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PASSPORT CENTRAL OREGON COAST

Your Passport to the Central Oregon Coast

INSIDE...

Maps (area, hiking, biking) Dining, lodging, fishing, whale watching, tide pooling, lighthouses and much more! SERVING THE CENTRAL OREGON COAST FROM TILLAMOOK TO FLORENCE | www.oregoncoastpassport.com


Location Location Location Portland 99W

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Lincoln City

Salem

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Newport

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art of being in the right place at the right time. At

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99W

Good luck is the

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Eugene

Chinook Winds, we certainly have

enough of the “right”places. And since our Las Vegas-style casino is open 24 hours a day, the right time is up to you. 1,100 Slots • Blackjack • Poker • Keno Roulette • Craps • Entertainment • Bingo Pai-Gow • Hotel •18-Hole Golf Course Five restaurants, two with ocean views.

www.chinookwindscasino.com.

"It's Better at the Beach!" • On

the beach in Lincoln City • 1-888-CHINOOK

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5/1/12 1:32 PM


Come to Newport Cafe where Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner are served 24 hours a day! Fish & Chips•Shrimp•Crab • Oysters•Steamed Clams & much more! Bread Bowl with Homemade Chili or Chowder Pancakes •French Toast • Stuffed French Toast Breakfast Burritos•Cafe Omelettes Burgers•Sandwiches • Soups•Salads EVERY THING HOMEMADE!

PUBLIC VOTED #1

NE 6th Street & Hwy 101 Across from ProBuild

541.574.6847

great breakfast and seafood all day


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entral regon oast assport

Jeremy Burke

Heceta Head Lighthouse - Jo Wienert www.jowienert.com

Barbara Moore Teresa Barnes John Anderson Krisstina Borton Jack Davis Steve Card

Larry Coonrod Jack Davis Rick Beasley Sue Lick Tim Hirsch

Central Oregon Coast Passport is published twice a year by the News-Times. All rights reserved, material may not be reprinted without written consent from the publisher. Central Oregon Coast Passport makes every effort to maintain the accuracy of information presented in the magazine, but assumes no responsibility for errors, changes or omissions.

831 NE Avery St. Newport, OR 97365 • 541.265.8571 • newportnewstimes.com

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A Publication of the


Photo by Jo-Hanna Wienert • www.jofotos.com

Inside

Things to do Things to do on the Oregon coast Pgs. 50-54

Bike Route

A quick guide to Biking on the Oregon coast Pg. 55

Trail Maps

Hiking Trails on the Oregon coast Pgs. 48-49


Tillamook

Tillamook Air Museum

Map

Pacific City

Pelican Pub

Lincoln City

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Kite Festival

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Hiking Drift Creek Falls

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Depoe Bay

Boating

Points of Interest Map

Toledo

Summer Festival

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NOAA

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Waldport

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Thing to do

Map

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Yachats

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Florence

Old Town District

Map

Trail Maps Things to Do Oregon Coast Bike Route 6- www.oregoncoastpassport.com

Lincoln City Depoe Bay

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Map

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Newport

La-De-Da

Tillamook

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able of ontents

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Events

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Siletz Newport Toledo

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Waldport 34

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Yachats 101 Florence

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Oregon Dunes National 50-54 Recreation Park 55

Siuslaw National Forest

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TILLAMOOK

Photo by Jo-Hanna Wienert • www.jofotos.com

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Tillamook Air Museum

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n the Oregon Coast stands a hidden gem. The Tillamook Air Museum. Formerly a WW II dirigible (blimp) hangar, the facility now houses one of the top five private collections of both military and civilian aircraft. This is without doubt, a remarkable spot for a Museum. It is history housing history at its finest.

Stop off and take a tour of the Tillamook Air Museum and you will immediately recognize that you are in for a treat. Unlike most other museums of its kind, the Tillamook Air Museum’s aircraft are not displayed behind velvet ropes. In fact, no barrier whatsoever stands between you and these magnificently restored airplanes. Visitors may freely approach all of the Museum’s aircraft to get a better look. If that wasn’t something unusual, (and refreshing) even more impressive is the fact that the majority of these aircraft fly on a regular basis (at least two fly days each month are scheduled).This is clearly evidenced by the oil pans set beneath each aircraft to collect leaking oil. Somehow, knowing that these aircraft still fly makes them all the more real. Just ask a member of the Museum about this flying and their eyes will light up. This, they say, is known as “education through interaction.” Seeing aircraft as they were meant to be seen. Soaring, high above, the roar of their engines echoing off of the surrounding

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hills. Indeed, it is hard to imagine a more perfect philosophy. Here, the emphasis is on the experience. And, what an experience it is. Among the jewels of the Tillamook Air Museum’s collection is its P-38 Lightning. One of America’s most distinguishable fighters of WW II, the P-38 Lighting is only one of seven that still fly today (out of a production of a little over 10,000 aircraft). Another standout


of the collection is the Japanese Ki-43 Hayabusa (Oscar). This Japanese aircraft is the only flying specimen of its kind left in the world. In use with the Japanese Army during WW II, the Oscar was used extensively as a Kamakazi aircraft late in the war. Other aircraft that you will find upon visiting the Museum are the F4U Corsair, P-47 Thunderbolt, SBD Dauntless dive bomber, P-51 Mustang, TBM Avenger and PBY Catalina. These are just a few of the aircraft that the Museum has to offer. Almost as impressive as the aircraft collection itself is the hangar (Hangar B) where the aircraft call home. One of two blimp hangars (the other one, Hangar A burned down in a 1992 fire) constructed in 1943 to house blimps that would be used for anti-submarine patrol during WW II, the hangar is built almost entirely of wood. One of the world’s largest wooden structures, the hangar is truly a sight to behold. Covering over seven acres of land, the hangar stretches 1,072 feet in length, 296 feet wide and rises 192 feet above the floor. An engineering marvel, this gargantuan hangar alone is worth a trip to the Tillamook Air Museum. Other highlights that one shouldn’t miss on their visit to the Tillamook Air Museum, are the Museum’s exhibit hall. Here, you will find wartime and aviation themed artifacts from WW I to the present. These include pieces of the great German airship, the Hindenburg, Helmets from Nazi Germany, Japanese battle flags and much much more. This hidden alcove is sure to impress, so be sure not to miss it. After visiting the Museum, be sure and stop by the Tillamook Air Museum’s “Air Base Café.” Here you will find a full menu of soups, salads, sandwiches and burgers. Truth be told, the food is excellent and the service is outstanding. Where else can you dine below actual flying aircraft, hung from the ceiling above? After your meal, also be sure and stop by the Museum’s Gift Shop. Here you will find plenty of gifts for the aviation (and non-aviation) enthusiast alike. As far as gift hops go, this is as good as they get. What better place to take home a commemorative souvenir of your visit to the Museum. Hands down, the Tillamook Air Museum is one of the best air museums there is. The Museum promises a unique experience, in every way. It is difficult not to come away in awe after visiting. Having a little something for everyone, the Tillamook Air Museum is truly a must see.

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PACIFIC CITY Photo by Laren Woolley www.oregoncoastphotography.com 10www.oregoncoastpassport.com

Photo by Laren Woolley www.oregoncoastphotography.com


Pelican Brewery

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ramatic sunsets highlighting majestic Haystack Rock, longboarders tackling one of the Oregon coast’s best surfing spots and families testing their endurance by climbing a towering dune that — from the top — offers a sweeping panorama of the Pacific from Tillamook Head to the Nestucca River Estuary and beyond. That’s the scene at Pelican Pub & Brewery, now in its 15th year of delivering award-winning beer and cuisine to match — offerings that do their best to rival the unobstructed views of Cape Kiwanda and Haystack Rock.

Beer choices at the Pelican run the gamut. The 2010 Great American Beer Festival gold-medal winning Kiwanda Cream Ale offers proof that a light beer doesn’t have to be boring while tried-and-true favorites like Tsunami Stout (bronze medal at 2010 GABF, gold at 2006 GABF), Doryman’s Dark Ale (gold medal at 1999 and 2007 GABF), India Pale Ale (gold medal at 2004 GABF) and MacPelican’s Scottish Style (silver medal at 2005 and 2006 GABF) round out their most popular beers. And with each new season, you’ll always find something new to sip. A case in point is the upcoming release of their ever-popular Surfer’s Summer Ale (gold medal at 2008 GABF) and the debut of Ankle-Buster Ale and Winema Wit. Boasting a herbal hop character, Ankle-Buster Ale features a fruity-spicy Belgian yeast aroma, toasty and carmel-like malt flavor and a clean, dry finish while Winema Wit, fermented with Belgium yeast, offers a snappy, fruity spicy character thanks to a seasoning of orange peel, coriander and cardamom. As the leaves change colors, the brewery brings back fall favorites Elemental Ale and Full House while winter harkens in Bad Santa and Angler’s Amber Ale. Spring seasonal favorites include Riptide Red and Nestucca ESB. The pub also keeps a selection of Belgian/French and vintage/strong ales on tap. “It’s our mission to present as many colors, flavors, aromas and traditions of

