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for Economic Development in New Orleans

ANNUAL IMPACT REPORT


PLACE R NEW ORLEANS BUS INESS PEOPLE E GROW II N F O R M AT T R AC T EQUITY 2017 IMPACT REPORT

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FROM OUR

THE HONORABLE MITCHELL J. LANDRIEU Mayor, City of New Orleans

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2017 IMPACT REPORT

“Since 2010, we have worked diligently to create access to real opportunities for all the residents of New Orleans to ensure everyone could benefit from the city’s growth. New Orleans continues to experience unprecedented success in attracting new businesses, fostering an environment for entrepreneurship, and creating opportunities for all of our residents. We have focused on attracting and growing specific industries as identified in our ProsperityNOLA strategy, such as bioinnovation, digital media, and advanced manufacturing, and our hard work is paying off. Since 2010 we have created over 20,000 new jobs. I commend the New Orleans Business Alliance for their commitment to being part of the team that is responsible for bringing DXC Technology to New Orleans. DXC will be opening a Digital Transformation Center, the biggest economic development win in the state’s history that will bring 2,000 jobs to our city. In 2017, we integrated the Network for Economic Opportunity into NOLABA to ensure the institutionalization of equity as a vital strategy for New Orleans’ ongoing economic competitiveness and growth, to continue to make sure that every resident of New Orleans can win. I commend the New Orleans Business Alliance for partnering with both the City and business community to create diverse opportunities for all New Orleanians.”

- THE HONORABLE MITCHELL J. LANDRIEU Mayor, City of New Orleans


LEADERSHIP 2017 was a year of tremendous progress for our collective economic futures in New Orleans. The New Orleans Business Alliance (NOLABA) was honored to be an important catalytic organization for achieving significant progress in creating enhanced economic security for more New Orleanians. Landmark business attraction wins in knowledge sector industries were announced. In software development, New Orleans opened her arms to the Digital Transformation Center for Fortune 250 Virginia-based DXC Technology; and in bioinnovation, Tennessee-based Provision Healthcare, in partnership with LCMC Health and LSU, selected our city for its Louisiana Proton Therapy Center, which will provide state-of-the-art cancer treatment to more of our friends and neighbors. In April, NOLABA joined a very exclusive group within the economic development community as it became one of fewer than 70 Accredited Economic Development Organizations (AEDOs) by the International Economic Development Council. Programmatically, we continued to build on the #WhyNOLA campaign launched in 2016 by creating the Economic Development Ambassadorship Program. Our Ambassadorship Program is equipping more and more New Orleanians with the information and tools to join us in telling the world that New Orleans is ready and open for business.

HENRY L. COAXUM, JR.

Chair, Board of Directors

Further, we amplified our work with small business technical assistance providers, financial intermediaries and small business owners, themselves. In the pages that follow, we invite you to read – but perhaps more importantly, see – the diverse faces of economic progress in our city. Not only visually and culturally arresting, that diversity is a competitive advantage that New Orleans has not always fully leveraged for her collective economic advancement. September 28 changed that. On September 28, led by inspired leadership from the Landrieu administration, NOLABA Board and New Orleans Workforce Development Board, the New Orleans City Council approved an agreement that will lead to the integration of The Network for Economic Opportunity, with its workforce development and placemaking capabilities, into NOLABA. Economic development only matters because people matter, and the upcoming integration will bring job seekers closer to job creators, our neighborhood commercial corridors nearer to the Central Business District, and the promise of economic progress closer to kitchen-table reality for more New Orleanians. While tremendous progress occurred, our work is unfinished and incomplete. With your support, we proceed into the future stronger and better positioned to help more people find dignity in work and realize the American dream through the creation of small businesses. Our future New Orleans-born Fortune 500 companies are not far in the distance. As always, we remain grateful for your continued support. With greater expectations for a brighter shared economic future,

Henry L. Coaxum, Jr.

Quentin L. Messer, Jr.

QUENTIN L. MESSER, JR. President & CEO

Please feel free to contact us at info@nolaba.org, 504.934.4500 or www.nolaba.org if you’d like to learn more about all the work we do to create a thriving, sustainable economic future for all New Orleanians. 2017 IMPACT REPORT

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 4 |

NOLABA’s approach to economic development is holistic. We strive every day to achieve equitable and inclusive economic growth for all New Orleanians by working to attract incoming business, grow our local workforce and small business ecosystem, and share information to connect people to opportunity.

