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A benefit of membership with the New Orleans Museum of Art

ARTSQUARTERLY VOLUME XXXII ISSUE 2

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART

APRIL/MAY/JUNE 2010

Beyond the Blues: Reflections of African America in the Fine Arts Collection of the Amistad Research Center BY MARGARET ROSE VENDRYES Curator, Amistad Research Center Fine Arts Collection

Elizabeth Catlett, American, born 1915 Blues, 1983, color lithograph 28 x 18 in., Purchase, 1990

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NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


ARTS QUARTERLY

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FROM

THE

DIRECTOR

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n the few months between being appointed Director of NOMA and moving here in April 1973, the trustees asked me to make a thorough evaluation of the Museum's permanent art collection and write a new Acquisitions Policy to serve as a guide for future growth. Taking into consideration the limited purchase funds that NOMA then had available and searching for areas of world art which were reasonably priced, I recommended that we begin to form a comprehensive collection of photography. At the time, photographs were definitely unappreciated, with few private collectors and even fewer museums interested. Incredibly, back then there were even art professionals who questioned whether photography was a legitimate art form. Our first purchase in this area, a portfolio of fourteen photographs by Walker Evans, was made in March 1973. What began as a trickle became a flood of purchases for NOMA in the next five years, with the Museum annually acquiring hundreds of works. When we started, prices for works by major masters were in the hundreds of dollars each; after a few years, those prices escalated to the thousands, and today the tens of thousands. Nearly four decades later, NOMA has one of the finest photography collections in the country, with over 8,000 images. Purchases have been supplemented by wonderful gifts from artists and collectors, most notably the contemporary collection of Dr. H. Russell Albright. 2010 will be a great year for photography at NOMA with seven special exhibitions scheduled. This photo feast begins in April with a show of two series by the renowned Louisiana photographer William Greiner, Fallen Paradise: New Orleans, 1995-2005 and Land's End: Baton Rouge, 2007-2010. This will be followed by a show, organized by NOMA Curator of Photography Diego Cortez, of photographs by musician-poet Patti Smith, which she is generously donating to us. Smith will speak at NOMA on April 22 on her work and her recently published and highly acclaimed memoir, Just Kids, about her long friendship with Robert Mapplethorpe. In May, in conjunction with the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association, we will present The Therapist: An Intimate, Extended Portrait/Self-Portrait by New Mexico-based photographer Donald Woodman. Our big summer exhibition, Ancestors and Descendants: Ancient Southwestern America at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century, will feature, along with ceramics and textiles, rare photographs of Navajo and Pueblo rituals and dances. To commemorate the fifth anniversary of Katrina, NOMA and four other American museums will simultaneously present Richard Misrach's powerful F**k You: Messages from New Orleans and the Gulf Coast. In October, NOMA and the Historic New Orleans Collection will present their eighth collaborative exhibition, Photography in Louisiana, drawn from their two collections. And finally, in November, Diego Cortez has organized an exhibition of new work by the famous contemporary French photographer Bernard Faucon, entitled The Most Beautiful Day of My Youth. The 110 prints in this show also will be given by the artist to NOMA. And so our extraordinary photography collection continues to grow.

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ARTSQUARTERLY VOLUME XXXII ISSUE 2 1

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART

APRIL/MAY/JUNE 2010

Beyond the Blues: Reflections of African America in the Fine Arts Collection of the Amistad Research Center Margaret Rose Vendryes

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Women Artists in Louisiana, 1965-2010 Judith H. Bonner

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SWEET Suite Louisiana: Color Intaglio Prints by Warrington Colescott Mary Weaver Chapin

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Joan Mitchell in New Orleans Miranda Lash

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The Therapist: An Intimate, Extended Portrait/Self-Portrait Donald Woodman

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An Evening with Patti Smith Diego Cortez

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Swamp Tours: Exploring the Louisiana Contemporary Collection Miranda Lash

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CURATOR’S CHOICE: Victorian Splendor: A Cameo Glass Vase by George Woodall John Webster Keefe

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The World According to William Greiner: Fallen Paradise, 1995-2005, and Land’s End, 2007-2010 Elizabeth Chubbuck Weinstein

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Cox “Our History” Art Contest

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Celebrating Jackie Sullivan’s Thirty-Seven Years of Service to NOMA

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Dreams DO Come True! Super Bowl Wager Snags a Masterpiece for NOMA Grace Wilson

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Thank You, Volunteers!

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Sculpture Garden Reopening Pamela Buckman

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Welcome Anne Gauthier, 2010 NVC Chair! Virginia Panno

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New Admission Policy for NOMA

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Expanded Wellness Offerings at NOMA Pamela Buckman

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NOMA Notables: Meet the New Administrative Team

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From NOMA to the North Shore

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Circles and Fellows of the New Orleans Museum of Art

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Join the Circles and Upgrade Your Support of NOMA

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Corporate Membership

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The Art of Business

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Contributions

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New Members

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Library Happenings

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NOMA Education: Programs & Activities

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Visit NOMA for a Unique Shopping Experience

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Museum Shop Featured Artists

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Program Sponsors

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Museum News

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NOMA Exhibition Schedule

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NOMA Calendar of Events

*Articles appearing in any issue of Arts Quarterly do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the staff or the board of trustees of the New Orleans Museum of Art.

Editor: Caroline Goyette

SUPPORT ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

Art Director: Aisha Champagne Advertising Manager: Karron Lane Printing: Roberson Printing

The programs of the New Orleans Museum of Art are supported by a grant from the Louisiana State Arts Council through the Louisiana Division of the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Arts Quarterly (ISSN 0740-9214) is published by the New Orleans Museum of Art, P.O. Box 19123, New Orleans, LA 70179-0123. 504-658-4123. Advertising 504-610-1279 or 504-658-4123. © 2010, New Orleans Museum of Art. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced or reprinted without permission of the publisher.

Free admission for Louisiana residents is sponsored by The Helis Foundation and the members of the New Orleans Museum of Art. The Museum is open Wednesday, noon to 8 p.m., Thursday-Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Besthoff Sculpture Garden is open every day, Thursday-Tuesday, 10 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. and Wednesday, 10 a.m. to dusk. For information on upcoming exhibitions and events at NOMA, please call 504-6584100 or visit our website at www.noma.org.

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ARTS QUARTERLY

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Beyond the Blues: Reflections of African America in the Fine Arts Collection of the Amistad Research Center BY MARGARET ROSE VENDRYES Curator, Amistad Research Center Fine Arts Collection

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he Amistad Research Center, located on the Tulane University campus, is the nation's largest independent archive specializing in the history of African Americans and other minority ethnic groups. A lesser known aspect of the Center is its extraordinary collection of fine art dating from the nineteenth century to the present day. Beyond the Blues: Reflections of African America in the Fine Arts Collection of the Amistad Research Center, presented by the New Orleans Museum of Art and the Amistad Research Center, marks a long overdue public access to these remarkable works of art. On view at NOMA April 11 through July 11, 2010, the exhibition will feature nearly 150 works including paintings, prints, and sculpture, as well as archival materials such as letters and sketchbooks, providing a fascinating glimpse of the artistic process. Like the Collection itself, the exhibition is a map that charts change in American visual arts while highlighting African American connections passed, like a baton, over the course of a century from one generation to the next.1 Given the considerable obstacles faced by most of the artists en route to public recognition, the outpouring of creativity and imagination showcased in Beyond the Blues is evidence of enormous perseverance and personal determination. Painters like Henry Ossawa Tanner (1859-1937) and Edward Bannister (1828-1901) who made a living as artists around the turn of the nineteenth century were exceptions in their time. These men, while conscious of race, did not create particularly race-conscious art; rather, their work merged seamlessly with accepted thematic and aesthetic trends. They were among the few who gained access to formal art education or were able to apprentice in the atelier of a

Figure 1 Richmond Barthé, American, 1901-1989 Shoeshine Boy, 1938, bronze, 10 x 5 x 7 in. Amistad Research Center: Gift of Jimmy Daniels and Rex Madsen, 1987

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seasoned artist, as was the case for sculptor Edmonia Lewis (circa 1845-1911) in Rome. With the intensification of the New Negro movement in the 1920s, visual artists gained status as professional champions of racial uplift because of their ability to literally challenge black stereotyping with their art. As the visibility of and respect for art professions grew, so did their ranks. Sculptors like Richmond Barthé (1901-1989) literally transformed the poor black Shoeshine Boy into a high art subject worth placing on a pedestal (figure 1). When Barthé was a student at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1924 through 1928, he was the only African American enrolled in the fine art program. The graphic arts held greater promise for employment, but when Ellis Wilson (1899-1977) completed the Art Institute’s commercial art program around the same time as Barthé, his dark skin made it difficult to find work using his hard-earned skills. Settled in Manhattan, Wilson ended up an apartment building superintendent, painting lively reflections of black life at every opportunity. A small percentage of visual artists achieve fame and fortune. The choice to work against such odds is made by men and women who recognize that making art is their best contribution to society. Beyond the Blues is anchored by traditional fine art categories—portraiture, landscape, and genre—favored here by a varied cross-section of artists who used their talent to reflect on African America. The variety of methods that span generations and yet express likeminded sentiments is stunning. Within each category, four themes surfaced: “Seeing with Candor,” “Inhabiting Our World,” “Living in the Moment,” and “Believing in Divinity.” Across these themes runs a current of experiences that create a contextual and aesthetic flow uniting the entire Amistad Research Center Fine Arts Collection. The theme “Seeing with Candor” includes portraits of notable persons such as Sarah Vaughan (Ben Jones [born 1942]) and Dr. James H. Robinson (Betty Holbrook [19132009]), as well as anonymous characters like Malvin Gray Johnson’s (1896-1934) washerwoman or Elizabeth Catlett’s (born 1915) sharecropper, in each case allowing for agreeable introductions to individuals with stories worth knowing. Many African American artists worked to undo denigrating representations of black peoples, especially during and just after the nineteenth century. The humanity and beauty of black faces spoke to artists who in turn shared, through careful and straightforward representations, vehicles for us to see and perhaps know something about their lives. Children, the promise of a positive future, were pictured in diverse and imaginative ways. William H. Johnson (1901-1970) developed a style in the 1940s that reflected a child’s innocence using crayon-bright colors and, with a different sensibility, Porter’s (dates unknown) “Black is Beautiful” poster from the 1970s pictures a black girl, like a shimmering avatar, mirrored against a tropical fantasy. However, dark portrayals of childhood are here too. Boys rendered as deeply pensive beyond their years by Charles T. Johnson (dates unknown), Hale Woodruff (1900-1980), and William Artis (1914-1977) are reminders of another side of black adolescence. Children mature into men and women who become, in the hands of visual artists, symbols of social and economic strength. They are figures that define and animate space. The visual art depiction of landscape is centuries old. That African American artists found inspiration in the spaces they inhabited and found unique ways to depict it comes as no surprise. Aaron Douglas (1899-1979) teases

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


Figure 2 John T. Scott, American, 1940-2007 Congo Square, 1991 Serigraph, 42 x 36 in. Amistad Research Center: Gift of the Artist

us with a glimpse out a curtained window, while Alma Thomas (1896-1978), using equally exuberant watercolors and liquid forms, asks us to meditate on nature’s wonders loosely traced in her Flowering Tulip Trees. For many African Americans, urban landscapes were the most familiar. Malvin Gray Johnson painted his 1930s Tenements with admirable economy, yet it sways as if animated by a rousing rent party given by tenants trying to ward off eviction. That party has spilled into the streets in Buist Hardison’s (born 1949) Detroit Summer, where color effectively simulates a sweltering heat that makes open, public spaces particularly lively. This Midwestern moment is right in step with John T. Scott’s (1940-2007) Congo Square in New Orleans which vibrates to a point where the drumbeat is nearly audible (figure 2). Vincent Smith (1929-2004) collaged the rough texture and appearance of a late 1960s cityscape, then softened it with graffiti expressing youthful romance— Annie Lou Loves Bill. Visual art documents our environment with all its glitter and grit, myths and facts, revealing information about ourselves as much as the places we inhabit.

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American artists looked to home for their subjects, especially in times of economic struggle such as during the Great Depression. In 1942, national responsibility again came to the fore when the United States entered World War II. This international conflict also marked the rise of the civil rights movement as African Americans demanded full citizenship. Facing radical social, political, and economic change, post-war American art became more open to abstract expressions. Expressionistic style and shape was often employed to reveal deeper meaning than that offered by naturalistic representations. At a time when new black cultural symbols were being designed, among them the raised fist and the radiating afro, a number of African American artists expressed their ideas and allegiances through abstraction. John Dowell (born 1941), among others, recognized in jazz music an improvisational model he then used to create his Soul Coltrane of 1967, where line traces the trajectory of complex sound (figure 3). Using color as the main force, Keith Morrison (born 1942)’s Carnival not only evokes place, but also the sensation of being enveloped by music. Abstraction freed these artists to

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Figure 3 John Dowell, American, born 1941 Soul Coltrane, 1967, lithograph, 17 x 19 in. Amistad Research Center: Gift of the Artist

describe the visible world as witness to more than meets the eye. For example, David Driskell’s (born 1931) Winter Landscape shimmers like a fresh snowfall and James Phillips’s (born 1945) untitled 1973 painting reveals his struggle to visualize music and poetry. Phillips marveled at how a Coltrane horn solo could conjure up vibrant colors in his mind’s eye. Because of the fleeting nature of listening, one must live in the moment to fully enjoy the experience. Deep appreciation for jazz is the foundation of many works by African American artists. For artists like John T. Scott, Kimberly Dummons (born 1972), John Dowell, and Jeff Donaldson (1932-2004), jazz is like a religion. Donaldson’s Mom & Pop speaks to the intersection of African spiritual belief where black elders brandish the staff of Shango, the Yoruba deity of justice and victory, and a reverence for African America’s proud sages. African American music also represents a genuine link to Africa, in that blues, gospel, jazz, hip-hop, and rap are signs of African cultural retentions. The Amistad Fine Arts Collection reminds us that many threads make up the whole cloth that is American culture. Visual artists in

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particular created with faith that their creations would contribute to America’s cultural patrimony. Religious faith—believing in divinity—inspired artists like Hale Woodruff, whose lines create a Country Church that evokes the homespun quality of a rural place of worship, or Wilmer Jennings (1910-1990), who reminded us of the Bible’s guidance in De Good Book Says, or Warren Marr III (born 1916), whose stoic rendition of religious tolerance, One Society, is dreamlike and yet very real and current in its sentiment (figure 4). We encounter here old Bible stories told anew: the folk-like figures in William H. Johnson’s temptation of Christ; Jonah encased, like the meat of a walnut, inside Driskell’s whale; Allan Rohan Crite’s (1910-2007) adoration of a black baby Jesus; and Woodruff’s delightful array of inventive Magi. There are many reasons to spend time with visual art and even more ways to see it. The Amistad Research Center is the custodian of incredibly special objects. They are valuable gifts from the artists, their patrons, donors, and all those responsible for making the holdings of the Amistad Research Center available to us. Respect them. Celebrate them. Support them. Enjoy them.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


Figure 4 Warren Marr III, American, born 1916 One Society, 1972 Oil on canvas, 28 x 22 in. Amistad Research Center: Gift of the Artist, 1983

Notes 1. In 1992, my thesis “Art in the Archives: The Origins of the Art Representing the Core of the Aaron Douglas Collection from the Amistad Research Center” was the culmination of two years of research for the Master of Arts degree in art history at Tulane University, which included countless hours at the Amistad Research Center. Until this writing, my thesis remained the only in-depth look at the core objects that grew into this important collection of art by and about African Americans.

Beyond the Blues: Reflections of African America in the Fine Arts Collection of the Amistad Research Center will be on view in the Ella West Freeman Galleries from April 11 through July 11, 2010. The NOMA Members’ Preview is Saturday, April 10. A lecture introducing the exhibition will be given by

ARTS QUARTERLY

David C. Driskell, Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Art, University of Maryland, College Park, on Sunday, April 11, 2 p.m. in the Stern Auditorium. Exhibition walk-throughs will take place Wednesday, April 21, Wednesday, May 5, and Wednesday, June 16, at 6 p.m. The June walk-through will be led by guest curator Margaret Rose Vendryes. An artists’ panel discussion, featuring artists whose work is included in the exhibition, and moderated by exhibition curator Margaret Rose Vendryes, will take place Sunday, May 16, 2-4:30 p.m. in the Stern Auditorium. Following the panel, the artists will be in the galleries, available to answer questions about their work. A symposium featuring Beyond the Blues catalogue authors Margaret Rose Vendryes, Lowery Stokes Sims, Michael D. Harris, and Renée Ater will take place Sunday, June 13, 1-5 p.m. in the Stern Auditorium.

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Women Artists in Louisiana, 1965-2010 BY JUDITH H. BONNER Senior Curator, The Historic New Orleans Collection

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he New Orleans Museum of Art and The Historic New Orleans Collection are proud to present their seventh joint exhibition, Women Artists in Louisiana, 1965-2010. The show resumes where last spring’s exhibition, Women Artists in Louisiana, 1825-1965: A Place of Their Own, left off. The new exhibition continues to focus on the creative legacy of the state’s women artists, starting with the dawn of postmodernism and bringing viewers to the present day. On view are forty-four paintings, sculpture, photographs, and decorative arts by forty artists. The works include portraits, landscapes, genre scenes, non-objectives, and abstracts. Among the featured artists are Martha Ambrose, Jacqueline Bishop, Lynda Benglis, Jane Nulty Bowman, Dawn Dedeaux, Lin Emery, Mignon Faget, Suzanne Joslyn Fosberg, Joanne Greenberg, Angela Gregory, Shearly Grode, Ronna Harris, Gail Hood, Ann Hornback, Jacqueline Humphries, Ida Kohlmeyer, Carol Leake, Shirley Rabé Masinter, Chyrl Savoy, Eugenie “Ersy” Schwartz, Ann Strub, Patricia Whitty, Margaret Witherspoon, Mildred Wohl, and Jesselyn Zurik. Photographers include Debbie Fleming Caffery, Sandra Russell Clark, Tina Freeman, and Josephine Sacabo. This exhibition features some artists whose reputations are well established locally and nationally, and others who are still emerging. The contributions of these artists of the latter half of the century, understandably, were made possible by earlier women artists.

Ida Kohlmeyer, American, 1912-1997 Mythic Throne, 1986, oil and mixed media on wood Commissioned by the Krewe of Rex, New Orleans Museum of Art: Gift of the Louisiana Land and Exploration Company Foundation, Freeport-McMoRan Inc. and Charbonnet Construction Company, 1986.10. Photograph by Judy Cooper

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In April 1956, Lin Emery (born 1928), Shearly Grode (born 1925), and five other artists (George Dunbar, Jack Hastings, Robert Helmer, James Lamantia, and Jean Seidenberg) founded the cooperative Orleans Gallery for the purpose of exhibiting and recognizing contemporary art. With the growth of this endeavor, greater freedom came to Louisiana artists, including Ida Kohlmeyer (19121997), who exhibited with this group. Angela Gregory (1903-1990) was one of five women sculptors from Louisiana to achieve international fame, the other four being Kohlmeyer, Emery, Benglis, and Clyde Connell. Gregory’s success came from her foundation at Newcomb College, after which she worked in the Paris atelier of Antoine Bourdelle. Although the greater part of Gregory’s active career occurred from the 1920s through the 1950s, she is represented with a nod to the city’s history and its importance to the growth and development of the nation. Gregory’s plaster cast of a medallion for the sesquicentennial of the Battle of New Orleans (1965) is displayed with a bronze medallion and a doubloon-sized silver medal. Sculptors Kohlmeyer, Emery, and Eugenie “Ersy” Schwartz are represented in the exhibition, but they enjoy a greater presence on the grounds of NOMA— Kohlmeyer with two works, one in the Besthoff Sculpture Garden and another in the Booth-Bricker Courtyard; Emery with her wind-propelled kinetic sculpture in front of the Museum’s main entrance; and Schwartz with work created in collaboration with artist George Dureau as part of the City of New Orleans’s One Percent for Art Program for the gates of the Ella West Freeman Foundation Courtyard. Louisiana artist Elizabeth Shannon has a sculpture installed in the same courtyard. Kohlmeyer, whose art career was delayed, exhibited her first paintings at NOMA (then the Isaac Delgado Museum of Art) in the Fifty-Fourth Annual Spring Exhibition. After her graduation from Newcomb College at age 44 in 1956, Kohlmeyer studied with Hans Hofmann. After meeting Joan Miró, she painted nonobjectives, incorporating tenets of abstract expressionism. She also began creating sculptural works in wood and Plexiglas. Her whimsical Mythic Throne (1986) is the culmination of her first experiments combining sculpture and painting. A 1980 sculpture of a seated Mother and Child by sculptor-painter Jesselyn Zurik (born 1916), who studied under Will Henry Stevens at Newcomb College, is restrained, simplified, and minimalist. Originally from Lake Charles, Lynda Benglis (born 1941), who was influenced by color field painting, became known in the late 1960s for controlled poured latex “spills” and in the late 1970s for sculptural gilded knots with simulated pleated fabric. Louisiana sculptor Chyrl Savoy’s large 1970 Corpus (A Crucifix) is beautifully carved, the rich tones of the black walnut providing warmth to the abstracted figure. Savoy, a native New Orleanian (born 1944), received a B.A. from Louisiana State University in 1966, and then studied at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Florence, Italy before earning an M.F.A. from Wayne State University in Detroit. In 1971 Savoy received NOMA’s Individual Exhibition Award in the "Biennial Exhibition of Artists of the Southeast and Texas." Evelyn Menge (born 1947), who is known for her sculptural facsimiles of blue-andwhite New Orleans street tiles, is represented with a sidewalk relief spelling “Perdido,” a street that takes its name from the Spanish word for “lost.”