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beer as possible without replicating what’s already (on tap),” says Brewmaster Darron Welch. “Each beer has its own distinctive character.” Though everything starts with the ales that have garnered hundreds of awards since the pub opened in May 1996, the menu isn’t far behind. Each menu item from their charbroiled dinner burger to their pale malt crusted salmon, from a selection of gourmet pizzas to a heaping of steak and seafood has been tasted with the brewery’s award-winning beer. Ideal pairings are listed on the menu. Even their breakfast menu has the pedigree of the brewery all over it as their signature buttermilk-beer pancakes attest to. “It’s a great little brewpub on the beach,” said Welch. “We take our food as seriously as we take the beer.” Perhaps the most-loved aspect on a sunny spring or summer day, is the Pelican’s outdoor patio that abuts the beach. From there, countless visitors have fallen in love with Pacific City and locals have bid adieu to another vibrant sunset. The storied history of Pelican Pub & Brewery began when owners Jeff Schons and Mary Jones struck a deal for the old brick building that fronts the beach at Cape Kiwanda. Schons recalls enjoying a cup of coffee while perusing the business section when he spotted a Saxor Brewing advertisement. “That’s it, it’s a brewpub, Mary,” Schons recalls saying. From there, Schons and Jones went to a Portland craft brewing conference where they basically stumbled upon Darron Welch, a native Oregonian eager to return to his roots. All it took was a 3- by 5-inch index card posted at the conference’s bulletin board for Welch to come calling. A job as the head brewer of the newly conceived Pelican Pub & Brewery was a dream come true for Welch, who was ready to move out of Wisconsin, where he had been working as an assistant head brewer and back into Oregon as a head brewer. Little did Schons and Jones know that Welch would lead their brewery to national prominence. With Darron on board, the Brewery opened on May 4, 1996. Later that same year they captured their first award — The People’s Choice Award at the Florence Chowder Blues & Brews Festival. And, in 1998, on their first try at the Great American Beer Festival, Welch and team won a bronze medal for their Tsunami Stout and a silver for Doryman’s Dark Ale. Their first Brewery of the Year award came shortly afterwards when, in 2000, the Great American Beer Festival singled them out as Small Brewpub of the Year, a distinction they

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repeated in 2005. In 2006 they were selected as the Large Brewpub of the Year by the festival. Since that time, the brewery has carted home countless awards including the 2008 World Beer Cup Large Brewpub of the year. 2010 GABF accolades include a gold medal for Kiwanda Cream Ale and bronze medals for Tsunami Stout and MacPelican’s Wee Heavy Ale. Last year the pub also won a World Beer Cup silver medal for MacPelican’s Scottish Style Ale and nine medals from the North American Beer Awards including golds for Stormwatcher’s Winterfest and Surfer’s Summer Ale. Creator of acclaimed beers such as Kiwanda Cream Ale, which was named to DRAFT Magazine’s Top 25 Beers in the World of 2008 and 2009, Pelican Pub & Brewery’s oceanfront facility is located 22 miles south of Tillamook on the Oregon coast. The brewery boasts countless awardwinning beers during their 15 year history including India Pelican Ale, MacPelican’s Scottish-Style Ale, Tsunami Stout and Doryman’s Dark. The three-time Great American Beer Festival “Brewpub of the Year” winner is open seven days a week, serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. For more information, call 503-965-7007 or visit www.PelicanBrewery.com.

- By Tim Hirsch

Tim Hirsch is editor and publisher of the Pacific City Sun, where you’ll also find complete coverage of Pacific City, Cloverdale, Neskowin and the greater South Tillamook County area. For up-to-date news on Pelican Pub & Brewery events, including their three times a year Brewer’s Dinner, seasonal releases and more, visit www.pacificcitysun.com.


LINCOLN CITY

Photo by Laren Woolley www.oregoncoastphotography.com

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Lincoln City Kite Festival

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hen 10,000 people show up to swell the population of Lincoln City to nearly three times its normal size, you know something is up. And when your kids swear they saw giant purple and yellow octopus undulating overhead, you’d better take them seriously. No, this isn’t some pepperoni pizza induced dream, or Stephen King’s latest offering; it’s one of Lincoln City’s two outdoor kite festivals, held every spring and fall.

These events and the fact that Lincoln City has actually been named Kite Flying Capitol of the World by Kite Line magazine are no accident. To a large extent, they came about as a result of the inspired dedication and hard work of one man, David Gomberg. About 30 years ago, Lincoln City decided to hold a Kite Festival. When time came for the second annual event, then Lincoln City Chamber Director, and kite enthusiast, David Gomberg noticed a piece in Kite Line magazine about seeking

the best cities in the world for flying kites. Gomberg submitted for Lincoln City and the rest is history. Eventually Gomberg’s love of kites and

kite flying lead him away from his chamber Director’s position, but not away from his commitment to Lincoln City kite flying. To say that Gomberg is into kite flying in a


big way is an understatement. He is listed in the Guinness Book of World Records for the largest flying kite in the world at 10,000 square feet in size. According to Gomberg, “You make sure it is well anchored to something like a dump truck or tractor. It flies on 20 ton spectra fiber line.” The mega monster kite is currently based

in North Carolina. In addition to doing giant kites, Gomberg and his family run two retail kite stores, one in Lincoln City and one farther north in Seaside. 90% of the kites and toys sold at Gomberg’s Northwest Winds stores come from Oregon businesses. Almost all of the kite designs sold

are created by Gomberg, his family, friends and fellow kite enthusiasts from around the world. Situated half way between the North Pole and the equator, Lincoln City is an optimal kite flying location. Gomberg shares a little local secret: “January and February can have some fantastic sunny days, just perfect for kite flying.” You don’t have to show up for the big kite festivals to view some of these monster kites. As Gomberg explains, “Our Lincoln City store has been facilitating kite performances every weekend during the summer. We have friends that fly big kites and we invite them to demonstrate their big kites every weekend during the summer. When you drive down Hwy 101 and look out over the ocean and see a giant octopus flying over the beach, it tends to attract attention.” During the kite festivals, the police have a special sign they put up. It’s probably the only one of its kind in the world. It reads: “Kite Festival ahead: expect delays!”


Take a Hike Drift Creek Falls Trail

Photo by Laren Woolley www.oregoncoastphotography.com

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he Drift Creek Falls Trail is located in the Siuslaw National Forest and is managed by the Hebo Ranger District. Drift Creek Falls Trail is not to be confused with the Drift Creek Wilderness, which is further south. It is a good family-friendly day hike easily accessible from both Newport and Lincoln City. Driving the winding and dangerous U.S. Forest Service Road 17, climbing deftly around mountainous ravines, instills the illusion of exaggerated elevation though the trailhead is a mere 911 feet above sea level. Don’t be too discouraged by the vestiges of rapacious clear-cut forestry because the safe-haven of protected forests is worth the drive. The hike to Drift Creek Falls is an easy meander through a beautiful young secondgrowth forest of Douglas-fir, Western Hemlock, Sitka Spruce and Red Alder. Western Hemlock thrives beneath the protective canopy of larger Douglas-firs. Sitka Spruce and Western Hemlock are more often found in separate forests, but in portions of the Siuslaw National Forest and along the Falls Trail they uniquely coexist. Moss and lichen carpet swatches of forest floor, covering nurse logs and exposed roots; they cling to and drape the trunks and limbs of healthy trees. The lush undergrowth is a tangled montage of thorny vines and woody shrubs, deer ferns, sword ferns and salal. The fauna indigenous to the Siuslaw National Forest include 235 species of birds, more than 200 fishes, 69 mammals and 26 species of amphibians and reptiles. Common sightings on the Drift Creek Falls Trail include the ubiquitous yellow Oregon slug, woodpeckers, black beetles, salamanders, frogs and garter snakes; less often quail, hawks, rabbit, deer and Roosevelt Elk may be observed. Drift Creek Falls Trail is gorgeous year round. The dripping wet forest of winter is far from austere and bare bush or limbs offer a glimpse of deeper undergrowth. In the spring the birds are an audible wonder, a cacophony, if unseen; the foliage is both evergreen and punctuated with the lighter brighter green of leaflets unveiling. Also, the creek that spills over the falls is full this time of year, and therefore the falls dramatic. The summer is cool beneath the dense canopy overhanging and - even on


the Drift Creek Falls Trail - one might work up enough heat and the gumption to jump into the cold clear water of Drift Creek. Autumn is a colorful season to visit the falls, as much for the smattering of flush deciduous trees as for the plethora of fungi - a delight in their myriad forms. The main Falls trail is wide, averaging three feet across, and well groomed; it was once designated handicap accessible (but be forewarned that it has washed out in one spot and if not just dangerous, would be a chore to traverse in its entirety, except by the strongest of wheelers). Note also that there are several stairs to the forest floor on the opposite end of the bridge. The trail drops gently more than 340 feet from the trailhead to the suspension bridge over the falls. Here and there a felled giant is a reminder of the former grandeur of mature coastal forests. Most of the larger trees lining the trail are nearing 50 years old. Three notable stands of mature trees can be observed on the Drift Creek Falls Trail. The first and second are just before and after the suspension bridge. The other is located on the northeastern corner of the North Loop. The loop trail is not evenly graded like the main trail and is fairly rugged. It is a short addition, but pretty and less traveled. Intermittent smaller wooden bridges cleverly complete the main trail and north loop; rivulets tumble gently beneath except when swollen with rain or the run-off from a few perennial snow showers. As the path winds less than a mile and a half down through rugged ravines, it eventually abuts an unnamed stream, which becomes the falls that tumbles 75 feet into a pool of Drift Creek.