2017 IMPACT REPORT

BUSINESS ATTRACTION

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DXC Technology Provision Healthcare’s Louisiana Proton Therapy Center New Orleans Health Innovators Site Selection Services Conferences

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

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Integration of The Network for Economic Opportunity 504ward Venture for America Talent & Workforce Symposium Online Resources Career Connections

SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Business Services Small Business Spotlight Series Small Business Symposium Mayoral and Council Forums

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COMMUNICATIONS

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Refining the New Orleans Business Brand Capturing Our Audiences WhyNOLA & National Messages NolaKNO Initiative & Local Messages NolaEDAP: Economic Development Ambassadorship Program Industry Events & Thought Leadership Investor Engagement Election Transition

ANNOUNCEMENTS & REPORTS 41

Accolades International Economic Development Council/AEDO Certification Board & Team Investors & Financial Statements

2017 IMPACT REPORT

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ATTRACT

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2017 IMPACT REPORT


WINNING FOR NEW ORLEANS BUSINESS ATTRACTION Business attraction is a critical component in bringing new investments that fuel our economy. NOLABA played a vital role in bringing increased business activity to New Orleans in 2017, including the biggest economic development announcement in state history and cutting-edge initiatives in bioinnovation.

2017 IMPACT REPORT

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DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION CENTER A FORTUNE 250-SIZED WIN

NOLABA helped secure the largest economic development deal in Louisiana history in November 2017, when Virginia-based DXC Technology chose New Orleans as the home for its Digital Transformation Center opening in early 2018. The historic business attraction win shows that NOLABA’s dedication to recruiting technology companies pays off. The project will create 2,000 direct jobs through the next five years and potentially more than 2,250 indirect jobs, for an annual payroll exceeding $133 million by 2025. To meet that workforce demand, the State of Louisiana will fund a $25 million higher education initiative to expand the number of degrees awarded in computer science, management and STEM-related studies. NOLABA helped integrate New Orleans education leaders into pitching the impact of technology in K-12 and higher education.

HIGHLIGHTING OUR ASSETS

DXC announced its New Orleans site as the Freeport McMoRan Building on Poydras Street across from the Mercedes-Benz Superdome. NOLABA facilitated meetings with the New Orleans Saints and New Orleans Pelicans to spotlight cultural assets, and was most involved in highlighting New Orleans’ competitive and talented tech workforce as DXC narrowed its options from 30 U.S. cities over a period of more than a year. DXC officials identified New Orleans as a “talent-laden, culturally diverse, high quality-of-life city” that would appeal to the technology professionals it will hire.

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2017 IMPACT REPORT

“This is a truly exciting opportunity for DXC,” said Mike Lawrie, DXC Chairman, President and CEO. “We look forward to establishing our local presence and, as a vital partner, contributing to the recognition of New Orleans and Louisiana as leading technology and growth centers.”

CONNECTING WITH NEXTOP

NOLABA connected DXC to another avenue for tech talent in the nonprofit organization NextOp, which links highperforming, middle-enlisted military veterans to industry careers. NextOp’s placements have a 78 percent higher retention rate than other placements, according to NextOp Louisiana Regional Manager Ben Armstrong. “NOLABA is a pioneer in Southern veteran talent development and placement,” Armstrong said. “Because of the action of (NOLABA President and CEO Quentin Messer) and the introduction of us to DXC, they are going to fundamentally change the veteran transition and how veterans get jobs all over the state.”

A FORECAST FOR IMPACT

As for the economic impact to Louisiana, the LSU Economics & Policy Research Group estimates that the DXC Technology project will result in $64.3 million in new state taxes, $868.4 million in new Louisiana earnings and a total economic output of $3.2 billion through 2025. “DXC’s decision to make this significant strategic investment in New Orleans not only affirms the vibrancy of the local technology ecosystem but also demonstrates New Orleans’ increasing attractiveness for large-scale financial and human capital investment,” Messer said.


WELCOMING HEALTHCARE INVESTMENT

New Orleans took another step toward becoming a healthcare destination in April, when Provision Healthcare announced its decision to build a state-of-the-art proton therapy center in the city’s biomedical corridor to fight cancer. Thanks to the collaboration and support of NOLABA and other economic development allies, Provision Healthcare and its partners are making a $100 million capital investment to build the 30,000-square-foot Louisiana Proton Therapy Center.

A SPECIAL BENEFIT

Proton therapy is most effective against solid, well-defined tumors, and only two dozen proton therapy centers currently exist in the U.S. The Louisiana Proton Therapy Center will be housed on the University Medical Center campus on Canal Street and is scheduled to open in late 2019 or 2020. New Orleans officials believe that having cutting-edge technology known to produce far fewer side effects than conventional radiation treatments will provide both healthcare and economic benefits for the city.