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


During the late twentieth century, there occurred greater freedom in artistic expression, particularly with regard to content and social comment. Artists continued to experiment with the full range of early twentiethcentury trends, including abstract expressionism, dadaism, surrealism, and symbolism. Menge’s use of the word “lost” symbolizes the question of many artists who wished to explore representational subjects. With Robert Venturi’s Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture (1966), many artists began to feel a need for a greater challenge beyond the mere exploration of the formal elements—form, line, color, shape, space, texture, and value. The yearning for creative freedom was marked by a return to more traditional forms in the late twentiethcentury. Seeking greater artistic expression, Margaret Witherspoon withdrew from Newcomb College, studied at the Arts and Crafts School of Art in New Orleans and continued her art training at the Art Students League in New York. In 1957 Witherspoon re-enrolled at Newcomb, where she studied for eight years under painters Hal Carney and Pat Trivigno and printmaker James Steg. Her soft-edged Man and Woman (1975), executed in tones of blue, clearly focuses on the human figure. Grode’s 1978 iconic non-objective Conglomerate #2, which is gilded with gold leaf and silver leaf, appears to be a junction between painting and sculpture. As representational art began to re-emerge in the early 1980s, the emphasis of an artwork often had witty or humorous overtones reminiscent of the Dadaists. Ann Hornback’s 1984 watercolor, Al Dente, features a table in the foreground with a plate of spaghetti and meatballs, and the outline and form of a woman lying across the pasta; a man sitting nearby takes a snapshot of her. Jan Aronson’s geometric acrylic painting, Seven Twice (1975), with its glowing optical pattern, recalls op-art. Aronson, who exhibited the painting at the Bienville Gallery in 1976, was one of many artists who found support from gallery owner Ed Wiegand. A number of artists employ figurative art for social or political comment. Among the most powerful of these artists is Shirley Rabé Masinter (born 1932), who often focuses on neighborhoods in decline. Masinter’s 1993 large canvas street scene, Malcolm Rex, shows a young African American man with his arm upraised in a gesture that parallels the salute given by Hitler’s troops. The gray timber-framed building behind the young man shows pronounced disintegration, fragmented advertisements, and graffiti. While Joslyn Fosberg and Ronna Harris focus on the same subject, a bride in her bridal gown and veil, their interpretation differs entirely. Fosberg’s 1983-1985 young African American Bride appears timid and hesitant, as though rethinking her decision. This painting recalls Caroline Durieux’s 1944 lithograph, First Communion, in which a young African American girl peers around her veil. Like the first communicant, Fosberg’s bride is making a monumental religious step. Harris takes the indecision of Fosberg’s bride further. The skin tone of Harris’s 1991 Dead Bride is gray and ghastly. When the viewer glances downward at the reddened wrists visible through the bride’s sleeves, the effect is chilling. Jane Nulty Bowman’s 2005 acrylic sketch of trombone player Louis Nelson captures a continuing element of New Orleans culture. Carol Leake documents

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Gail Lynn Johnson Hood, American, born circa 1937 Little Tchefuncte, 1987, acrylic on canvas The Historic New Orleans Collection, 1998.51.2

The Last Comus Parade, a long-standing annual event that gave way to changing politics. This work underscores the opportunities offered to many women artists in designing Mardi Gras costumes, floats, and invitations, as well as portraying carnival “royalty.” Within the landscape tradition, acclaimed botanical artist Lucile Parker departs from painting flowers to depict a woodshed (1970). Parker, who earned a doctorate of fine arts from William Carey College in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, published her illustrations through Pelican Publishing. Gail Hood’s (born 1937) large acrylic painting of Little Tchefuncte (1987) provides a glimpse of Lake Pontchartrain’s Northshore, with its bayous coursing through dense pine woods. Here, the rough texture of the pine bark is visually tactile. During the late twentieth century a number of women photographers made significant contributions to art, including Debbie Fleming Caffery, Sandra Russell Clark, Tina Freeman, and Josephine Sacabo. Through the years photography has come to be viewed with as much gravity as painting and sculpture. Accordingly, Caffery and Sacabo focus soft lenses on subjects that convey the essence of humanity. Clark’s poetic work is reminiscent of Nicolas Poussin’s large pastoral landscapes with classical architectural elements. Freeman, whose works are more sharply focused, likewise portrays her subjects within a societal, cultural, or physical ambiance that personifies her sitters. n Women Artists in Louisiana, 1965-2010 will be on view in the Louisiana Galleries through September 12, 2010.

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SWEET Suite Louisiana: Color Intaglio Prints by Warrington Colescott BY MARY WEAVER CHAPIN, Ph.D. Associate Curator of Prints and Drawings, Milwaukee Art Museum

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arrington Colescott’s prints are riddled with complexities and contradictions, stinging satirical barbs and playful jokes, and exuberant color and subtle tonal variations of black and white. At age eighty-nine, Colescott is one of the elder statesmen of American printmaking and, perhaps, the reigning dean of color intaglio. Colescott was born and raised in Oakland, California, to parents of Louisiana Creole extraction. He studied at the University of California, Berkeley, and was drafted into World War II immediately upon receiving his bachelor’s degree in fine art. He served four years in the armed forces, which included occupation duty in Korea. He later joked, “ROTC [in high school and college] had instilled me with all of those skills that make for a successful military career—clumsiness, strategic sloth, and extreme caution—so I survived the war.” An observer with a keen eye and an excellent memory, Colescott made visual notes about life in the military, from the pageantry and heroics to the tedium, bureaucracy, and stifling hierarchy. These subjects would appear in his art years later as the targets for his blitzkrieg satirical attacks. After the war, Colescott earned a master’s degree in painting from Berkeley and began his teaching career, first at Long Beach Community College, and then at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he taught for nearly four decades. Fellowships from the Fulbright Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the National Endowment of the Arts allowed him to further his education in Paris and London.

As a technician, Colescott is a master. He is known for his practice of cutting his intaglio plates to create unique effects, a technique he credits to a frustrated printmaking student in the 1960s. The student had overetched a portion of his plate and was faced with the task of burnishing or scraping that section out, a long and tedious process. Instead, he grabbed a cutting torch from the sculpture studio and simply excised the ruined portion of the plate. It was a eureka moment for Colescott, who adopted the practice to great effect. Soon he was collecting bits of scrap letterpress type and photoengraved images from university printers and adding them to his etching plates. Some of his most complex prints were created from a galaxy of small shaped plates and bits of found copper, letterpress, or toys that he had inked up and sent through his press. Hand in hand with Colescott’s complex technique is his command of color. He is a masterful, if somewhat eccentric, colorist. His work throbs with hothouse hues, DayGlo flashes, and the occasional dusting of glitter. From time to time, he will step away from his bright palette and work on a monochromatic edition. Even then, black is never just black; it is mixed with cool blues, a hint of green, or a suggestion of purple. His black-and-white prints are rich color statements. At the heart of Colescott’s enterprise is a deep love of satire, farce, and the burlesque. Viewed in retrospect, his artistic career has unfolded as a hectic, surprising cabaret, teeming with a cast of standard characters—fatcat businessmen and their mistresses, bureaucrats, politicians, rubes, and knaves—and unexpected visitors to the scene, whether they be Benjamin Franklin,

Warrington Colescott, American, born 1921, Suite Louisiana: Mardi Gross, 2000, color etching and aquatint with stencil and á la poupée inking and glitter, Milwaukee Art Museum: Gift of the Artist and Frances Myers, M2004.541 Photograph by Michael Tropea

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NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


Sigmund Freud, or Dick Cheney. One can almost hear the music as these actors play their parts, complete with pratfalls, scandal, and a heaping dose of good-natured satire. The popular arts of vaudeville and the burlesque are at the crux of Colescott’s worldview; he first discovered these bawdy performances as a teenager in Oakland, California, at the Moulin Rouge burlesque house. “In its gaudy way,” he recalls, “it pursued the grandiose. There were uniformed ushers who asked for ID, but failed to see numbers in the darkness, colored spotlights, heavy curtains, and footlights, some burned out, lining the runway stage. The girls wore skimpy dresses that were designed to be unzipped and dropped on the rosin-covered floor. There were skits, very droll, and clowns dressed as hobos. It was outrageous good fun.” Colescott takes his inspiration from past artistic masters, including eighteenth-century satirists William Hogarth and James Gillray, as well as more recent artistic forebears such as Käthe Kollwitz, George Grosz, and Otto Dix. This is not to say that he is stuck in the past, however—current popular culture is simply too tempting for him to resist. Colescott is, perhaps, at his satiric best when mixing past and present, fact and fiction, in suites or series based on a loose narrative idea. This characteristic of his work first emerged in the 1960s. In a grant application from the time, he explained, “I have in mind a series of related plates: graphic, linear, satirical, and multi-colored .… Popular themes from various historical periods will be treated in terms of allegory and parody, with elements of the period and of the present being interwoven .… I want to deal with material that other artists have wrung dry, to tear it up, pulp it, and reconstitute it.” In Suite Louisiana, Colescott has explored his Creole heritage and created a series of eleven masterful intaglio prints, to be seen this spring at the New Orleans Museum of Art. Today, sixty years into his artistic career, Colescott shows no signs of slowing down or softening his approach. Instead, he carefully observes our world, finds the ironic, humorous, or absurd edges to it, and reaches for his etching needle to prepare another signature Colescottian view of the world. n

Warrington Colescott, American, born 1921 Suite Louisiana: Down Tchoupitoulas Street (Chef Emeril), 1996 Color etching Milwaukee Art Museum: Gift of the Artist and Frances Myers, M2004.541 Photograph by Michael Tropea

Mary Weaver Chapin, Ph.D, is Associate Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Milwaukee Art Museum and the author of The Prints of Warrington Colescott: A Catalogue Raisonné, 1948-2008, University of Wisconsin Press in collaboration with the Milwaukee Art Museum, 2010.

SWEET Suite Louisiana: Color Intaglio Prints by Warrington Colescott is on view in the Templeman Galleries, second floor, from April 11 through July 11, 2010. A “Meet the Artist” event featuring Warrington Colescott will take place in the NOMA Library on Friday, May 14, noon to 1 p.m. The Prints of Warrington Colescott: A Catalogue Raisonné, 1948-2008 by Mary Weaver Chapin, is available in the NOMA Museum Shop, $85.00. A gallery walk-through with the artist will take place Wednesday, May 19 at 6 p.m. Note: A major retrospective of Colescott’s work will take place at the Milwaukee Art Museum June 10September 26, 2010.

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Warrington Colescott, American, born 1921 Suite Louisiana: The Music of the Folks, 1996 Color etching and aquatint with stencil and á la poupée inking and hand coloring New Orleans Museum of Art: Joel and John N. Weinstock Fund, 2002.83 Photograph by Michael Tropea

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Joan Mitchell in New Orleans BY MIRANDA LASH Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art

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his spring New Orleans will experience an extraordinary influx of work by the artist Joan Mitchell. The New Orleans Museum of Art will be partnering with Tulane University’s Newcomb Art Gallery and the Contemporary Arts Center New Orleans in a three-part presentation of Mitchell’s work featuring oil paintings at NOMA, drawings at the Newcomb Art Gallery, and prints at the CAC. The paintings on view at NOMA span the majority of Joan Mitchell’s career, from the 1950s to the 1980s, offering visitors an opportunity to become acquainted with her diversity in style. About the Artist Joan Mitchell was born in Chicago, Illinois, in 1925 and died in a Paris suburb in 1992. Mitchell was the daughter of physician James Herbert Mitchell and poet Marion Strobel. She spent much of the 1950s in New York, living on St. Mark’s Place on the Lower East Side, and was deeply involved with the second generation of the New York School. While other members of the second generation moved painting toward cool, formalist images, Mitchell persisted in maintaining a style rooted in action painting. By doing so she achieved paintings of great emotional and intellectual intensity. Her expatriate years began in the late 1950s and continued uninterrupted until her passing in Vetheuil, France. She occupied a celebrated stature in the generation that succeeded Pollock and Rothko. She declined the theoreticism of her European counterparts, and remained throughout her career the empirical American, personally accountable for her memories and emotions. Her work is characterized by many developments from the 1950s to the early ’90s shortly prior to her passing. She usually worked on multiple

panels or large-scale canvases, striving to attract a natural rather than constructed rhythm from the composition, a rhythm emanating from the expansiveness of the gesture or from the unrestrained use of color and the works’ pervasive luminosity. The titles of her last paintings suggest the abstract valleys and empirical fields of her beloved French countryside. This exhibition is made possible with generous support from the Joan Mitchell Foundation and Cheim & Read Gallery, New York. n

Joan Mitchell in New Orleans is on view on the first floor in NOMA’s Great Hall and in the McDermott Lobby from March 31 through June 27, 2010. A three-day symposium celebrating the work of Joan Mitchell will take place Friday, April 9 through Sunday, April 11, 2010. The New Orleans Museum of Art will host a reception for symposium attendees on Friday, April 9 at 6 p.m. The reception will include the premiere of a 1974 film interview with Joan Mitchell by Lyn Blumenthal and Kate Horsefield. A panel with Ann Gibson, Robert Storr, and David Craven, moderated by Michael Plante, will take place on Saturday, April 10 at Tulane University in the Freeman Auditorium. A panel with Guy Bloch-Champfort, Irving Sandler, Christopher Campbell, and Mâkhi Xenakis, moderated by Michael Plante, will take place on Sunday, April 11 at the Contemporary Arts Center. For more information on attending the Joan Mitchell Symposium, please email: symposiuminfo@joanmitchellfoundation.org or call Christa Blatchford at the Joan Mitchell Foundation, 212524-0101.

Joan Mitchell, American, 1925-1992 Minnesota, 1980, oil on canvas, 102 x 244 in. © Estate of Joan Mitchell, Courtesy Joan Mitchell Foundation and Cheim & Read Gallery, New York

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The Therapist: An Intimate, Extended Portrait/SelfPortrait BY DONALD WOODMAN Photographer

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ne of my first mentors and teachers, Minor White, spoke of the act of turning the camera on oneself. Consequently, in 1972, when I was working with him, I began to do self-portraits as an exercise in intuitive self-exploration. Since then, at infrequent intervals, I have revisited this pursuit. The Therapist series, which I started on July 17, 1997, some time after I first started therapy with Dr. Donald Fineberg, is both an intimate portrait of “Dr. Don” and a self-portrait of the patient “Donald.” The relationship between therapist and patient served as a vehicle for exploring interpersonal relationships and personal identity. The images reflect both the tenor of the session and the emotions of the moment ranging from humor to pathos. The camera became a tool for the patient/artist as I explored various states with my therapist, including resistance; the interpretation of statements; perceptions and dreams; the act of transference; and flights of fantasy. These images act as a window into myself and metaphorically as a way to access the complexity of humanity. Thus, The Therapist series might be said to be an extension of my personal self-examination/exploration through portraiture. To create this series, I photographed Dr. Donald Fineberg each time we had a therapy session. I set up the following parameter: I allowed myself only one negative at each session. I started the series using my one-hundred-year-old, 4 x 5, "Brownie Style" box camera (a camera I frequently use), shooting with Polaroid type 55 positive/negative film to record the images. As the series progressed, I chose other equipment to suit the technical requirements necessary to execute each image, working with either a 4 x 5, Graflex, single lens reflex camera or my 4 x 5 Sinar view camera, but always using Polaroid type 55 p/n film and making one negative at each session. To create the final prints, I first printed the Polaroid negative in the darkroom creating a traditional silver gelatin print. Then I scanned these prints and

Donald Woodman, American, born 1945 The Therapist, 8/10/2000, ink jet print from 4 x 5 Polaroid 55 p/n negative, 30 x 24 in., Collection of the Artist

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manipulated them in Photoshop. It should be noted that the multi-exposures were created in the camera and not in Photoshop, thereby adhering to the original concept of allowing myself only one negative at each session. The final prints were produced on Epson Ultra Smooth Fine Art paper using an Epson 9600 ink jet printer. Although I originally conceived for the series to last one year (an arbitrary time frame), I found the challenge of the photographic problem, making only one negative at each session and the idea of a portrait as a series of images creating an extended portrait, very interesting. Thus, I continued making images over a four year period. I made the last exposure on September 24, 2001, two weeks after the infamous events of 9/11/2001, at a time when I was teaching at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green and commuting back to New Mexico. It seemed to both me and my therapist that the series was at an end. The process was occupying too much of our session time and we had new work to take on, which required more focused and traditional therapeutic methods. n

Donald Woodman graduated from the University of Cincinnati in 1969 with a B.S. degree in architecture along with extensive background work in photography. From 1970 to 1972, he worked with Minor White at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He moved to New Mexico in 1972, pursuing independent work in photography, film, and video. From 1977 to 1983, he served as personal assistant to abstract painter Agnes Martin. Over the years he has produced a number of important photographic series, including The Rodeo and the West; Harbinger of Which Future; The Selling of the West; and, in collaboration with his wife Judy Chicago, The Holocaust Project: From Darkness into Light. The Therapist, presented at NOMA in conjunction with the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association, will be on view in the Bay Gallery from May 22-August 1, 2010.

Donald Woodman, American, born 1945 The Therapist, 6/15/2000, ink jet print from 4 x 5 Polaroid 55 p/n negative, 40 x 30 in., Collection of the Artist

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An Evening with Patti Smith BY DIEGO CORTEZ Freeman Family Curator of Photography

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n Thursday, April 22, the night before Jazz Fest opens in New Orleans, artist and musician Patti Smith will present a talk at NOMA entitled “On Photography” at 6 p.m. in the Museum's Stern Auditorium. Her talk will accompany the opening of an exhibition of forty-five photographs by Smith, donated by the artist to the Museum in 2008 and 2010. After receiving these two major gifts to NOMA’s permanent collection, I invited Smith to come to NOMA to publicly address her relationship to photography, both in terms of her own photographic work and the history of the medium itself. Patti Smith: A Donation to NOMA consists of fortyfive silver prints made from negatives produced by the artist’s antique Polaroid Land 250 camera. These prints will be augmented by a few original, but unique, Polaroid photographs, which are also part of Smith's generous donation to our Museum. Patti Smith is an interdisciplinary artist of the highest order. She has excelled in the diverse fields of poetry, prose, music, drawing, film, and photography. Her friendship and artistic relationship with photographer Robert Mapplethorpe was recently documented in her best-selling memoir Just Kids (HarperCollins, 2010). Copies of the book will be on hand in the Museum Shop for Smith to sign following her talk. Smith first gained recognition in the 1970s for her unique combination of poetry and rock. So far, she has produced twelve albums, the most famous being Horses, considered one of the top 100 albums of all time. She was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in

2007. Smith began exhibiting her drawings in 1973 and later her photographs. Retrospectives of her work were organized by the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh in 2002 and at the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain in Paris in 2008. The source of inspiration for much of Smith’s poetry and music has often been key figures of French culture, including Arthur Rimbaud, Nicole Stéphane, Jean Genet, Antonin Artaud, and René Daumal, so we find many of the inspirational photographs Smith has taken derive from her frequent Parisian and French sojourns. We witness Rimbaud's utensils and grave, Picasso’s Rue des Grands Augustins Atelier, Susan Sontag’s tomb in Montparnasse, and Victor Hugo’s bed. Smith is especially inspired by the convergence of literary and photographic histories in nineteenth- and twentieth-century France. If her own identity as an American artist of the late twentieth century was that of proto-punk, it is one which parallels or pays homage to a similar defiant moment in cultural history: the underground art and literary movements of mid-to-latenineteenth century Paris. n Patti Smith: A Donation to NOMA will be on view in the Contemporary Art Galleries on the second floor through July 3. The artist will present a talk entitled “On Photography” on Thursday, April 22, at 6 p.m. in the Stern Auditorium.