The Drift Creek Bridge

An awesome suspension bridge spans 240 feet over Drift Creek Canyon, 100 feet above Drift Creek. Three feet wide and sturdy, though flexible to sway, some find the journey across the bridge unnerving. However most delight at the opportunity to step out over the forest canopy and gain a perfect view of the falls. The bridge is breathtaking and accentuates the environment tastefully, exhibiting thought for form and function. Drift Creek Bridge is dedicated to the late Scott Paul, a trail-builder with

the U.S. Forest Service at Mt. Baker in the Snoqualmie National Forest, Wash. Scott’s friend Caroll Vogel described him as one who “was sustained by wild places and a love for the paths that made them accessible. He was a poet, a student of history, and a teacher of traditional work skills.� Paul was the Forest Service Construction Foreman at Drift Creek Bridge and lost his life on the project in a tragic rigging accident, the trail was completed in his honor by his friends. Drift Creek Bridge was completed in 1997 and dedicated in 1998. It is unusual for light pedestrian suspension bridges in that it incorporates a quasi-stiffening truss in the deck. The bridge is anchored in rock via 10-foot rock bolts on one side of the gorge and 28 cy concrete deadmen are used on the other. Materials, including concrete, were mobilized to the sight via helicopter. The towers are 29 feet tall and penta-treated Douglas-fir glulams. The mainlines are one-and-a-quarter-inch galvanized 6 by 19 wire rope. The present trail is contemporaneous with the bridge though game trails preceded them. The north loop is a more recent addition. Beyond the bridge a path cuts across the canyon side and back to the base of the falls. Beware that this is the steepest part of the trail and in wet weather it can be slick. From the edge of Drift Creek the falls can be seen clearly careening over the broad rock face and eventually free falling to the pool below. There is a rustic picnic table at the base of the falls and another that side of the bridge. There is also a bench barely a quarter mile from the trailhead. Plans for further trail development around the falls have been entertained though there is no such work in progress. Drift Creek Falls trail is open year round from dawn until dusk. Dogs are welcome though they must be leashed. The one-and-a-half-mile hike to the edge of Drift Creek, well below the bridge and falls, will take most people less than an hour, though more time should be planned for the hike up and out or if using the north loop. A vault toilet is located at the trailhead. Drift Creek Falls trailhead is a U.S. Forest Service fee site. A day pass may be purchased at the trailhead for $5 per vehicle. Be sure to have exact change or plan to pay by check. Also, the following passes are honored: the Northwest Forest Pass, Oregon Pacific Coast Passport, Golden Passports,

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and the Washington and Oregon Recreation Pass. The trailhead is located on U.S. Forest Service Road 17, east of Lincoln City and is accessible either from the south or northeast. To access Forest Service Road 17 from the south, turn east onto Drift Creek Rd. from U.S. Highway 101 and after a mile and a half, veer south onto South Drift Creek Road. Shortly thereafter turn east onto Forest Service Road17, following signs for the trailhead. Expect the 10-mile drive to the trailhead to take about 25 minutes. There are two occasions that the road comes to an apparent T-junction; while the second is marked (take a left), the first is not (the signpost remains), follow to the left for the trailhead. From U.S. Highway 18 turn south onto Bear Creek Road (which becomes Forest Service Rd. 17). Follow the signs for 9 miles to the trailhead. Though Forest Service Road 17 connects (by way of Drift Creek, Drift Creek S. and Bear Creek roads) Highway 101 to Highway 18, and therefore bypasses Lincoln City, it should not be considered a shortcut because the condition and structure of the road is such that safe travel is time consuming. Much of the road is windy and single-lane with turnouts, several sections of road between Highway 18 and the trailhead are unpaved. Following a storm, heavy debris is sometimes strewn across the roadway; and rocks may fall onto certain sections of the road at any time. Drift Creek Falls Trail is located in the Siuslaw National Forest and is managed by the Hebo Ranger District; District Ranger George Buckingham can be reached at 503-392-3161. Office hours are from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Other Great Hikes

If your travel gear always includes a pair of hiking boots, then you’ve come to the right place. Lincoln City and its surrounding areas lay claim to some of the best hiking trails on the entire Oregon coast. The Salmon River and the exquisite little beach at its mouth is the Cascade Head Natural Scenic and Research Area. To get there, take Highway 101 north for about four miles to Three Rocks Road. Follow it up to the trailhead of The Nature Conservancy Interpretive Trail, a two mile hike that winds over

the north and south sides of Cascade Head. The rocky outcropping rises up to 1,700 feet above the surging Pacific Ocean and affords breathtaking views both north and south. Two other managed trails cover alternative areas of Cascade Head. To the south, near Siletz Bay, off Highway 101 you will find signs to another popular hiking trail; Drift Creek Falls, Trail No. 1378. This moderately difficult hike is 1.5 miles on a well maintained hiking trail The hike takes you through moss covered primordial forests, arriving at a 240 foot long suspension bridge that affords a breathtaking view of the cascading 75 foot Drift Creek Falls. Many other great hiking trails are in and near Lincoln City, but these two should get you off to a good start. For more information, stop by one of the Lincoln City Visitors Centers or visit www.discoverlincolncity.com.

So Many Parks, So Little Time

Launch a boat, set up a picnic, throw out a crab ring, or just cuddle up on a blanket and watch the sun sink into the wine dark Pacific Ocean, these are just a few of the countless things you can do at one of the many parks situated in and around Lincoln City. For some lakeside fun, Regatta, Holmes Road and Sand Point parks afford access to Devils Lake, two with boat launching facilities. For beach access, try Canyon Drive Park, or Wecoma Park. Taft Waterfront Park allows easy bay and beach access, as well as crabbing and fishing opportunities. Siletz Bay Park, south of town, near Schooner’s Creek Bridge is the perfect starting point for a bird watching expedition around Siletz Bay. Kids will love the multitude of fun stuff to do at Kirtsis Park, Regatta Park and at Kids’ Park and seniors too! And you’ll find tennis courts available at Dorchester Park. Canyon Drive Park: SW 11th and Coast Avenue Dorchester Park: NW Neptune and 28th Street Holmes Road Park: Where Holmes Road intersects West Devils Lake Road

3 Great Attractions in Newport Oregon

Fun for the Whole Family!

250 SW Bay Blvd. Newport, Oregon

541-256-2206

w w w. m a r i n e r s q u a r e . c o m

Ripley’s and Believe It or Not are registered trademarks of Ripley Entertainment Inc. 18- www.oregoncoastpassport.com


Josephine Young Park: SW 65th Street Kids’ Park and Seniors Too!: SW Fleet and 68th Street Kirtsis Park: Highway 101 and NE 22nd Street Regatta Park: West Devils Lake Road and Regatta Park Road Sandpoint Park: East Devils Lake Road and Loop Drive

Siletz Bay Park: Highway 101 and Schooner Creek Bridge Taft Waterfront Park: SW 51st Street, off Highway 101 Wecoma Park: NW 31st Street and Jetty Avenue

Discover Regatta Park

Regatta Park in Lincoln City is a gem not too many tourists know about. Located on the West side of Devils Lake, away from the hustle and bustle of Lincoln City’s main drag, Regatta Park offers visitors a great place to relax with the kids. But don’t think the kids will be interested in relaxing, once they lay their eyes on the park’s main feature, Sandcastle Playground, a state of the art wooden playground structure that might resemble a castle, or a labyrinth guaranteed to stimulate the imagination of any child. More conventional swings and slide are also a part of this kid’s fantasy land. For adults, there is a dock for boats that doubles as a great fishing spot. The well maintained park has a small sandy beach, perfect for just laying back and reading a good book. The views of Devils Lake are breathtaking. Picnic tables and on site barbecues make summer outings easy. Parking is right in front of the lake. To get to Regatta Park, turn, east on NE 14th Street and follow the winding road for half mile. Keep an eye out for the park on your right, as it can sneak up on you.

It was the tastiest and most abundant seafoodbased Cioppino I had ever tried.”... ~ Tripadvisor Review

• Oceanfront views • Fully equipped kitchens in every unit • Indoor heated pool • WiFi available

“Pounding is using his fisherman connections to offer the freshest seafood at unpretentious prices” ~Northwest Palate

BLACKFISH CAFE

2733 Nw Hwy 101 Lincoln City 541-996-1007 blackfishcafe.com

800-648-2119 • 541-996-3623 • fax 541-996-5585 www.oceanterrace.com 4229 SW Beach Avenue • Lincoln City, Oregon 9736719 www.oregoncoastpassport.com


DEPOE BAY 20- www.oregoncoastpassport.com

photo by Ray Lusson


LITTLE CREEK APARTMENTS Your New Home on the Oregon Coast

RhododendronFestival Festival Rhododendron May18, 18,19 19& &20, 20, 2012 2012 May & Wheels In &Show Wings Wings & Wheels Fly InFly & Car June 30,Show 2012 Car June 30, 2012 Rods N’ Rhodies Invitational Car Show Invitational Rods N’ Rhodies September 7,Show 8 & 9, 2012 Car September 7, 8 & 9, 2012 Chowder Blues & Brews Festival September 21, & 22Brews & 23, Festival 2012 Chowder Blues

Welcome to Little Creek Apartments, a community for young and old alike in the thriving coastal town of Newport, Oregon. Nestled in the trees 1/4 mile east of Hwy 101 near the Agate Beach Golf Course, it features beach access within walking distance via a pedestrian underpass. Nearby shopping centers and public transit make for a high quality and convenient life style. With the on-site amenities designed to meet all your needs, Little Creek Apartments is a place you can truly call home. • 2 & 3 bedroom units • Energy efficient construction means lower PUD bills • Each unit includes a dish washer, ceiling fan, disposal, refrigerator & stove • All 3 bedroom units have 2 full baths and washer/dryer hook-ups

• On-site laundry facilities • Three fenced playgrounds, picnic areas and walking trail • Furnished vacation units available • No pets or smoking • On-site management / maintenance team

