 25 County Center Dr. in Oroville, (530) 538-7631, www.butte county.net.

FREEDOM FROM SMOKING PROGRAM: An eightsession course providing techniques to quit smoking. The program will be held in the Canyon View Clinic Wellness Center. Call for more information. Th, 2/2, 2:30-5pm; Tu, 2/7, 2:30-5pm; Th, 2/9, 2:30-5pm. Feather River Hospital, 5974 Pentz Rd. in Paradise, 876-7154, www.frhosp.org.

BUTTE PARENTS FOR CPS AND COURT REFORM: A meeting to share and discuss stories related to Children’s Services. M, 7pm. Free. Cozy Diner, 1695 Mangrove Ave., (530) 895-1195.

CARTOONING & ART CLASS: All skill levels are welcome to join this six-session class where students will learn techniques to draw cartoon and comic book figures, horses, dragons and flip book animation. W, 3:30-4:30pm through 2/22. $70. Chico Art Center, 450 Orange St. 6, (530) 895-8726, www.chicoart center.com.

GLUTEN CONFUSION SEMINAR: Dr. Patrick Giammarise will host this seminar to clear up the confusion on what a gluten sensitivity is and how testing and treatment can offer relief for some bowel problems. Th, 2/2, 6-7pm. Free. Allergy & Digestive Relief Center, 2639 Forest Ave. 100, 899-8741, www.digestionrelief center.com.

CHICO FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE: Chico Friends of the Library weekly book sale. Sa, 9:15-11:30am. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary.

INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: No partners necessary. Call for more information. First F of every month, 8pm. $2. Chico Creek Dance Centre, 1144 W. First St., 345-8134.

CHOOSEMYPLATE PRESENTATION: The Chico State Nutrition and Food Science Association hosts this presentation to explain ChooseMyPlate, the new symbol the USDA has unveiled to replace the food pyramid. Participants will also be informed of key pointers for healthy living. Su, 2/5, 10am. Free. Butte County Library, Chico Branch, 1108 Sherman Ave., (530) 891-2762, www.buttecounty.net/ bclibrary.

PARADISE FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE:

Sa, 10am-3pm. Butte County Library, Paradise Branch, 5922 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 8726320, www.buttecounty.net/bclibrary/ Paradise.htm.

SAMARITAN FREE CLINIC: This clinic offers free basic medical care and mental health counseling. Call for more information. Su, 2-4pm. Free. Paradise Lutheran Church, 780 Luther Dr. Next to Long’s Drugstore in Paradise, 8727085.

DANCE SANCTUARY WAVE: Bring a water bottle, drop your mind, free your feet and your spirit. Call for directions. Tu, 6:30-8:30pm. $10. Call for details, 891-6524.

SOUL SHAKE DANCE CHURCH: Drop your mind, find your feet and free you spirit at this DJ dance wave to a range of musical styles. No previous dance experience necessary. Su, 10am-noon. $8-$15 sliding scale. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 895-4707.

DENTAL CARE FOR UNINSURED CHILDREN: Chico area dentists unite for this one-day event where uninsured children ages 1-12 will receive free dental care. Pre-registration is required and children must be accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. F, 2/3, 9am-5pm. Free. Erik Roos Dentistry, 274 Cohasset Rd., 893-4044.

FARMERS MARKET - CHAPMAN: Free blood-pres-

Volunteer BIDWELL PARK VOLUNTEERS: Help the park by

sure screenings, recipes and kids activities at 16th and C streets. EBT SNAP cards accepted. F, 2-5:30pm through 2/29. Dorothy Johnson Center, 775 E. 16th St., (530) 624-8844, www.cChaos.org.

volunteering for trash pick-up, invasive plant removal, trail maintenance, site restoration, water quality testing and more. Ongoing; check Friends of Bidwell Park web site for dates and locations. Ongoing. Call for location, www.friendsofbidwellpark.org.

FARMERS MARKET - CHICO STATE: The Organic Vegetable Project’s weekly sale of freshpicked greens of chard, kale, cabbage, flowers, herbs, veggies, farm-fresh eggs and more. Location: Student Learning Center plaza. W, 9am-1pm. Chico State, 400 W. First St., (530) 898-6333, www.chicostateboxoffice.com.

FARMERS MARKET - FIREHOUSE: Locally grown fruits and vegetables and resources for better health. Th, 11am-3pm through 8/31. El Medio Fire Department, 3515 Myers St. in Oroville, (530) 592-0889 ext. Message, www.cChaos.org.

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MORE ONLINE Additional listings for local meetings, support groups, classes, yoga, meditation and more can be found online at www.newsreview.com/chico/local/calendar.


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he path of the righteous man,” quoth the

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CN&R 29


6701 CLARK ROAD

872-7800

www.paradisecinema.com

final week! meryl streep in

iron lady fri 6:30pm 8:30pm sat (4pm) 6:30pm 8:30pm sun (2:30pm) 5pm mon-thu 6:30pm

ALL SHOWS PRESENTED

George Clooney is not an island.

IN

S HOWTIMES G OOD F RI 2/3 - THUR 2/9  1:30 4:15 6:55 *9:20PM

BIG MIRACLE

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CHRONICLE

 1:20 3:20 5:15 7:25 *9:45PM

THE WOMAN IN BLACK [PG-13]

 1:00 3:05 5:10 7:15 *9:20PM

[PG-13]

THE DESCENDANTS ®

5 OSCAR

MAN

[PG-13]

NOMINATIONS

ON A

 1:20 4:00 6:45 *9:30PM

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LEDGE

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ONE FOR THE MONEY [PG-13]

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RED TAILS

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MASSAGE Trouble in paradise

TOUCH OF CHINA

George Clooney is at his best as a widower in moving, funny tragicomedy

Eunexpectedly rich moment involving the story’s protagonist (Matt King, played by George Clooney). He’s just gotten arly on in The Descendants, there’s an

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some more very bad news of a very personal sort, and his reaction is to bolt from the house and run down a curving suburban street to his neighboring inby laws’ place. He’s wearing flip-flops (the setting Juan-Carlos is Hawaii) and he runs in an oddly comical and Selznick ungainly fashion. The blend of comedy and sorrow, pathos and panic in that moment is characteristic of the entire picture, and it’s also a signature moment for the character. King/Clooney is a Hawaiian businessman, soon-to-be-widowed father of two troubled daughters, head of a clan whose roots in Hawaii go back to the 19th century. He’s a mild sort of take-charge guy who’s The Descendants Starring George also a bit of a clueless doofus, a moderately Clooney, Shailene shrewd pater familias but casually ineffectual Woodley, Amara and oblivious as a husband and father. Miller and Beau The role may seem somewhat unusual for Bridges. Directed Clooney, but it provides the occasion for the by Alexander Payne. Cinemark most nuanced and wide-ranging performance 14, Feather River I’ve seen from him. And it’s no mere star-turn: Cinemas and writer-director Alexander Payne (Sideways) Paradise Cinema puts Clooney/King at the center of things here, 7. Rated R. but the center in this case is always part of a larger and ever more entangled situation. And that larger situation takes in quite a lot: King’s comatose and dying wife, the sorrows and travails of the two young (and already motherless) daughters, the belated discovery of Poor the wife’s infidelity, and the impending sale of virgin wilderness that has belonged to the King clan for more than a century. It’s the stuff of soap opera and tragic melodrama, but Payne Fair and company enliven and complicate all that by taking it in yet another direction—toward the comedy of contemporary middle-class manners. Good Adapted (by Payne and two co-writers) from a novel by Kaui Hart Hemmings, the story has a casual abundance that proves both Very Good disarming and engaging. Each of the plot strands involves a test of regions of King’s character that he has heretofore neglected, and the zig-zag path of his quirky integrity is comiExcellent cally crucial but never independent of the

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FRIDAY 2/3 – THURSDAY 2/9 MAN ON A LEDGE (diGital) ADVENTURES OF TINTIN (PG-13) 11:20am 2:00Pm (3d) (PG) 1:40Pm 6:50Pm 4:30Pm 7:00Pm 9:30Pm 9:25Pm MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN GHOST PROTOCOL (diGital) (PG) 11:05am (diGital) (PG-13) 4:15Pm 1:20Pm 7:20Pm BEAUTY AND THE BEAST ONE FOR THE MONEY (2012) (3d) (G) 2:30Pm (diGital) (PG-13) 4:50Pm 12:25Pm 2:45Pm 5:05Pm BEAUTY AND THE BEAST 7:25Pm 9:45Pm (2012) (diGital) (G) RED TAILS (diGital) 12:15Pm (PG-13)11:05am 1:55Pm BIG MIRACLE (diGital) 4:45Pm 7:35Pm 10:25Pm (PG)11:30am 2:05Pm UNDERWORLD AWAKENING 4:40Pm 7:15Pm 9:50Pm (3d) (r) 5:35Pm 7:50Pm CHRONICLE (diGital) 10:30Pm (PG-13) 11:00am 1:15Pm UNDERWORLD AWAKENING 3:30Pm 5:40Pm 8:00Pm (diGital) (r) 1:05Pm 10:10Pm 3:20Pm CONTRABAND (diGital) WOMAN IN BLACK, THE (r )11:15am 1:50Pm 4:25Pm 7:05Pm♥ 9:40Pm♥ (diGital) (PG-13) 12:30Pm 2:55Pm 5:20Pm 7:45Pm DESCENDANTS, THE 10:15Pm (diGital) (r )11:10am (SPECIAL SHOWING) - MET 2:05Pm 4:50Pm 7:30Pm OPERA: THE ENCHANTED 10:10Pm ISLAND ENCORE (diGital) EXTREMELY LOUD & (Nr) 2/8 oNly 6:30Pm INCREDIBLY CLOSE (SPECIAL SHOWING) - NT (diGital) (PG-13) LIVE: TRAVELLING LIGHT 1:00Pm (4:00Pm*) (diGital) (Nr) 2/9 oNly (6:55Pm*) (9:55Pm*) GREY, THE (2012) (diGital) 7:00Pm (r)11:25am 2:10Pm 4:55Pm (MIDNIGHT SHOWING) - STAR WARS: EPISODE 7:40Pm 10:25Pm I - PHANTOM MENACE (3d) HAYWIRE (diGital) (r) (PG) late NiGht thurS. 4:20Pm 10:20Pm 2/9 12:01am HUGO (3d) (PG) 7:10Pm 10:05Pm ShowtimeS liSted w/ ( *) Not ShowN wed. 2/8 ShowtimeS liSted w/ ♥ Not ShowN thurS. 2/9

30 CN&R February 2, 2012

2/9 Tao: The Way of the Drum 2/11 Hugh Masekela 2/14 Martha Graham Dance Company 2/22 Los Lonely Boys 2/23 Luma Theater 2/29 Red Star Red Army Chorus & Dance Ensemble 3/1 Ladysmith Black Mambazo 3/7 Nellie McKay Band 3/14 Playing for Change 3/23 Dervish 3/27 Branford Marsalis 4/6 & 4/7 Keeping Dance Alive! All shows at Laxson Auditorium California State University, Chico