Patti Smith, Autoportrait, New York, 2005 Gelatin silver print, 4-1/2 x 3-1/2 in. New Orleans Museum of Art: Gift of the Artist, 2008.207

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Swamp Tours: Exploring the Louisiana Contemporary Collection BY MIRANDA LASH Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art

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his summer a new exhibition celebrates NOMA’s history of collecting contemporary art by Louisiana artists. Co-curated by Bill Fagaly, Curator of African Art, and Miranda Lash, Curator of Modern Art, Swamp Tours: Exploring the Louisiana Contemporary Collection will highlight unusual and unexpected acquisitions, focusing on works that have not been on view in recent years. The artists represented reflect a broad range of backgrounds and ages, from sculptors who emerged in the late 1960s such as Lynda Benglis and Keith Sonnier, to self-taught artists Sister Gertrude Morgan, J. P. Scott, and Clementine Hunter. The exhibition will also include artists whose careers have formed in recent decades, including Jeffrey Cook and Jacqueline Humphries. Curator Bill Fagaly, who has organized and supported exhibitions and acquisitions of contemporary art at the New Orleans Museum of Art for many years, provides extraordinary insight into how this collection has been shaped over time. His groundbreaking 1977

exhibition, Five from Louisiana, featuring the work of Lynda Benglis, Tina Girouard, Richard Landry, Robert Rauschenberg, and Keith Sonnier, was recently discussed in the January 2010 issue of Artforum. Together, Fagaly and Lash will conceptualize an exhibition which celebrates NOMA’s recent past, and looks forward to an expanding future in contemporary art. n Swamp Tours: Exploring the Louisiana Contemporary Collection will be on view in the Frederick R. Weisman Galleries from May 26 through August 22, 2010. A reception to celebrate the opening of Swamp Tours will take place on Wednesday, May 26, from 6 to 8 p.m. A gallery walk-through with curators Bill Fagaly and Miranda Lash will take place on Wednesday, June 23, at 6 p.m.

James P. Scott, American, 1940-2007 Shrimp Boat, n.d. Wood, paint, 26 x 51 x 17 in. New Orleans Museum of Art: Gift of Kurt A. Gitter, M.D. and Alice Rae Yelen, 1992.464

Lynda Benglis, American, born 1941 Untitled from the Pinto Series, 1971 Colored beeswax on wood, 36 x 5 x 1-3/4 in. New Orleans Museum of Art: Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Glade, 1981.98

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CURATOR’S CHOICE: Victorian Splendor: A Cameo Glass Vase by George Woodall BY JOHN WEBSTER KEEFE The RosaMary Foundation Curator of the Decorative Arts

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lthough an important work by the renowned English cameo glass carver George Woodall (1885-1925) had long been on the Museum’s list of desiderata, its acquisition was not practicable until the establishment of a munificent decorative arts purchase endowment by the late Dr. William McDonald Boles and Eva Carol Boles in 1996. The Boles Fund made the purchase of our vase by Woodall possible in 2001. Cameo glass had been the unchallenged aristocrat of the glassmaker’s art since its development by the Romans in the first century A.D. Given the love of the Victorian age for historical styles, complicated technical means, and dramatic contrasts of colour, the revival of cameo glass during the late nineteenth century was virtually a foregone conclusion. That London’s prestigious British Museum owned an important collection of ancient Roman cameo glass also played a role in the revival of the medium. That the Museum also held one of the world’s most celebrated examples of ancient cameo glass, the Portland Vase, obviously inspired the glassmakers of Stourbridge, the sole British center possessing a sufficient pool of experience and talent to support the development of contemporary cameo glass decoration. The Portland Vase, an imperial Roman work of staggering virtuosity, had been found intact in Rome in the sixteenth century; from that moment, it was a subject of international interest, desire, intrigue, and legend. Sold by the noble Barberini family in 1783 to Sir William Hamilton, the vase was acquired by the Duchess of Portland for a then-astronomical sum. The Portlands lent the vase to Josiah Wedgwood, who executed a copy of it in blue and white jasperware. In 1810, the vase was lent to the British Museum, where it was widely admired; eight years later, two Birmingham glass artists attempted to reproduce it in the original medium and failed. The celebrated and revered ancient vase again captured international attention in 1845, when a museum-going vandal smashed it into 189 pieces.1 These developments were followed avidly by the general public as well as the glassmakers of Stourbridge. The great pioneer of the nineteenth-century English cameo glass revival was John Northwood I (1836-1902), who had begun working in the glass industry at the age of twelve. Northwood trained both George and Thomas Woodall in the art of cameo carving. Approached by Philip Pargeter, the owner of the Red House Glass Works of Stourbridge2, in 1843 to undertake the creation of a replica of the Portland Vase, Northwood completed the commission in 1876 to the amazement of the glassmaking world and the general public. It was then widely exhibited, becoming the centerpiece of Thomas Webb and Sons’ stand at the 1878 Paris exposition.3 Cameo glass had become such a widely desired product that by 1877, the major Stourbridge glass producers had established their own cameo workshops. George and Thomas Woodall were employed by Thomas Webb and Sons (active 1836-present) of Stourbridge, eventually supervising a team of cameo decorators who created the most consistently high quality work in this aspect of glass manufacture during the 1880s and ’90s. Creating works in cameo glass was a complex process fraught with the all-too-real possibilities of

fracture, complete breakage, and failure. The production of cameo blanks was an extension of the casing, or layering, technique introduced in Britain in the 1840s. That technique was refined to allow a uniformly thick layer of glass, usually white, to be overlain on a coloured matrix. That dense outer layer permitted high-relief carving in complex patterns. However, the colours to be layered had to possess virtually identical coefficients of expansion and contraction or the proposed piece would fracture or shatter. Once the casing was successfully completed, the piece was bathed in acid to provide a ground for the drawn design, which was then painted with an acid resist, which was allowed to set. The piece was then dipped in hydrofluoric acid to remove unwanted portions of the outer layer; this process was likely to be repeated a number of times depending upon the thickness of the outer layer and how much of it the design required to be removed. By these means, a design silhouette was created, and this was then modelled using small woodenhandled steel points of varying size to carve, model, and refine the proposed design. At any stage of this complex process, a miscalculation or misstep could cause the destruction of the piece since cameo glass also retained an element of stress between its layers. By the 1880s, the classic Roman-inspired cameo palette of white over blue was superceded by different ground colours although white remained the preferred colour for the outer layer. In the Museum’s vase, which is thought to have been executed by George Woodall about 1889, the body is of pale rose-tinted glass cased in translucent pink, with an outer layer of opaque white. Such a delicate palette was, of course, in keeping with the late Victorian era’s taste for pale but rich colour. The extreme fashionability of cameo glass caused its creation by the leading Stourbridge firms in a great diversity of form ranging from parasol handles and place salts to scent bottles and inkwells to decanters and lamps. At the apex of this wide range stood the large vases like the NOMA example. That this vase was decorated by one of the greatest cameo carvers of the day caused it to be ranked as a truly exceptional work. The Woodalls took charge of Thomas Webb and Sons’ cameo department in 1874; by 1889, the approximate date of this vase, George Woodall was at the height of his formidable powers. Pieces by Woodall consisted of as many as five layers of glass. His design sources were eclectic, ranging from Owen Jones’s classic Grammar of Ornament (1856) and his influential Chinese Ornament of 1867. Engraved designs by such sculptors as the English John Flaxman II (1755-1826) and the Italian Antonio Canova (1757-1822) and by such diverse painters as Guido Reni (Italian, 1575-1642) and François Boucher (French, 1703- 1770) were also of interest to him. Woodall is also known to have collected diverse seventeenth- and eighteenthcentury engravings whose subjects caught his eye. He also clipped magazine illustrations of Moorish and Egyptian scenes as potential inspirations. Woodall’s forms tended toward those of Islamic or Oriental influence to which designs from the aforementioned sources were applied. His surviving work makes it apparent that he frequently chose forms and designs not only for their appeal to affluent potential purchasers but for the

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


TALLNECK VASE, circa 1889 Pale rose-tinted lead glass: blown, cased in translucent pink and opaque white lead glass and cameo-cut. By George Woodall (1850-1925) for Thomas Webb and Sons, Stourbridge, England. New Orleans Museum of Art: Dr. William McDonald Boles and Eva Carol Boles Fund, 2001.219 George Woodall was one of the most talented English cameo cutters of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. His work was regularly exhibited at the great international expositions of the day. He and his brother Thomas headed the cameo department at Thomas Webb and Sons, one of England’s major producers of cameo glass. Woodall’s work continues to be highly esteemed today and is avidly collected internationally. Photograph by Judy Cooper

challenges they presented to him in their combination and execution. He was also known to alter the design as he worked directly upon the piece. In the NOMA vase, Woodall chose a complex design of bearded Mannerist masks and interlaced foliate scrolls. The intricate design is executed with the delicacy and supreme confidence rightly associated with the oeuvre of George Woodall. Woodall retired from Thomas Webb and Sons in 1911 at the age of sixty-one. However, he continued to work on glass at home while also pursuing his interest in photography, a field at which he was also talented. When he died in 1925, George Woodall had preserved for a half-century the distinguished English cameo tradition established by his mentor John Northwood I. The New Orleans Museum of Art is indeed fortunate to have a splendid work by this great artist in glass in its permanent collection. n

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Notes 1. The vase has subsequently been restored. 2. The Red House Glass Works is today Stuart Crystal. 3. The Northwood Portland Vase was eventually sold at Sotheby’s Belgravia in 1975 for £30,000, a then-record for glass sold at auction. It is now in the Dr. Leonard and Juliet Rakow Collection in the Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York.

The Woodall vase is on exhibition in the late nineteenth-century section of the glass collection in the Lupin Foundation Center for the Decorative Arts on the Museum’s second floor.

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The World According to William Greiner: Fallen Paradise, 1995-2005, and Land’s End, 2007-2010 BY ELIZABETH CHUBBUCK WEINSTEIN Museum Curator, Louisiana Art & Science Museum

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he ordinary becomes extraordinary in two series of works by photographer William Greiner, on view from April 11 through July 11. Both series—exposés of details that frequently pass beneath our notice—are illuminated by Greiner’s wry sense of humor and technical mastery. He shot the first series, Fallen Paradise, in and around New Orleans from 1995 until just prior to Hurricane Katrina. Instead of focusing on the devastation of his beloved city, Greiner moved to Baton Rouge and continued his long-term practice of working close to home. He shot Land’s End in the Baton Rouge area between 2007 and 2010. In Fallen Paradise, the images of pre-Katrina New Orleans are not intended as memorials. Yet time has altered the perspective with which we view these suburban landscapes—a rusty playground on River Road, the now-famous drainpipe at the 17th Street Canal—and a sense of foreboding pervades them. The absence of human presence, customary in Greiner’s work, lends a crisp stillness, making the ordinary scenes uncanny. For Greiner, the series is a testament to “the patina that veiled New Orleans prior to Hurricane Katrina ... [and] reveals a paradise which had already fallen.” Greiner’s use of color and his focus upon banal subjects often prompt critics to liken him to William Eggleston. However, Greiner’s mastery of composition and use of saturated color make his technique more akin to painting. Not unsurprisingly, he admires the work of Milton Avery, Ralston Crawford, and Edward Hopper. In the New Orleans series, a paradigm of Greiner’s style is

the elegant Lounger Chairs, New Orleans Athletic Club Rooftop. Not exactly a picture of civic health, the image shows a jarringly red tile floor dominating the foreground, punctuated by two unoccupied metal chairs, one listing to the right. A rusty yellow wall slices across the horizon line, providing an uncertain foundation for the gray downtown New Orleans cityscape, profiled against a crystal blue sky crossed by clouds. But dismal these photographs are not. Greiner’s eye for color juxtapositions and his wry approach lighten the emotional impact of the subject matter. He does not arrange his scenes; instead, he captures whatever moves him or his funny bone—for example, a red rubber boot displayed on the rooftop of the brick Rubber Co. building or the sign on a seedy establishment that proudly proclaims it to be the London Lodge. Never mind that it’s located on the murky edge of a rundown section of Airline Highway. Moving to Baton Rouge has not altered Greiner’s quirky perspective. Take a look at his image of a grove of large palm trees that appear to be growing in an asphalt lot, taking up several spaces usually reserved for cars. However, Greiner’s respect for the power of nature and an enhanced awareness of mankind’s vulnerability underlie the newer series, Land’s End. The experience of Hurricanes Katrina and, more recently, Gustav, which caused much devastation to the Baton Rouge area, has enhanced his awareness of environmental issues. Concern about the effects of global warming and climate change have led Greiner to consider the possibilities of land masses shrinking, islands

William Greiner, American, born 1957 SUMMER FOLIAGE-YMCA, Baton Rouge, LA, 2008 From the series Land’s End, Lambda Lightjet print, 25 x 30 in. Collection of the Artist

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disappearing, and new coastlines forming. Simply put, the phrase “land’s end” means “from coast to coast” and is also the name of the westernmost point of the English mainland. The rocky cliffs were the final sight of land for the early sailors venturing to cross the fearsome Atlantic, and a welcome one for those long at sea. Built on higher ground than New Orleans, Baton Rouge becomes the new Land’s End. In many of the Land’s End images, nature seems to be gaining ground. A bicycle lies submerged in mud. Empty shopping carts, one bright red, sit abandoned in the middle of a once-bustling Target shopping center lot. In another, vegetation overtakes a mound of dirt in a now-grassy construction site. The ordinary no longer seems so friendly—here the construction mound is curiously angular as if it were the site for some strange ritual. Mankind’s desire to control nature has been the subject of many an artist’s work. (Gregory Crewdson’s photographed constructions of suburban neighborhoods in his 1995 Natural Wonder series come to mind.) However, because Greiner’s images are of places and things familiar to us, the effect is poignant. These photographs with their strange beauty remind us how tenuous life can be and how the world according to William Greiner is a most mysterious place. n

William Greiner, American, born 1957 Creosote-Soaked Pole, Baton Rouge, LA, 2008 From the series Land’s End Lambda Lightjet print, 25 x 30 in. Collection of the Artist

William Greiner’s work is found in many prestigious private and public collections, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, New Orleans; the New Orleans Museum of Art; and the Louisiana Art & Science Museum, Baton Rouge. Elizabeth Chubbuck Weinstein is the museum curator of the Louisiana Art & Science Museum in Baton Rouge. She has organized numerous exhibitions, including the first showing of William Greiner: Fallen Paradise: 1995-2005, presented in 2008. William Greiner Photographs: Fallen Paradise and Land’s End runs April 11 through July 11, 2010 in the Templeman Galleries. A walk-through of the exhibition with the artist will take place Wednesday, April 14, at 6 p.m.

William Greiner, American, born 1957 Lounger Chairs, New Orleans Athletic Club Rooftop, New Orleans, LA, 1995 From the series Fallen Paradise Lambda Lightjet print, 25 x 30 in. Collection of the Artist

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2010 Cox “Our History” Art Contest

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he New Orleans Museum of Art is proud to exhibit the winning artworks of the 2010 Cox “Our History” Art Contest. Open to public, private, and parochial school students from Orleans, Jefferson, St. Bernard, and St. Charles parishes, the annual contest awards a total of $5,000 in scholarships to twenty students competing in five grade-level categories. The work of all twenty finalists was on display in NOMA’s McDermott Lobby Galleries through late March. n

Cox “Our History” Art Contest winners in the Great Hall at NOMA.

First place, 9-11 grade category: Walt Whitman: See, Hear, and Am Silent by Jeffery Nguyen, Thomas Jefferson High School, 9th grade. Photograph by Judy Cooper.

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elebrating Jackie Sullivan’s

Thirty-Seven Years of Service to NOMA

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n Tuesday evening, December 29, 2009, several hundred guests, including NOMA trustees, staff, volunteers, city officials, friends, and family, attended a gala celebration honoring Jacqueline L. Sullivan, long-time Deputy Director for Finance and Administration, on the occasion of her retirement after thirty-seven years of service. The program included a blessing by Father Val McInnes and remarks by NOMA Trustee S. Stewart Farnet. NOMA Director E. John Bullard read a special commendation from the Louisiana legislature, sponsored by Senator Ed Murray, and another special commendation from the New Orleans City Council, presented by Councilmember-at-Large Jackie Clarkson. n

Photographs by Judy Cooper

NOMA Trustee Janet Frischhertz, Jackie Sullivan, and NOMA Director E. John Bullard.

NOMA Curator of African Art Bill Fagaly, Jackie Sullivan, and LPO Vice President Sharon Litwin.

Jackie Sullivan, New Orleans Councilmember-atLarge Jackie Clarkson, and NOMA Trustee S. Stewart Farnet.

Jackie Sullivan and her family on the steps in the Great Hall.

NOMA Trustees Cammie Mayer and Julie George, Jackie Sullivan, and past NVC Chair Judy David.

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City of New Orleans Assistant CAO Cynthia Sylvain Lear, New Orleans Councilmember Cynthia Willard-Lewis, Jackie Sullivan, and New Orleans Assessor Erroll Williams.

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Dreams DO Come True! Super Bowl Wager Snags a Masterpiece for NOMA BY GRACE WILSON Director of Communications and Marketing

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he New Orleans Saints weren’t the only winners on Super Bowl Sunday. E. John Bullard, NOMA’s Montine McDaniel Freeman Director, won a betting match with Maxwell L. Anderson, the Melvin & Bren Simon Director of the Indianapolis Museum of Art (IMA). The spoils? A three-month loan of The Fifth Plague of Egypt, a landscape by British artist J.M.W. Turner, which was unveiled at NOMA on March 25. The Turner will remain on view at the Museum until June 27, 2010. “Dreams do come true!” Bullard said. “Both teams made their cities proud. We are looking forward to our friends at IMA, Colts fans, Saints fans, and all football and art lovers visiting the New Orleans Museum of Art to see the Turner, our Claude Lorrain [NOMA’s wager in the bet] and all the Museum’s masterpieces. And I would be remiss if I didn't say, ‘Who Dat?!’” The betting war began online Monday, January 25, when arts blogger Tyler Green of Modern Art Notes (artsjournal.com/man) tweeted: “@tylergreendc: Would love to see @IMAmuseum [IMA] and @NOMA1910 [NOMA] make a Super Bowl bet. Like a painting-loan-tothe-winning city.” His suggestion quickly led to an all-out betting war of fine art. Anderson started the wager on Twitter by offering a contemporary artwork by Ingrid Calame to NOMA, should the Saints win: “@MaxAndersonUSA: We are prepared to lend a painting by Ingrid Calame to NOMA, for 3 months as of July 1.” He added, “We're already spackling the wall where the NOMA loan will hang.”