– call or stop by – 365 NE 36th Street • Newport, OR 97365 • (541) 265-2663

September 21, 22 & 23, 2012

Florence Area e Chamber e S of e Commerce “Com And Visitor Center “ ! e e S e Hwy 101 Florence OR What290W 97439 541-997-3128 FLORENCE AREA www.florencechamber.com CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

“Come See What We See!“

AND VISITOR CENTER 290 HWY 101, FLORENCE 541-997-3128

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OPen daily at 10 am 541.574.6404 nye Beach • 704 nW Beach dr. newport

WWW.FLORENCECHAMBER.COM www.oregoncoastpassport.com 21


photo by Ray Lusson

Boating

Ahoy! Welcome to Depoe Bay, the “World’s Smallest Harbor” and a gorgeous port of call for recreational boaters, charter operators, commercial fishermen and divers. The harbor’s short entrance makes the run to the fishing and whalewatching grounds the shortest on the Pacific Coast. The harbor’s large boat ramp, paved parking and a fish cleaning station lure boats of all sizes and shapes. But a little research on the harbor entrance is prudent before navigating the bar. Shading represents danger areas on the chart picturedhere. In addition to buoys, aides to navigation include pairs of range markers. Steering a course to keep range markers in line will keep your boat within the channel. Following are areas presenting hazards to navigation in Depoe Bay. They should be avoided at all times: A. North reef. Once a boat has cleared the entrance, waters to the north are hazardous until the red bell buoy is reached. The seas break from the northwest and southwest at the same time, so this area must be avoided at all times. B. South reef. Better known as Flat Rock, this area lies just south of the channel. Breakers are almost always present. Boaters coming from the south should never use this area as a shortcut to the channel. Avoid this area at all times. C. Channel from the red bell buoy in. The passage into and out of Depoe Bay is short but can be challenging. The Coast Guard recommends studying it before attempting to operate a boat in it. Because the north and south reefs are so close to the channel, during adverse conditions, breakers from the north reef will cross the channel and run into the entrance. When this condition exists, it is better to stand by at the entrance buoy until the Coast Guard advises it is safe to enter or is there to escort boats in. An important rule at Depoe Bay: Never fish 22- www.oregoncoastpassport.com


between the entrance and the red bell buoy. Entrance

Boats over 50 feet should not enter the bay without checking with the harbormaster and the Coast Guard. All vessels are required to sound one prolonged (four to six seconds) blast when departing or entering Depoe Bay. Local protocol gives the right-of-way to any inbound vessel. On a building north of the entrance channel, a Rough Bar Warning Light is positioned 25 feet above the water displaying two flashing yellow lights. When lights are flashing, check with Depoe Bay Coast Guard on VHF channel 16 for crossing restrictions. When visibility is less than one nautical mile, the Coast Guard activates its fog signal. The horn then sounds for 2 seconds, once every 30 seconds.

Bar Conditions Report

Recorded weather and bar condition reports: Coast Guard Station Depoe Bay, 541-765-2124.

Aids to Navigation

Small Craft Warning: One RED pennant is displayed by day and a RED light over a WHITE light at night to indicate winds as high as 33 knots (38 m.p.h.) or sea conditions considered dangerous to small craft operations are forecast for the area. Gale: Two RED pennants are displayed by day and a WHITE light above a RED light at night to indicate that winds within the range 34 to 47 knots (39 to 54 m.p.h.) are forecast for the area. Storm: A single RED flag with a BLACK center is displayed during daytime, and two RED lights at night are displayed to indicate that winds 48 knots (55 m.p.h.) and above are forecast for the area. If the winds are associated with a tropical cyclone (hurricane), the “Storm Warning” display indicates that winds 48 to 63 knots (55 to 73 m.p.h.) are forecast.

Boating in Oregon Coastal Waters

If you’re new to Depoe Bay, a chart is recommended. In Oregon, charts may be purchased from authorized National Chart Agents. Locally, they can be found in Newport at Englund Marine Supply Co. Inc. 880 SE Bay Blvd., 541-265-9275.

www.oregoncoastpassport.com 23


TOLEDO

istockphotos.com 24www.oregoncoastpassport.com


Toledo Summer Festival

The 2012 Toledo Summer Festival begins on Thursday, July 26 with the Sidewalk Chalk Artists competition and the Queen’s Coronation. Friday brings the Kids’ Parade and the opening of the Carnival, Food and Craft Booths, Bingo and Karaoke Competition. The Festival continues on Saturday and Sunday with the 5K and 10K Walk/Run, Grand Parade, Logging Show, Texaco Country Showdown, Bake Off Competition, Karaoke Finals and more.

Thursday, July 26

2012 Festival Schedule

11 am Sidewalk Chalk Artists - Artist registration in front of City Hall on Main Street 4 pm Sidewalk Chalk Artists Judging 6:30 pm Sidewalk Chalk Artists Awards Ceremony 7 pm Queens Coronation - Memorial Field

Friday, July 27

6 pm Kids Parade - Begins at Toledo Library, Ends at end of Main Street, Field Opens - Carnival, Food & Craft Booths, Bingo, Beer Garden, Toledo Idol Karaoke Competition - Sign-ups (at the grandstands) 7 pm Toledo Idol Karoake - Semi-Finals (at the grandstands) 12 am Field Closes

Saturday, July 28

9 am Festival 5K/10K Walk & Run 12 pm Grand Parade - Begins at Bay Blvd & Hwy 20, Ends at end of Main Street Field Opens - Carnival, Food & Craft Booths, Bingo, Beer Garden 2 pm Local Logging Show 5 pm Dance Heads™, Mrs. Claus Silent Auction 7 pm Texaco Country Showdown 10 pm Fireworks, DJ - After Fireworks 12 am Field Closes

www.oregoncoastpassport.com 25


Sunday, July 29

Sunday is Pepsi Day at Toledo Summer Festival --12 pm Field Opens - Carnival, Food & Craft Booths, Bingo, Beer Garden 1 pm Toledo Idol Karaoke - Finals (at the grandstands), Bake-Off Competition 5 pm 2012 Toledo Summer Festival Closes See you again next year!

26- www.oregoncoastpassport.com


E X P L O R E

28- www.oregoncoastpassport.com

TASTE.

SEE.

EXPERIENCE.


NEWPORT

www.oregoncoastpassport.com Photo by Jo-Hanna Wienert • www.jofotos.com 29


N.O.A.A.

Noaa pacific fleet homeport newport oregon

NOAA fleet supports ocean and climate research

Part of agency’s overall mission of ‘science, service, and stewardship’

Science, research, and their practical applications to everyday life is the foundation of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). NOAA “enriches life through science,” says Jane Lubchenco, the agency’s administrator since 2009. “Our reach goes from the surface of the sun to the depths of the ocean floor as we work to keep citizens informed about the changing environment around them.”

Scientific foundation

NOAA’s history is an integral part of the history of science and scientific research in the United States. NOAA has existed as an officially designated agency only since 1970, but the three agencies – the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, the U.S. Weather Bureau, and the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries - that, along with other elements, merged to become NOAA are among the federal government’s oldest. Much of the nation’s scientific heritage and legacy lies within those three agencies. NOAA’s genealogy traces back to 1807, when science-oriented President Thomas Jefferson created the Survey of the Coast to provide nautical charts for safe passage along the nation’s coastlines and into the nation’s ports. It provided the foundation for extensive research and information “to enhance the safe and efficient navigation of our nation’s waterways,” according to NOAA’s website (www.noaa.gov). NOAA currently manages the network that provides a common reference and coordinate system for all maps and charts, including position (latitude and longitude), elevation, and distance and direc30- www.oregoncoastpassport.com

Miller Freeman Ship Specifications

Length: 215 ft Breadth: 42 ft Draft: 21ft – 33ft (Centerboard retracted or extended) Cruising Speed: 11 knots Range: 12,582nm Endurance: 31 days Hull Number: R223 Call Letters: WTDM Officers: 7 Licensed Engineers: 4 Crew: 27 Scientists: 11 Launched: 1967 Commissioned: 1974 Designer: Philip F. Spaulding Builder: American Shipbuilding Toledo, OH


101

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Line Drawing of The Bell Shimada Courtesy of NOAA.

AGATE BEACH GOLF COURSE

tion between points. In 1870, the federal government established the first agency to provide weather observations and warnings within the U.S. Army. The Weather Bureau itself began in 1890, when Congress transferred those services to the Department of Agriculture. The service evolved in scope and capacity, becoming the National Weather Service in 1970. Today, NOAA is the nation’s primary source of weather data, forecasts and warnings. The fishing industry has played a vital role in the nation’s history since its inception. Formal efforts to protect fisheries started in 1871 with the founding of the U.S. Commission of Fish and Fisheries, charged with protecting “food fishes,” along with scientific studies for managing and protecting marine mammals. In 1882, the USS Albatross became the first government research vessel built exclusively for fisheries and oceanographic research, during three decades of service, Albatross discovered more new marine species than any other research vessel, launching a tradition for NOAA’s current marine research efforts.

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HATFIELD HATFIELD MARINE MARINE SCIENCE CENTER SCIENCE CENTER

OREGON COAST AQUARIUM

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Length: 231 ft Breadth: 42 ft Draft: 14.3 Cruising Speed: 12.5 knots Range: 5,898 nm Endurance: 22 days Hull Number: S221 Call Letters: WTEf Officers: 12 Licensed Engineers: 4 Crew: 35 Launched: 1967 Commissioned: 1968 Designer: Maritime Administration Builder: Aerojet-General Shipyards, Jacksonville FL

SE MAR

Ship Specifications

SE

“NOAA’s mission touches the lives of every American,” says Lubchenco, who brought an extensive background as a marine ecologist and environmental scientist, and expertise in oceans and climate change to the agency’s leadership position. That mission, which focuses on “science, service and stewardship,” is to understand and predict changes in climate, weather, oceans and coasts, share that

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Today, that research takes place in laboratories throughout the nation, including Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) in Newport’s South Beach district, and aboard the fleet of ships and airplanes operated by the NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps.