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tougher issues involved. And that comic trajectory never stands apart from at least a half-dozen other characters, most of whom turn out—sooner or later—to be more complicated and interesting—and humane—than we might have guessed from the stereotypical sit-com first impressions that most of them make. The daughters, teenaged Alexandra (Shailene Woodley) and pre-teen Scottie (Amara Miller), are prime examples, as are King’s grumbly father-in-law (Robert Forster) and Alexandra’s hulking boyfriend Sid (Nick Krause). There’s an edgy, shambling ambiguity in Cousin Hugh (Beau Bridges) and fresh little deflected nuances in Brian Speer (Matthew Lillard), the real estate agent who has cuckolded King, as well as in Julie Speer (Judy Greer), his unsuspecting wife. Ω

Animal inside The Grey

4

Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R.

by Craig Blamer There’s a pulp sensibility running

through Joe Carnahan’s The Grey that evokes the man vs. nature adventure stories from the ’30s that were packaged between the lurid covers of men’s magazines, refined with a touch of Jack London’s eye for the desolate wilderness that served as a backdrop for his early Alaska tales. And that is good. However, if one goes into The Grey expecting to see Liam Neeson unleash all sorts of badassery on the timber wolves at hand, one might be disappointed. The Grey is heavy on the existentialism, light on the badassery, as Neeson and his erstwhile posse of survivors summon everything they can just to stay ahead of the snapping white fangs. What’s happened is, a bunch of roughnecks head out of a remote Alaskan drilling site on their way home to collect their paychecks


Pregnant? Need Help? when their transport plane scatters itself and them across the remote tundra. With no rescue team expected and a pack of territorial wolves just slaverin’ for some easy meat, the handful of survivors bundle up and try to make it to the supposed safety of the woods. Why? Maybe it was one of those “Seemed like a good idea at the time” things. It probably sounded sensible coming from Neeson’s character. He’s the only one of the bunch who seems to have the skill set to help them evade becoming wolf poop. While the rest of the survivors have the mean-street cred to be able to handle their differences mano-a-mano, they’re a little out of their ele-

ment when it comes to facing down the call of the wild. At first there doesn’t seem to be a lot going on with The Grey, which is essentially a point-A-to-point-B story (a werewolf movie without the were). But Carnahan (Narc) displays an evocative feel for old-fashioned story-telling, and a nuanced sense of dark irony. And while he follows the template of body-count horror, he also takes the time to define the characters beyond the expected caricatures and tweak the narrative tropes we’ve come to expect from a Hollywood thriller with a subtle hand, letting one appreciate the ironies without having them spoon fed. Ω

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reworking of the 2009 Icelandic film Reykjavík-Rotterdam. Cinemark 14. Rated R.

5

The Descendents

Opening this week Big Miracle

A romantic drama based on the real-life story of a family of gray whales trapped under ice in the Arctic Circle, starring John Krasinski as a newspaper reporter and Drew Barrymore as his Greenpeace girlfriend and partner in leading efforts to try and save the whales. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG.

Chronicle

See review this issue. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated R —J.C.S.

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

In the wake of the death of his father (Tom Hanks) during the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center, a young, gifted boy (Thomas Horn) searches for the lock that belongs to a mysterious key his father left behind. An adaptation of Jonathan Safran Foer’s 2005 novel of the same name. Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13.

A found-footage sci-fi flick about three high-school friends who gain superpowers after making an incredible discovery. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

4

The Woman in Black

2

Daniel Radcliffe begins his post-Potter life starring as a lawyer who visits the remote English countryside and discovers a village terrorized by the ghost of a vengeful woman. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Now playing

4

The Adventures of Tintin

Steven Spielberg’s animated adaptation of the classic European comic books (originally authored by the Belgian artist Hergé) has great liveliness and authenticity, cinematic and otherwise. The combination of motion capture and 3-D, both completely at the service of the unfolding story, works extraordinarily well. The sensational, exuberantly paced action sequences have a surprising kinetic dimensionality to them, and as a result, they make genuine physical sense in even their more magical moments. The best of the comic action in Tintin replicates the elaborate and beautifully timed stunts of classic silent films—the accidental gesture that perfectly subverts an impending threat, for example. In Spielberg’s other holiday release, War Horse, the horse is one of the film’s long-suffering heroes, but even with his gallant beauty, he makes less of an impression, characterwise, than does Tintin’s trusty dog “Snowy,” who is every bit as memorable as the flagrantly erratic Captain Haddock and the bumbling detectives, Thompson and Thomson, and perhaps others among Tintin’s familiar irregulars. Cinemark 14. Rated PG —J.C.S.

Beauty and the Beast 3-D

Disney brings back the wildly popular 1991 animated classic about the unlikely romance between Belle and Beast for a 3-D run. Cinemark 14. Rated G.

Contraband

Mark Wahlberg plays a retired contrabandrunner forced to do “one last job” in order to save his bro-in-law and keep his wife and kids from being targeted by a drug lord. A

The Grey

See review this issue. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —C.B.

Haywire

Haywire isn’t much more than an exercise in lo-fi style over substance, with a script that is rudimentary at best: a topshelf mercenary (played by mixed-martial artist Gina Carano) is betrayed by her foolish boss/ex-lover (Ewan McGregor) and sets off on a globe-hopping tour of mayhem as she lays down some payback on him and the other men (played by a lot of familiar faces) involved. No real stakes, other than some general payback. But Haywire isn’t about the story … or the acting. It’s about providing the viewer with the opportunity to watch a beautiful woman kick the shit out of a handful of deserving men. And she kicks down with the physical stuff damn well. Eliminate Carano from the mix and the film’s not worth making. Cinemark 14. Rated R —C.B.

3

The Iron Lady

Having Meryl Streep play the title role in a Margaret Thatcher biopic seems like a very good idea, but there are also times in The Iron Lady when that seems like the production’s only good idea. Streep’s Oscarnominated performance is a triumph over heavily Thatcherized prosthetic make-up, if nothing else, and there’s a reliably professional cast of British actors in the mix—Jim Broadbent as Thatcher’s husband, Denis; Olivia Colman as the Thatchers’ daughter, Carol; Alexandra Roach and Harry Lloyd as Margaret and Denis in their younger days, etc. Many of the film’s apparent assets, however, are rather sadly neutralized by the decision of the filmmakers—director Phyllida Lloyd and writer Abi Morgan—to put Thatcher’s elderly years as the center of things. Morgan’s screenplay uses an almost random array of flashbacks to provide glimpses of Thatcher’s life, public and domestic alike, with results that are skimpy on the history, clichéd on the personal life, and often counterproductive with respect to character and drama. The end result is not so much a portrait of “the Iron Lady” as yet another demonstration of what a brave and resourceful trouper Streep is. Pageant Theatre. Rated PG-13 —J.C.S.

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Man on a Ledge

There’s a fugitive (Sam Worthington) on the ledge of a high rise in Manhattan, a cop (Elizabeth Banks) trying to talk him down, and something fishy going on involving the fugitive’s bro (Jamie Bell), diamonds and a pissed-off Ed Harris. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

One for the Money

Katherine Heigl plays a bounty hunter who ends up chasing down an old flame (Jason O’Mara) on her first assignment. An adaptation of the first book in Janet Evanovich’s best-selling series of romance/adventure novels centered on the exploits of bounty hunter Stephanie Plum. Cinemark 14, Feather River Cinemas and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

Red Tails

A high-flying action/drama inspired by true events surrounding the Tuskegee Airmen, the famed group of African-American WWII DESIGNER pilots. Starring Terrence Howard, Cuba Gooding Jr., Nate Parker Ne-Yo and Bryan JEN_PU Cranston. Cinemark 14 and Paradise Cinema 7. Rated PG-13.

3

Underworld: Awakening

This fourth entry of the Underworld franchise delivers on what it promises: gothic action-porn with vampire warrior Kate Beckinsale twirling about in pleather, kicking ass among the explosions. This time around, the war between vampires and werewolves is interrupted when humans finally take notice of the conflict and do what humans do best when confronted with what scares them: kill ’em all. There’s no plot, of course. But the movie fills in the blanks with stoner-friendly mayhem, an emphasis on hyperkinetic visuals and pounding soundtrack. Unfortunately, the action bogs down in the second act as the characters pause to vogue and deliver leaden exposition to bring the audience up to speed on the back, front and side stories. Personally, I prefer my monsters to just moan and eat people, not stand around waxing existential. But then, this franchise wasn’t meant for my tastes. (Well, aside for the Beckinsale in pleather part.) Fortunately, the yapping is kept to a minimum as the flick shifts back into gear and resumes delivering with the fireworks to the end. Cinemark 14 and Feather River Cinemas. Rated R —C.B.

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Gypsy Rose Salon & Gallery

Still here

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Hugo

Cinemark 14. Rated PG —J.C.S.

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Mission: Impossible— Ghost Protocol

Cinemark 14. Rated PG-13 —C.B.

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CN&R 31


HOUSING EXPO Learn about off-campus housing options

Tuesday - Thursday • Feb. 7 - 9, 2012 10am - 4pm • Bell Memorial Union, 1st Floor, CSU Chico

Can’t stop Hugh At 72, South African jazz legend Hugh Masekela is as prolific as ever The irrepressible one. PHOTO COURTESY OF HUGH MASEKELA

Iwho could be said to have truly “been there, done that,” legendary f ever there was a person

South African trumpeter Hugh Masekela would by Christine G.K. easily fit the bill. After all, how LaPado many people can christine.lapado@ say that they have gmail.com lived through the struggles of apartheid, recovered from decades Preview: of alcohol addiction Chico Performances presents Hugh and traveled the Masekela Saturday, world many times Feb. 11, 7:30 p.m., over as a famous at Laxson musician, having Auditorium. performed and Tickets: $18-$30 www.chico recorded with the performances.com likes of Paul Simon, Miriam Laxson Makeba, LadyAuditorium smith Black MamChico State bazo and The 898-6333 Byrds? And that’s just the tip of a large iceberg. However, during a recent phone interview from Namibia, when confronted with the question, “So, you’ve been there, done that— what are you excited about these days?” Masekela didn’t miss a beat: “I don’t think anybody’s ever ‘been there, done that.’ There’s 7 billion people in the world!” There is always, in other words, someone new to meet, something new to do and see. His take on the joys of living a long life was refreshing, his enthu32 CN&R February 2, 2012

siasm infectious. “I am excited about life, about being alive,” offered Masekela, who is set to grace the stage at Chico State’s Laxson Auditorium on Feb. 11 with his high-energy Afrobeat/jazz sounds and killer sixpiece band. “You have to remember I never thought I’d live this long,” he added, referring to his struggles with substance abuse. “I’m into Chinese tai chi,” said the nearly 73-year-old Masekela, beginning to run down the things he’s doing that keep his life exciting. “I have a novel coming out, a Johannesburg thriller called Honky.” “Honky,” he explained, is short for “Seholongo”—“a name in my ancestral native language that one of my uncles was called. It means ‘a very strong farmer who doesn’t need to sleep.’” His debut novel, selfpublished by his book-publishing company, House of Masekela, will be released in March, in South Africa first. Masekela said he started the novel 13 years ago, and it is the first of three that he has been working on to be finished. “I finished it two months ago,” he said. “I have a very sharp literary group of young South Africans that I have been working with.” Masekela next mentioned the musical theater company he started three years ago: “We did a play called Songs of Migration at the Market Theatre in Johannesburg