Dismissing the Calame, Bullard raised the stakes by offering a painting by French Impressionist PierreAuguste Renoir. On Tuesday morning, Bullard e-mailed Green with the following message: “Max Anderson must not really believe the Colts can beat the Saints in the Super Bowl. Let's up the ante. The New Orleans Museum of Art will bet the three-month loan of its Renoir painting, Seamstress at Window, circa 1908, which is currently in the big Renoir exhibition in Paris. What will Max wager of equal importance? Go Saints!” Via Twitter, Anderson upped the ante yet again: “We'll see the sentimental blancmange by that ‘China Painter’ and raise you a proper trophy”—a jewelencrusted cup by French artist Jean-Valentin Morel, which won the Grand Medal at the 1855 Paris World Fair. In an e-mail sent to Green later on Tuesday, Bullard countered: “I am amused that Renoir is too sweet for Indianapolis. Does this mean that those Indiana corn farmers have simpler tastes? If so why would Max offer us that gaudy chalice—just looks like another overelaborate Victorian tchotchke. Let's get serious. Each museum needs to offer an art work that they would really miss for three months. What would you like Max? A Monet, a Cassatt, a Picasso, a Miro? Sorry, but we have no farm scenes or portraits of football players to send you.” Anderson replied, raising the stakes yet again: “Colts will win; here's how sure I am: IMA Turner for Vigée Lebrun's Portrait of Marie Antoinette.”

Joseph Mallord William Turner, British, 1775-1851 The Fifth Plague of Egypt, 1800, oil on canvas, 48 x 72 in. Indianapolis Museum of Art: Gift in memory of Evan F. Lilly, 55.24

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NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


NOMA responded: “Sorry—Marie is too fragile for travel, much like Favre. What about Claude Lorrain, Ideal View of Tivoli?” Bullard followed up with an email to Green: “I’m glad to see that Max has gotten serious. Certainly the Turner painting in Indianapolis is a masterpiece, worthy of any great museum. Regrettably the size, over ten feet high with its original elaborate frame, and the fragile condition of New Orleans’ Portrait of Marie Antoinette prohibits it from traveling. I propose instead our large and beautiful painting by Claude Lorrain, Ideal View of Tivoli, 1644. This great French artist is considered the father of landscape painting and was one of Turner's great inspirations. These two paintings would look splendid hanging together in New Orleans—or miracle of miracles, in Indianapolis.” Finally, the betting concluded—and the Super Bowl wager between the two museums was sealed—on Wednesday with Anderson’s tweet: “Deal—Claude for Turner. Two masters in spirited competition across the channel, and between our fair cities. Go Colts!”

Thank You, Volunteers!

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Bullard’s final response was, “Max is a gracious opponent. Thanks for accepting the wager of a Claude from New Orleans for a Turner from Indianapolis. But this is definitely the Saints’ year. They are the Dream Team and in New Orleans we know that Dreams Come True. Geaux Saints!!!” n

J.M.W. Turner’s The Fifth Plague of Egypt will be on view at NOMA until June 27.

Follow NOMA on Twitter! http://twitter.com/NOMA1910

ongratulations and deepest thanks to our wonderful NOMA volunteers, who clocked over 14,000 hours for the year 2009! More than 300 chamberlains, docents, NVC members, and students sold memberships, guided tours, produced gala balls and exhibition openings, assisted in the Museum Shop, manned the coat room, and weeded the Sculpture Garden. More than 12,000 school children were guided through Disney's Dreams Come True exhibition by our knowledgeable docents. The tireless efforts of NVC members made Art in

Bloom, Love in the Garden, and the Odyssey Ball great successes. And countless volunteers worked to welcome visitors to The Art of Caring and Dreams Come True. The services these volunteers provide are vital to the operations of the New Orleans Museum of Art. On April 18, the Museum will host an awards ceremony and luncheon in honor of the many volunteers who have worked so hard to make the New Orleans Museum of Art such a fine institution. Volunteers, we appreciate all that you do! n

NOMA volunteers enjoying the Parallel Universe exhibition.

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The Sydney and Walda Besthoff

Sculpture Garden Sculpture Garden Reopening BY PAMELA BUCKMAN Besthoff Sculpture Garden Manager

Photographs by Judy Cooper

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he repaired and revitalized Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden opened its gates to the community on Saturday, March 20. The celebration included presentations by Board of Trustees President Stephen A. Hansel, Trustee Sydney Besthoff, New Orleans Deputy Chief Administrative Officer Cynthia Sylvain Lear, Councilmember-at-Large Jacquelyn Brechtel Clarkson, FEMA Senior Advisor for the Public Assistance Program John Connolly, Besthoff Sculpture Garden Manager Pamela Buckman, and New Orleans Museum of Art Director E. John Bullard. After a ribbon cutting at the entrance gates, a new sculpture was unveiled: Auguste Rodin’s Monumental Head of Jean d’Aire from The Burghers of Calais, 1884-

86/1909-1910. Temporarily located in NOMA’s Great Hall, the Rodin bust now has a new home in the Pine Grove. The ceremony was followed by brunch in the Garden with refreshments provided by City Park Catering and Swiss Confectionery and entertainment by the Sophisticated Gentlemen, a jazz combo. Repairs to the Sculpture Garden were funded by FEMA; additional trees, shrubs, and enhanced event power were funded by the Getty Foundation, the Garden Study Club of New Orleans, and private donations. The Sculpture Garden’s future holds many exciting new events for NOMA membership as well as the general community. As always, we welcome volunteers to help us assist visitors at the Sculpture Garden Information Booth and in providing garden maintenance. n

Re-landscaping at Sculpture Garden entrance.

One of many large live oaks being craned into the Garden.

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Guests enjoying refreshments and jazz combo, the Sophisticated Gentlemen.

John Bullard and Sydney Besthoff unveiling the Rodin sculpture.

Giacomo Manzú sculpture installation funded in honor of Blanche and James Comiskey by their family.

NOMA Director John Bullard, Sculpture Garden Manager Pamela Buckman, and “Senior” Garden Volunteer Buddy Hanneman.

Arthur Pulitzer, Councilmember-at-Large Jacquelyn Brechtel Clarkson, and Orleans Parish Sheriff Marlin Gusman.

Sydney and Walda Besthoff and Stephen Hansel, president, NOMA Board of Trustees.

Pamela Buckman and Brandon Adams, landscape architect, Perez.

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John Connolly, senior advisor for the Public Assistance Program, FEMA; Jackie Sullivan, recently retired NOMA deputy director; and Ronnie Farley, FEMA project coordinator.

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The latest Cameo Gallery exhibition, CROSSCURRENTS: East Meets West, West Meets East in Ceramic Design, has been extended through Sunday, May 16, 2010. The Cameo Gallery is located in the Museum’s Lupin Foundation Center for the Decorative Arts on the second floor.

NOMA READS

A month-long series of programs and events relating to the exhibition Beyond the Blues: Reflections of African America in the Fine Arts Collection of the Amistad Research Center and featuring the book Barthé: A Life in Sculpture by Margaret Rose Vendryes. See page 40 for more information.

SYMPHONY BOOK FAIR MAY 13 & 14, 9 A.M. TO 8 P.M. MAY 15, 9 A.M. TO 4 P.M.

STUDENT LIFE CENTER, DELGADO COMMUNITY COLLEGE: CITY PARK CAMPUS $10 ADMISSION CHARGE THE FIRST DAY

DON’T MISS THE SYMPHONY BOOK FAIR, A MAJOR FUND-RAISER FOR THE LOUISIANA PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA. INCLUDED AMONG THE ITEMS FOR SALE ARE MANY ART BOOKS, ALL IN EXCELLENT CONDITION. PLEASE CALL 861-2004 FOR MORE INFORMATION.

MORNING YOGA IN THE SCULPTURE GARDEN Every Saturday, beginning April 17 at 8 a.m.

EVENING TAI CHI IN THE NOMA GALLERIES Every Wednesday beginning April 7 at 6:30 p.m.

SYMPHONY BOOK FAIR

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NOMA members can register for classes by calling EJGH HealthFinder at 504-456-5000. Fees are $5 per session for NOMA members, $10 for non-members. Participants should bring their own yoga mats.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


Welcome Anne Gauthier, 2010 NVC Chair! BY VIRGINIA PANNO NVC Correspondent

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hen Anne Gauthier was told that her year as NVC Chair coincided with the forty-fifth anniversary of the organization, her brown eyes twinkled. She knew a birthday celebration would be in order. Anne’s admiration is great for the dedicated group of women who comprise the New Orleans Museum of Art Volunteer Committee. In 1965, a small group of New Orleans activists at what was then the Isaac Delgado Museum founded a women’s volunteer committee with the goal of purchasing Edgar Degas’s Portrait of Estelle Musson and returning it to New Orleans. “Bring Estelle Home” was the first citywide effort of the “Delgado Dames,” the determined group of women that would become the NVC. How fitting that the organization should mark its forty-fifth year with this petite dynamo in charge! Anne is a native of Lafayette, Louisiana, where she attended the University of Southwestern Louisiana. A home economics and education major, she was involved in campus politics, where she met her future husband, Wendell H. Gauthier. A romance ensued and marriage followed. After graduation, the couple moved to Jefferson Parish where both held teaching jobs and Wendell attended Loyola Law School. Anne soon became the mother of three daughters, Cherie, Celeste, and Michelle. Her days were filled with family activities, scouting, and school functions. She also opened a kitchen shop in Harahan called Chanticleer Rouge, which showcased her love of cooking and baking. Breadbaking and gingerbread-making were among the classes Anne taught. Wendell’s burgeoning legal career earned him national and international recognition until his untimely death in 2001. Anne’s pursuits turned increasingly philanthropic. She became active in Cancer Crusaders, a volunteer organization that supports cancer research in the New Orleans area. Her involvement with the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra and friendship with Principal Guest Conductor Klauspeter Seibel led to her membership on the LPO Advisory Board. Anne joined the NVC in 2008 when then-Chair Brenda V. Moffitt recruited her to head the group’s art

trips. The group spent a delightful day on the Northshore, where one of the stops was Anne’s Old Mandeville home, and took a fabulous trip to San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. JoAnn Christopher, a friend of Anne’s for over twenty years who presently serves as NVC Home and Art Tour Co-Chair, enthuses, “I have served on many committees with Anne. Nothing is too difficult for her to do. She has great ideas, plans well, and is a great leader. Anne always has a smile!” One of the endeavors closest to Anne’s heart is St. Andrew’s Village, a faith-based, long-term living community for adults with disabilities that’s being developed on one hundred acres of land in Abita Springs. “Anne has been instrumental in promoting St. Andrew's Village. We are extremely honored that she has been such an avid supporter,” says U.S. District Judge Jay Zainey, who, with his wife Joy, is one of the founding couples of the community. Anne and daughter Cherie Gauthier Lirette included special needs children in the festivities at this year’s NVC Fabergé Egg Hunt, held on March 21 in the Besthoff Sculpture Garden. Cherie sums up the Gauthier family tradition of service: “My mother and father met as student council activists and continued that tradition of volunteerism throughout our childhoods, encouraging us to be involved in our community as well. I've enjoyed working with my mother on many projects over the years and helping her with NOMA events this year.” Devoted to her family, Anne has four grandchildren, three of whom are under five years old. Visits from their vivacious grandmother, “Mum,” are met with delight. Even with her busy schedule, Anne finds time for travel, another passion. Whether touring the countryside of Provence or shopping the markets in Istanbul, she takes pleasure in learning about new cultures and people. In addition to marking an NVC anniversary, Anne Gauthier’s tenure as chair will usher in NOMA’s centennial celebration. As she contemplates the wonderful accomplishments of the New Orleans Museum of Art, Anne looks forward to the future. “Bring a friend!” is the theme of her year. She wants to remind every New Orleanian of this treasure in City Park. Clearly, the NVC has a treasure in Anne! n

NVC Chair Anne Gauthier with granddaughter Madeline Anne Marie Lirette.

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New Admission Policy for NOMA

Expanded Wellness Offerings at NOMA BY PAMELA BUCKMAN Besthoff Sculpture Garden Manager

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hen the New Orleans Museum of Art reopened after Katrina in March 2006, after being closed for six months, a new free admission policy for Louisiana residents was initiated. This was funded in part by a generous grant from the Helis Foundation of New Orleans. Now after four years and facing financial challenges due to the continuing aftereffects of Katrina and the Great Recession, the Museum has found it necessary to again charge admission to Louisiana visitors. Fortunately, the Helis Foundation has agreed to continue its support so that the Museum can offer a reduced rate to Louisiana citizens and admit all visitors free on Wednesdays. Of course Museum Members are admitted free at all times. Museum hours remain the same: Wednesday, noon until 8 p.m., Thursday-Sunday, 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. The hours of the newly reopened Sydney and Walda

Besthoff Sculpture Garden have been extended to seven days a week: Wednesday, 10 a.m. until dusk, ThursdayTuesday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission to the Besthoff Sculpture Garden is free every day to all visitors. Beginning Thursday, March 18, NOMA will charge the following admission:

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Sartori, Director of Marketing Communications at EJGH. The relationship between the two organizations began with East Jefferson’s support of “Love in the Garden” in 2008 and continued with the yoga series. The EJGH family is comprised of 3,000 team members, nearly 700 physicians, and more than 25,000 active members of their “Healthy Lifestyles” Membership Organization. NOMA looks forward to continuing to build its relationship with EJGH and developing more collaborative wellness activities in the future.

hanks to the success of last spring’s “Yoga in the Sculpture Garden” program, NOMA and partner East Jefferson General Hospital (EJGH) will expand wellness offerings at the Museum. Beginning Wednesday, April 7, the Museum will see the launch of a new program, “Tai Chi in the NOMA Galleries.” Held on Wednesday evenings from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. during the Museum’s extended hours, the weekly event gives participants the opportunity to relax and re-invigorate in an inspiring setting, surrounded by works of art. “Yoga in the Sculpture Garden” will return to the Besthoff Sculpture Garden beginning Saturday, April 17. Classes will take place every Saturday morning from 8 to 9 a.m. All classes are taught by a certified yoga instructor from the EJGH Wellness Center. “It is hard to imagine an organization with whom we would rather be associated than NOMA,” says John

Louisiana Residents (with photo I.D.): $8.00 Adults Seniors, Students $7.00 & Military Children (3-17) $4.00 Out-of-State Visitors: Adults $10.00 Seniors, Students $7.00 & Military Children (3-17) $5.00

NOMA members can register for classes by calling EJGH HealthFinder at 504-456-5000. Fees are $5 per session for NOMA members, $10 for nonmembers. Participants should bring their own yoga mats.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


NOMA Notables

Meet the New Administrative Team

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he new year brought lots of changes to NOMA—starting with a new administrative team. Before her retirement at the end of December 2009, former Deputy Director Jackie Sullivan worked to assemble a topnotch staff to take her place. We have some new faces in established positions, and others taking on important new jobs, created to ensure the Museum operates smoothly and efficiently. Meet our administrative team. Gail Asprodites was promoted to the position of Assistant Director for Administration and Finance in January. A certified public accountant, Gail joined the NOMA staff as Comptroller in 2006. All the members of her administrative team are post-Katrina employees, she notes—a point which means a lot to her in terms of NOMA’s (and the city’s) recovery. “It’s gratifying to see how far the Museum has come since that time and to be able to put together such a committed and enthusiastic team to continue to shepherd the Museum forward,” she says. Gail’s ties to the Museum date back to her first job out of college. An accountant in the audit department of a national CPA firm, her first field assignment was the audit of the gift shop sales from the King Tut exhibition at NOMA. Gail continued to perform annual audits for the Museum for the next six years and worked extensively with non-profit organizations. Later, she served as the External Reporting Manager for a publicly held company. In 1988, Gail left the workforce to spend time with her three sons. During this time, she maintained a presence at NOMA and many other civic and cultural organizations as a volunteer activist. As Assistant Director for Administration and Finance, Gail is responsible for overseeing all projects, large and small, taking place at the Museum. Among the many events ahead for NOMA—including a significant renovation—she is especially looking forward to the Museum’s centennial year in 2011. “My hope is that we get the same kind of enthusiasm we saw in this city when the Saints were in the Super Bowl. NOMA’s centennial is something for the region to celebrate and be proud of.” In the year since Susan Hayne joined NOMA as Human Resources Manager, she has been hard at work

Left to right: Bernard Mitchell, Gail Asprodites, Karl Oelkers, Susan Hayne, and Ty Smithweck. Photograph by Judy Cooper.

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securing high-caliber candidates for NOMA staff positions. All told, Hayne has conducted a whopping 118 interviews over the past year, facilitating the hires of nine full-time employees and twenty part-time/temporary employees for the Disney exhibition. Susan also handles screening and placement for interns, is developing new employee and volunteer handbooks, and maintains an open door policy for employees. “All employees deserve respect and I really like listening and finding creative solutions,” she says. A native of New Orleans and graduate of UNO, Susan has a diverse background in workforce management and recruiting. Although she’s only been at NOMA a year, she has extensive ties to the Museum through volunteer work, having chaired Art in Bloom, served on the marketing committee for the NOMA cookbook, and developed a successful home and kitchen tour fund-raiser for the Museum. The human resources manager position is a new addition to the administrative team, and NOMA is grateful to Susan for the support she provides the Museum’s employees. Bernard Mitchell joined NOMA last July as Chief of Security. He has earned the designation as a Certified Protection Professional (CPP) by the American Society of Industrial Security and brings extensive experience to the position, having worked as a Senior Security Specialist with FedEx Express and as a New Orleans police officer. During his time with the NOPD, he was awarded three Letters of Commendation for Exemplary Performance. A New Orleans native, Bernard earned his B.S. in Business Administration at the University of New Orleans and his M.B.A. at Loyola University. In his free time, he enjoys fishing and cooking. NOMA is grateful for his ongoing efforts to increase the security of Museum properties and staff. Karl Oelkers was recently promoted to the position of Facilities Manager. A native of Queens, New York, and graduate of Tulane University, Oelkers originally joined the NOMA staff in 2006 as IT Coordinator. In his new position, he oversees the daily operation and maintenance of the Museum and other properties; he also coordinates capital projects such as renovations and repairs. One of the aspects of his job that he enjoys most is exploring new ways to apply technological advances— such as lighting—to improve the building and the artviewing experience. “I’m having fun with it and looking forward to the challenges ahead,” he says of the position. Husband to Susan and father to Benjamin, age 8, Oelkers spends his free time sailing or attending his son’s many activities. William “Ty” Smithweck joined NOMA in December as Comptroller. A native of Mobile, Alabama, Ty often took family trips to New Orleans as a child and visited friends here as an adult. “I always told everybody I was going to move here,” he recalls. When the position at NOMA came open, Ty thought it would be a good fit—and not just because of the location. At the time, he was working as the Business and Finance Manager for the Exploreum Science Center in Mobile. “Once I started working there, I fell in love with museums in general and what they do for a community.” That appreciation has only deepened since moving to New Orleans, he says. “The city is so rich in history and culture. To be able to work in a place that keeps the artistic collection of the city—it’s aweinspiring.” A certified public accountant and graduate of the University of Alabama, Ty has brought great energy and enthusiasm to his position. He’s currently working to implement the Museum’s new accounting system. n

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From NOMA to the North Shore

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he New Orleans Museum of Art has a special membership group just for residents of St. Tammany Parish. NOMANS—New Orleans Museum of Art on the North Shore—have the opportunity to attend exhibitions and special events just for North Shore members, including many right in their own backyards.

*All events are held at the organization address listed unless otherwise noted.* BAYOU LACOMBE ART CENTER 30414 Hwy. 190, Lacombe, LA 70445 985-882-4836; www.blartcenter.org Sunday, April 18, 1-5 p.m.: Arts and Crafts Market Lots of original and one-of-a-kind functional and fine art, crafts, and food items. There will be a spacewalk for the kids and lunch for sale to munch on. Come by after church and show your Sunday bulletin to receive a free soft drink with any purchase. Then wander into the taxfree gallery to view work by local artists and visit the gift shop. Saturday, June 5, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.: Cultural Artisan Open House Featuring Rodney Lewis of Walker, Louisiana Rodney Lewis, a native of Walker, Louisiana, and a participant in the Cultural Tent at the Lacombe Crab Festival, has been making authentic hand-painted pirogues for years. He will regale his audience with stories of Cajun history and their use of the pirogues, demonstrate how to make them, and provide small pirogues for participants to paint on their own. These wooden pirogues come in either 17- or 23-inch sizes. Mr. Lewis’s painted Louisiana bayou scene pirogues will be on display and for sale at the event. Saturday and Sunday, June 26-27, 11 a.m.-8 p.m.: Lacombe Crab Festival The Bayou Lacombe Art Center and Kids of Our Lacombe, together with the Lacombe Crab Festival, will host the Cultural Village and Artists Walk in the Lacombe

As part of this initiative, each issue of Arts Quarterly will highlight upcoming exhibitions and events at partner North Shore arts organizations. Check back each quarter for updates on North Shore activities.