GREAT EXPECTATIONS

ATTRACTING CHANGE-MAKERS

LOUISIANA PROTON THERAPY CENTER

The project will create 60 new direct jobs with an average annual salary of $100,000, plus benefits. Louisiana Economic Development estimates 63 new indirect jobs will also result, for a total of more than 120 new jobs in the New Orleans area. “This project underscores the unique potential of the University Medical Center, LSU Health Sciences Center, and other local research institutions and healthcare providers to spur bio-related economic growth in New Orleans and throughout the region,” said NOLABA President and CEO Quentin Messer, Jr. “New Orleans’ unparalleled, world-class research innovation, hospitality and teamwork made this project a reality.”

2017 IMPACT REPORT

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NEW ORLEANS HEALTH INNOVATORS CHALLENGE

A COMMITMENT TO INNOVATION 10 |

2017 IMPACT REPORT

BUILDING A DIGITAL HEALTH FOOTPRINT

NOLABA expanded the impact of its BioInnovation work stream by introducing the New Orleans Health Innovators Challenge (NOLAHI) in 2017. NOLAHI is a signature initiative designed to accelerate digital health business activity in New Orleans and improve health outcomes for the city’s residents. By applying to the NOLAHI Challenge, high-growth startups and entrepreneurs from around the country put themselves in the running to connect with New Orleans’ leading local healthcare stakeholders, form pilot partnerships and win cash or in-kind prizes to propel their solutions. NOLABA partnered with MedStartr, a national leader in enabling healthcare crowd challenges, to host NOLAHI’s digital platform, and brought prominent healthcare leaders to the table to propose Challenge Statements addressing critical healthcare issues.

Brought to you by:

CHALLENGE

INNOVATE

CONNECT

WIN

IMPACT

THANK YOU TO THE FOLLOWING NOLA HEALTH INNOVATORS PARTNERS:


PARTNERS AND CHALLENGE STATEMENTS

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana and Ochsner Health System stepped forward as the title partners and jointly posed the Diabetes Care Challenge. This Challenge Statement asked for a new digital solution to help diabetic patients with routine aspects of their care. Diabetes is an often deadly disease in Louisiana, which has the fifth-highest rate of diabetes in the nation. “Innovation is part of our mission, and we believe in the power of innovation, entrepreneurship and new thinking to lead to better health outcomes in our communities,” said Aimee Quirk, CEO of innovationOchsner. Tulane Health System and Lafayette General Foundation also supported NOLAHI by posing Challenge Statements on patient navigation and data interoperability, respectively. Financial partners in the inaugural Challenge included Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, Capital One and LookFar. Stone Pigman is also providing free legal consulting for NOLAHI winners, and attorneys contributed a four-part blog series to nolaba.org offering legal advice for health tech startups. The Shop, Propeller, Launch Pad and The Warehouse donated free co-working space, and the New Orleans BioInnovation Center volunteered to host practice pitch sessions for the finalists.

LAUNCHING THE CHALLENGE

The health systems, NOLAHI partners and community members came together to launch NOLAHI at the New Orleans Jazz Market on Nov. 16, 2017. NOLABA, the City of New Orleans, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana and Ochsner Health System kicked off the day with a press conference announcing their commitment to healthcare innovation and formally opening applications at nolahi.org. NOLABA brought healthcare leaders, entrepreneurs, concerned citizens and others in a unified online community hosted by MedStartr with the ultimate goal of revolutionizing healthcare in New Orleans. Together, members spread the word of this groundbreaking initiative. The application process lasted two months and garnered 34 applications for the three challenges.

THE FINALE

NOLAHI will continue in 2018 when judges from around the country will evaluate the applications, and finalists will pitch during the 2018 New Orleans Entrepreneur Week.

NEW HIRE:

SALLY LINDSAY

Sally arrived at NOLABA in August 2017 as part of the nationwide Venture for America fellowship program that places recent college graduates in cities with emerging entrepreneurial ecosystems. As a manager of business development and strategy, the Columbia graduate is charged with assisting NOLABA’s BioInnovation efforts, particularly NOLAHI. “I hope during my years at NOLABA I can help expand the promise and potential of the healthcare industry by connecting residents with high-quality jobs and improving health outcomes for our community,” Sally said. “To be placed at NOLABA was truly a dream come true.”