[in 2010], and we are bringing it to the Kennedy Center [in Washington, D.C.] in October, and to the Edinburgh Festival in Scotland in August. ” Masekela added that he both acted and played music in the James Ngcobo play. Masekela is also getting ready to release two albums. In late March, he and his “old friend,” pianist Larry Willis, with whom he attended the Manhattan School of Music 50 years ago, will release Friends, a four-CD box set of “all old American classic ballads,” such as “Body and Soul,” “A Portrait of Jennie” and “Polka Dots and Moonbeams.” On Friends, Masekela sings the Fats Waller tune “Until the Real Thing Comes Along” (“I sing it real romantically”). The second album, recorded with his touring band, will be called Masimong. “‘Masimong’ means ‘in the field plowing and harvesting,” Masekela said. “And don’t forget the manure!” “I’m doing all those things, and community work,” he went on in his bubbly, happy way. Masekela said he works as a substanceabuse counselor as well as a trainer of substance-abuse counselors for his Musicians and Artists Assistance Programme of South Africa foundation. Sounds like a man who is busy doing everything he possibly can. “Yes, I have to,” he said. “How can I be bored when I have so much to do?” Ω


SUPPORTING LOCAL MUSIC Thu Feb 2

Count Funkula

Fri Feb 3

The Melodramatics + Final Last Words Wed Feb 8

Soul Real Music Group Presents... Thu Feb 9

Afternoon Bloom

Fri Feb 10

Steel Breeze

Wed Feb 15

Victoria! + Avenue of Escape + CARAWAY Fri Feb 17

The Hooliganz + Lynguistix + Tre Jones

EVERY LIVE MUSIC 30 Wednesday 9 - close Hour) Thursdays 6 - 9 (Happy Friday 8 - 11

hump The last

y month) (last Wednesday of ever Come check out our NEW riter Singer/Songw Showcases highlighting talented local musicians 8th Starts March 2

229 BROADWAY • 893.1891 JOIN THE PARTY, CHECK IN AND BE OUR FRIEND ON FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/LaSallesLIVE... for people that like “LIVE” music!

Valentine’s Weekend Special SWEETHEART DINNER Hors d’oeuvre to Share, Entreé, Dessert to Share, Box of Chocolate and Single Red Rose -

Friday, February 10 through Sunday, February 12 and Valentines Day, February 14

Reservations: (530) 528-3506

www.rollinghillscasino.com February 2, 2012

CN&R 33


NIGHTLIFE

2THURSDAY

THURSDAY 02|2—WEDNESDAY 02|8

street; (530) 893-1891.

Thunder Cafe; (530) 895-8100; www.tbarchico.com.

OPEN MIC: Singers, poets and musicians

AARON RICH & FRIENDS: Country music round-robin free-for-all. First and Third Th of every month, 9pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon & Brewery; 303 Main St.; (530) 894-5408.

welcome. Th, 7-10pm. Has Beans Internet Cafe & Galleria; 501 Main St.; (530) 894-3033; www.hasbeans.com.

weekly revue. F, 4:30pm. Free. Tackle Box Bar & Grill; 375 East Park Ave.; (530) 345-7499.

OPEN MIKEFULL: Open mic night to benefit

Earthdance. Refreshments on sale. First

BLUES JAM: Weekly open jam. Th, 8pm-

midnight. Lynns Optimo; 9225 Skyway in Paradise; (530) 872-1788.

and Third Th of every month, 7pm. Opens 2/2. $1. Paradise Grange Hall; 5704 Chapel Dr. in Paradise; (530) 873-1370.

CHICO JAZZ COLLECTIVE: Thursday jazz.

Th, 8-11pm. Free. The DownLo; 319 Main St.; (530) 892-2473.

COUNT FUNKULA: As the name suggests, things might get a little funky with Count Funkula as the evening’s entertainment. Th, 2/2, 6pm. Free. LaSalles; 229 Broadway St. 2nd

COUNTRY SHOWCASE: Rich & Kendall’s

3FRIDAY

ENVELOPE PEASANT & THE SCIENTIFIC ORCHESTRA: Sean Harrasser’s eccentric acoustic pop crew appears with Americana duo Broken Rodeo and Lexi Bakkar. F, 2/3, 8pm. $5. Café Coda; 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafecoda.com.

IRISH MUSIC HAPPY HOUR: A Chico tradi-

CHUCK EPPERSON: Guitarist Chuck Epperson featuring saxophonist Eric Weber. F, 2/3, 7-8:30pm. N/c. T Bar; 250 Vallombrosa Ave. 200 Next to Morning

tion: Friday night happy hour with a traditional Irish music session by the Pub Scouts. F, 4pm. $1. Duffys Tavern; 337 Main St.; (530) 343-7718.

JEFF PERSHING BAND: You can count on Chico’s beloved Jeff Pershing Band to bring the funk all night. F, 2/3, 9pm. Free. Tackle Box Bar & Grill; 375 East Park Ave.; (530) 345-7499.

JOHN TRENALONE: Jazz and Broadway

MELVIN SEALS & JGB Friday, Feb. 3 El Rey Theatre SEE FRIDAY

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34 CN&R February 2, 2012

standards of the last 100 years. F,

6:30-8:30pm through 4/27. Free.

Johnnies Restaurant; 220 W. Fourth St. inside Hotel Diamond; (530) 895-1515; www.johnniesrestaurant.com.

JUST US: Just Us pays homage to Motown and touches on more modern R&B. F, 2/3, 9:30pm. Free. Colusa Casino Resort; 3770 Hwy. 45 in Colusa; (530) 458-8844; www.colusa casino.com.

LIVE MUSIC: Live music and dancing. F,

2/3, 8:30pm. Free. Gold Country Casino; 4020 Olive Hwy at Gold Country Casino & Hotel in Oroville; (530) 534-9892; www.goldcountrycasino.com.

BRASS HYSTERIA!

THE MELODRAMATICS: The Melodramatics are a Redding-based ska/reggae group sharing the bill with poppunkers Final Last Words. F, 2/3, 8pm. $5. Lost On Main; 319 Main St.; (530) 891-1853.

Saturday, Feb. 4 Lost on Main SEE SATURDAY

MELVIN SEALS & JGB: Former Jerry Garcia Band keyboardist Melvin Seals and his band JGB will follow Alli Battaglia and the Musical Brewing Co. F, 2/3, 8pm. $18. El Rey Theatre; 230 W. Second St.; (530) 342-2727.

MONOPHONICS: The Monophonics, a San Francisco funk and soul group, will appear alongside Sacramento’s ZuhG and DJ Dan K. F, 2/3, 9pm. $8. Lost On Main; 319 Main St.; (530) 891-1853.

THE MOTIFS: Live music in the Bow &

Arrow Lounge. F, 2/3, 8:30pm. Free. Feather Falls Casino; 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

PYROMANIA: Rise up, gather round Def

Leppard fans. You know who you are. F, 2/3, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino; 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfallscasino.com.

REDD FLATS: The Redd Flats will compliment any BBQ dinner with some rockin’ blues. F, 2/3, 6pm. Free. Smokin Mos BBQ; 131 Broadway St.; (530) 8916677; www.smokinmosbbq.com.

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4SATURDAY BRASS HYSTERIA! Chico skabilly band Brass Hysteria! appear alongside Sacramento’s La Noche Oskura and Redding’s Upstate. Sa, 2/4, 8:30pm. $4. Lost On Main; 319 Main St.; (530) 891-1853.

CARAVANSERAI: A tribute band covering all eras of Carlos Santana’s legendary career. Sa, 2/4, 9:30pm. $5. Feather Falls Casino; 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.featherfalls casino.com.

DAIRY QUEENS: The all-girl punk rockin’ Dairy Queens round out a bill featuring The Pushers, Critic and the Oisters. Sa, 2/4, 8pm. $5. Monstros Pizza & Subs; 628 W. Sacramento Ave.; (530) 345-7672.

JUST US: Just Us pays homage to

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Motown and touches on more modern R&B. Sa, 2/4, 9:30pm. Free. Colusa Casino Resort; 3770 Hwy. 45 in Colusa; (530) 458-8844; www.colusa casino.com.

THE MOTIFS: Live music in the Bow &

Arrow Lounge. Sa, 2/4, 8:30pm. Free. Feather Falls Casino; 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville; (530) 533-3885; www.feather fallscasino.com.

ROCK RIDGE BLUEGRASS BAND: Chico’s own Rock Ridge Bluegrass Band bring the twang to Cafe Flo. Sa, 2/4, 7pm. $5. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre; (530) 402-7121.

THE SHIMMIES: Chico’s beloved rockers The Shimmies, plus eccentric LA pop outfit TS and the Past Haunts, Heywood and Good Problems. Sa, 2/4, 8pm. $5. Café Coda; 265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafecoda.com.


NIGHTLIFE

5SUNDAY

THIS WEEK: FIND MORE ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECIAL EVENTS ON PAGE 26 THE SHIMMIES

265 Humboldt Ave.; (530) 566-9476; www.cafecoda.com.

JAZZ: Weekly jazz. Su, 4-6pm. Has Beans

JAZZ HAPPY HOUR: Every Monday. M, 5-

LA FIN DU MONDE: Chico’s experimental

6MONDAY

instrumental sons La Fin Du Monde appear with Chico trio Goat and Seattle math rockers X-Ray Press. M, 2/6, 7:30pm. $5. Babylon Community Art Center; 900 Orange St.

DINNER & JAZZ SERIES: Wes Montgomery is highlighted in this installment of Cafe Coda’s jazz series. First M of every month, 7-8:30pm. $10. Café Coda;

RUTHIE FOSTER & PAUL THORN: Ruthie

MONOPHONICS Friday, Feb. 3 Lost on Main

Foster and Paul Thorn, on tour together for the first time, bring their combination of thoughtful songwriting and blues virtuosity to the Big Room. M, 2/6, 7:30pm. $28. Sierra Nevada Big Room; 1075 East 20th St.; (530) 3452739; www.sierra nevada.com/ bigroom.

7TUESDAY Tuesday with Aaron Rich. Tu, 7-9pm. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre; (530) 402-7121.