Community Center in John Davis Park. Local and regional artists, craftsmen, and cultural artisans will display, demonstrate, and sell their artwork. LOUISIANA WATERCOLOR SOCIETY 985-727-1105; www.LWSart.org Saturday, May 15, 3-5 p.m.: Opening Reception for the 40th Annual International Exhibition Louisiana Watercolor Society proudly presents its 40th Annual International Exhibition at Place St. Charles, 201 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans, LA. The exhibition will be on view May 8-28; the opening reception will take place Saturday, May 15. The exhibition will be juried by Soon Y. Warren (National Watercolor Society). Warren was born in South Korea and immigrated to the United States in 1987. She began painting full time in 1998, and has been juried into many exhibitions and earned numerous awards. Her favorite subjects are those found in nature. She is the author of two painting technique books: Vibrant Flowers in Watercolor (2006) and Painting Vibrant Watercolor: Discover the Magic of Light, Color and Contrast (2009). Warren was a featured artist in the October 2009 Watercolor Artists magazine. SLIDELL ART LEAGUE GALLERY 1827 Front Street, Slidell, LA 70458 985-847-9458; www.slidellartleague.info Upcoming Shows: Through April 16: Quest for Fire April 23: Is It or Isn’t It Workshops and Events: Friday, April 9: Slidell Art League Gala—Art on the Bayou: Garden Party! To be held at Palmetto’s Restaurant. More information TBA. Every third Saturday of the month: Children’s Workshops Times vary according to instructor so check the website (above) for more information. Saturday, April 17, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.: Pastel Workshop with Jean Lajaunie A supply list will be available through our website. $25 for members and $35 for non-members. Saturday, May 29: Bayou Liberty Pirogue Races with Bruce Hume Oil paint supply list will be available through our website. $25 for members and $35 for non-members. Saturday, April 24 and Saturday, June 26: Bruce Hume Workshops

Cultural artisan Rodney Lewis

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Robert Warrens, The Pelican, 2005-2008, acrylic painting, 48 x 56 in.

Every Tuesday night, 7-9 p.m.: Bottles and Brushes Check the website for upcoming artists and themes. All supplies are provided; just bring yourself, a friend, and your favorite drink/snack of choice. ST. TAMMANY ART ASSOCIATION 320 North Columbia Street, Covington, LA 70433 985-892-8650; www.sttammanyartassociation.org Open through Saturday, April 17: Robert Warrens: The Woods and the Persuasion of Nature Saturday, April 17, 6-9 p.m.: Spring for Art Exhibition Reception The St. Tammany Art Association celebrates the artwork of contemporary artist Robert Warrens. Born in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, Warrens is Professor Emeritus, Louisiana State University, where he taught visual arts from 1967-1998. His bibliography is extensive and includes articles in major art journals and awards and grants from the Pollock Krasner Foundation, the Andy Warhol Foundation, the Contemporary Arts Center, the New Orleans Museum of Art, and the Delgado Society. He is both a painter and a sculptor. His professional career includes forty-five solo exhibitions in museums, universities, and galleries throughout the United States, particularly the South, including a major museum retrospective at NOMA in 1990 which exhibited one hundred works of art. He has produced numerous commissions including three major works in Baton Rouge and New Orleans. Take a look at Robert Warrens: The Woods and the Persuasion of Nature at the reception for “Spring for Art,” Saturday, April 17, 6-9 p.m. The exhibition is supported by a grant from the Louisiana Division of the Arts as administered by the St. Tammany Arts Commission. Saturday, April 24, 7-11 p.m.: Geaux Arts Ball 2010: “CSI and Art: Uncovering the Hidden Symbolism in Art” “CSI and Art: Uncovering the Hidden Symbolism in Art” is the theme of the St. Tammany Art Association’s April

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Geaux Arts exhibition at St. Tammany Art Association

24, 2010 Geaux Arts Ball. Partnering with local schools, the event will showcase living art tableaux created by talented art students, as well as live music, an open bar, and an array of food donated by local restaurants and businesses. Proceeds from the Geaux Arts gala will help expand the St. Tammany Art Association’s educational outreach program. All proceeds of the event, including silent auction items, will go toward the Art Association’s mission of providing support to local artists and education to the community. Tickets are $25 in advance, and $30 at the door. Corporate and individual sponsorships are also available. Tickets may be purchased by calling 985-892-8650 or by visiting the STAA website: www.sttammanyartassociation.org. Saturday, May 8, 7-9 p.m.: Opening Reception for the Talented Art Teachers Exhibit Show runs May 8-29; for more information, contact the St. Tammany Art Association. St. Tammany Art Association June Summer Camps: Session I: Monday-Friday, June 7-11, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Session II: Monday-Friday, June 14-18, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Session III: Monday-Friday, June 21-25, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Fee: $220 / $200 STAA members Supplies included; please bring bag lunch and morning snack. The class will feature top-of-the-line art instruction by local artist and educators. Children will be guided in a hands-on learning environment through the fundamentals of painting, drawing, and clay work. Award-winning artists Maggie Payton and Natalie Keeney will instruct.

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Circles and Fellows of the New Orleans Museum of Art

Ms. Debra B. Shriver Mrs. Margaret B. Soniat and Mr. Joel J. Soniat Dr. and Mrs. Richard L. Strub Mr. and Mrs. St. Denis J. Villere

PATRON’S CIRCLE

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he two most prestigious levels of annual giving in support of the New Orleans Museum of Art are the Circles and the Fellows. We invite you to consider upgrading your support of NOMA and joining the following Circles and Fellows. For information, please call 504-658-4107. n

Circles CIRCLES

ircles

PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE

Mr. and Mrs. John D. Bertuzzi Mr. and Mrs. Sydney J. Besthoff III The Booth-Bricker Fund Mr. and Mrs. Ralph O. Brennan Collins C. Diboll Private Foundation Mr. and Mrs. David F. Edwards Mr. and Mrs. S. Stewart Farnet Dr. and Mrs. Ludovico Feoli Mr. and Mrs. Stephen A. Hansel Ms. Adrea D. Heebe and Mr. Dominick A. Russo, Jr. Helis Foundation Mrs. Killian L. Huger, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. David A. Kerstein Mr. Paul J. Leaman, Jr. Mrs. Paula L. Maher Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Mayer Mrs. Robert Nims Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Reily, Jr. Mrs. Françoise B. Richardson Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shelton Mrs. Patrick F. Taylor Zemurray Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. William D. Aaron, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Wayne F. Amedee Mrs. Jack R. Aron Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Boh Mr. E. John Bullard III Mr. and Mrs. Mark Carey Dr. and Mrs. Isidore Cohn, Jr. Mr. Leonard A. Davis Mr. and Mrs. Prescott N. Dunbar Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Favrot, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Francis Mr. Richard W. Freeman, Jr. Mrs. Sandra D. Freeman Mr. and Mrs. James J. Frischhertz Mr. and Mrs. Edward N. George Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Heebe Ms. Allison Kendrick Mr. Henry M. Lambert and Mr. R. Carey Bond Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Lemann Dr. Edward D. Levy, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomas Lewis Dr. and Mrs. E. Ralph Lupin Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Masinter Mr. Edward C. Mathes Ms. Kay McArdle Mr. and Mrs. R. King Milling Mrs. Ellis Mintz Mr. and Mrs. Michael D. Moffitt Robert and Myrtis Nims Foundation Dr. Howard and Dr. Joy D. Osofsky Mr. and Mrs. R. Hunter Pierson, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. James J. Reiss, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Edward F. Renwick Mr. and Mrs. R. Randolph Richmond, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin M. Rosen Mr. and Mrs. Brian A. Schneider Mr. and Mrs. Edward Shearer Mr. and Mrs. Lynes R. Sloss Mr. and Mrs. Bruce L. Soltis Mrs. Frederick M. Stafford Mrs. Harold H. Stream, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. James L. Taylor Mrs. John N. Weinstock Mrs. Henry H. Weldon Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Wilson, Jr.

DIRECTOR’S CIRCLE Mr. and Mrs. F. Macnaughton Ball, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence D. Garvey Mrs. Harry Greenberg Mr. Jerry Heymann Heymann-Wolf Foundation Mrs. Charles W. Ireland Mr. and Mrs. Erik F. Johnsen Mr. and Mrs. Peter R. Monrose, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Patrick Dr. and Mrs. James F. Pierce Mr. and Mrs. George Rodrigue Mr. and Mrs. Edwin R. Rodriguez, Jr.

34

FELLOWS Mr. John Abajian and Mr. Scott R. Simmons Mrs. Adele L. Adatto Dr. and Mrs. Kenneth N. Adatto Mrs. Jimi Andersen Mrs. Jack R. Anderson Mrs. H. W. Bailey

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Banta Mrs. Howard T. Barnett Ms. Roberta P. Bartee Mr. and Mrs. Beauregard L. Bassich Mr. Robert M. Becnel and Ms. Diane K. Zink Mr. and Mrs. Edward B. Benjamin, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. W. Mente Benjamin Mr. and Mrs. Dorian M. Bennett Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Berenson Mrs. Marian Mayer Berkett Ms. Virginia Besthoff and Ms. Nancy Aronson Dr. Siddharth K. Bhansali Mr. and Mrs. Donald T. Bollinger Mrs. Jane Bories and Mr. Sam Corenswet Ms. Jean M. Bragg Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Brenner Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Bright, Jr. Mrs. Betty Graves Brown Mrs. B. Temple Brown, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Perry S. Brown Mr. and Mrs. William D. Brown Judge and Mrs. Christopher Bruno Ms. Pamela R. Burck Mr. Harold H. Burns Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Canizaro Mr. and Mrs. Carlo Capomazza di Campolattaro Mr. James Carville and Ms. Mary Matalin Dr. and Mrs. Edgar L. Chase III Dr. Victor P. Chisesi Mr. and Mrs. William K. Christovich Mr. Stephen W. Clayton Mr. and Mrs. John Clemmer Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Coleman Mr. Barry J. Cooper and Mr. Stuart H. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Camille A. Cutrone Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Davis III John W. Deming and Bertie Murphy Deming Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Con G. Demmas Mr. and Mrs. George Denegre, Jr. Drs. Raja W. and Nina Dhurandhar Mrs. Albert S. Dittmann, Jr. Dr. Clayton B. Edisen Dr. and Mrs. John Ollie Edmunds, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Epstein, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. K. Barton Farris Mr. and Mrs. D. Blair Favrot Mr. and Mrs. Edward Feinman Ms. Natalie Fielding Mrs. Julia Fishelson Mr. and Mrs. Richard B. Fox Mr. and Mrs. Louis M. Freeman Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Friedman Mr. and Mrs. Louis L. Frierson Mrs. Anne Gauthier Dr. and Mrs. Charles F. Genre Mrs. Dennis A. Georges Dr. Kurt Gitter and Mrs. Alice Rae Yelen Mrs. Luba B. Glade Mr. Roy A. Glapion Mrs. Louis A. Glazer Mr. and Mrs. Mason Granger Ms. Susan Talley and Mr. James C. Gulotta, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. James O. Gundlach Mr. and Mrs. John W. Hall Mrs. H. Lloyd Hawkins, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. Heller

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


Mr. and Mrs. Theo M. Heller Mrs. S. Herbert Hirsch Mrs. William H. Hodges Mr. and Mrs. John C. Hope III Mr. Harry T. Howard III Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Huguley III Mr. Alex T. Hunt, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Marvin L. Jacobs Mr. and Mrs. Harold B. Judell Mrs. Arthur L. Jung, Jr. Mrs. Gloria S. Kabacoff Mrs. Morris Klinger Mr. and Mrs. John P. Laborde Dr. and Mrs. W. Wayne Lake, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Lane III Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Lapeyre, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. John H. Lawrence Rita Benson LeBlanc Mr. Victor C. Leglise, Sr. Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Logan Drs. Cris and Sarah Mandry Ms. Kathleen Manning Mr. and Mrs. Stephen D. Manshel Mr. and Mrs. Adam B. Marcus Mrs. Walter F. Marcus, Jr. Mrs. Shirley R. Masinter Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Mason Mr. and Mrs. John McCollam Mr. and Mrs. William McCollam, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Alvin S. Merlin Mr. and Mrs. Albert Mintz Mrs. Bernard D. Mintz Mr. and Mrs. Donald P. Mitchell Mrs. Louise Moffett

Join the Circles and Upgrade Your Support of NOMA

T

he Board of Trustees of the New Orleans Museum of Art cordially invites you to upgrade your support and become a member of the Patron’s Circle, Director’s Circle, or President’s Circle. These categories, our most prestigious levels of annual giving, are comprised of individuals who contribute $5,000, $10,000, or $20,000 each year in unrestricted funds. NOMA is pleased to extend unique privileges including Fellows and Collector’s Society memberships to those who demonstrate their commitment at these levels. We are most grateful for your generous and continuing support.

ARTS QUARTERLY

Ms. Stephany S. Monteleone Mrs. George R. Montgomery Dr. and Mrs. Lee Roy Morgan, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Morton Mrs. Andrée Moss Dr. and Mrs. Bert Myers Mrs. Elizabeth S. Nalty Mrs. Isidore Newman II Mr. and Mrs. John B. Noland Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Norman, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. John L. Ochsner Mr. Roger H. Ogden Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. O’Krepki Dr. Sanford L. Pailet Mr. and Mrs. Norvin L. Pellerin Mrs. Ben J. Phillips Mr. and Mrs. Dick H. Piner, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur C. Pulitzer Mr. and Mrs. Leon H. Rittenberg Mr. and Mrs. James C. Roddy Mr. Andre Rodrigue Mr. Jacques Rodrigue Mr. Arthur Roger Mrs. Carol H. Rosen Mr. and Mrs. Paul S. Rosenblum, Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Louie J. Roussel III Mr. and Mrs. Hallam L. Ruark Mrs. Basil J. Rusovich, Jr. Ms. Nadine C. Russell Mrs. Pamela Reynolds Ryan Miss Courtney-Anne Sarpy Mr. and Mrs. Richard Schornstein, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Selber, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. William H. Shane, Jr.

President’s Circle Director’s Circle Patron’s Circle

$20,000 $10,000 $5,000

GENERAL MEMBERSHIP PRIVILEGES, PLUS: • Free admission to the Museum and Sculpture Garden at all times • Reciprocal membership in major art museums across the U.S. and Canada • Complimentary membership in NOMA’s Fellows and Collector’s Society • All Members’ Previews of special exhibitions • An opportunity to have a private tour with the director or curator of a collection or special exhibition • A special reception in a private collector’s home

Mr. and Mrs. Lester Shapiro Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Siegel Mr. and Mrs. Edward M. Simmons Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Simmons Dr. and Mrs. Julian H. Sims Mrs. Evald L. Skau Mrs. Joe D. Smith, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Rodney R. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Snyder Mr. and Mrs. Harry C. Stahel Mrs. Mary E. Stern Ms. Anne Reily Sutherlin Ms. Jude Swenson Dr. Nia K. Terezakis Ms. Catherine Burns Tremaine Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Van der Linden Mr. and Mrs. George G. Villere Mr. John E. Wade II Mr. and Mrs. R. Preston Wailes Dr. and Mrs. Cedric Walker Mr. Albert J. Ward, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Robert G. Weilbaecher Ambassador and Mrs. John G. Weinmann Mrs. Karolyn Kuntz Westervelt Mrs. Donald L. White Mrs. Nan S. Wier Mr. Robert J. A. Williams and Mrs. Norris Williams Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Young, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Young

• Invitations to attend behind-thescenes events with Museum curators • Advance announcements for special travel programs • Annual listing on Donor Wall as a member of the Circle group • Special recognition in Arts Quarterly _________________________________ These circles recognize cumulative giving in a calendar year, restricted to gifts of Annual Appeal and membership dues. Contributions to capital projects and special events do not apply. _________________________________ For further information on NOMA’s Circles, please call 504-658-4107. n

35


CORPORATE MEMBERSHIP

W

e are deeply grateful to the following member firms whose investment in the Museum makes it possible for NOMA to pay dividends in service to the public, to the business community, to the City of New Orleans, to the greater metropolitan area, and to the State of Louisiana.

GUARANTOR

CONTRIBUTOR

LEADER

Jones, Walker, Waechter, Poitevent, Carrere & Denegre Superior Energy Services, Inc. Whitney National Bank of New Orleans Willoughby Associates, Ltd.

Boh Bros. Construction Co., L.L.C. Bolton Ford Hotel Monteleone Laitram, L.L.C. New Orleans Silversmiths Rathborne Companies East, L.L.C. Republic National Distributing Company The Times-Picayune

PATRON Brian Schneider Company The Sydney and Walda Besthoff Foundation

A. L. Lowe Picture Framing Company Aquatic Gardens Coffee Roasters of New Orleans The Edgar Degas House Gulf Coast Bank Hirsch Investment Management, L.L.C. Mudbug Media, Inc. Sisung Securities Corporation Teri Galleries, Ltd.

ASSOCIATE UNIVERSITY MEMBERS

MASTER Christie’s Fine Art Auctioneers Dooky Chase’s Restaurant Energy Partners, Ltd. The Schon Charitable Foundation

Bowie Lumber Associates M. S. Rau Antiques, L.L.C. Neal Auction Company, Inc. Royal Antiques, Ltd.

Dillard University Loyola University Our Lady of Holy Cross College Tulane University University of Louisiana at Lafayette

WAYS OF GIVING he future of the New Orleans Museum of Art depends T to a large degree on the foresight and generosity of today’s visionaries—our members—who are willing to

NAMED ENDOWMENT FUND

consider new ways to make gifts. Here are a few suggested methods of making a difference for NOMA:

The principal of a fund established in your name—or for someone you wish to honor or memorialize—is managed for growth, while the income from the fund supports Museum programs.

GIFT OF CASH OR MARKETABLE SECURITIES

CHARITABLE REMAINDER TRUST/ CHARITABLE LEAD TRUST

Gifts may be restricted to a designated program or applied to NOMA’s general operating fund.

GIFT OF LIFE INSURANCE

Name NOMA as policy owner and beneficiary and receive immediate tax deductions on your premium.

GIFT OF PROPERTY

Gifts of real estate, boats, or artwork provide NOMA with marketable assets and may enable you to avoid capital gains taxes.

Provide NOMA or yourself with a steady income stream and, with a remainder trust, leave a significant future gift to NOMA. Both arrangements entitle you to considerable tax savings.

BEQUESTS

Name NOMA as a beneficiary in your will and make a lasting contribution to the Museum.

For more information about any of these suggested methods of giving to NOMA, call (504) 658-4107. 36

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


THE ART OF BUSINESS CORPORATE MEMBERSHIP IN THE NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART

BENEFITS TO YOUR COMPANY WHEN YOU INVEST IN THE PREEMINENT CULTURAL INSTITUTION OF OUR CITY CORPORATE MEMBERSHIP ❑ Please have NOMA’s Corporate Membership Director call. ❑ Please send me a brochure on Corporate Membership. ❑ Our check is enclosed in the amount of $_______________. Please make check payable to: New Orleans Museum of Art. ❑ Please send an invoice in the amount of $______________. Firm Name ____________________________ Contact Person ____________________________ Phone ____________________________ Address ____________________________ City/State/Zip ____________________________ Mail to: Corporate Membership New Orleans Museum of Art P.O. Box 19123 New Orleans, LA 70179-0123

ARTS QUARTERLY

When you take your place among the Corporate Members of the New Orleans Museum of Art, you are supporting the continuing excellence of the Gulf South’s finest institution for arts and arts education. NOMA is a force for economic development, contributing greatly to our city’s prominence as an international cultural center and visitor destination. The business and professional sectors have long recognized that the Museum makes our community a more desirable place for families and companies to locate.