NewOrleansBioInnovationCenter 2017 IMPACT REPORT

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INSIDER INSIGHTS

SITE SELECTION SERVICES NOLABA is uniquely positioned to provide insight into New Orleans’ neighborhoods and demographics in order to help businesses capitalize on growth opportunities. Whether the objective is starting, expanding or relocating, our understanding of the city’s landscape is instrumental to connect you with resources to pinpoint your best options. We go above and beyond with a hands-on approach. NOLABA’s real-time online site selection tools provide custom reports and information for incoming site selectors, and our asset tours highlight key areas of growth and development unique to New Orleans. For example, New Orleans East is the only area in New Orleans offering large tracts of undeveloped land, providing a blank canvas for expansion. In 2017 NOLABA illustrated in a new map the industrial and commercial opportunities in the area, along with general planning districts, parks, nature preserves and wetlands. The map is published as both a print and digital resource to educate business prospects. Stennis Space Center = 44 mi.

NEW ORLEANS EAST INDUSTRIAL OPPORTUNITIES

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Located on an 832-acre campus, the Michoud Assembly Facility is a world-class, multi-tenant facility specializing in largescale aerospace manufacturing. Michoud is owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and is now home to a variety of companies from the commercial and government sectors. Tenants share access to one of the world’s largest indoor manufacturing facilities, stateof-the-art equipment, and an extensive selection of shared services.

• High-level security • Blade Dynamics • Full services and and Wetlands • Boeing support available • Lockheed Martin • Advanced NASA• NASA manufacturing • Textron Systems equipment for lease • USDA • Low utility rates Port of New Orleans • On-site medical clinic and fitness New Orleans Regional center

The Port of New Orleans leases over 1,000 acres of properties under long- and short-term

• Direct water and rail access • Foreign-Trade Zone

• Dupuy Storage & Forwarding • New Orleans Cold

• Basic materials handling • Cement handling • Manufacturing & packaging

convenient access to the Interstate Highway System, and most feature access to waterways and the New Orleans Public Belt Railroad, which connects the Port to all six Class I railroads operating in the United States.

bulk and container terminals

• SSA Marine • TCI Packaging

• Shipbuilding & repair • Steel distribution • Truck & container depots • Warehouse & distribution

Industrial Area

Greenfield and existing buildings are available in privately owned industrial areas of New Orleans East. Parcel sizes range from 1 to 100 acres.

• Proximity to transportation, Port facilities and NASA • Access to workforce, housing, public services

• Agrico Sales • Air Products • BlueLinx • Boh Bros. Construction • Entergy • Folgers Coffee • Reily Foods • UPS

• Industrial storage • Manufacturing • Transportation • Warehousing

Neighborhood Commercial/ Retail

Retail opportunities at all levels exist in the commercial areas of New Orleans East. Businesses enjoy high visibility along I-10 and I-510 for local residents, commuters and tourists. Multiple large sites are available.

• Interstate access • 80,000+ residents • Greenfield opportunities exist

• CVS • The Home Depot • Honda • Lowe’s • Nissan • Toyota • Walgreens • Walmart • Wyndham Garden

• Auto sales & service • Hospitality • Retail • Services

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2017 IMPACT REPORT

Parks, Nature Preserves

Business Park

KEY INDUSTRIES • Advanced manufacturing • Calibration measurement • Composite fabrication • Engineering & tooling design • Friction stir welding • Heat treatment • Machining • Mechanical & chemical testing • Spray booths • Thermal protection application • Tooling modifications • Transport & lifts

This map is for illustrative purposesagreements. only. ForAllmore detailed zoning, visit property.nola.gov. properties featureinformation • Access to on break Storage & Warehouse • Refrigerated warehousing

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12/19/17 3:20 PM

GENERAL PLANNING DISTRICTS Large, open parcels of undeveloped land in both high-traffic areas and secluded locations. All uses require city approval. EXAMPLE

DESCRIPTION

I-510 Corridor (former site of Jazzland and Six Flags New Orleans)

Greenfield opportunities exist along I-10 and I-510. Key industries include retail, hospitality, light industry and transportation.

Undeveloped Wetlands

These areas include large tracts of secluded, undeveloped wetlands.

Undeveloped Adjacent Small Parcels

This is a large area of undeveloped sites with different owners.

PROTECTED ZONES - Undevelopable Land - Parks, Nature Preserves and Wetlands - Residential Zones - Municipal Facilities

935 Gravier Street, Suite 2020 New Orleans, LA 70112 504.934.4500 • www.nolaba.org businessdevelopment@nolaba.org

12/19/17 3:20 PM


CONFERENCE PRESENCE Collision returned to New Orleans for a second straight year in 2017. Dubbed “America’s fastest-growing tech conference” by Forbes, Collision enjoyed an estimated 20,000-guest attendance at the Morial Convention Center – an increase of more than 60 percent from 2016. NOLABA is on a national stage every year at industry-specific conferences, gaining high visibility with business leaders and networking with peers across the country. Here are examples of how NOLABA represented New Orleans in 2017.