JAZZ LUNCH: Every Wednesday with

SALSA BELLA: Live Salsa music in the

restaurant. W, 8-11pm. Tortilla Flats; 2601 The Esplanade; (530) 345-6053.

sons 8-10pm. W, 8-10pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon & Brewery; 303 Main St.; (530) 894-5408.

Wednesday night, swing dancing les-

898-1776

Recycle this paper.

D EEK OL ONE W

DJ DANCING CRAZY HORSE: DJ Hot Rod and mechani-

cal bull contest. F, 9pm-1:30am. Crazy Horse Saloon & Brewery, 303 Main St., (530) 894-5408.

The DownLo, 319 Main St., (530) 892-2473.

LASALLES: Su, 9pm. LaSalles, 229 Broadway St. 2nd street, (530) 893-1891.

LAST CALL LOUNGE: M, Th, 8pm-midnight. Last Call Lounge, 876 East Ave., (530) 895-3213.

LYNNS OPTIMO: F, Sa, 9pm. Lynns Optimo, 9225 Skyway in Paradise, (530) 872-1788.

Montgomery St. Pub, 1933 Montgomery St. in Oroville, (530) 533-0900.

MONTGOMERY ST.: Tu, 8pm. Free. Montgomery St. Pub, 1933 Montgomery St. in Oroville, (530) 533-0900.

QUACKERS: F, 9pm. Free. Quackers Lounge, 968 East Ave., (530) 895-3825. le Box Bar & Grill, 375 East Park Ave., (530) 345-7499.

NTS POST EVE Y ONLINE B AT ING R E T IS G E R /chico

om newsreview.c

QUACKERS: Th, 9pm. Free. Quackers Lounge, 968 East Ave., (530) 895-3825.

SMOKIE MOUNTAIN: F, Sa, 9pm. Free. Smokie Mountain Steakhouse, 7039 Skyway in Paradise, (530) 872-3323, www.smokiemtnsteakhouse.com.

STUDIO INN: With Brandon Hightower. Tu,

9pm-1am. Studio Cocktail Lounge, 2582 Esplanade, (530) 343-0662.

TORTILLA FLATS: Karaoke en Espanol. Su,

8-midnight. Free. Tortilla Flats, 2601 The Esplanade, (530) 345-6053.

WE’RE BACK!

HAPPY HOUR

$2 Draft

3-6 Mon-Fri 10-Midnight Sat

250 Chasset Rd, Ste. 10 • 899-7070

TH E B F . . 4 T A S 9PM

Studio Inn Lounge 2582 Esplanade Chico

Chris Hutchins, Mark Darling, Kevin Peak, Rhett Spears

Tavern, 5771 Clark Rd. in Paradise, (530) 877-7100.

TACKLE BOX: DJ Shelley. Tu, Su, 6pm. Tack-

DOWN LO: DJ Ron Dare. Tu, Sa, 9pm. Free.

SWING DANCE WEDNESDAY: Every

$150 to the Sacramento Airport!

KINGS TAVERN: M, Tu, 8pm. Free. Kings

MADISON BEAR: Dancing upstairs and

MONTGOMERY ST.: W, F Sa, 8pm. Free.

bass rig, guitar amp and PA system are provided, bring your own instruments. All ages until 10. W, 7pm. Free. Italian Garden; 6929 Skyway in Paradise; (530) 876-9988; wwwmyspace.com/theitaliangarden.

with this ad

Broadway St. 2nd street, (530) 893-1891.

MALTESE: Dirty Talk: LBGT dance Party w/ DJ2K. F, 9pm-2am through 4/6. Free. Maltese Bar & Taproom, 1600 Park Ave., (530) 343-4915.

OPEN JAM NIGHT: Join the jam. Drum kit,

$50 OFF

Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfalls casino.com.

on the patio. W-Sa, 9pm. Madison Bear Garden, 316 W. Second St., (530) 891-1639, www.madisonbeargarden.com.

8WEDNESDAY

Your Ticket to the Super Booyah! Liberty Cab

FEATHER FALLS: Tu, 7-11pm. Free. Feather

11pm: on the patio; Sa, 9pm: “That 80s Party”; and Tu, 10pm: DJ. LaSalles, 229

Carey Robinson Trio. W, 12-2pm. Free. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre; (530) 402-7121.

SEE FRIDAY

9pm. Free. Crazy Horse Saloon & Brewery, 303 Main St., (530) 894-5408.

LASALLES: Th, 10pm: DJ Mac Morris; Fr,

HONKY TONKIN SHOWCASE: Every

KARAOKE CRAZY HORSE: All-request karaoke. Tu,

FEATHER FALLS: Su, 8pm-midnight. Free. Feather Falls Casino, 3 Alverda Dr. in Oroville, (530) 533-3885, www.featherfallscasino.com.

SEE SATURDAY

7pm. Cafe Flo; 365 E. Sixth St. Next door to the Pageant Theatre; (530) 402-7121.

Internet Cafe & Galleria; 501 Main St.; (530) 894-3033; www.hasbeans.com.

DUFFYS: DJ Lois & DJ Spenny. W, 10pm. $1. Duffys Tavern, 337 Main St., (530) 343-7718.

Saturday, Feb. 4 Café Coda

LIVE

Rock & Roll

SUNDAY & TUESDAY

KARAOKE

WITH DJ SHELLEY

$1 WELL & DRAFTS INCLUDES SIERRA NEVADA

THURSDAY MCBRIDE BROTHERS FRIDAY

HAPPY HOUR WITH

RICH & KENDALL HOSTED MUSIC SHOWCASE 4:30–8:00 PERFORMERS WELCOME!

DECADES SATURDAY

ALL FIRED UP 379 E. Park Ave • 345-2277 February 2, 2012

CN&R 35


08

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Old Ideas

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Leonard Cohen Columbia I’ve been reading and/or listening to Leonard 10 Cohen for a half-century. I wrote about his novel, Beautiful Losers, as part my master’s thesis. Any list of my favorite songs would include several Cohen titles like “Thanks for the Dance,” “Dance Me to the End of Love,” “Bird on a Wire” and “Going Home,” a new favorite from this, his latest album. The lyrics for “Going Home” were pubMUSIC lished as a poem in The New Yorker, a distinction not many popular songs can claim. Sung from his muse’s point of view, it starts: “I 08 to speak with Leonard/ He’s a sportsman and a shepherd/ He’s a lazy love bastard/ Living in a suit.” As his fans know, Cohen was an old-fashioned print poet before he cut his first album during that great burgeoning of creativity in the mid ’60s, a time when it seemed not at all surprising to hear intelligent lyrics written and sung by an honest-to-God poet. And he’s been giving us good stuff ever since. His previous album, Dear Heather, released 09 some eight years ago, was a winner, and so is this one. You don’t have to be old to appreciate Old Ideas, but it probably won’t hurt. —Jaime O’Neill

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Intel Wars Michael M. Aid

08 Bloomsbury Press

As you buy your morning coffee drink, some government employee is spending your tax dollars to prevent a central-Asian terrorist from slipping anthrax 09 into your latte. Since 9/11, billions have been spent on these efforts, and in Intel Wars: The Secret History of the Fight Against Terror, author Michael Aid explains how terrorists have eluded our best efforts. The book is filled with extensive anecdotes—such as planned secret U.S. drone strikes on compounds of 10 Haqqanis, tribal militants in Pakistan (and Afghanistan), and then-CIA Deputy Director Stephen Kappes’ confrontation with Pakistan’s Directorate for Inter-Services Intelligence on why they alerted Haqqanis beforehand. When Aid examines the FBI’s counter-intelligence program alarm bells go off about its domestic spying, and concerns about 08 official truthfulness on who is winning this war appear valid. Not only is the war on terror in doubt, but the effort to put our 16 intelligence agencies under the director of national intelligence’s control appears unsuccessful. On balance, says Aid, mediocrity is rewarded, and despite some successes to crow about, al-Qaeda remains pernicious, even after bin 09 Ladin’s death. (Sigh.) I think I need another cup of coffee.

BOOK

—J. Jay Jones

The Best of Kay Kay and the Rays

10

Kay Kay and the Rays Catfood Records 08

A compilation of three CDs Kay Kay and the Rays made from 1999-2003, this Odessa, Texas, group’s Best of gets off to a rousing start with “Lone Star Justice,” a scathing indictment of that state’s judicial system (“We got justice in the 09 09 09 09 Lone Star state, but if you’re poor you might have to wait”). This theme is • Daily Lunch N E W S & R E V I E W B U S I N E S S U Salso E ON LY examined on “Texas Justice-Billy’s Story” (“Texas justice, the price is Specials DESIGNER so EXEC. high, it’s the best that money can buy”). They also pull no punches ISSUE DATE ACCT. 08 when • Champagne SS 02.03.11 JLD dealing with powerful corporations as on “Enron Field,” which gets FILE NAME 10 REV. DATEway with a horn-fuelled Stax Records-like vibe before getting down 10 10 Fri-Sun 10 under Brunch to business with lines like this: “They lined their own SHUBERTS020311R1 01.28.10 pockets, y’all, they’re tryin’ to shift the blame.” It’s 09 • Beer & Wine USP (BOLD SELECTION) exactly this uncompromising view of the Texas social structure that got PRICE / ATMOSPHERE / EXPERT / UNIQUE songs like these banned from airplay—and that’s a shame, too, since the music underpinning the lyrics is pure-D dynamite! It’s not all political, though: Kay Kay Greenwade’s a big lady—one CD is titled Big Bad Girl— 10 with a powerful voice to match, and she also addresses other issues such as on “Love Me, Baby,” on which she practically moans, over yet another With purchase of 2 drinks. Not valid w/any other offer. powerful horn-soaked groove, “c’mon and love me, baby.” Buy it for the lyrics, stick around for the musical grooves! 208 Cedar - Behind Ray’s Liquor • 343-3444 • Open Mon-Sun 7 am-2pm • E xp. 2.29.12 —Miles Jordan

10

for Buy 1 Get the 2 nd of equal or lesser value free

36 CN&R February 2, 2012

tuesday Burrito special 2 for 1

MUSIC


ARTS

DEVO

Jason Cassidy • jasonc@newsreview.com

TRUE CRIME Recently, Arts DEVO was up especially early, surfing the

web, drinking the morning’s first cup of coffee and stalking his past, when he stumbled upon the website for his high school alma mater and its alumni page. There, mixed in with information on reunions and how to join the Alumni Association, was a link to the “Memorial Page” where the names of former students who have died have been arranged by graduation year. I naturally went straight to my class, and to my surprise there were six names from the class of 1987. It’s a small school, and I would not have guessed that six people my age, people I’d grown up with, would be dead already. Admittedly, at 42, I haven’t given dying a great deal of thought. This definitely got me thinking. Two of the people on the list had died during our senior year, in separate auto accidents. Curious about what happened to the others, I started poking around online. One classmate, someone I went to school with from second grade through our senior year, died in Chico, in 1993, two months before I married my wife here at the age of 23. Another died just this past December, after “succumbing to a long battle [with] cancer.” He was 43. As I scrolled through the other years on the memorial page I stopped at the name of the brother of someone from my class. I Googled his name, and the story of his death appeared under the headline: “Father, son dead in Monday stabbings.” The 2006 story and its follow-ups went on to say he had apparently attacked his father in his father’s kitchen, stabbing him repeatedly. His father reportedly responded in self-defense, fatally wounding his son before dying himself. That was obviously way more of a story than I’d bargained for. There are many ways to be separated from this mortal coil, and I guess it shouldn’t be so surprising that those within my life’s sphere aren’t immune to even the most gruesome scenarios. But I am shocked. And I’m sad for both men and their family that things ended in such a horrible way.