AGATE BEACH


knowledge and information with others, and conserve and manage coastal and marine ecosystems and resources. The NOAA Marine Operations Center–Pacific (MOC-P), now based in Yaquina Bay in Newport, plays a central role. It serves as homeport for four of NOAA’s research and survey ships, including its newest vessel Bell M. Shimada; provides administrative, engineering, maintenance and logistical support to the nine-vessel Pacific fleet; and houses the MOC directorate, which oversees both the Pacific and Atlantic marine centers, and all NOAA ship operations. NOAA officials celebrated 200 years of service in 2007 – the same year that the Port of Newport submitted a bid to provide a new home for the Pacific research fleet, responding to the agency’s request for proposals as a long-standing lease at Lake Union in Seattle neared an end. NOAA awarded the bid in August 2009, port officials managed a $38 million, 22-month construction project completed in May 2011, and NOAA signed a 20-year renewable lease with the port in July 2011.

Moving forward

During the competitive lease process, port officials touted Newport as “the best working waterfront on the West Coast,” with its commercial fishing fleet, U.S. Coast Guard Station Yaquina Bay, and ocean research activities. The NOAA fleet, they said, would not only enhance such research efforts, but would help attract additional marine science ventures, putting Newport’s already considerable marine science profile on a rising tide. The South Beach peninsula where the NOAA MOC-P facility is located is also home to one of the nation’s premier marine research facilities at HMSC, as well as the Oregon Coast Aquarium. Local, state and federal officials believe it could help transform South Beach into an international hub for research and development on ocean health – a key component in climate change. The fleet itself provides floating, mobile platforms for marine science research, collecting data essential to protecting marine mammals, coral reefs and historic shipwrecks, managing commercial marine fish stocks, understanding climate processes, and nautical charting. They also deploy and maintain buoys that gather oceanographic weather information and other data. Their activities also support existing NOAA facilities located at HMSC. The Newport Research Station at HMSC is the only ocean port research facility for NOAA’s Seattle-based Northwest Fisheries Science Center. Located in the heart of Oregon’s groundfish, salmon and other fisheries, the vessels offer support for the 70 scientists and staff who conduct marine science research throughout the Pacific coast region. Capt. Rick Brown, a retired NOAA Corps officer and current program manager at NWFSC at HMSC, says their work depends on those NOAA ships “to support a variety of fisheries and ecosystem-based cruises.” During the field season (spring, summer, autumn – roughly April through October or November), the vessels are almost always out at sea, conducting essential ocean research, fisheries surveys and seafloor mapping. When home, they are highly visible from many viewpoints, standing out at the facility’s central location in Yaquina Bay that allows them quick, easy access to the ocean, from where they an fan out in any direction for exploration purposes. Former Gov. Ted Kulongoski called the homeport’s construction in Newport “a landmark event for this state,” noting that the ensuing research and development that could evolve from it “will not only put Newport on the map, it will put Oregon on the map.” Folks from Newport, Lincoln County, and throughout Oregon agree, and are going full steam ahead in welcoming NOAA’s considerable presence and personnel to the community.

Line Drawing of the Rainier Courtesy of NOAA. See more information on following page

32- www.oregoncoastpassport.com

Noaa pacific fleet homeport newport oregon

McArthur II Ship Specifications

Length: 224 ft Breadth: 43 ft Draft: 15 ft Cruising Speed: 11 knots Range: 8,000 nm Endurance: 45 days Hull Number: R330 Call Letters: WTEJ Officers: 4 Licensed Engineers: 4 Crew: 23 Scientists: 15 Delivered to Military Sealift Command: 1985 Transferred to NOAA: 2002 Commissioned: 2003 Designer: Maritime Administration Builder: Tacoma Boatbuilding Company Tacoma, WA

Bell M. Shimada Ship Specifications

Length: 208.6 ft Breadth: 49.2 ft Draft: 19.4ft – 29.7ft (Centerboard retracted or extended) Cruising Speed: 14 knots Range: 12,000nm Endurance: 40 days Hull Number: R227 Call Letters: WTED Officers: 5 Licensed Engineers: 4 Crew: 24 Scientists: 15 Launched: 2008 Commissioned: 2010 Builder: VT Halter Marine, Inc. Moss Point, MS


r

Blown Glass - Lampworking - Fused Glass - Ceramics - Paintings - Metalwork

Visit OSU Hatfield Marine Science Visitor Center 7AVES5SEWITHTEXTUREORWITHOUT#ROPBUTDONOTUSEPIECESINDIVIDUALLY 4HETEXTUREISCREATEDBYLINKEDTIFFlLES

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Page 7

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Bob Meyer, Glassblower www.blownhotglass.com email: bob@blownhotglass.com

2030 SE Marine Science Drive Newport, Oregon 541-867-0100

Admission by Donation

http://hmsc.oregonstate.edu/visitor

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NYE COTTAGE •B•E•A•D•S•

A great place to shop for any occasion or holiday – NEW ITEMS ARRIVING DAILY –

Seagulls • Statuary Seashells • Glass & More RECOVERY ITEMS

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Relax in a unique part of Newport 541-265-5642 541-265-5642

www.thelightkeepersinnbb.com www.thelightkeepersinnbb.com 811 811 SW SW 12th 12th St St •• Newport, Newport, OR OR •• 97365 97365

OregOn Beach hOuse

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nyecottage.com • 541-265-6262 Open Daily 10-5

LANDING AT NEWPORT

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WiFi Full Kitchen Fireplace Bay View Fitness Center Pet Friendly BBQs 24-Hour Front Desk

890 SE Bay Blvd Newport 541.574.6777 800.749.4993

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COME STAY in Lincoln City!

Vacation Rentals For You!

Intimate Condos to Big, Beautiful Beach Homes ~ Hideaways for two or sleep up to 30 guests!

~ Family & pet friendly ~ Hot tubs ~ Ocean front ~ Bikes ~ Game rooms ~ Homes fully furnished & impeccable

Lincoln City, Depoe Bay, Newport & Neskowin Call for “Your Best Beach House ever!” ~ 888-755-7783 Toll Free www.cottagesbythebeach.com ~ e: cottagebella@yahoo.com

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Free Full Hot Breakfast Free High-Speed Internet Suites In-Room Coffee Conference Rooms Exercise Room Indoor Heated Pool Spa and Sauna Refrigerator / Microwave HBO Half-mile to Beach Balcony Rooms Available 4430 S.E. HIGHWAY 101 Lincoln City, Oregon 97367

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34www.oregoncoastpassport.com http://bestwesternoregon.com/hotels/best-western-plus-landmark-inn

3517 NW Hwy 101•Lincoln City, OR•541-996-9900 Also in Seaside, Oregon • 866-738-6269 Check us out at BOTH locations! 1-800-4-MOTEL6 • www.motel6.com

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Port of Siuslaw Campground & Marina –In Historic Old Town–

RV Sites • Boat Ramp • Marina Wi-Fi • Fuel Dock Restrooms/Showers • Laundry

(541) 997-3040

100 Harbor St., Florence, OR 97349 campground@portofsiuslaw.com www.portofsiuslaw.com www.oregoncoastpassport.com 35


Photo by Jo-Hanna Wienert • www.jofotos.com

WALDPORT

36- www.oregoncoastpassport.com


Things to Do Waldport A

gate hunting is a popular hobby along the central Oregon coast, and it’s also a fun family friendly activity. Agates come in a variety of types and colors. In addition to agates, lucky beachcombers may find fossils, and even an elusive glass float. Agates are formed by silica entering a hollow opening in a rock or shell or even a piece of wood. Over time, as the outer layer of material wears away, the agate remains. The ideal times to find agates are winter and early spring, but they can be found year round. Keep an eye on the tide table for low tides and search along gravely patches of beach. Check out www.oregonagates. blogspot.com to see photos and learn what people are finding on the beach.

T

here may be more miles of hiking trails located near Waldport than just about any other coastal town. The Cape Perpetua Scenic area offers a dozen trails from the relatively easy Amanda and Giant Spruce trail to the more demanding Cook’s Ridge Trail. If isolation and unmatched scenic beauty is what you desire, the Drift Creek Wilderness area east of Waldport sports unrivaled hiking challenges. For maps and information about all the great hiking opportunities, check in with the professionals at U.S. Forest Service Ranger Station in Waldport located at 1130 Forestry Lane or call them at 541-563-3211. www.oregoncoastpassport.com 37


T

he Alsea Bay estuary and nearby Beaver Creek State Natural Area are recognized as part of a global network of places noted for their outstanding value to bird conservation. Bald eagles and osprey are common sights along the bay. A nesting pair of osprey at Waldport High School have become the unofficial mascots of the town. At low tide herons and great egrets gather along the tidal flats of the bay and Lint Slough.