BENEFITS FOR YOUR BUSINESS Your Corporate Membership provides world-class benefits to your employees and a positive image for your company. From unlimited family admission to NOMA, to the loan of fine art from NOMA’s permanent collection, to a Company Day for all your employees and their families, your Corporate Membership is a high-profile business asset and a great business decision. The vitality and growth of the New Orleans Museum of Art is dependent, quite literally, on the companies we keep. Our Corporate Membership Program provides the opportunity for your business, whether large or small, to participate at the level most beneficial to you. We have streamlined the rate structure and improved benefits, so select your membership category today, and enjoy all the special privileges of Corporate Membership at NOMA.

CORPORATE MEMBERSHIP PRIVILEGES • Free family admission at all times (immediate family, including children and grandchildren 17 years and younger). • Free subscription to Arts Quarterly. • Invitations to Members-Only Previews throughout the year. • Discount of 10% in the Museum Shop. • First notices of Special Events at NOMA. • Opportunity to participate in Members’ Art Tours in America and abroad. • Curatorial Opinion Service. • Opportunity to participate in Volunteer Programs. • Access to the Dreyfous Art Reference Library.

BENEFACTOR

• Limited use of a Museum space for a member’s business function at a mutually agreeable time. • Your company’s name prominently displayed in the Museum. • Family Membership privileges for eight designated officials with Reciprocal Membership at 39 participating museums. • A complimentary invitation for one designated official to NOMA’s Holiday Party. • Specially scheduled Corporate Day with recognition in the Museum and free admission for all employees and their families. • A Speakers Bureau program at your place of business or at the Museum. • 100 Museum passes. • Curatorial consultation. • One catalogue from NOMA’s inventory.

PATRON

$10,000 &

ABOVE

• Use of the Museum for a member’s business special event at a mutually agreeable time. • Your company’s name prominently displayed in the Museum. • A private viewing and guided tour of an exhibition for the executives of your firm. • Family Membership privileges for ten designated officials with Reciprocal Membership at 39 participating museums. • A complimentary invitation for one designated official to NOMA’s Holiday Party. • Specially scheduled Corporate Day with recognition in the Museum and free admission for all employees and their families. • A Speakers Bureau program at your place of business or at the Museum. • 125 Museum passes. • Curatorial consultation. • One catalogue from the Museum’s inventory.

$5,000

• Family Membership privileges for six designated officials with Reciprocal Membership at 39 participating museums. • A complimentary invitation for one designated official to NOMA’s Holiday Party. • Specially scheduled Corporate Day with recognition in the Museum and free admission for all employees and their families. • A Speakers Bureau program at your place of business or at the Museum. • 75 Museum passes. • Curatorial consultation. • One catalogue from NOMA’s inventory.

MASTER

$2,500

• Family Membership privileges for five designated officials with Reciprocal Membership at 39 participating museums. • A Speakers Bureau program for your employees at your place of business or at the Museum. • 50 Museum passes. • Curatorial consultation. • One catalogue from NOMA’s inventory.

LEADER GUARANTOR

$7,500

$1,000

• Family Membership privileges for four designated officials with Reciprocal Membership at 39 participating museums. • 25 Museum passes. • Two posters from NOMA’s inventory.

ASSOCIATE

$500

• Family Membership privileges for three designated officials with Reciprocal Membership at 39 participating museums. • 15 Museum passes. • A poster from NOMA’s inventory.

CONTRIBUTOR

$250

• Family membership privileges for two designated officials of your firm with Reciprocal Membership at 39 participating museums. • 10 Museum passes.

37


C

O N T R I B U T I O N

T

S

he New Orleans Museum of Art has established a number of special funds for gifts in honor of or in memory of friends or family members or to commemorate an event. Recipients or their families will be notified of the gift and will be acknowledged in Arts Quarterly. For information on NOMA special funds, call 504-658-4100. Donations for all funds should be mailed to the New Orleans Museum of Art, PO Box 19123, New Orleans, Louisiana 70179-0123. ■

IN MEMORY OF

IN HONOR OF

IN HONOR OF

ELLIS MINTZ

CHARLES & CAMMIE MAYER

Anne & Luis Banos

Mr. & Mrs. Quintin Hardtner Kay McArdle

MR. & MRS. EARL S. EICHIN, JR. MR. & MRS. FITZPATRICK VAUGHAN MR. & MRS. GEORGE HOPKINS MR. & MRS. ROBERT MCHARG MR. & MRS. GRAY S. PARKER LEONARD PARRISH MRS. SHEPARD SHUSHAN MRS. HERBERT VAN HORN THOMAS WESTERVELT MR. & MRS. PHILIP WOOLLAM

IN MEMORY OF ALBERT DITTMANN, JR. Anne & Luis Banos

IN HONOR OF JIMMY & JANET FRISCHHERTZ Kay McArdle

IN MEMORY OF

IN HONOR OF

OPAL JEAN ANTINORI

IN HONOR OF

The Press Club of New Orleans

JULIE SILVERS - STUDIO SALON

FRANÇOISE B. RICHARDSON AFRICAN ART FUND

IN HONOR OF

Studio Salons Randy Campbell

IN HONOR OF

Scott Simmons & John Abajian

JACKIE SULLIVAN RECEIVING THE FAMILY SERVICE AWARD AS AN OUTSTANDING PERSON

MRS. FRANÇOISE B. RICHARDSON Bill Fagaly Norma Freiberg

MRS. JEAN HEID MEMORIAL FUND Betty Lou Weiss Chappy & Rene Holbrook Mr. & Mrs. Wayne J. Prejean

LIBRARY FUND

IN HONOR OF

P. ROUSSEL NORMAN FUND

MR. & MRS. MOISE STEEG’S ANNIVERSARY

IN MEMORY OF

Dr. & Mrs. Isidore Cohn, Jr.

Anne & Luis Banos

IN HONOR OF

PHOTOGRAPHY FUND

MIGNHON TOURNE

SUNNY NORMAN

Allison Penzato

IN MEMORY OF

LOUIS HARRIS FUND

OPHELIA MAY ADAMS BROWN Kimberly & Harry Rosenberg

IN MEMORY OF GUY C. LYMAN, JR. Harry C. Stahel

IN HONOR OF KIM HARRIS

IN MEMORY OF

Dara & Bruce Baird

DR. SAM ZURIK Kimberly & Harry Rosenberg

NVC FLOWER FUND

IN HONOR OF

IN MEMORY OF DR. ERNEST J. COOK, JR. Patricia Cook, M.D.

IN MEMORY OF UNA DUMESTRE

IN MEMORY OF BETTY FORTIER

IN MEMORY OF

DR. BERNARD “BERNIE” M. JAFFE’S BIRTHDAY Kimberly & Harry Rosenberg

Shirley Rabe Masinter

Amie & Graham Paul

HOLIDAY GIFTS NVC PORTICO RENOVATION FUND

NATHALIE EWING The Stuart Hall Sunshine Club

IN HONOR OF

IN MEMORY OF

Fay Beth Wedig

THE BIRTHDAY OF DELLIE AND FRED LOZES

Cammie & Charles Mayer

IN HONOR OF MR. & MRS. E.J. FORIO, JR. MR. & MRS. MICHAEL RAPIER MR. & MRS. RICHARD SIMMONS MR. & MRS. MICHAEL FISCHER

JOHN BULLARD MS. ALICE RAE YELEN KURT A. GITTER, M.D. DRS. JOY & HOWARD OSOFSKY Lisa Rotondo-McCord

IN HONOR OF ANNE & REX CULP MRS. FRANÇOISE B. RICHARDSON SUSAN & JIMMY GUNDLACH RHESA & ALDEN MCDONALD LINDA & ALBERT MINTZ ANNE & JOHN CASBON MARY KAY & GRAY PARKER MS. CRISTINA WYSOCKI DR. DAVID BOUDREAUX RICHARD NESBITT MR. & MRS. ROBERT YOUNG MR. & MRS. STEVE HANSEL MR. & MRS. MICHAEL MARSIGLIA MR. & MRS. CHARLES B. MAYER MR. & MRS. DANNY CONWILL MARIO VILA CHRISTIAN MASLACH PHIL ZIMBARDO MR. & MRS. ROBERT BOH MR. & MRS. EDGAR CHASE MS. MARJORIE COLOMB MS. RENAE CONLEY MR. & MRS. HAROLD FUSELIER MR. & MRS. JACK LABORDE LT. GOV. & MRS. MITCH LANDRIEU DR. & MRS. E. RALPH LUPIN PETER MAYER MR. & MRS. IRVIN MAYFIELD MS. MARY JANE MCALISTER MR. & MRS. R. KING MILLING MRS. BETSY NALTY MS. DEBBIE POWELL MR. & MRS. EDMUND REDD PATRICK TESSON DR. JOSHUA LOWENTRITT DR. JONATHAN LEVY MR. & MRS. JOEL CHAISSON MAX PROTECH DR. ABE FRIEDMAN MR. & MRS. JOHN BERTUZZI MR. & MRS. GEORGE RODRIGUE SIDONE VILLERE JONATHAN FERRARA MR. & MRS. MOISE STEEG, JR. MRS. PHYLLIS TAYLOR MR. & MRS. FRANK STEWART MR. & MRS. EMERIL LAGASSE MS. TIFFANY ADLER Drs. Joy & Howard Osofsky

Mr. & Mrs. Donald King

COLONEL ALBERT JOHN WETZEL The Officers & Directors of Whitney Bank

IN MEMORY OF RICHARD OWEN “DICK” SHELTON

IN HONOR OF DIANE WALMSLEY FOR HER HARD WORK AS NVC CHAIR Charles & Cammie Mayer Kay McArdle

IN HONOR OF RICHARD FREEMAN Judie Boudin Celia McCormick

Shirley Rabe Masinter

38

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


NEW MEMBERS

T Mr. Christopher M. Adams Ms. Elise Allen Ms. Marilyn Amar Ms. Shiva Ambrose Ms. Karen Angle Mr. Robert Arceneaux and Ms. Jennifer Kennedy Dr. Jamilyn Aubel Sarah Bacon Mrs. Alice B. Bahlinger Tom and Ellen Bambrick Mr. and Mrs. Luis Banos Jennifer Morgan Barnes Mike and Kelli Barnes Susan Barre Christopher Beattie Marc Beerman Mrs. Melissa P. B. Beese Karl Ben Mia Ben Ms. Debby Bennen Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Benson Gwen Bernstrom and Brittany Bernstrom Jarvain and Gloria Bingmon Mr. Joe Biniek Ms. Carrie Black Sheena Blackman Anthony and Cheryl Bordelon Ms. Anna Bordlee Mr. Michael Borne Bruce Boulware Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Bourg Nancy Bourg Mr. John Edmund Bradley Sarah Jane Brady Anna Brandenburg and Shannon Ferguson Ms. Anamaria Brandon Laura Brooks Jon C. Brown Mr. Kenneth Buchta Patricia M. Burke Dr. and Mrs. Raymond Byerley Mr. Tom Cain Mr. D. J. Callais Raymond Calvert Sarah Cambas Ms. Sharon Cannon Dr. John Carradine Bruce Carter Mrs. Brenda Castanada Dr. Emmet B. Chapital Frank Charneco and Rebecca Charneco Mrs. Jennie Chimento Ms. Dionne Chouest Mrs. Renie Clark Coffee Roasters of New Orleans Dr. Charles Coleman John Collins Mrs. Patricia H. Collins Mrs. Barbara Colosino Bonnie P. Cook Vallan Corbett William and Rebecca Couret Jennifer Culicchia Charles Curran Joshua and Adrienne Daly Mr. and Mrs. John D'Aquin Maureen Davis Ms. Sydney Davis Mr. Bruce Dean Ann B. Debessonet Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Decker Alexandra Diaz-Hall

ARTS QUARTERLY

he New Orleans Museum of Art is happy to welcome the following new members. We are grateful for their support and generosity. n

Mrs. Kelli Donegan Mr. Charles Donewar and Mrs. Masie Donewar Patricia Doran Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Dozier Mr. Victor Edwards Claire M. Ernst Gabriel Falgoust Ms. Madeleine Faust Skylar Fein Paulette Fernandez Nolan Ferraro Clare Fiasconaro Mr. Brian Fiegel Dexter Fields and Alva J. Groth Mrs. Amiee Fitzmorris Mary Flowers Mr. Joseph Fried Kathleen Funck Mr. and Mrs. J. U. Gajan III David and Mary Ann Galarneau Julia Garcia Stephan Gardner Mr. Benjamin Geary Michael Genova Charles and Marnie Genre Ms. Kendall Genre Dr. Lane Gober and Mrs. Liz Gober Barbara Godelfer Ms. Elizabeth S. Good Lori Gordillo Mr. Alan Gorman Mrs. Charlotte Gottesman Mrs. Connie Gowland Mrs. Julie H. Grantz Mr. Shawn Gruenig Thomas Guerin Ms. Katherine Guiden Dom and Mary Beth Gulotta Mrs. Linda Gunkel Dr. Don Hammen Mr. and Mrs. R. Clay Harrelson Ms. Barbara Harris Patricia Hart Mr. and Mrs. Ron Hartman Mr. and Mrs. Craig Haydel Mrs. Susan Hayne Ms. Emily Haynie Mr. Odom B. Heebe, Jr. Mrs. Lucy Hernandez Mr. Thomas Herrington Ms. Margot Herster Mr. Randy Hess Mr. Michael Hilferty Dr. and Mrs. Eugene J. Hoffman Maurine Hogan Joseph Hood Jeremy Horowitz Mr. Lee M. Horvitz Jessica Hughes Jeremy Hunnewell and Genevie Pope Dr. James Hyman Peter Ingrassia and Janet Ingrassia Mrs. Maria Irwin Jackie W. Jackson Mr. Robert B. Johnston Yvonne Jones Mrs. Ronda Jones-Crutchfield Scott Joyce and Tiffany B. Joyce Mrs. Julien Jurgens Dennis Kamstra and Fran Kamstra Nathan Kamstra Mrs. Liz Keeney Ms. Melissa Kelley

Mr. Damon Ketchens Gail Kiefer Steve Kline Mrs. Lisa Knickerbocker Mark Koehler Ms. Elizabeth Korevaar Mary Kostmayer Garry Laborde Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence L. LaGarde Ms. Amy Laws Suzanne Lazarus Mr. and Mrs. Sam Le Blanc Benjamin-David Legrand Ms. Christine Lehmann Mina Lilley Kirby Linck Jeffrey Loesing Mrs. Lynn Long Ms. Yvonne Marie Long James Looney Debra Loria Robert and Kerrie Loyde Mr. and Mrs. Clark Lozes Mrs. Erin B. Luetkemeier Keith Lunsford Dorene Lusignan H. Louis Lyles Robert and Viviana Maclean Dr. Raga Malaty Mrs. Melissa Mantila Robin Marshall William L. Mazilly Aphrodite McCarthy Becky McCormick Roxane McKay Dr. and Mrs. Warren McKenna Christopher McLachlan Mrs. Erin McNutt Mrs. Gloria Medina Larry Merington Lauren Michel Daina Mims John Mitchell Patrick Mitchell Mr. Paul C. Mitchell Dr. and Mrs. Larry Montelibano Michelle Bacon Moore Ms. Kristina Mores Mr. Robert Morrison Ms. Norissa Munson Ms. Flo Murat Mr. Paul Murphy Katherine Nicolay Lydia North Mr. George T. Oliver and Mr. Elden Spear Ms. M. Ondrusek Mrs. Jennifer Oubre Mr. Phillip Pacey Kenneth Pailet Marilyn Palma Mary Elizabeth Paltron Ms. Lori Parigi Fred and Gertie Parker Alice Parkerson Joe Ann Perrien Ms. Rosemary Perrone Dionne Peters Mrs. Doreen Pettit Miss Jayne Phillips Kellen Pirri Mr. Larry Porche Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Power, Jr. Mr. Theodore D. Powers

Mr. Kirk Redmann John and Mirella Reilly Vivian Retz Paul and Erin Ribka Mr. Matthew Rinard Dr. and Mrs. Chris Ritter Mr. and Mrs. Edwin R. Rodriguez, Jr. Yasmine Rodriguez Mr. Charles Rogers, Jr. Mr. James Rogers III Roger Runnels Michael Ryan and Beverly Rainey Mr. Brian E. Salathe David Salvant Mrs. Tracy Sanbola Aaron Sanders and Kim Sanders Mrs. Emily Schmidt Barbara Schnauder Mrs. Sara Schwarz Mr. Donald Schwenn Mr. Ajay Shah Eleanor Sharpe Dr. Malachi Sheahan Mr. Mike Shook and Mrs. Margaret Shook Carl Siener and Jane Siener Vincent and Sheila Simmons Mr. Jayson Sims Mrs. Hope Singleton Mr. and Mrs. Lynes R. Sloss Mr. Alan Smason Mrs. Michelle Smith Yeon Soo Son Mr. Gerry Spedale Lisa Sprenger Dr. and Mrs. Fred Stalley Mr. Eric Stoen Steve and Kathleen Stukenborg Ms. Jacqueline L. Sullivan Mrs. Rosemary Tappan Ms. Lauren Tarantino Lu-Ann Taylor Ms. Julie Taylor-Vaz Ms. Lisa M. Thamasett Julie Thomas Mr. and Mrs. Clark Thompson Ms. Melissa Thompson Ms. Rebecca Thomson Terry Toppino Ms. Cynthia Touzet Laurette Toye Ms. Janelle Trosclair Edmond Vail Brian Van Deventer Mr. Richard Velkley Mrs. Barbara Verret Scott Verret and Dawn Penning Ms. Thai-Bao Vu Mrs. Laurie Wahlder Lieutenant Commander Michael Wallace Mrs. Celia Ward Mrs. Evelyn Ward Liese Weber-Frutchey Gary and Laurie Wehlen Mrs. Cindy Welch Ms. Kathy Wendling Wendy Westfaul Ms. Jan White Mrs. Sulley Williams Julie Winn Mr. Paul Wisneskey and Ms. Holly Scheib Mrs. Amy Zapata Ms. Alanna Zaritz Mrs. Carey F. Zuniga

39


The Felix J. Dreyfous Library

Library Happenings Thursday, April 8, noon-1 p.m.: Book Signing Margaret Rose Vendryes will discuss and sign copies of her book. Call 504-658-4117 or email scork@noma.org to reserve a place.

NOMA READS APRIL In April, the library will introduce a new, annual program called NOMA READS. Featuring a series of events and book discussions based on an important NOMA exhibition, this year’s program takes place in conjunction with Beyond the Blues: Reflections of African America in the Fine Arts Collection of the Amistad Research Center (at NOMA April 11 through July 11, 2010). The exhibition will showcase more than one hundred paintings, works on paper, and sculptures, as well as personal papers of the artists from the Amistad Research Center Collection. As part of NOMA READS, we will read the book Barthé: A Life in Sculpture by Margaret Rose Vendryes. Richmond Barthé, a renowned sculptor who had New Orleans and Mississippi connections, is one of the artists whose work will be included in Beyond the Blues; the book’s author, Margaret Rose Vendryes, is the curator of the exhibition. Please contact the Museum Shop at 504658-4133 or museumshop@noma.org to reserve a copy of the book. To receive event reminders and updates, contact the librarian at 504-658-4117 and ask to be put on the Book Club list. More details about the book: Barthé: A Life in Sculpture by Margaret Rose Vendryes. University Press of Mississippi, 2008. ISBN 978-1604730920. “Richmond Barthé (1909-1989) was the first modern African American sculptor to achieve real critical success. His accessible naturalism led to unprecedented celebrity for an artist during the 1930s and 1940s.” (Quotation available at http://www.upress.state.ms.us/books/1122).

NOMA READS EVENTS

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Friday, April 23, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (approx): Field trip to the Amistad Research Center at Tulane University We will meet at the Amistad Research Center at 10 a.m., where the staff will present a program about the history of the Center and its collections, and introduce us to original documents relating to artists represented in Beyond the Blues. At 11:30 a.m., we will walk to the nearby LavinBernick Center for University Life and eat lunch in the faculty dining room. This is a “Dutch treat,” so we will all pay our own $10 for lunch at the Center. Call 504-6584117 or email scork@noma.org to reserve a place. Friday, April 30, noon-1 p.m.: Book Club Discussion Group

NOMA BOOK CLUB PROGRAMS MAY

Watch your email for updates about NOMA READS special events, programs, library displays, and bibliographies. It is very important to contact the librarian at 504-658-4117 or scork@noma.org to reserve space at programs.