treat yourself to gift certificates up to

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ON A MUCH LESS DEPRESSING NOTE: BEER! By now you’ve

undoubtedly heard the huge news from folks at Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.: That’s right, the 2012 edition of Bigfoot Ale has been released! Good days ahead! … Oh, and there was also the little matter of our friendly neighborhood craft brewers officially announcing last Wednesday that they had chosen a site for their East Coast expansion: the western North Carolina town of Mills River. It was actually damn exciting to watch television footage of N.C. Gov. Beverly Perdue as she made the announcement and toasted brewery owner Ken Grossman and his son Brian with a cup of Chico-grown ale at the future site of Sierra Nevada II. The plan is to have the second brewery—and its 90-or-so workers—up and running by early 2014. Bigfoot 2012 is here. The Chico-ish locale appears ideal for many rea- You can stop reading sons—good water, small-town quality of life, natu- now. ral setting in the shadows of a gorgeous mountain range (Blue Ridge Mountains)—but at the top of the list has to be the distinction of the nearby college town of Asheville as Beer City USA for the last three years in a row based on craft-brew pioneer Charlie Papazian’s annual online poll at examiner.com. Join me in raising a glass and congratulating Sierra Nevada, and our new sister beer-city. Cheers!

The Boss Burger

DEVOTIONS

• A rose by any other name: Gotta give a shout out on behalf of AD’s personal stylist Adrian Muñoz down at Gypsy Rose salon. Adrian has been the one constant at 151 Broadway, cutting hair in the big window as one salon after another passed through the prime piece of downtown real estate. Adrian will be on hand with the rest of the crew Saturday, Feb. 4, 5-9 p.m., as the new Gypsy Rose hosts a hip grand-opening party featuring live music by Lansana Kouyate art by Emily McClintick, plus drinks and hors d’oeuvres. Adrian Muñoz

View dozens of choices available now at

www.newsreview.com GIFT CERTIFICATES FROM RESTAURANTS, RETAIL, SALONS, GOLF, VACATIONS & MORE February 2, 2012

CN&R 37


Find Us Online At:

www.chico.newsreview.com

BUTTE COUNTY LIVING Open House Guide | Home Sales Listings | Featured Home of the Week

Quality, affordable & friendly housing APARTMENTS/DUPLEXES/TOWNHOUSES Location 1161 Citrus Ave #J, E 1012 Meier #A Duplex 706 W. 6th St #C 745 W. 1st Ave #4

Bd/Ba 1/1 2/2 1/1 2/1

Rent $500 $900 $525 $650

Dep. $600 $1000 $625 $750

Location Durham 2360 Durham St

HOUSES

Bd/Ba Rent Dep. 1/1

$400

Location 9895 Jones Ave (Durham) 3834 Keefer Rd 63 Glenshire 1057 Diablo 2320 Floral St 36 Wrangler Ct 9 Hillary Ln

$500

BEST DEAL IN TOWN! 633 Hazel

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SmAll, QuieT, Well mAiNTAiNed Complex

$1000

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Now Offering 1 & 2-Bedroom, 1-Bath Units

Studios, 1 & 2-Bedroom Units

Two Story, 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath Townhouses with Small Backyard or One Story, 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath Flats All Units Include W/D, D/W, Central Heat/Air, and More BBQ and Cat Friendly, Off Street Parking, Walk to CSU

542 Nord Avenue Call Today (530) 893-1967 uterrace@rsc-associates.com

1382 Longfellow Ave. Chico 895-1733 www.reliableproperty.com Info subject to change. Please do not disturb tenants. We will schedule the appointment.

CONDOMINIUM of the first quality in Chico, now priced at

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HUNTINGTON Full Size WaSher/Dryer in each unit, SWimming Pool, garageS available too!

2002 Huntington Drive (20th Street near Forest Avenue) CALL TODAY AT (530) 894-2408 huntington@rsc-associates.com

Professionally Managed By rsC assoCiates, inC.

Professionally Managed By rsC assoCiates, inC.

PARADISE IN THE MOUNTAINS

$129,000

CALL FOR APPOINTMENT

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(530) 519-4714 · www.JimsChicoHomes.com

Ceres Plaza

Sizzling DealS & More! Beautiful pool & clubhouse with computer room and pool table 1459 E. Lassen Avenue Call Today (530) 893-3018 cere@rsc-associates.com Professionally Managed By rsC assoCiates, inC.

Crystal Trott

Broker/Owner Crystal Trott Sharon Norlund Real Estate Services serving you with integrity Office: (530)-343-1188 • Cell: (530)-521-9139 Fax: (530)-343-1188 • trott@sbcglobal.net

DRE License: 00627005

IT’S A GREAT TIME TO BUY, DON’T MISS YOUR CHANCE TO GET THE HOME YOU WANT AT GREAT PRICE WITH LOW INTEREST RATES! CALL ME TODAY.

4565 Crown Point Rd. This is a 40 acre parcel that has Big Chico Creek running through it. There are beautiful views and a very cozy house with a shop! Priced to sell $190,000.

Janetta Lydon GRI, SRES

EMMETT JACOBI

Alice Zeissler

www.AtoZchico.com

Corner location with 1/bdrm 1bth and 714 sq ft. Sparkling brushed nickel plumbing fixtures includes Granite Transformations counters in kitchen/bath with designer basins. New deep stainless steel sink, range, and microwave. Inside laundry, storage galore, and covered parking. Plus a pool and all the Sheridan Commons amenities.

JUST LISTED!!

3 bedroom, with newer windows refinished hard wood floor, living and family room all on a large lot. $219,000

3 bedroom, 2 bath near Mt. Shasta & stones throw from River: Dunsmuir

Jeffries Lydon

Dep. $1450 $1750 $1250 $1250 $1250 $1000 $1200

1415 Sheridan Ave. #7

So CloSe To CAmpu S!

University terrace

Rent $1350 $1600 $1150 $1150 $1150 $900 1200

$1100

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Free Real Estate Listings Find Us Online At:

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Homes Sold Last Week

Janetta.Lydon@gmail.com

Sponsored by Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

1292 E 8th St

Chico

$128,000

3/ 2

1720

825 W 8th Ave

Chico

$125,000

3/ 2

1620

1810 Vermont St

Gridley

$240,000

4/ 3

3468

14310 Hamilton Nord Cana Hwy Chico

$331,000

3/ 1

1127

1394 Arch Way

Chico

$265,000

3/ 2.5

1818

4267 Tuliyani Dr

Chico

$455,000

4/ 3

2726

135 Beaver Rd

Palermo

$145,000

2/ 2

1512

1960 Dean Rd

Paradise

$170,000

3/ 3

2475

2455 Durham Dayton Hwy

Durham

$241,000

4/ 2

2045

460 Valley View Dr

Paradise

$163,000

3/ 2

1833

2509 W Sacramento Ave

Chico

$240,000

2/ 1.5

1228

6170 Alamo Ave

Paradise

$105,000

3/ 2

1094

2601 Chantel Way

Chico

$305,000

3/ 2.5

2213

5962 Fickett Ln

Paradise

$140,000

2/ 2

1204

38 CN&R February 2, 2012


OPEN

hOuSE

Century 21 Jeffries Lydon

Sat.11-1, 2-4

Sat.11-1, 2-4 4243 Shorthorn Drive (X St: Garner) 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 2140 sq. ft. $429,000 Kimberley Tonge 518-5508 Carolyn Fejes 966-4457

Sat.11-1, 2-4 & Sun.11-1, 2-4 1932, 1933 & 1944 Wisteria Lane (X St: Glenwood) All in same subdivision, bed/Ba/sq. ft. varies. 3&4 Bd / 2 Ba, 1707-1928 sq. ft. $297,900--$341,100 Frankie Dean 840-0265 Brandi Laffins 321-9562 Sherry Landis 514-4855

65 Sweetbriar Drive (X St: Keefer) On 5.41 Acres!!! 3 Bd / 2 Ba, 1601 sq. ft. $365,000 Katherine Ossokine 591-3837 Janetta Lydon 514-8116

2405 Holly Avenue (X St: Cussick) 3 Bd / 3 Ba, 1842 sq.ft. $275,000 Emmett Jacobi 519-6333

Thurs. - Sun.12-5

Sat. 10-12

Sycamore Creek Subdivision

123 Terrace Drive (X St: E.1st Ave) 3/2 $189,900 Marty Leatherman 896-3175

3088 Gallatin Gateway (X St: East Ave/Ceanothus Ave) 3bd/2 ba, 1,863 sq. ft. $286,990 Ally Gibson (530) 518-ALLY (2559)

Sat.11-1, 2-4 1152 Manzanita Ave. (X St: Ceres Ave.) 3 Bd / 1 Ba, 1560 sq. ft. $219,000 Janetta Lydon 514-8116 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Thur 2:30-5 & Fri - Sat 12-5 The Orchard Subdivision 17 Abbott Circle (X St: Windham) 4bd/3ba, 1,710 sq. ft. $330,990 Kelsey Gibson (530) 864-8453

187 E. Lincoln (X St: Oleander) 4 Bd / 3 Ba, 2804 sq. ft. $379,000 Johnny Klinger 864-3398 Ronnie Owen 518-0911 Alice Zeissler 518-1872

Beautiful building lot on Golf Course, among Million Dollar Homes.

FREE MARKET ANALYSIS

$159,000

Pride of ownership. Beautiful 4 Bd, 3 Ba home has it all!! A must see.

Call Me Today to Schedule!

$489,000

Frankie Dean •

CoLdweLL Banker/ dufour reaLty

3094 Gallatin Gateway (X St: East Ave/Ceanothus Ave) 3bd/2 ba, 1,543 sq. ft. $249,990 Ally Gibson (530) 518-ALLY (2559)

Sat.11-1,2-4 & Sun.2-4

Sat.11-1, 2-4 & Sun.11-1

Realtor/E-Pro

ranCho ChiCo reaL estate

Amber Grove home with G spacious floor NDIN$279,950 plan, lots ofPE storage.