38- www.oregoncoastpassport.com


YACHATS

Photo by Laren Woolley www.oregoncoastphotography.com

www.oregoncoastpassport.com 39


la-de-dacapit

T

he sleepy community of Yachats derives its name from the Chinook Indian word Yahuts, which means dark waters at the foot of the mountain. This tiny burg sits at the confluence of the Yachats River and the Pacific Ocean, amid a backdrop of rising foothills. So small that it doesn’t have a single stop light, Yachats is home to a rich assembly of poets, writers and artisans, all drawn to the understated ambiance of this coastal non-resort town. In today’s hectic electronically corrupted lifestyle, Yachats remains a place where life moves at more of a leisurely smell the roses stroll. Perhaps this is why the locals have taken one of the busiest holiday of the year, the 4th of July, and given it a typically Yachat’s twist. We give you the 18th “Probably Annual” Yachats 4th of July la-de-da Parade. This community event is so quintessentially Yachats, from the synchronized umbrella twirling squad to the belly dancers, and mutts and owners on parade to the volunteer firefighters. Grab the kids, park a couple of lawn chairs on the side of the road and take it all in. The parade is open to all who want to participate. The restrictions are few; remember this is a G, or at worst a PG rated parade, and please clean up after any animal droppings that your group is responsible for. The parade starts at noonish behind the commons and winds its way down the back streets of Yachats to its conclusion at the Post Office parking lot. In addition to the parade, there are plenty of other activities going on, such as the 7th annual rubber ducky race for kids. This is when a bunch of yellow rubber duckies are dropped off near the bridge into the Yachats River. Each duck has a number and is sponsored. You can sponsor one duck for $5 and three for $10. The first ducklets to make it over the finish line win what the race sponsors refer to as “fabulous” prizes. All proceeds go toward the Yachats Youth and Family Activities Program. Throughout the day there will be food galore, as well as various live entertainment venues. At the end of the day, there will be fireworks shot off the point at the west end of town, shortly after sunset. There is hardly a bad seat in town for these spectacular areal displays. Throughout the year, other exclusively Yachats events take place, such as the fall Yachats Village Mushroom Fest, a three day event filled with mycological education and gastronomic adventures. For more information on these and other events happening in Yachats, go to the Yachats Chamber of Commerce web site: www. yachats.org 40- www.oregoncoastpassport.com


taloftheworld

www.oregoncoastpassport.com 41


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42- www.oregoncoastpassport.com


FLORENCE

www.oregoncoastpassport.com 43


Florence’s Old Town District

B

ay Street lies just off Highway 101, and follows the Siuslaw River for several blocks, encompassing an area of Florence known as Old Town. Having gained its name from the many historical buildings that trace their history back to the late 1890s, this section of Florence is alive today with energy and opportunity. From its beginnings as a center for fishing and logging, Old Town has grown to become a favorite of locals and tourists alike. Unique shops and www.oregoncoastpassport.com 44


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diverse local restaurants make up the bulk of Old Town establishments, but there is so much more to this quaintly dynamic heart of Florence. There is a floating fish market on the public docks, and several intimate parks look out over the ever changing Siuslaw River. Commercial and sports fishing boats share the Port of Siuslaw docks and boat ramp. And anyone with a license and a crab net can try their luck at catching Dungeness crab right off the docks. When it comes to dining experiences, Florence’s Old Town stands out. Of course you can find the standard beach fare of clam chowder and fish and chips, but your inner foodie will also be treated to a variety of extraordinary culinary delights from a wide selection of owner run establishments, all within easy strolling distance of wherever youD park in Old Town Several restaurants offer outdoor patios and decks for socializing and dining al fresco amid the backdrop of the Siuslaw River and the photo inspiring Siuslaw Bridge. This stunning art deco D styled steel and double-leaf bascule draw span bridge was built in 1936, replacing the ferry services that had previously been the only means of fording the swift, deep waters of the Siuslaw. Pilings grouped on both sides of the river’s bank stand as aging sentinels to this bygone time. D In addition to retail gift stores and restaurants, you will find book stores, coffee shops and art galleries, including the Back Street Gallery, which is now located on Bay Street, and exclusively features local artists. There is even a Pioneer Museum where you can D view photos and memorabilia from the days when logging was king. Throughout the summer and fall, a lively farmers’ market sets up every weekend on the grassy portion of land adjacent to the promenade that runs along the boat docks on the east end of Bay D D Street. Succulent fresh produce, as well as one of a kind original gifts and hand crafted treasures can be found. Many Oregon coastal towns have their tourist section, but nowhere else will you find the alluring mix of a laid back take time D to smell the flowers ambiance combined with the excitement of discovering so many new things. Florence’s Old Town should definitely find its way onto your “gotta check it out” list.

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250

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thingstodo on the oregon coast

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Photo by Jo-Hanna Wienert • www.jofotos.com

thingstodo Kayak Beaver Creek One of the most exciting additions to the program at South Beach: kayak tours. Folks who register for the activity will launch from nearby Ona Beach (5 miles south) and spend two hours exploring the fascinating Beaver Creek area with a guide. Kayak tours are offered starting July 4 through Labor day weekend. No experience necessary. South Beach State Park supplies the kayaks, paddles, lifejackets (PFDs), and interpretive host guides. Minimum age is 6. Paddlers under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. $15 per person (subject to change). All trips start at the Hospitality Center at South Beach State Park. All trips include about 2 hours of paddling. Reservations strongly recommended. Reservations can be made beginning June 1 by calling the Hospitality Center at 541-867-6590 or by visiting in person.

surfing

There’s a certain kind of bravado that comes along with harnessing the power of the ocean in the Pacific Northwest. After all, if you can surf when the water temperature is not much warmer than the air temperature and neither are above 55 degrees, you can surf anywhere. Once you’ve covered yourself in several millimeters of neoprene, big waves, and the peace that comes only on a surfboard await you. Here are some tips to make the most of your experience: Take a lesson Skilled instructors all along the coast offer tips from how to paddle out to finding hidden spots with epic sets. Get geared up Lest you be so foolish, cover yourself with booties, gloves and a thick wetsuit and hood. Suit and board rentals are available for reasonable prices at all central coast surf shops. Watch the wildlife Don’t be alarmed to see sea lions frolicking near the line up or hear tales of shark sightings. Jellyfish may also float along on occasion, but protection from stings is another bonus of the wetsuit. Mind your manners Be respectful and aware of yourself. Use a leash to keep stray boards in check. Yield the right of way to those already riding or the first to catch a wave. Accidentally overstep your bounds? Kindly apologize. Know the natives While surf culture can seem intimidating, surfers are generally laid-back and friendly. Locals are willing to welcome visitors to the lineup and give a shout out to beginners. If you’re unsure of etiquette rules or wave selection, most of those sharing the waves will offer a hand. Play it cool Respect the power of the ocean. Learn about riptides and currents, and surf within your ability level. Surf store employees and resident riders can give more information on the best spots to go during certain conditions. Surf shops on the central Oregon coast Kiwanda Surf Company 6305 Pacific Ave., Pacific City | 503-965-3627 Safari Town Surf Shop 3026 NE Hwy 101 #3, Lincoln City | 541-996-6335 Oregon Surf Shop 3001 SW Hwy 101, Lincoln City | 877-339-5672 Nelscott Reef Surf Shop 4235 SW Hwy 101, Lincoln City | 541-996-6122 Lincoln City Surf Shop 4792 SE Hwy 101, Lincoln City | 541-996-7433

Ossie’s Surf Shop 4860 N Coast Hwy, Newport | 541-574-4634 Ocean Pulse Surf & Skate 428 SW Coast Hwy, Newport | 541-265-7745 Alsea Bay Board Sports 260 Hwy 101, Waldport | 541-563-7873 Central Coast Watersports 1901 Hwy 101, Florence | 541-997-5218

Fishing - central coast

ALSEA RIVER: steelhead Winter steelhead fishing is slow. Most fish in the river are natives this time of year. Anglers are reminded to handle the native fish with care. The mainstem and North Fork Alsea remain open for adipose fin-clipped steelhead through April then all areas will be closed to fishing above tide water until May 28. NEHALEM RIVER: steelhead Fishing conditions have been improving as the river drops with the recent drier weather. Some winter steelhead should still be in the river through April, but many fish are close to spawning and may move out of the mainstem. Expect fishing to be fair. Anglers who catch a steelhead or salmon with numbered tag(s) are encouraged to report catch information via the internet at http://www.dfw.state.or.us/

Photo by Jo-Hanna Wienert • www.jofotos.com

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RR/northwest/fish_tag_returns.asp or by calling ODFW at 503-842-2741 and asking for Derek Wiley. All live tagged fish that are not legal to retain or are voluntarily not kept should be released quickly and unharmed with tags intact. NESTUCCA RIVER AND THREE RIVERS: steelhead, chinook There is still some good opportunity for winter steelhead as water conditions have improved. The catch will be comprised of both hatchery fish and wild fish. A few bright fish are still coming in, but many fish will be darker or spawned out. A few early summer steelhead have also been reported caught. No reports of spring chinook yet. SALMON RIVER: Fishing above tidewater is closed effective April 1 and will reopen on May 28. SILETZ RIVER: steelhead Winter steelhead fishing is slowing and on the tail end of the run. Most fish are in full spawning colors. April is the peak spawning month for native fish so anglers are reminded to handle them with care. Good bank fishing can be found around the Moonshine Park area and up through the gorge when river conditions allow. A small number of summer steelhead should start to show up this time of year. SIUSLAW RIVER: Fishing above tidewater is closed and will reopen for trout season on May 28. TILLAMOOK BAY: sturgeon, chinook Sturgeon fishing is fair. Effort was relatively light on the last tide series. A good low tide series in early May should provide good fishing conditions. Fish sand shrimp on the bottom near the channel edges during the outgoing tide, especially

during low tide series. Move often to find fish if you are not getting bites. Spring chinook angling should begin to pick up soon, but angling is very slow at this time. Trolling Herring in the lower bay or near shore ocean generally produces the first fish of the year. TRASK RIVER: steelhead, chinook Fishing for steelhead was fair to good over the weekend as the river was in good shape. Some bright winter steelhead are still available, but many are now spawning or spawned out. An occasional summer steelhead may be caught also. No reports of spring chinook yet. Anglers who catch a steelhead or salmon with numbered tag(s) are encouraged to report catch information, call ODFW at 503-842-2741 and asking for Derek Wiley. All live tagged fish that are not legal to retain or are voluntarily not kept should be released quickly and unharmed with tags intact. WILSON RIVER: steelhead, chinook Fishing for winter steelhead has been good when the river is in shape. The first summer steelhead of the year was reported caught recently. Fishing should continue to be good this week depending on water conditions. Good numbers of fish are in the system throughout the open fishing areas, but fewer bright winter steelhead are still showing up. Boaters need to use extreme caution around MP 6 or avoid that section of river due to a large tree partially blocking the river. Spring chinook are not expected to show up in any numbers until May. YAQUINA RIVER: Fishing above tidewater is closed effective April 1 and will reopen for trout season on May 28.