Margaret Rose Vendryes

Thursday, April 15, 9:15 a.m.-2 p.m. (approx.): “Richmond Barthé in Mississippi”: Field trip to the Hancock County Library System in Bay St. Louis, MS Richmond Barthé was born in Bay St. Louis and maintained close relationships with family and friends there all his life. The Hancock County Library System in Bay St. Louis is the home of several of Barthé’s sculptures, including some from his time in Jamaica. The library also has a significant archive of Barthé information. Following a viewing of the sculptures and a tour of the newly reopened library, we will eat lunch at a local restaurant. We will meet in the library at NOMA at 9:15 a.m. and carpool to Bay St. Louis. Call 504-658-4117 or email scork@noma.org to reserve a place.

Warrington Colescott

Friday, May 14, noon-1 p.m.: “Meet the Author” event featuring Warrington Colescott Warrington Colescott was born in 1921 in Oakland, California; his parents had relocated from Louisiana the previous year. After earning his B.A. and M.A. from the University of California at Berkeley, Colescott continued with studies at the Grande Chaumiere, Paris, and the Slade School of Art, London. Join us in the library as Mr. Colescott discusses his art, the works in his NOMA exhibition, SWEET Suite Louisiana: Color Intaglio Prints by Warrington Colescott (April 11-July 11) and the making of the book The Prints of Warrington Colescott: A Catalogue Raisonné, 19482008. After the meeting, Mr. Colescott will be available to sign copies of his book. Book Club Selection: The Art Thief by Noah Charney. Simon and Schuster, 2008. ISBN: 9781416550310. “Full of fascinating art-historical detail, crackling dialogue, and a brain-teasing plot, Noah Charney's debut novel is a sophisticated, stylish thriller, as irresistible and multifaceted as a great work of art.” (Quotation available at www.amazon.com)

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


The Art Thief

Little Big Man

Friday, May 21, noon-1 p.m.: Book Discussion Group Bring a packed lunch; NOMA will provide soft drinks. Please call 504-658-4117 or email scork@noma.org to reserve a place at Book Club meetings and events.

JUNE Book Club Selection: Little Big Man by Thomas Berger. Dial Press, 1989. ISBN: 9780385298292. “When Little Big Man was first published in 1964 it was immediately hailed as one of the finest novels ever about the American West, presenting one of the most detailed and accurate portraits of the era in fiction. Familiar myths perpetrated endlessly by film and television were effortlessly debunked. Of particular note was Berger's grand and moving portrait of a white boy brought up among the Cheyenne in the 1850s.” (Kirkus UK quoted at www.amazon.com) Wednesday, June 2, noon-1 p.m.: Curatorial program in the library NOMA Curator of Native American and preColumbian Art Paul Tarver will show us examples of Native American art and discuss his upcoming exhibition Ancestors and Descendants: Ancient Southwestern America at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century; Selections from the George Pepper Native American Archive at the Middle American Research Institute, Tulane University. Friday, June 25, noon-1 p.m. Book Club Discussion Group Bring a packed lunch; NOMA will provide soft drinks. Please call 504-658-4117 or email scork@noma.org to reserve a place at Book Club meetings and events.

American Musicians: Photographs by Lee Friedlander

Rescuing Da Vinci

image, they also tell a compelling story. The image of James Shorty and Family (p. 28), the musicians in Preservation Hall (p. 73), and the portrayal of a gaunt and harried-looking Frank Sinatra (p. 135) give insights into personalities, emotions, and settings. If you love photography, portraits, or music, you will enjoy this book. (779.0924 F91) Rescuing Da Vinci: Hitler and the Nazis Stole Europe’s Great Art—America and Her Allies Recovered It by Robert M. Edsel. Dallas, TX: Laurel Publishing, 2006. This book will be of interest to those who read and enjoyed The Rape of Europa: The Fate of Europe's Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War by Lynn H. Nicholas, those who are interested in art history, and those who are interested in World War II. The book’s illustrations are especially noteworthy: page after page, mostly black and white, a few color, showing the extraordinary measures countries took to preserve their art treasures from destruction in World War II. Michelangelo’s David was wrapped and encased in brick (p. 69), while the Hermitage was evacuated (pp. 78-81). Sadly, many of the photographs show images of the destruction of buildings, monuments and, in the instance of Poland, an entire culture (p. 93). The “Treasures Destroyed” section (pp. 282-84) is also a sad reminder of the aftermath of war. There are works by Andrea Del Sarto and Rubens that will not be seen again. The redeeming feature in this grim chronicle of lost art treasures is the knowledge that the “Monument Men” and others worked heroically to ensure that many art treasures were restored to their countries of origin, and to the museums that housed them. (940.5405 E243rdh)

ABOUT THE LIBRARY NOTABLE NEW ADDITIONS TO THE LIBRARY (The number in parentheses following the review is the number the book is shelved at in the library.) American Musicians: Photographs by Lee Friedlander by Lee Friedlander, Steve Lacy, and Ruth Brown. New York: D.A.P./Distributed Art Publishers, 1998. In this book Lee Friedlander has captured the images of local and nationally known singers and musicians. The singers and musicians represented are from various musical backgrounds including gospel, bluegrass, New Orleans jazz, and country and western. New Orleanians include John Casimir’s Young Tuxedo Band, 1958, the Olympia Brass Band, 1970, the Excelsior Band in 1968, Billie Pierce, Alice Zeno, and Punch Miller. There are also photographs of Sister Gertrude Morgan. Friedlander’s photographs are notable in that they don’t just show an

ARTS QUARTERLY

The Felix J. Dreyfous Library is located in the basement of the New Orleans Museum of Art. The library’s services and collections (20,000 books and 70+ periodical subscriptions) are available for use by members of NOMA. Members of the public, local students, and educators are also welcome. The library is staffed by a librarian, Sheila Cork, who holds a master’s degree in Library and Information Science, with an extensive background in reference and research. In addition, the library is fortunate to have volunteers who help on a regular basis. Use of the library is by appointment only during the librarian’s regular working hours, Monday-Friday, 9-5 p.m. Call 504-658-4117 or email the librarian at scork@noma.org to make an appointment to use this valuable resource. n

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NOMA EDUCATION: Lectures, Walkthroughs, & Special Events

Wednesday, April 7, 5:30 p.m.

Sunday, April 11, 2 p.m.

Thursday, May 13, 7 p.m.

Grad Student Night at NOMA (Great Hall) Hosted in collaboration with Tulane University, the University of New Orleans, and the Museum Studies program at Southern University of New Orleans, NOMA invites all New Orleans faculty and graduate students of art history and studio art to a special preview of the exhibition Joan Mitchell in New Orleans.

Beyond the Blues: Introductory Lecture (Stern Auditorium) David C. Driskell, Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of Art, University of Maryland, College Park, will give a lecture introducing the Beyond the Blues exhibition.

Faubourg Quartet Performs at NOMA (Stern Auditorium) The Faubourg Quartet, a New Orleansbased string quartet comprised of members of the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra and NOCCA's classical music faculty, will perform At the Octoroon Balls by Wynton Marsalis and String Quartet no. 12 “American” by Antonin Dvorak. At the Octoroon Balls, Marsalis’s first composition for string quartet, evokes the people and places of New Orleans. NOMA members and NOCCA students and faculty: free with ID. General admission: $10. Students/seniors: $5 with ID.

Wednesday, April 7, May 12, & June 2, 6 p.m. Super Bowl Wager Walk-through: Claude Lorrain & J.M.W. Turner This walk-through will examine the landscape tradition with particular attention to the two works wagered in the Super Bowl bet between NOMA and the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

Friday, April 9, 6 p.m.

Beyond the Blues

Joan Mitchell Symposium Reception (Great Hall) NOMA hosts a reception for attendees of the three-day symposium Joan Mitchell in New Orleans (April 9-11, co-presented with Tulane University and the Contemporary Arts Center). Reception will include the premiere of Joan Mitchell: An Interview, originally recorded in 1974 and re-edited in 2004 by Lyn Blumenthal and Kate Horsefield.

Saturday, April 10, 5:30-8 p.m.

SWEET Suite Louisiana

Members-Only Exhibition Preview for: Beyond the Blues: Reflections of African America in the Fine Arts Collection of the Amistad Research Center (Ella West Freeman Galleries) SWEET Suite Louisiana: Color Intaglio Prints by Warrington Colescott (Templeman Galleries) William Greiner Photographs: Fallen Paradise and Land’s End (Templeman Galleries) All three exhibitions open to the public on Sunday, April 11.

Saturday, April 10, 1-5 p.m. and Sunday, April 11, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Louisiana Iris Show Photograph by Judy Cooper

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Louisiana Iris Show (Besthoff Sculpture Garden) The Greater New Orleans and Acadiana Iris Societies jointly present the first-ever Louisiana Iris Show in the Besthoff Sculpture Garden on April 1011. Entries will be accepted from 7:3010:30 a.m. on Saturday, April 10, and anyone is welcome to bring irises to be judged. After judging, the free show will be open to the public from 1-5 p.m. on April 10 and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. on April 11. For more information, call show chair Patrick O’Connor, 504-456-6060.

Wednesday, April 14, 6 p.m. Exhibition Walk-through: William Greiner Photographs: Fallen Paradise and Land’s End (Templeman Galleries) The artist will lead this walk-through of two series of his works, shot in New Orleans and Baton Rouge.

Starting Friday, April 16, noon Fridays at Noon: Beyond the Blues Walk-through (Ella West Freeman Galleries) The Education Department introduces “Fridays at Noon,” a regularly scheduled guided tour of the Beyond the Blues exhibition for the general public. The program will run weekly for the duration of the exhibition.

Sunday, May 16, 2-4:30 p.m. Beyond the Blues Artists’ Panel Discussion (Stern Auditorium) Artists whose work is featured in the Beyond the Blues exhibition will discuss their work in a session moderated by exhibition curator Margaret Rose Vendryes. Following the panel, the artists will be in the galleries, available to answer questions about their work.

Wednesday, May 19, 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 21, 6-8 p.m. PhotoNOMA (Great Hall) The New Orleans Photo Alliance and the New Orleans Museum of Art present “PhotoNOMA,” a photographers’ portfolio night. One hundred photographers from throughout the region will display their work. Free and open to the public.

Wednesday, April 21 & Wednesday, May 5, 6 p.m. Exhibition Walk-throughs: Beyond the Blues (Ella West Freeman Galleries) These curator-guided tours of Beyond the Blues will highlight many of the significant paintings, works on paper, and sculptures included in this important exhibition.

Exhibition Walk-through: SWEET Suite Louisiana: Color Intaglio Prints by Warrington Colescott (Templeman Galleries) The artist Warrington Colescott will lead this exhibition walk-through. Colescott has delighted gallery visitors and collectors with his charming, large color prints in a career spanning more than sixty years. Taking his Creole heritage by the scruff of its neck, his eleven (so far) Suite Louisiana prints not only amuse the general public, but command the respect of graphics connoisseurs with extremely sophisticated technical originality. No reproduction can fully do justice to these images; they must be savored in person.

Wednesday, May 19, 6 p.m. April 23-24 & April 30May 1, mornings Sync Up Conference (Stern Auditorium) The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation presents the third annual Sync Up conference, connecting musicians with festival producers and leaders in the film, television, video game, and social networking industries. Admission is free, but advance registration is required: www.syncupconference.com.

Wednesday, April 28, 6 p.m. Listening Party with Quintron (Frederick R. Weisman Galleries and the Besthoff Sculpture Garden) Commemorating the completion of Quintron's latest album, recorded entirely on-site, NOMA will host a listening party.

Sculpture Tour with Miranda Lash (Besthoff Sculpture Garden) Miranda Lash, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, leads a guided tour of the Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden, focusing on masterpieces by artists including Louise Bourgeois, Henry Moore, Claus Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen, and Robert Indiana.

Thursday, May 20, 6:30 p.m. Anyplace But Here: African American Art and Rosenwald Fellows’ Travel (Longue Vue House and Gardens) A collaboration with Longue Vue House and Gardens for the Beyond the Blues exhibition, this event will feature a lecture and exhibition of works by Rosenwald Fellow artists on loan from the Amistad Research Center.

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


PROGRAMS & ACTIVITIES Wednesday, May 26, 6 p.m. Opening reception for Swamp Tours: Exploring the Louisiana Contemporary Collection (Frederick R. Weisman Galleries) Co-curated by Bill Fagaly, Curator of African Art, and Miranda Lash, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, this exhibition highlights rarely seen treasures from NOMA’s collection of Louisiana contemporary art.

Wednesday, June 9, 6-7 p.m.

Beyond the Blues

Art-Making Activities

Horticultural Tour (Besthoff Sculpture Garden) Pamela Buckman, Sculpture Garden Manager, will lead a tour through the Sculpture Garden focusing on the

Saturday, May 15, Drop-in anytime between 11 a.m.-3p.m. Family Art-Making Activity Come paint with us! NOMA’s art therapist, Holly Wherry, will be facilitating a group painting project for all ages. Families are invited to drop in and enjoy creating artwork together. Free with Museum admission. No registration required.

revival of plant life as well as exciting new additions. Meet Pamela at the front entrance to the Sculpture Garden for the tour.

Sunday, June 13, 1-5 pm. Beyond the Blues Symposium (Stern Auditorium) Catalogue authors Margaret Rose Vendryes, Lowery Stokes Sims, Michael D. Harris, and Renée Ater will present talks on various aspects of the art featured in Beyond the Blues, and the importance of the Amistad Research Center for the preservation of and access to information regarding African American history, culture, and art.

adults. Art therapists will guide you in expressing yourself with provided art materials. Free. No registration required.

Sunday, June 6, 1-4 p.m.

Community Art-Making Studio for Adults No artistic ability required. Explore your creative side in a relaxing and inspiring environment with other

A Brush Stroke Symphony: Family Art-Making Activity In conjunction with this spring's exhibition of paintings by master American abstract expressionist Joan Mitchell, all visitors to the Museum are invited to join the Education Department for a family art-making activity day. We will make paintings with varied textures, patterns, splatters, and drips by experimenting with different brush sizes and tools. Your

Film

Wednesday, May 5, 6 p.m.

Sunday, May 23, 2 p.m.

Screening of Pretty Baby (Stern Auditorium) The New Orleans Photo Alliance, in partnership with NOMA, presents Pretty Baby, Louis Malle's classic 1978 film based loosely on the character of E.J. Bellocq, the New Orleans photographer famous for his portraits of Storyville prostitutes. The film is presented in conjunction with the Photo Alliance's current exhibition, Four by Five, on view at the Photo Alliance Gallery April 3-May 23.

Beyond the Blues: Film and Panel Discussion: An Afternoon of New Orleans African American History and Art (Stern Auditorium) This program will center on lesser known aspects of African American culture in New Orleans. The film, Faubourg Treme: The Untold Story of Black New Orleans, will be screened and followed by a panel discussion. Lolis Eric Elie, a New Orleans writer and the film's co-director, will speak on the Afro-Creole experience in the visual arts, literature, and journalism, subjects that are alluded to but not

Educator Workshop and Materials

Wednesday, April 14, 4 to 6 p.m.

more information and to reserve your spot, please call the Education Department at 504-658-4128.

Wednesday, June 2, 6-8 p.m.

ARTS QUARTERLY

Educator Workshop: Beyond the Blues In conjunction with Beyond the Blues, the NOMA Education Department will present a workshop for K-12 educators focusing on curriculum connections and other ways of bringing this extraordinary exhibition into the classroom. There is no charge for the workshop, but space is limited. For

Educator Materials: Beyond the Blues The NOMA Education Department has produced an in-depth Educator Resource for K-12 classroom teachers focusing on the Beyond the Blues exhibition and ways to incorporate this extraordinary collection of African

Wednesday, June 16, 6 p.m. Exhibition Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (Ella West Freeman Galleries) Guest curator Margaret Rose Vendryes will lead this special walk-through of Beyond the Blues.

Wednesday, June 23, 6 p.m. Gallery Talk with Bill Fagaly and Miranda Lash (Frederick R. Weisman Galleries) The curators of Swamp Tours discuss NOMA’s history of collecting work by Louisiana artists in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

compositions will be filled with intense colors, many types of lines, and unique shapes. When your painting is complete, you will have your own abstract masterpiece to take home! Visitors are encouraged to view the Joan Mitchell exhibition and to use the family guide materials furnished by the Museum in collaboration with the Joan Mitchell Foundation. Free with Museum admission. All materials will be provided.

examined exhaustively in the film. Dawn Logsdon, the film’s co-director, will speak about her experience researching the information both in conjunction with the film, and years ago in cooperation with her late father, the much-heralded Joe Logsdon. Keith Medley, author of We As Free Men: Plessy vs. Ferguson, will talk about the civil rights legacy in the Afro-Creole community. Brenda Marie Osbey, 20052007 Louisiana Poet Laureate, will talk about anti-slavery agitation among the free black community in antebellum New Orleans.

American art and historical documents into the classroom. Teachers who attend the Educator Workshop will receive a copy of this Educator Resource when they attend. The manual can be accessed on the Internet at www.amistadresearchcenter.org. For more information, please call the Education Department at 504-658-4128.

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Visit NOMA for a Unique Shopping Experience Good-Byes! We are saying good-bye to some of our inventory items. Come by and visit the Museum Shop to find some great bargains.

Book Sale: $5.00 each or three for $10.00! Fabulous sale of past Museum exhibition catalogues.

Stop by the NOMA Museum Shop, call us at 504-658-4133, or shop online at www.noma.org/museumshop. We Ship in the Continental U.S.

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NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


Museum Shop Featured Artists Come meet and mingle with our featured artists on the following dates. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 2010, 6-8 p.m. Maria Fomich Maria Fomich is an up-and-coming jewelry artist in New Orleans. A local by heart and birth, she gains inspiration from the city we all love. The Cleveland Institute of Art can be credited for her ability to stay up late and work running on coffee.

spirit, music, and community. My work reaches deeper than the fleur-de-lis and into the heart of who we are. My jewelry is about our pride in our culture because in a time when culture is fading, ours holds strong and still flourishes.

Fomich describes the relationship between her work and her hometown: “New Orleans is an unforgettable mix of flavor and mystery. I’m proud to be a part of a city whose culture is about

My work is about living, having fun, and wearing art. For me, it’s about the love of tools, and the satisfaction of creation.”

WEDNESDAY, MAY 5, 2010, 6-8 p.m. Elaine Gleason Elaine Gleason designs and constructs striking lighting fixtures for traditional and contemporary home and commercial settings. These sculptures are inspired by the ambiance and rhythms of her native New Orleans. For the past eight years, Gleason has focused her creative energy on the design and manufacture of metal furniture and lighting fixtures in New Orleans at her studio, Bywater Metal Art. Her designs are evocative of the nature and culture around her: the classic architecture, indigenous music, and lush foliage that saturates this

unique city. Gleason studied art at the University of Arizona and received her B.F.A. with a focus on sculpture from the University of Georgia. Gleason’s art has been shown at the New Orleans Jazz Fest, Art in Bloom at the New Orleans Museum of Art, D.O.C.S. Gallery, New Orleans Academy of Fine Art, Philadelphia Rosen Show, New York International Gift Show, Atlanta International Gift Show, and High Point Furniture Show. She has many new designs of chandeliers and sconces that are also coming soon to Flambeau Lighting.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 2, 2010, 6-8 p.m. Peggy Bishop Peggy Bishop has been making pottery for about ten years. She learned the basics by taking classes locally and has enlarged her abilities through a variety of workshops. She began with the usual—functional ware such as bowls, cups, and the like—but soon conceived the notion of what have become her beloved totem poles, stacks of pots serving as quasi-official outdoor urban sculptures. Lately, she’s expanded the idea to include fanciful birds and fish, two of which adorn the entrance to the Tulane Women’s Center. A third, a wildly colored parrot hanging in a nearby tree, was recently stolen!

ARTS QUARTERLY

A native of Miami, Bishop grew up in New Orleans and graduated from UNO with a degree in education. She had a long career as a teacher, both in the New Orleans public schools and at Children’s House Montessori School. She’s also a gifted home cook; Frank Brigtsen of Brigtsen’s Restaurant once called her his favorite chef. She lives on beautiful Bayou St. John, a stone’s throw from the Museum. Bishop’s functional work can be seen at Le Boulevard at 5201 Canal Boulevard. She will also be exhibiting ceramic sculpture on the first weekend of Jazz Fest 2010.