#01767902

Paul Champlin Making Your Dream Home a Reality

530-840-0265

Frankiedean.com

208 Crater Lake Drive (X St: Calistoga) 4/3 $339,500 Barbara Rupp 321-3113

Sat. 1-3 1708 Salem St (X St: W. 17th St) 4/2 $339,000 Jenna Steinsiek 321-5686

Sat. 1-3 3173 Summit Ridge Terrace (X St: Ridge Hollow) 5/3 $595,000 Brent McCarthy 228-1232

~Home with unit, Bidwell Park, 2,712 sq ft $329K ~Charmer, 4 bed/2 bth, 1,900 sq ft $195K ~3 bed/2 bth, 1,512PE sq ND ft 1.22 INGacres horse property $289K ~Pool, cul de sac, 3 bed/2 bth, 1,900 + bonus rooms $225K ~Super nice single story NDING 1,477 sq ft $159,500 PEcondo/home, Teresa Larson (530) 899-5925

(530) 828-2902

Sat. 1-3

www.ChicoListings.com • chiconativ@aol.com

GREAT NEWER HOME CLOSE TO COLLEGE 3 bed/2 bath

$179,000

Call me for details

Dean Gaskey 519-5610 The key to your next home chicolistedhomes.com

The following houses were sold in Butte County by real estate agents or private parties during the week of January 16, 2011 — January 20, 2011. The housing prices are based on the stated documentary transfer tax of the parcel and may not necessarily reflect the actual sale price of the home. TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

ADDRESS

TOWN

PRICE

BR/BA

SQ. FT.

1043 Buschmann Rd

ADDRESS

Paradise

$175,000

1/ 1

1485

7 Cleaves Ct

Chico

$190,000

4/ 2

1407

5836 Clark Rd

Paradise

$240,000

2/ 2

2163

1097 Viceroy Dr

Chico

$205,000

4/ 2

1603

108 Stringtown Rd

Oroville

$215,000

3/ 2

2354

11 Catalina Point Rd

Chico

$459,000

3/ 3

2869

2939 Oro Garden Ranch Rd

Oroville

$160,000

4/ 3

2258

1284 Richins Ave

Gridley

$175,000

3/ 2

1456

145 W Lindo Ave

Chico

$238,500

2/ 2.5

1721

721 Skyway Ave

Chico

$285,000

4/ 2.5

2998

39 Northwood Commons Pl

Chico

$175,000

2/ 1.5

1410

50 Fairway Dr

Chico

$340,000

3/ 2

2928

Oroville

$109,000

3/ 2

1056

23 Fairway Dr

Chico

$340,000

2/ 1.5

2842

2440 Mitchell Ave

February 2, 2012

CN&R 39


Home Week of tHe

Online ads are

STILL

Bringing You To

FREE!*

PARADISE

3BR/2BA 1142 Sq.Ft. Butte College Park Mobile $20,000 Ad #967 14463 Drew Ct - Vacant Land .26 AC $27,000 Ad #307 2BR/2BA 1360 Sq.Ft. Bonus, 3 AC, Private $189,900 Ad #695

4243 SHoRtHoRN DRIVe – cHIco Charming North Chico home is situated on nicely landscaped 1.6 acre lot and features many upgrades including; newer paint and carpet, newer tile entry way, remodeled master bathroom and a light and spacious living room, a cozy den/ dining room, comfortable bedrooms with lots of closet and storage space, a tastefully decorated kitchen & pantry and full laundry room and a 2 car garage. Outside you find a nice patio area, a 3 bay detached shop w/ office and lots of room to park RV?s. This truly great find has too many other great features to mention, thus making it a must see!

5BR/4BA Custom View Home

4249 Sq.Ft. $413,000 Ad #987

LISteD at: $429,000 Russ Hammer | Century 21 Jeffries Lydon | REALTOR®

HammerSells@sbcglobal.net | 530.894.4503

5350 Skyway, Paradise

(530) 872-7653

Paradise@C21SelectGroup.com www.C21Skyway.com

Online ads are free. Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (530) 894-2300 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

Online ads are

STILL

FREE!*

*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

AS SEEN IN CAREER BUILDER.COM

If you are not afraid to speak in front of small groups and want unlimited income potential call 800-961-0199 Hal Faresh RVP Legal Shield Independent Associate

GENERAL $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

Career Training: AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214 toll free.

40 CN&R February 2, 2012

APARTMENT RENTALS

Paid In Advance! Make $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN) Teach English Abroad! 4week TEFL course in Prague. Job assistance worldwide. We have over 1500 graduates teaching in 60+ countries! www.teflworldwideprague.com. info@teflworldwideprague.com (AAN CAN)

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ROOMS FOR RENT

Pine Tree Apts 893-8616 Oak Meadow Apts 898-1450 Mission Ranch 892-0400 Villa Risa 636-4622 Built, Owned & Managed by MWSproperties.com

A HEALING TOUCH

Full Body Massage Call Sherri

530-403-6425

ALTERNATIVE HEALING CHICO CANNABIS CLUB Lifetime membership, $65. We meet twice a month. Joel Castle, 354-8665

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE Wanted Older Guitars! Martin, Fender, Gibson. Also older Fender amps. Pay up to $2,000. 916-966-1900

more music online

www.newsreview.com

SHARE LARGE HOME 1 block from Esplanade. Enjoy large bedroom, large private bath , living room, storage, separate entrance. Share utilities with professional owner at other end of house. Large fenced yard, pet ok. $300 month, second bedroom available for $100. Victor, 566-1092.

Professional Practice Mgt. Taxes done? Accounting & tax services. Corporate & individual. James Horgan 343-5292

MEDICAL MARIJUANA EVALUATION Locally Owned

J.H. Schwartz M.D. $100 New Recommendations $50 Renewal

NEW BEGINNINGS A sober living environment, rooms for rent. $350/month + utilities. 647 W 2nd Ave. #4 resident mgr. Neal, 354-3395 ROOMS NOW: Soberÿ& Community Living. Single or Share. $425per month +$175 dep. Includes All Utilites + Food. Dianna 1-530-923-6162

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THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE Massage By John

$35 special. Full-body Massage for Men. In-Calls, Out-Calls Now avail. By Appointment. CMT, 530-680-1032

Full Body Massage For Men $25 Call Lee CMT 893-2280 Shower Available

Private & Confidential CHICO NATURAL SOLUTION For Chronic Pain

ATTORNEYS DID YOU USE THE OSTEOPOROSIS DRUG FOSAMAX (Alendronate) during 2000February 2008? If you experienced a femur fracture (upper leg), you may be entitled to compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727

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BULLETIN BOARD Wanted for Consignment Yard art, garden tools, patio furniture, sporting goods, commercial equipment, antiques, furniture, bikes, jewelry, costume jewelry, and just about anything that is in good condition and priced to sell at our warehouse consignment store.Stop by 2450 Valine/Meyers between 1-4pm or call John at 894-1628. Near the Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore and Wilbur’s Feed.

GARAGE SALES CNR 6+ FAMILY YARD SALE 353 E 2nd St. in parking lot. Across street from farmers market. Saturday, February 4th. 8am-?. Clothes, small to plus size, kitchen supplies, office supplies lots and lots of misc. items. Stop by after the farmers market and see what treasures you can find.

CLASSIFIEDS

CONTINUED ON 41


AUTOS 1983 Full-sized Chevy Blazer.All original. Most factory options. Very well kept condition. 530-895-8171 Audi 1996 A6 Quattro 4WD, automatic, 4door, CC, PW/PD, CD, ski storage, new tires, runs great, $4900. 186K mi. 530-570-5113 New Prius Are Here! 50 MPG, best warrantee, 2 year service free, call Lee McKim, Hybrid Specialist, at 530-354-7782 at Chuck Patterson Toyota.

CLASSICS 1970 MGB Classic Convertible Restored, pristine condition. All records. $8,995.00. 530-345-9373 Days or Evenings.

RV’s Fleetwood 18’ 4x4 Tent Trailer Perfect condition. Too many extras to put in paper. Breaking system incl. 530-873-4517 $5500 OBO

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as MYSTIC DESIGN at 406 Nord ave. #4, Chico, CA 95926. BEN BRADSHAW, 406 Nord Ave. #4, Chico, Ca 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: BEN BRADSHAW Dated: January 6, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000027 Published: January 12,19,26 February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PALETERIA Y NEVERIA LA FLOR DE MICHOACAN HOMEMADE ICE CREAM SHOP at 1008 W Sacramento Ave. Suite C, Chico, CA 95926. Antonio Arreguin Bermudez, 15 Top Flight Ct. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: Antonio Arreguin Bermudez Dated: January 4, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000006 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are

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doing business as NEW BEGINNINGS HOUSE OF RECOVERY at 647 W 2nd Ave. #1, Chico, CA 95926. STACY JOHNSON, 2697 White Ave. Chico, CA 95973. RAFAEL VEGA, 3449 Page St. Redwood City, CA 94063. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: STACY JOHNSON Dated: January 5, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000016 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CHICO WEB DESIGN at 242 Broadway St. #12, Chico, CA 95928. 5.2 LLC, 242 Broadway St. #12, Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: JEFF SIERRA Dated: December 15, 2011 FBN Number: 2011-0001688 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MARCELLI’S SANDWICH’S AND MORE at 215 W 1st St. Chico, CA 95928. MARK A MARCELLI, MARY TASSA MARCELLI, 444 Weymouth Way, Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: Mary Tassa Marcelli Dated: January 9, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000032 Published: January 12,19,24, February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as JILLS ELEGANT DOG BOUTIQUE at 1722 Mangrove Ave. #24, Chico, CA 95926. JILL VAN CURLER, 1722 Mangrove Ave. #24, Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: JILL VAN CURLER Dated: December 9, 2011 FBN Number: 2011-0001662 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as ART & ZAIN FENCING at 474 E 12th St. #1 Chico, CA 95928. SAIN PIMENTEL, ARTURO QUINTERO, 474 E 12th St. #1, Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Signed: SAIN PIMENTEL Dated: December 30, 2011 FBN Number: 2011-0001746 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as TEN STAR LOCK at 311 Otterson Dr. #10, Chico, CA 95928. KELLY MICHELE MORABITO, 311 Otterson Dr. #10, Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: KELLY MORABITO Dated: December 8, 2011 FBN Number: 2011-0001657 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BOOTLEG at 126 W 2nd St. Chico, CA 95928. SUSAN KIRSTEN REED, 1315 Sunset Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: SUSAN REED

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Dated: January 4, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000007 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2011