club jackets, record albums, posters, skateboards, snowboards, and a counter full of surf history. The Museum benefits from your donations, which are always welcome! For more information visit http://www.lcsurfshop.com/nwsurfmuseum.html Located in Lincoln City Surf Shop : 4792 SE Highway 101 Lincoln City, OR 97367 | 541-996-RIDE

thingstodo Lincoln County Historical Museum

The Society focuses on the same goals established early by its members: to preserve, publish, and educate. The Society maintains two historic structures, the Burrows House and a site on Newport’s historic Bayfront slated to become the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center, as well as the Log Cabin Museum. It also maintains the CV Tradewinds Kingfisher, Stan Allyn’s charter boat, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. The Society preserves the state’s largest collection of artifacts from Oregon’s central coast. For more information visit http:// www.oregoncoast.history.museum/index.html or call 541-265-7509

thingstodo

DEVILS PUNCH BOWL STATE NATURAL AREA

Surfers and surf watchers energize this area! During winter storms, water from the restless ocean slams with a thundering roar into a hollow rock formation shaped like a huge punch bowl. The surf churns, foams, and swirls as it mixes a violent brew. The punch bowl was probably created by the collapse of the roof over two sea caves, then shaped by wave action. The park is a popular whale watching site and displays an intriguing geology. This is a scenic picnic spot atop the undulating rocky shoreline. Don’t forget to explore the tidepools. There is no fee to use this park. For information, call 1-800-551-6949.

thingstodo Dunes

From Heceta Head to Coos Bay, from sea level to as high as 500 feet, the Oregon Dunes offer a wealth of recreational opportunities for everyone, from those who enjoy a quiet hike or horseback ride and the possible sighting of wildlife to those who enjoy a more action-packed adventure on two or four wheels. Here are some places to go to enjoy all the Oregon Dunes have to offer. • Baker Beach, about eight miles north of Florence, is a popular place for hikers who want to explore sand and beach in areas less traveled by the masses. Birdwatchers and horseback riders also enjoy this beach for all it has to offer. At its northernmost point, the sand abruptly gives way to the rocks at the base of Heceta Head. • Recreation areas at the north edge of town, Heceta Beach, and west of town, the North Jetty, offer easy access for beachcombing, surfing, hiking and kite flying. • Sandboarders flock to Sand Master Park for the best rides, equipment and instruction in the world. The park is located at 87542 Highway 101 in Florence. Visit www.sandmasterpark.com for more information. • Dune lovers who prefer motorized entertainment descend upon “The Hill” and the other popular off-highway vehicle (OHV) riding areas off South Jetty Road, less than a mile south of the Siuslaw River Bridge. • For sand adventurers who prefer someone else do the driving, both Sand-

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land Adventures and Sand Dunes Frontier offer rides on OHVs that seat as few as four or as many as 34 riders. For more information, visit www.sandland.com or www.sanddunesfrontier.com. • Eight miles south of Florence, the Siltcoos Recreation Area, where the Siltcoos River meets the sea, offers several campgrounds with OHV staging areas and direct access to the dunes. • Ten miles south of Florence, the Oregon Dunes Overlook, part of the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area, offers breathtaking views of the dunes and the ocean. A three-mile roundtrip trail through the dunes to the beach gives hikers the opportunity to explore every aspect of this unique landscape. For more information about the ODNRA, visit www.fs.fed.us/r6/siuslaw/recreation/tripplanning/oregondunes.

thingstodo thingstodo Lincoln City Surf Museum

We have over 25 surfboards on display so stop in and check out the board that Joel Tudor rode in the 1993 Tressels contest. This board can also be seen in two surf movies. We have several historic videos for sale and lots of other memorabilia like

Climb the Lighthouse Yaquina head

Have you ever climbed the stairs of a lighthouse? Wondered what it was like to be a lighthouse keeper? Viewed a working lens? We invite you to visit Yaquina Head Lighthouse, where these questions and more will be answered, as you tour this historic structure.


The 93 foot tower, Oregon’s tallest, is located on a narrow point of land jutting due west into the Pacific Ocean north of Newport, at Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area. Winds and rain have buffeted this lighthouse since its beginning in 1872. It took approximately one year, and over 370,000 bricks to construct Oregon’s tallest lighthouse. The light has been active since Head Keeper Fayette Crosby walked up the 114 steps, to light the wicks on the evening of August 20, 1873. At that time the oil burning fixed white light was displayed from sunset to sunrise. Today, the

fully automated first order Fresnel lens runs on commercial power and flashes its unique pattern of 2 seconds on, 2 seconds off, 2 seconds on, 14 seconds off, 24 hours a day. The oil burning wicks have been replaced with a 1000 watt globe. The nightly vigil of watching the light is gone as are the resident keepers and their quarters, but the staff of the Bureau of Land Management, who are now responsible for the tower, guide you through the lighthouse with tales of yesteryear. For more information call 541-574-3100 for Park Hours and Tours. or 541-574-3100 for Interpretive Store.

Whale watching takes place almost year-round on the Oregon coast. We watch whales in the winter from mid-December through January. Spring watching begins in March with a peak in numbers the last week and finishes in June with mothers and babies being the last whales traveling north. Summer brings whales that feed along our coast from July to mid-November. Located in Depoe Bay on Highway 101. Summer Season: Memorial Day - Labor Day 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Daily, Discovery Season: October- May 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., Wednesday - Sunday. For more information contact 541-765-3304

thingstodo Camp in a Yurt Beverly Beach

Beverly Beach is popular for a reason! Like magic, a well-known walkway goes under the highway and emerges to the long expanse of sandy beach extending from Yaquina Head (you can see the lighthouse from here) to the headlands of Otter Rock. When the weather cooperates, kites color the air and whip in the wind. Bring a bucket and build a sand castle! Surfers often head to the north beach, while folks looking for fossils head south. There are 53 full hookup, 75 electrical, 128 tent (maximum site 65 feet; due to the physical constraints, trailers, including tent and/or cargo trailers, are not permitted in most tent sites); 21 yurts (cable TV hookups in A-loop yurts and selected campsites); group tent (5 areas); meeting hall; hiker/biker camp. For information only, call 541-265-9278 or 800-551-6949. To make reservations, call 1-800-452-5687. Rates: Yurts $40.

thingstodo thingstodo Photo courtesy of the Oregon Coast Aquarium

see the

sharks

Passages of the Deep The Aquarium’s Passages of the Deep exhibit allows the visitor to literally immerse themselves in the ocean realm that exists right off the Oregon coast. A series of underwater walkways leads the visitor from the dark, quiet canyons of the Orford Reef, through the sparkling and teeming waters of Halibut Flats, and finally into the vast blue expanse of the Open Sea. As you pass through these three ecosystems, you symbolically move further into the Pacific Ocean, encountering vastly different animals along the way. Orford Reef Located just offshore near Point Blanco, Orford Reef is a cluster of submerged haystack rock formations, only the tops of which are visible above water. Beneath the waves, the areas between these rocks form a deep reef of narrow crevasses and swaying forests of bull kelp which can reach lengths up to 100 feet (30 meters.) Far below the kelp forest, the reef provides a natural shelter from the weather and wave action, creating a stable refuge for a variety of species. One of the most predominant fish in the Orford Reef is the Rockfish, of which there are 60 different species in the Pacific Ocean. These predatory fish will often hang suspended in the still waters or hide among the drifting kelp as they stalk their unsuspecting prey. Halibut Flats The stormy Oregon coast is often known as the “Graveyard of the Pacific” and here is proof. In Halibut Flats, ocean life finds shelter among the sunken skeleton of a long-forgotten ship. There’s more sunlight in Halibut Flats than there was in the narrow canyons or Orford Reef and the animals are more active. In ecosystems like this one, a tremendous number of interconnected species form a vibrant underwater community. Aside from the sturgeon, lingcod, halibut and flounder that constantly patrol the shipwreck, the sandy ocean floor is a resting ground for skates, a disk-shaped species of fish related to sharks and rays. You

may have to look carefully, however, as the skates’ mottled coloring is the perfect camouflage for this region of dappled sunlight. Open Sea The longest tunnel in Passages of the Deep also represents the world’s largest environment – the Open Sea. There are no towering kelp forests or narrow rocky channels here… just water as far as the eye can see. Most of the species represented in this exhibit live in the upper strata of water, commonly referred to as the Sunlit Zone. This area is alive with five species of shark, huge bat rays and great schools of anchovy and mackerel. The sharks are particularly popular with Aquarium visitors and all our species are native to Oregon coastal waters, including our largest specimen, the Broadnose Sevengill Shark. As you exit Passages of the Deep, be sure to check out any activities that may be in progress in our Gleason Events Room or browse the merchandise in the Shark Zone Gift Shop.

thingstodo Whale Watching Depoe Bay

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department park rangers are ready at the Whale Watching Center in Depoe Bay to answer your questions and help you find whales to watch. Located on U.S. 101 along the seawall in scenic Depoe Bay, the center is a perfect spot for visitors to locate and watch whales as they blow, dive, spyhop and breach.