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PROGRAM SPONSORS A

nnual operating support for NOMA’s exhibitions, the “Van Go,” free admission for Louisiana residents, family workshops, films, lectures, art classes, and numerous other special programs enjoyed by visitors from throughout the city, the state, the country, and, indeed, the world, are made possible through the generosity of our many sponsors. The New Orleans Museum of Art and its thousands of visitors are deeply grateful to these friends for their continued commitment. If you would like additional information on sponsorship, please contact the Museum’s Development Department, 504-658-4100. ■

BECOME A NOMA SPONSOR

$99,999 – $50,000 CHEVRON: Dreams Come True: Art of the Classic Fairy Tales from the Walt Disney Studio Exhibition Support Handbook of School Programs Teachers’ Packets CITY OF NEW ORLEANS, EDWARD WISNER DONATION: Dreams Come True: Art of the Classic Fairy Tales from the Walt Disney Studio Exhibition Support LOUISIANA DIVISION OF THE ARTS: Institution Stabilization Arts in Education General Operating Support

$100,000 + THE AZBY FUND: General Operating Support Besthoff Sculpture Garden Operating Support Security Equipment FORD FOUNDATION: Planning and Exploration of New Orleans Audiences GETTY FOUNDATION: Conservation of the Besthoff Sculpture Garden THE HELIS FOUNDATION: Reduced Admission for Louisiana Residents and Free Wednesdays for Everyone, 2010 THE PATRICK F. TAYLOR FOUNDATION: Taylor NOMA Scholars Program Education Department Support ZEMURRAY FOUNDATION: General Operating Support

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SELLEY FOUNDATION: General Operating Support Art Storage Building Renovation SHERATON NEW ORLEANS HOTEL: Dreams Come True: Art of the Classic Fairy Tales from the Walt Disney Studio Exhibition Support WALT DISNEY STUDIO: Dreams Come True: Art of the Classic Fairy Tales from the Walt Disney Studio Free Admission for Greater New Orleans Public School Students

$34,999 - $20,000 GAIL AND JOHN BERTUZZI: Dreams Come True: Art of the Classic Fairy Tales from the Walt Disney Studio Exhibition Support CAPITAL ONE BANK: Dreams Come True: Art of the Classic Fairy Tales from the Walt Disney Studio Exhibition Support ELIZABETH HEEBE-RUSSO: Dreams Come True: Art of the Classic Fairy Tales from the Walt Disney Studio Exhibition Sponsor D. LEE HODGES SHERRI S. LOGAN: Objects of Desire: Fabergé from the Hodges Family Collection Exhibition Catalogue Support LAKESIDE SHOPPING CENTER AND THE FEIL ORGANIZATION: Dreams Come True: Art of the Classic Fairy Tales from the Walt Disney Studio Exhibition Support THE LUPIN FOUNDATION: LOVE in the Garden 2009 Odyssey Ball 2009 Art in Bloom 2010 LUTHER AND ZITA TEMPLEMAN FUND: Dreams Come True: Art of the Classic Fairy Tales from the Walt Disney Studio Exhibition Support THE ROSAMARY FOUNDATION: Family Workshops Handbook of School Programs Annual Support

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


$19,999 - $10,000

$9,999 - $5,000

Odyssey Ball 2009 Art in Bloom 2010

CANAL BARGE: Art in Bloom 2010

AT&T: Odyssey Ball 2009

DOWNMAN FAMILY FOUNDATION: NOMA Exhibitions

BRUCE J. HEIM FOUNDATION: Art Therapy

EUGENIE & JOSEPH FAMILY FOUNDATION: Art in Bloom 2010

ENTERGY LOUISIANA: Educational Programs

MACY’S: Dreams Come True: Art of the Classic Fairy Tales from the Walt Disney Studio Exhibition Support

FRIEND OF ODYSSEY BALL: Odyssey Ball 2009

GAUTHIER FAMILY: Odyssey Ball 2009

MRS. JOHN MASCARO: Odyssey Ball 2009

FRISCHHERTZ ELECTRIC COMPANY: Odyssey Ball 2009

MRS. JEAN R. HEID: Art Acquisition Fund

MATHES BRIERRE ARCHITECTS: Odyssey Ball 2009

THE GPOA FOUNDATION: Educational Pre-Visit Video of African Art Collection

INTERNATIONAL SURETIES, LTD.: Art in Bloom 2010

MCILHENNY CO: Art in Bloom 2010

CAROLINE IRELAND: Odyssey Ball 2009

MRS. ELLIS MINTZ: Odyssey Ball 2009

J. ARON AND COMPANY, INC.: Dreams Come True: Art of the Classic Fairy Tales from the Walt Disney Studio Exhibition Support

JERI NIMS: Odyssey Ball 2009

MORRIS G. AND PAULA L. MAHER FOUNDATION: Odyssey Ball 2009 NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS: Curatorial Support RUBY K. WORNER CHARITABLE TRUST: Mid-Week in Mid-City MR. AND MRS. ROBERT SHELTON: Odyssey Ball 2009

ARTS QUARTERLY

ALLISON KENDRICK: Odyssey Ball 2009

MR. AND MRS. FRANK NORMAN: P. R. Norman Fund Art Acquisition

THE JOHN BURTON HARTER CHARITABLE FOUNDATION: Odyssey Ball 2009

SUPERIOR ENERGY SERVICES: Art in Bloom 2010

JONES, WALKER, WAECHTER, POITEVENT, CARRERE & DENEGRE, LLP:

WARREN ROESCH: Odyssey Ball 2009

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MUSEUM NEWS MUSEUM NEWS MUSEUM BOARD OF TRUSTEES BOARD MEETING SCHEDULE NOMA’s Board of Trustees will meet Wednesday, April 21, May 19, and June 16, 2010.October 21

NVC GENERAL MEETING Plan to attend the NVC General Meeting on May 10, 2010 at 5:30 p.m. in the NOMA auditorium. The NVC will celebrate its fortyfifth anniversary with a panel discussion, featuring founding president Beverly Muller. Reminiscings and behind-thescenes stories are sure to delight members, old and new. Join the fun and have a slice of birthday cake! A light supper will be served. NVC HOUSTON ART TRIP Twenty fortunate NVC members will buckle their seatbelts and fly away on a short but spectacular NVC Houston art trip scheduled for April 6-8, 2010. Regional Art Trip Co-Chairs Elaine Mintz, Virginia Dare Rufin, and Sue Singer have mapped an exciting agenda, including museums and galleries, dinners and a Broadway Across America performance of In the Heights, a 2008 Tony Award winner for its dance and score. Participants will visit the Houston Museum of Fine Arts featuring Sargent and Prendergast exhibitions, where they will take part in a docent-led tour and enjoy a boxed lunch in the sculpture garden. Other stops include the Menil Collection (featuring the collection of philanthropists Dominique and John de Menil and the Cy Twombly Gallery), the Rice University Art Gallery (Ghana sculptor El Anatsui exhibition), and the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston. The group will also make a special visit to the Rothko Chapel, described as “a pilgrimage stop for thousands of visitors who are drawn by its importance both as an artistic masterpiece and as an ecumenical gathering place for people of all religious beliefs.” Co-Chair Elaine Mintz advises, “Our hotel will be the ‘sexy,’ swanky ZaZa, which is located minutes from the museums we will

48

be visiting.” Dinner will be at the hotel on April 6 and will accompany the show on April 7. The co-chairs are still finalizing details for more trip lagniappe: possibly other museums, a private home tour, and a scenic drive.

STAFF NEWS Congratulations to Caroline Goyette, Editor of Museum Publications, who was recently awarded a four-week artist residency at the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts in Nebraska City, Nebraska. The Center offers up to fifty juried residencies a year to writers, composers, and visual artists working in the United States and abroad. Residents receive living and studio space and a small stipend. Goyette earned her M.F.A. in Creative Writing-Fiction from the University of Oregon; she will spend her time at the Center working on a collection of short stories. NOMA Volunteer Coordinator Gretchen Wheaton recently had a show of her work at Solidair Gallery in Bywater. The exhibition featured photographs from locations ranging from Bywater, the Marigny, and the French Quarter to Chile and China. Wheaton earned her B.F.A. in Photography from Moore College of Art in Philadelphia. A collector of contemporary Louisiana art and photography, her work is often concerned with architectural textures and shadows and explores the idea of “oldness.” Disney Security Attendant Roman Alokhin had works of photography on display as part of two recent exhibitions: The American Dream at the New Orleans Photo Alliance Gallery and Onward, a show in Philadelphia. Alokhin prefers to work with traditional black and white film which he develops and prints; both exhibitions featured Alokhin’s silver gelatin prints. Born and raised in Moscow, Alokhin earned undergraduate and graduate degrees in Information Technology from the University of Alabama in Hunstville and spent eight years in the field before turning to photography. n

SENIOR STAFF E. John Bullard, The Montine McDaniel Freeman Director Gail Asprodites, Assistant Director for Administration and Finance Marilyn Dittmann, Director of Development Lisa Rotondo-McCord, Assistant Director for Art/Curator of Asian Art Alice Rae Yelen, Assistant Director of Education Pamela Buckman, Sculpture Garden Manager Monika M. Cantin, Associate Collections Manager Aisha Champagne, Director of Publications and Design Sheila Cork, Librarian Diego Cortez, The Freeman Family Curator of Photography John d’Addario, Associate Curator of Education Sarah Davidson, Coordinator of Special Events Alice Dickinson, Associate Collections Manager William A. Fagaly, The Françoise Billion Richardson Curator of African Art Anthony V. Garma III, Exhibition Installation Coordinator Caroline Goyette, Editor of Museum Publications Susan Hayne, Human Resources Manager Sophie Hirabayashi, Education Department Assistant Tao-nha Hoang, Chief Preparator Jennifer Ickes, Assistant Registrar Kristin Jochem, Development Associate for NVC John W. Keefe, The RosaMary Foundation Curator of The Decorative Arts Miranda Lash, Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Elizabeth Levy, Membership Assistant Bernard Mitchell, Chief of Security Karl Oelkers, Facilities Manager George Roland, The Doris Zemurray Stone Curator of Prints and Drawings Ty Smithweck, Controller William Sooter, Preparator Paul Tarver, Registrar/Curator of Native American and pre-Columbian Art Steve Thompson, Computer Coordinator Patricia Trautman, Museum Shop Manager Laura Wallis, Development Associate for Membership and Annual Appeal Holly M. Wherry, Art Therapist, Katrina Initiative Grace Wilson, Director of Communications and Marketing NOMA BOARD OF TRUSTEES Stephen A. Hansel, President Mrs. James J. Frischhertz, Vice-President Mrs. Charles B. Mayer, Vice-President William D. Aaron, Jr., Vice-President Michael Moffitt, Treasurer David F. Edwards, Secretary Mrs. Françoise B. Richardson, Assistant Treasurer Mrs. John Bertuzzi Sydney J. Besthoff III Mrs. Mark Carey Edgar L. Chase III Leonard Davis H. Mortimer Favrot, Jr. Mrs. Ludovico Feoli Timothy Francis James Gable Mrs. Anne Gauthier Mrs. Edward N. George Roy A. Glapion Terry Hall Lee Hampton

Ms. Adrea Heebe Ms. Allison Kendrick Subhash V. Kulkarni Henry Lambert Mrs. Merritt Lane Paul J. Leaman, Jr. E. Ralph Lupin, M.D. Paul Masinter Edward C. Mathes Kay McArdle Alvin Merlin, M.D. Councilmember Shelly Midura Mrs. R. King Milling Mrs. Michael Moffitt Mayor C. Ray Nagin Howard Osofsky Mrs. Robert J. Patrick Thomas Reese, Ph.D. Mrs. James J. Reiss, Jr. Mrs. George Rodrigue Bryan Schneider Mrs. Robert Shelton Mrs. Lynes R. Sloss Ms. Alexandra E. Stafford Mrs. Richard L. Strub Mrs. Patrick F. Taylor Louis A. Wilson, Jr.

HONORARY LIFE TRUSTEES H. Russell Albright, M.D. Mrs. Jack R. Aron Mrs. Edgar L. Chase, Jr. Isidore Cohn, Jr., M.D. Prescott N. Dunbar S. Stewart Farnet Sandra Draughn Freeman Kurt A. Gitter, M.D. Mrs. H. Lloyd Hawkins Mrs. Killian L. Huger Mrs. Erik Johnsen Richard W. Levy, M.D. J. Thomas Lewis

Mrs. Paula L. Maher Mrs. J. Frederick Muller, Jr. Mrs. Jeri Nims Mrs. Charles S. Reily, Jr. Mrs. Françoise Billion Richardson R. Randolph Richmond, Jr. Charles A. Snyder Mrs. Frederick M. Stafford Harry C. Stahel Mr. and Mrs. Moise S. Steeg, Jr. Mrs. Harold H. Stream Mrs. James Lyle Taylor Mrs. John N. Weinstock

NATIONAL TRUSTEES Joseph Baillio Mrs. Carmel Cohen Mrs. Mason Granger Jerry Heymann

Herbert Kaufman, M.D. Mrs. James Pierce Ms. Debra Shriever Mrs. Billie Weisman Mrs. Henry H. Weldon

NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART


NOMA Exhibition Schedule

Parallel Universe: Quintron and Miss Pussycat Live at City Park Frederick R. Weisman Galleries Through May 2, 2010

CROSSCURRENTS: East Meets West, West Meets East in Ceramic Design Cameo Gallery Through May 16, 2010

Feathers, Fur and Flowers: The Natural World in Edoperiod Painting Japanese Galleries Through June 20, 2010

Beyond the Blues: Reflections of African America in the Fine Arts Collection of the Amistad Research Center Ella West Freeman Galleries April 11 - July 11, 2010

William Greiner Photographs: Fallen Paradise and Land’s End Templeman Galleries April 11 - July 11, 2010

SWEET Suite Louisiana: Color Intaglio Prints by Warrington Colescott Templeman Galleries April 11 - July 11, 2010

The Therapist: Photography by Donald Woodman Swamp Tours: Exploring the Louisiana Contemporary Collection Frederick R. Weisman Galleries May 26 - June 23, 2010

Bay Gallery May 22 - August 1, 2010

Women Artists in Louisiana, 1965-2010 From the collections of The Historic New Orleans Collection and the New Orleans Museum of Art Templeman Galleries Through September 12, 2010

Joan Mitchell in New Orleans NOMA Great Hall Through June 27, 2010

Patti Smith: A Donation to NOMA Second Floor Contemporary Art Galleries April 22 - July 3, 2010

Ancestors and Descendants: Ancient Southwestern America at the Dawn of the Twentieth Century, Selections from the George Pepper Native American Archive at the Middle American Research Institute, Tulane University Ella West Freeman Galleries July 24 - October 24, 2010 For further information on upcoming exhibitions and events at the New Orleans Museum of Art, call 504-658-4100, or visit our website at www.noma.org. n

ARTS QUARTERLY

49


NOMA Calendar of Events LEGEND: 4 Art-Making Activities

s

Educator Workshops

¶ Exhibitions

■ Films/Music ❃ Lectures and Walk-throughs ❂ Library Events ❖ Mid-Week in Mid-City (Museum Hours on Wednesdays: 12-8 p.m.)

✖ Sculpture Garden Events ❁ Special Events

Monday

Sunday

5

APRIL 2010

4

11

❁✖

10 a.m.-4 p.m. Louisiana Iris Show (Sculpture Garden)

12

6

7

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1

2

3

8

Noon-1 p.m. Book Signing (Library)

9

6 p.m. Joan Mitchell Symposium Reception (Great Hall)

❃❖ 6 p.m. Super Bowl Wager Walk-through

13

s❖

14

4-6 p.m. Educator Workshop: Beyond the Blues

5:30-8 p.m. Members-Only Preview: Beyond the Blues, SWEET Suite Louisiana, William Greiner Photographs

15

9:15 a.m.-2 p.m. Book Club Field Trip: Bay St. Louis, MS

17

16

Noon Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (EWF Galleries)

20

❁❖

21

6-8 p.m. PhotoNOMA (Great Hall)

❃ 6 p.m. Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (EWF Galleries)

❁¶

22

6 p.m. Lecture and opening: An Evening with Patti Smith (Stern Auditorium and Contemporary Galleries)

23

Sync Up Conference (Stern Auditorium)

❃ Noon Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (EWF Galleries)

❂ 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Book Club Field Trip: Amistad Research Center

26

10

❃❖

2 p.m. Beyond the Blues Introductory Lecture (Stern Auditorium)

25

❁✖

1-5 p.m. Louisiana Iris Show (Sculpture Garden)

6 p.m. Walk-through: William Greiner Photographs (Templeman Galleries)

19

5:30 p.m. Grad Student Night at NOMA (Great Hall)

10 a.m. Opening: Beyond the Blues, SWEET Suite Louisiana, William Greiner

18

Wednesday

Tuesday

27

■❖

28

6 p.m. Listening Party with Quintron (Weisman Galleries and Sculpture Garden)

29

30 ❁ Sync Up Conference (Stern Auditorium)

❃ Noon Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (EWF Galleries)

❂ Noon-1 p.m. Book Club Discussion Group (Library)

24

Sync Up Conference (Stern Auditorium)


Monday

Sunday

Thursday

Wednesday

Tuesday

Saturday

Friday ❁

1

MAY 2010

Sync Up Conference (Stern Auditorium)

3

2

4

10

11

8

7

12

13

7 p.m. Faubourg Quartet (Stern Auditorium)

14

Noon Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (EWF Galleries)

4

15

22

11 a.m.-3 p.m. (drop-in) Family Art-Making Activity

17

18

✖❖

19

6 p.m. Sculpture Tour (Sculpture Garden)

20

6:30 p.m. Anyplace But Here (Longue Vue House and Gardens)

24

25

¶❖

26

27

31

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday 1

Wednesday

Thursday

2

3

Noon-1 p.m. Book Club Curatorial Program (Library)

21

The Therapist Exhibition Opens (Bay Gallery)

28

29

Noon Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (EWF Galleries)

6 p.m. Opening Reception: Swamp Tours (Weisman Galleries)

30

Noon Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (EWF Galleries) Noon-1 p.m. Book Club Discussion Group (Library)

6 p.m. Walk-through: SWEET Suite Louisiana (Templeman Galleries)

Film and Panel Discussion: Faubourg Treme (Stern Auditorium)

JUNE 2010

Noon Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (EWF Galleries)

Noon-1 p.m. Book Club: Meet the Author (Library)

■ 232 p.m.

Friday

Saturday

4

5

Noon Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (EWF Galleries)

❃❖ 6 p.m. Super Bowl Wager Walk-through

4❖

6-8 p.m. Community Art-Making Studio

4

7

8

✖❖

9

10

6-7 p.m. Horticultural Tour (Sculpture Garden)

1-4 p.m. Family Art-Making Activity

14

21

16

15

1-5 p.m. Beyond the Blues Symposium (Stern Auditorium)

27

❃❖

6 p.m. Super Bowl Wager Walk-through

2-4:30 p.m. Beyond the Blues Artists’ Panel Discussion (Stern Auditorium)

20

6

16

13

5

6 p.m. Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (EWF Galleries)

9

6

■❖

6 p.m. Film: Pretty Baby (Stern Auditorium)

22

11

17

18

❃❖

6 p.m. Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (EWF Galleries)

Noon Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (EWF Galleries)

❃❖

23

6 p.m. Gallery Talk: Swamp Tours (Weisman Galleries)

24

25

Noon Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (EWF Galleries)

❂ Noon-1 p.m. Book Club Discussion Group (Library)

28

29

30

12

Noon Walk-through: Beyond the Blues (EWF Galleries)

19

26


Post Office Box 19123 New Orleans, Louisiana 70179-0123

NON-PROFIT ORG. US POSTAGE PAID NEW ORLEANS PERMIT #108

AQAprilMayJune2010  

VOLUME XXXII ISSUE 2 NEW ORLEANS MUSEUM OF ART APRIL/MAY/JUNE 2010 BY MARGARET ROSE VENDRYES A benefit of membership with the New Orleans Mu...

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