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons is doing business as PIGGS LIQUOR STORE at 3046 Myers St. Oroville, CA 95966. ELIAS DORGHALLI, 86 Taige Way, Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: ELIAS DORGHALLI Dated: December 29, 2011 FBN Number: 2011-0001739 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as GORDO BURRITO at 1295 E 8th St. Chico, CA 95928. URIARTE GORDO BURRITO, 1412 Half Dome Way, Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: JOSE JUAN URIARTE Dated: January 9, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000033 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as AIREX ENTERPRISES INC at 251 Boeing Ave. Chico, CA 95973. AIREX ENTERPRISES INC, 251 Boeing Ave. Chico, CA 95973. JIM RASDEUSCHEK, SUSAN RASDEUSCHEK, 5320 Blinzig Ct. Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: Susan Rasdeuschek Dated: January 4, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000005 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SPRINT at 1215 Mangrove Ave. Suite A, Chico, CA 95926. S WIRELESS NW, 549 SW Mill View Way, #100, Bend, OR 97702. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MARK B JOHNSON Dated: November 28, 2011 FBN Number: 2011-0001591 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as SPRINT at 1124 Oro Dam Blvd. Suite K, Oroville, CA 95966. S WIRELESS NW INC, 549 SW Mill View Way, #100, Bend, OR 97702. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed: MARK B JOHNSON Dated: November 28, 2011 FBN Number: 2011-0001590 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as ORIENTAL MASSAGE at 1722 Mangrove Ave. #38, Chico, CA 95973. BO HU, 666 Gail Ave. #C-26 Sunnyvale, CA 94086. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: BO HU Dated: January 3, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000002 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing

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business as PREMIER TAXI at 2961 Hwy 32 #81, Chico, CA 95973. ARTURO A SIXTOS, 1027 Esplanade H, Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: ARTURO SIXTOS Dated: January 3, 2012 FBN Number 2012-0000001 Published: January 19,26, February 2,9, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE ENERGY X CHANGE at 1870 Vallombrosa, Chico, CA 95926. JON STALLMAN, 1870 Vallombrosa, Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: JON STALLMAN Dated: December 9, 2011 FBN Number: 2011-0001664 Published: January 19,26, February 2,9, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name UNITED COUNTRY TOWNE AND COUNTRY PROPERTIES at 2540 Esplanade #7, Chico, CA 95973 ROBERT PROSISE, GAIL PROSISE, 640 Cedar Canyon Rd. Lake Almanor, CA 96137. This business was conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: ROBERT L PROSISE Dated: January 10, 2012 FBN Number: 2005-0000880 Published: January 19,26, February 2,9, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as NORTH COUNTIES REAL ESTATE at 1074 East Ave. #B1, Chico, CA 95926. ROBERT L PROSISE, 10675 Bryne Ave. #31, Los Molinos, CA 96055. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: ROBERT L PROSISE Dated: January 10, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000054 Published: January 19,26, February 2,9, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as GOLDEN LEAF, GOLDEN LEAF DESIGNS, GOLDENLEAFDESIGNS.COM at 472 E 1st Ave. Chico, CA 95926. GREG BELLINGER, 472 E 1st Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: GREG BELLINGER Dated: January 10, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000046 Published: January 19,26, February 2,9, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as SANTINOS IN CHICO at 1340 Laurel St. Chico, CA 95928. KAELEN DAVIS, 1340 Laurel St. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: KAELEN DAVIS Dated: January 6, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000024 Published: January 19,26, February 2,9, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons is doing business as ARTFUL ENGRAVINGS at 641 W 6th Ave. Chico, CA 95926. STEWART OMARAH, 641 W 6th Ave. Chico, CA 95926.

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This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: STEWART 0’MARAH Dated: January 19, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000094 Published: January 26, February 2,9,16, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following persons have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name WASHER WAREHOUSE at 1436 Nord Ave. #E, Chico, CA 95926. MARILYN R SCHMIDT, MICHAEL W SCHMIDT, 1131 Stewart Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business was conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: MARILYN R SCHMIDT Dated: January 9, 2012 FBN Number: 2007-0000584 Published: January 26, February 2,9,16, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as MANZA BIRD PRODUCTS, RIDGETOP RANCH at 151 Verner Oaks Rd. Oroville, CA 95966. HEATHER GRAY, JOHN GRAY, 151 Verner Oaks Rd. Oroville, CA 95966. Signed: JOHN GRAY Dated: January 13, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000070 Published: January 26, February 2,9,16, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LOVELY PRECIOUS MOMENTS at 2321 Honey Run Rd. #39, Chico, Ca 95928. Angela Marie Fonseca Salerno 2321 Honey Run Rd. #39, Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: ANGELA SALERNO Dated: December 13, 2011 FBN Number: 2011-0001684 Published: January 26, February 2,9,16, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as PERFORMANCE ORIENTED at 2776 Alamo Ave. Chico, CA 95973. PAUL ABBOTT, 2776 Alamo Ave. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: PAUL ABBOTT Dated: January 19, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000092 Published: January 26, February 2,9,16, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LION OF ENTERTAINMENT at 1850 Humboldt Rd. #61, Chico, CA 95928. OLIVER T POLLARD, 1850 Humboldt Rd. #61, Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: OLIVER POLLARD Dated January 12, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000069 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as THE PAW SPA at 762 Mangrove Ave. Chico, CA 95926. LORI MONIAN, 702 Mangrove Ave. #232, Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: LORI MONIAN Dated: January 13, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000072 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as LATENIGHTAIRCOOLED at 2961 Hwy 32, #91, Chico, CA 95973. BRYAN HOUSTON, 1223 Stewart Ave. Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: BRYAN HOUSTON Dated: January 26, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000137 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as STRANGE SEED MUSIC at 134 W 13th St. Chico, CA 95928. SCOTT CAMERON, 134 W 13th St. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: CAMERON SCOTT Dated: January 27, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000148 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME - STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name QUEEN NAIL AND SPA at 801 East Ave. #112, Chico, CA 95926. TONY LE, 400 Mission Ranch #39, Chico, CA 95926. This business was conducted by an individual. Signed: TONY LE Dated: January 30, 2012 FBN Number: 2009-0001694 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as QUEEN NAIL SALON at 801 East Ave. #112, Chico, CA 95926. DUY LE, 10127 Barnes Ln. S Tacoma, WA 98444. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: DUY LE Dated: January 30, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000156 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as JIMMY JACKS at 305 Main St. Chico, CA 95938. LISA N COOKE, TYLER COOKE, 1574 Kona Dr. Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Signed: TYLER COOKE Dated: January 26, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000134 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons is doing business as ENLIGHTENED FITNESS at 24 Tarn Circle, Oroville, CA 95966. AIYANA CASSANDRA MILLER, 24 Tarn Circle, Oroville, CA 95966. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: AIYANA MILLER Dated: December 28, 2011 FBN Number: 2011-0001732 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as WHIRLED EVENTS at 865 E 6th St. Chico, CA 95928. STORMI D TURNER, 865 E 6th St. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual.

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Signed: STORMI D TURNER Dated: January 24, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000129 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

Unit 005: Christina Straits Unit 486: Michael Brown Unit 251: Deborah Nolen Unit 393: Cathy Turner Unit 255: Destini Lee Unit 467: Michael Brown Unit 460: Michael Brown Unit 316A: Adriana O’Neal Unit 054: George Boeger Unit 279: Frank Torress Unit 239: Frank Torress

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons is doing business as FULL SERVICE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 641-643 Flume St. Chico, CA 95928. DAVID M HOWARD, 1722 Hemlock St. Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: DAVID M HOWARD Dated: January 4, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000011 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

NOTICE OF LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE OF PERSONAL PROPERTY Pursuant to the California self-storage facility act (B&P code 21770 et sec) the undersigned will sell the contents of units: TERRY THURMAN, misc household item. TIFFANY COOK, bike, boxes, bags, keyboard. To the highest bidder on: February 11, 2012 Beginning at 12:00pm. Sale to be held at: Extra Storage, 2298 Park Ave. Chico, Ca 95928. Published: January 26, February 2, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as COUPONACODE at 1281 Arch Way, Chico, CA 95973. NICHOLAS KOEHLER, 1281 Arch Way, Chico, CA 95973. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: NICK KOEHLER Dated: January 23, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000105 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as CELESTINO’S LIVE FROM NY, CELESTINO’S NY PIZZA at 101 Salem St. #100, Chico, CA 95928. CELESTINO ENZO LLC, CELESTINO GENCARELLI, ENZO PERRI, 101 Salem St. #100, Chico, CA 95928. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: ENZO PERRI Dated: January 19, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000097 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following persons are doing business as BARRY FISCHER PROPERTIES LLC at 14401 Hwy 99 N, Chico, CA 95973. BARRY FISCHER PROPERTIES LLC, 27 Veneto Circle, Chico, CA 95926. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed: ROBERT B FISCHER Dated: January 26, 2012 FBN Number: 2012-0000141 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as BANGOR RANCH VINEYARD AND WINERY at 5768 La Porte Rd. Bangor, CA 95914. GARY PAUL FOX, 6288 Broadway Terrace, Oakland, CA 94618. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed: GARY P FOX Dated: December 1, 2011 FBN Number: 2011-0001626 Published: December 15,22,29 January 5, 2012

NOTICES Notice of lien sale: February 18th at 11am at Bidwell Self Storage, 65 Heritage Lane, Chico, 893.2109, Pursuant to CA Business Code 21700, in lieu of rents due, the following units of household or personal items and boxes, furniture, home d‚cor, kitchen items, etc. and other misc. items not specified will be sold. Silent auction. The unit numbers and names are:

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE DARYL W KAISER TO all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: DARYL W KAISER A Petition for Probate has been filed by: MARGARET KAISER in the Superior Court of California, County of Butte. THE Petition for Probate requests that: MARGARET KAISER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: FEBRUARY 23, 2012 Time: 1:30pm Dept: TBA Address of the court: Superior Court of California County of Butte 655 Oleander Ave Chico, CA 95926. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate,

CLASSIFIEdS

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February 2, 2012

CN&R 41


ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner ALI KARIMI ESTAHBANATI filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: ALI KARIMI ESTAHBANATI Proposed name: ALI KARIMI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 10, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Stephen E Benson Dated: December 12, 2011 Case Number: 155327 Published: January 12,19,26, February 2, 2012

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner NATALIE LOUISE BOYETTE filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: NATALIE LOUISE BOYETTE Proposed name: NATALIE LOUISE FROST THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name

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changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: February 24, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Stephen E Benson Dated: December 28, 2011 Case Number: 155510 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner MELISSA ANNE HICKS filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present name: MELISSA ANNE HICKS Proposed name: CAROLYN ANNE GOLDSTONE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: March 23, 2012 Time: 9:00am Dept: TBA The address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Ave. Chico, CA 95926 Signed: Sandra L Mclean Dated: January 24, 2012 Case Number: 155729 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

SUMMONS SUMMONS NOTICE TO RESPONDENT JOAN B SMITH You are being sued. Petitioner’s name is: ALEX J SMITH You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123)

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at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp) at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. The name and address of the court are: Butte County Superior Court One Court St. Oroville, CA 95965 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: Alex J Smith 5678 Clara Lane Paradise, CA 95969 Signed: Kimberly Flener Dated: August 15, 2011 Case Number: FL040372 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2011

are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online SelfHelp Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Butte County Superior Court 655 Oleander Chico, CA 95926 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or the plaintiff without an attorney, is: Troy M Wilkinson 589 East Ave. Chico, CA 95926 530-342-6142 Signed: Kimberly Flener Dated:October 19, 2011 Case Number: 154960 Published: February 2,9,16,23, 2012

SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT MAX LEE CRICK and BETTY CRICK and DOES 1 to 10 You are being sued by Plaintiff: STATEWIDE CREDIT AND COLLECTION BUREAU, INC. NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 calendar days after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you.Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your country law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There

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you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Case Number: PR40137 Attorney for petitioner: RICHARD D HARDIN, INC. 7 Williamsburg Lane Chico, CA 95928 (530)895-8868 Published: Februayr 2,9,16, 2012


but true: A lot of people seem to be perpetually in a state of wanting what they don’t have and not wanting what they actually do have. I’m begging you not to be like that in the coming weeks, Aries. Please? I’ll tell you why: More than I’ve seen in a long time, you will have everything going for you if you want precisely what you do have—and are not full of longing for what’s unavailable. Do you think you can you manage that brilliant trick? If so, you will be amazed by the sublimity of the peace that will settle over you.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Of all the

signs of the zodiac, Tauruses are the least likely to be arrogant. Sadly, in a related development, they’re also among the most likely to have low self-esteem. But your tribe now has an excellent opportunity to address the latter problem. Current cosmic rhythms are inviting you rather loudly and dramatically to boost your confidence, even at the risk of you careening into the forbidden realm of arrogance. That’s why I recommend Taurus musician Trent Reznor as your role model. He has no problem summoning feelings of self-worth. As evidence, here’s what he confessed when asked about whether he frequents music social networks: “I don’t care what my friends are listening to. Because I’m cooler than they are.”

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “If Mark Twain

had had Twitter,” says humorist Andy Borowitz, “he would have been amazing at it. But he probably wouldn’t have gotten around to writing [The Adventures of] Huckleberry Finn.” I think you’re facing a comparable choice, Gemini. You can either get a lot of little things done that will serve your shortterm aims, or else you can at least partially withdraw from the day-to-day give-andtake so as to devote yourself with more focus to a long-range goal. I’m not here to tell you which way to go; I just want to make sure you know the nature of the decision before you.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You now have a special talent for helping your allies tap into their dormant potentials and latent energy. If you choose to use it, you will also have a knack for snapping lost sheep and fallen angels out of their wasteful trances. There’s a third kind of magic you have in abundance right now, Cancerian, and that’s the ability to coax concealed truths out of their hiding places. Personally, I’m hopeful that you will make lavish use of these gifts. I should mention, however, that some people may resist you. The transformations you could conceivably set in motion with your superpowers might seem alarming to them. So I suggest that you hang out as much as possible with change lovers who like the strong medicine you have to offer.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Publishing a volume

of poetry is like dropping a rose petal down the Grand Canyon and waiting for the echo,” said author Don Marquis, speaking from experience. Something you’re considering, Leo, may seem to fit that description, too. It’s a project or action or gift that you’d feel good about offering, but you also wonder whether it will generate the same buzz as that rose petal floating down into the Grand Canyon. Here’s what I think: To the degree that you shed your attachment to making an impact, you will make the exact impact that matters most. Give yourself without any expectations.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Comedian Louis

CK told a story about his young daughter. She had a fever, and he gave her some Tylenol that was bubblegum flavored. “Eww!” she complained. Louis was exasperated. “You can’t say ‘Eww,’” he told her. What he meant was that as a white kid in America, she’s among the most privileged characters in the world—certainly far luckier than all the poor children who have no medicine at all, let alone medicine that tastes like candy. I’m going to present a similar argument to you, Virgo. In the large scheme of things,

your suffering right now is small. Try to keep your attention on your blessings rather than your discomfort.

Of horses and history by

Howard Hardee

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I stumbled upon

howardh@newsreview.com

an engineering textbook for undergraduates. There was a section on how to do technical writing, as opposed to the literary kind. It quoted a poem by Edgar Allan Poe: “Helen, thy beauty is to me / Like those Nicean barks of yore / That gently, o’er a perfumed sea, / The weary way-worn wanderer bore / To his own native shore.” Then the book gave advice to the student: “To express these ideas in technical writing, we would simply say, ‘He thinks Helen is beautiful.’” Don’t take shortcuts like that, Libra. For the sake of your emotional health and spiritual integrity, you can’t see or treat the world anything like what a technical writer would.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Are you

ready to start playing in earnest with that riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma? Are you looking forward to the rough-and-tumble fun that will ensue after you leap into the middle of that sucker and start trying to decipher its impossibly interesting meaning? I hope you are primed and eager, Scorpio. I hope you can’t wait to try to answer the question that seems to have no answer. Be brave and adventurous, my friend—and be intent on having a blast.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Lessons could come to you from unforeseen sources and unanticipated directions during the next few weeks, Sagittarius. They will also come in expected forms from all the familiar influences, so the sum total of your learning could be pretty spectacular. To take maximum advantage of the opportunity, just assume that everyone and everything might have useful teachings for you—even people you usually ignore and situations that have bored you in the past. Act like an eager student who’s hungry for knowledge and curious to fill in the gaps in your education.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “The

consuming desire of most human beings is deliberately to plant their whole life in the hands of some other person,” said British writer Quentin Crisp. If you harbor even a small tendency in that direction, Capricorn, I hope that in the coming days you will make a concentrated effort to talk yourself out of it. In my astrological opinion, this is a critical moment in the long-term evolution of your healthy self-sufficiency. For both your own sake and the sake of the people you love, you must find a way to shrink your urge to make them responsible for your well-being.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): If you go to

California’s Yosemite National Park this month, you might get the chance to witness a reddish gold waterfall. Here’s how: At sunset, gaze up at the sheer east face of the rock formation known as El Capitan. There you will see what seems to be a vertical river of fire, also known as Horsetail Fall. I nominate this marvel to be your inspirational symbol for the coming weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you will have the power to blend fire and water in novel ways. I encourage you to look at the photo here—http://bit.ly/fluidicfire—and imprint the image on your mind’s eye. It will help unleash the subconscious forces you’ll need to pull off your own natural wonder.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): After singer

Amy Winehouse died, actor Russell Brand asked the public and media to scale back their derisive opinions about her struggle with intoxicants. Addiction isn’t a romantic affectation or glamorous self-indulgence that people are too lazy to overcome, he said. It’s a disease. Would you mock a schizophrenic for his “stupid” propensity for hearing voices? Would you ridicule a victim of multiple sclerosis for not being vigorous? I’m of the opinion that all of us have at least one addiction, although it may not be as disabling as Winehouse’s weakness for liquor and narcotics. What’s yours, Pisces? Porn? Sugar? Internet? Bad relationships? The coming weeks would be a very good time to seek help in healing it.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Rob Wangberg makes a living as a field representative for Rental Guys and Bobcat of Chico, but about a dozen times a year he finds himself traipsing through the back country of Northern California as part of a “living history” re-creation of the Sacramento Rangers, a cavalry regiment that patrolled Butte County and the Sacramento Valley for the Union during the Civil War. Riding horseback and in full uniform, the company treads the same ground the original outfit covered, using the same equipment and eating the same food as would have been available in the 1860s. For the 47-year-old Wangberg, the re-creation combines two of his passions— horses and history. For more information on the cavalry, visit www.californiacavalry.us.

Who were the Sacramento Rangers? The company formed under President Lincoln’s second call for volunteers in August of 1861. Their mission was to do whatever was ordered of them by the War Department in the Pacific. Their company stayed in California for the entire duration of the war, helping local law officials go after and arrest Confederate sympathizers. One time they went to the town of Snelling and arrested the newspaper editor for publishing untold things about the Union.

Where and how far do you ride? We go out and do maybe two or three nights, and then upwards of a week. We patrol anywhere where you’re still allowed to ride horses on the ground where the original

PHOTO COURTESY OF ROB WANGBERG

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Sad

by Rob Brezsny

15 MINUTES

BREZSNY’S

For the week of February 2, 2012

Sacramento Rangers patrolled. A good day’s ride will be about 10 miles, so we’re not endurance riders by any stretch of the imagination, but once you get the full gear on it’s still a pretty good ride.

What kinds of people are attracted to the club? They have to be someone who owns a horse and is interested in history. A lot of people are skeptical about the whole thing, until you get them to come out and see how fun it is.

How do you make sure it is an authentic experience? We go as far as to repackage the food we bring so there is no plastic or tinfoil out on the trail with us and we try to get as close to period food as possible. Probably the thing that gets the most attention, particularly with other horse riders, are the saddles. We use McLellan military saddles. There’s no padding on them, but they were designed so you can ride in them for long periods and they’ll still be fairly comfortable. Riding 50 or 60 miles a day wasn’t uncommon.

FROM THE EDGE

by Anthony Peyton Porter himself@anthonypeytonporter.com

Mr. Black Man Anthony is taking the week off, so he updated a column from 2009. I wore my Mr. Black Man costume to church one Sunday a few years ago. I’ve got this beautiful embroidered dashiki that a friend gave me some years ago. I think she thought I wasn’t black enough. It wouldn’t be the first time. Some years ago when I took my recent wife and brand-new son to Chicago, I didn’t take them around everywhere I went. I grew up in Chicago, and there were people there I’d known forever whom I wanted to say hello to who were not gonna be happy that I’d married a white woman and was sporting a blueeyed baby boy. One woman I’d partied with in high school and who had been a friend when I needed one asked me why I had married a white woman. Couldn’t I have found a Black woman? She thought I owed her an answer. I thought so too, and I said that race wasn’t important to me in any way, which was comfortably simple-minded and true. I recognize that perceptions and expectations around race affect human relationships, including mine. I just don’t give race any more attention than I have to, and that’s usually no attention at all. Years ago a job interviewer once asked me if I was most comfortable with a particular cultural

group. I said I if I had to rank them, I’d have to say I was most comfortable around black people, since that’s who I knew best. Wrong answer, no job. I was expected to be equally at ease with all groups, which seemed like a silly requirement and still does. That’s where tolerance comes in. I went to school with white people in high school and college and worked with them on most jobs, but other than the occasional drink after work I socialized mainly with black people and dated only black women. Then I moved to Minnesota, and I haven’t had a black woman in 25 years. I was in Minnesota two years before I met another black person. I would see one on the street now and then, and sometimes I’d run across black people at summertime events, but the things I did and in which I was interested didn’t cause me to see many black people; they still don’t. In Chico there are way fewer black people even than in lily-white Minnesota, for Pete’s sake, so I felt conspicuous in my dashiki at church. I should also say that I had on my black leather kepi with the stripes in liberation colors—red, black and green; I was not only Mr. Black Man, I was the Black Man, the Negro. I’ve been the Voice of the Negro at libraries, bookstore signings, and on nonprofit boards. Locally, I’m the Negro in the “Snooze & Review,” way in the back. February 2, 2012

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