See the Bay Discovery Tours

Marine Discovery Tours offers narrated ocean and bay cruises with naturalist guides from our docks along the Historic Bayfront District in Newport Oregon. Marine Discovery Tours offers the finest accomodations on the Oregon Coast for viewing whales and other sea life. The boat DISCOVERY is equipped with the latest audio-visual aids including big screen television for viewing microscopic marine life, satellite locator maps and nature videos. Inside and outside seating ensure comfort no mattter what the weather. For more information & reservations call 1-800-903-BOAT(2628)

thingstodo Take a Hike

See Pages 52-56 for some great hiking maps on the coast. Also see story on Drift Creek Falls pages 16 & 17.

thingstodo Hunt for Agates

Treasures await visitors to the central Oregon coast beaches, where with a little hunting and a little luck, people can find agates, fossils and the occasional glass float. “We’re quite fortunate to have such a beautiful selection of materials here


found from Yachats to Otis. This is really a hotbed for agate collectors,” said Kay Myers, co-author of “Agates of the Oregon Coast.” Agates come in many different colors, ranging from orange, red and clear to rare pinks and lavenders, which Myers counts as some of her prize finds. Agates are formed by silica entering a hollow opening in a rock or shell or even a piece of wood. Over time, as the outer layer of material wears away, the agate remains. “There’s so much that can be found out there; wonderful fossils from tiny ones to actual limb casts of petrified wood that was replaced totally by agate,” Myers said. The ideal times to find agates are winter and early spring, but they can be found year round. Myers suggests first looking for a gravelly beach. “We really depend on those winds out of the southwest because that peels off the sand and leaves the gravel bars exposed,” she said. “Minimally you want a spread of rocks, but a sandy beach isn’t going to provide much as a rule.” Keep an eye on the tide table for low tides. The recent minus tides have revealed many good agate-hunting spots. Myers stresses the importance of safety first when venturing on to the beach. Visit Myers’ blog, www.oregonagates.blogspot.com to see photos and learn what people are finding on the beach.

Also, check out the Bayfront Road to Toledo for good birding. Go at least as far as Salley’s Bend. Many ducks and brants can be seen here. At low tides numerous shorebirds and Bald Eagles are often seen at the mudflats. Near Toledo look for Green Heron. The Estuary Trail can be accessed from the Hatfield Marine Science Center. Over 3,000 feet of trail offer year-round public access to the estuary, and interpretive signs are placed along the trail, with an observation shelter provided approximately midway. Parts of the trail and facilities are accessible to the physically challenged. The Oregon Coast Aquarium has outside walking paths to the sea aviary for

viewing Tufted Puffins, Pigeon Guillemots, and Rhinoceros Auklets up close. South Beach: Along the South Jetty Road, look for loons, cormorants, Pigeon Guillemots, and Harlequin Ducks. Yaquina Head Lighthouse and North: From April through July, thousands of common murres and many cormorants, both Brandt’s and Pelagic, will be seen on nearby offshore rocks. On the cliffs gulls, Pigeon Guillemots, and Pelagic Cormorants maintain precarious nests. Sometimes you can see Tuffed Puffins. They nest in burrows along the tops of the cliffs. Wheelchair accessible tidepools have been created off Lighthouse Access Road. Look for bird activity there. http://www.oregoncoastbirding.com/

thingstodo Connie Hansen Garden

The Connie Hansen Garden in Lincoln City was developed between 1973 and 1993 by Constance P. Hansen, “Connie”, who was an enthusiastic gardener, both a collector and an artist. After her death, the Conservancy was formed to save the garden from destruction. The volunteers of the Conservancy are stewards of the horticultural, artistic and ecological style, as well as the spirit, of the late Connie Hansen. It is the mission of the Conservancy to preserve, restore, maintain and continue to develop the Garden to provide a focus and a facility to encourage education and involvement with gardening and related arts in the community. Visitors are always welcome to walk around the garden during daylight hours. There are many paths, gravelled and grass. Take any route that appeals and stay as long as you like. For more information visit www.conniehansengarden.com

thingstodo Horseback Riding on the Beach

With beautiful trails and spectacular ocean views, the central Oregon coast offers a variety of options for horseback riding. Whether you are an experienced rider or a “newbie,” there is a trail for every level of rider. • Just over five miles north of Florence, Baker Beach Trail has beach and lake access for riders and hikers. Open year-round, Baker Beach Trail is rated easy to moderate for riders. Take Highway 101 north and turn left at Baker Beach Road. • Horse Creek and Dry Lake trailheads are part of the Herman Peak Horse Trails. Considered easy to moderately difficult, the Dry Lake and Horse Creek trailheads both offer tables, fire rings and vault toilets. Camping and corrals are available at Horse Creek Trailhead, and Dry Lake Trailhead has tent sites. Take Highway 101 north and turn right onto Herman Peak Road. The staging area for Dry Lake Trailhead is 3 miles up. Horse Creek Trailhead is 2.4 miles up from Dry Lake. • Since 1981, horse lovers have converged at C&M Stables, to enjoy everything from romantic sunset beach rides to forest adventures. Located 8 miles north of Florence, C&M Stables has trained equestrians on staff to make sure every level of rider has the experience of a lifetime. C&M Stables is at 90241 Highway 101 North, 541-997-7540.

thingstodo Bird watching

Catch sight of a variety of songbirds at Yaquina Bay State Park. There is a trail from the park to the beach, and access to the north jetty.

54- www.oregoncoastpassport.com

thingstodo Fly a kite

Lincoln City, named by Kitelines Magazine as one of the best places to fly kites in North America, celebrates with three kite festivals each year, two outdoors and one indoors. Situated on the 45th parallel, Lincoln City is positioned at the ideal point for mixing warm equatorial air and cold polar air, which creates ideal winds for outdoor flying. Furthermore, the clean air directly from the ocean is pre-

ferred by kite flying experts, and even novices will see a difference in their abilities at this location. Kite flying is a family activity available in Lincoln City throughout the year, regardless of the weather, through festivals, kite building workshops and kite flying lessons. It’s always time to fly! For more information visit http://www. oregoncoast.org/pages/things-pages/kitepage.php

32nd Annual YACHATS MUSIC FESTIVAL

13th Annual YACHATS VILLAGE MUSHROOM FEST

thingstodo thingstodo July 13-15, 2012- Yachats Presbyterian Church, 360 W 7th St For over 30 years, Yachats has had the privilege of hosting internationally acclaimed artists of FOUR SEASONS. This magnificent music festival includes 3 days of cameo performances by 20 to 25 major classical artists. Don’t miss this best kept secret on the Oregon Coast Tickets are now available for individual concerts held on Friday, Saturday & Sunday evenings, and a Sunday matinee. Beginning in June Tickets will be available online or may be purchased in Yachats at the Adobe Resort or the Yachats Visitors Center. FMI, please call 510-8454444, or visit Yachats Music Festival and Four Seasons Arts.

thingstodo Relax at Overleaf Spa

For one of the premier spa vacations in the Pacific Northwest, stay at the Overleaf Lodge and enjoy extreme pampering at the Overleaf Spa. Guests of Overleaf Lodge receive free use of the day spa’s facilities, including the soaking pool, hot tub, steam rooms and saunas. Treatments such as massages and facials cost extra, above and beyond the resort’s room rate. Spa hours: 9:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Daily Located on the 3rd floor above the main lobby of Overleaf Lodge. 800-338-0507 Extension 440.

October 19-21, 2012 Friday 5 p.m. - Sunday 5 p.m Yachats Commons, Cape Perpetua and About Town Come savor autumn on the Oregon coast where the fun-guys go -to the Yachats Village Mushroom Fest! Enjoy wild forest mushroom cuisine, expert led mushroom walks, talks and exhibits, culinary and fungi arts workshops, culinary mushroom markets, wine tasting, and live entertainment. Guided mushroom walks and exhibits are FREE and open to the public. The Yachats Village Mushroom Fest is sponsored by the Yachats Area Chamber of Commerce and is generously supported by Yachats Area restaurants, lodging and gift shops, the Cape Perpetua Visitors Center and Scenic Area, Gerdemann Botanical Preserve, Forest Ecologist Marla Gillham, OSU Faculty, Students and Alumni, Cascade Mycological Society, North American Truffling Society, Lincoln Co Mycological Society, the City of Yachats, Yachats Ladies Club, The Overleaf Event Center, Yachats Farmers Market, area naturalists, and many culinary mushroom enthusiasts. FMI please Email or call 1-800-929-0477, 541-547-3530.


55- www.oregoncoastpassport.com


See one of America’s finest collections of over 30 magnificently restored warbirds, including our P-38 Lightning, F4U-Corsair, P-51 Mustang, PBY Catalina and SBD Dauntless Dive bomber. Explore our Exhibit Hall with rare wartime and aviation artifacts! Have lunch at our 40’s/50’s Café. Enjoy shopping in our aviation gift shop. All housed in a rare World War II Blimp Hangar... the largest wooden structure in the world!

Tillamook Air Museum 6030 Hangar Road. Tillamook OR 97141 www.tillamookair.com 503-842-1130 info@tillamookair.com

Central Oregon Coast Passort  

Visitors Guide to the Central Oregon Coast

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