More than 4,500 tech companies descended on New Orleans from more than 100 countries May 2-4. NOLABA teamed up with local, regional and state economic development partners to staff a booth on the Convention Center floor and also co-hosted a Sunset Summit at the Rusty Nail to welcome attendees on the first night of the conference.

RECon 2017 marked another milestone in NOLABA’s presence at the world’s largest retail real estate conference, produced by the International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC) in May.

NOLABA’s booth highlighted impressive facts about New Orleans’ growing tech community and business friendliness, and more than 1,100 Collision attendees enjoyed the Sunset Summit – more than double 2016’s head count.

NOLABA’s annual booth moved out of its former location in the far back corner of the Las Vegas Convention Center’s Central Hall into an easily accessible and highly visible site in North Hall. The higher walls and larger graphics delivered a booth with a much more substantial feel as an estimated 37,000 attendees gathered in Las Vegas – about a 2.7 percent increase from 2016. Momentum at RECon first started to build in 2013 and 2014 when NOLABA could cite deals like Costco, H&M and Tiffany & Co., and the redevelopment of The Outlet Collection at Riverwalk. Those early successes laid the groundwork for continued retail expansion, and retailers like True Religion, M•A•C Cosmetics and Sephora have now opened successful locations in New Orleans.

The continued success of Collision is a true testament to the momentum that continues to move New Orleans’ homegrown and new tech companies forward, as well as the successful collaboration between NOLABA and its economic development partners. Both of these forces are combining to shine a national and international spotlight on New Orleans as a growing tech hub.

OTHER CONFERENCE ATTENDANCE AND PARTICIPATION:

In 2017, NOLABA’s partners from the Mayor’s Office of Economic Development, Downtown Development District and Algiers Development District, and City Council Members James Gray (District E) and Nadine Ramsey (District C) attended prearranged meetings at RECon. As technology continues to influence consumers’ purchasing preferences, NOLABA continues to educate national, regional and local retailers about exceptional opportunities for growth in all neighborhoods of Orleans Parish.

...AND MANY MORE 2017 IMPACT REPORT

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2017 IMPACT REPORT


CULTIVATING & RETAINING TALENT WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT

A healthy economy demands a diverse and skilled workforce to support and grow local business and attract incoming investments. NOLABA took big steps forward in 2017 in attracting highly skilled workers, retaining talent and connecting the local community to opportunity.

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A UNIFIED MISSION

INTEGRATION OF THE NETWORK FOR ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY BUILDING ON A STRONG FOUNDATION

Since its inception in 2010, NOLABA has been an economic development catalyst for the city of New Orleans, creating a supportive, business-friendly environment for existing business and industry, and for the attraction of new businesses to the city. As we continue to grow and evolve, we realize the importance of a holistic approach to economic development, and work tirelessly to expand our programmatic work to reach even more people, in more ways. “We believed, historically, that a rising tide raised all boats. Then, we looked ashore and realized that there were many that did not have boats,” said NOLABA Board Chair Henry Coaxum, Jr. “Diversity can be and must be our strength if we want to truly compete nationally and internationally.”

A POWERFUL PARTNERSHIP

On Sept. 28, 2017, NOLABA officially became New Orleans’ single point of entry for business attraction, retention and workforce development when the City Council approved a three-year cooperative endeavor agreement to enact a new business model for economic development that is business-friendly, people-centered and place-based, by joining forces between NOLABA and The Network for Economic Opportunity. The Network was a NOLABA partner organization that provided New Orleans residents and small businesses with the education, training and relationships to help them achieve their goals and build wealth. Now, together as the new NOLABA, programming is expanding to align with equitable growth strategies as we work to achieve economic prosperity for all New Orleanians. “I am most proud that this plan is not a plan that came from government employees or NOLABA staff, but intentionally engaged job seekers, small businesses, local training providers, economic development stakeholders, developers, funders and advocates,” said Ashleigh Gardere, former adviser to Mayor Mitch Landrieu and executive director of The Network. “This new model is the community’s statement that our collective efforts are creating change in the lives of real people.”

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2017 IMPACT REPORT


A NEW MODEL BUSINESS-FRIENDLY

The new business model builds on the organization’s experience, adding real estate development expertise to the portfolio of tools supporting business attraction and industry growth. A business-friendly NOLABA will also convene and institutionalize a small business ecosystem to provide support to technical assistance providers and entrepreneur development organizations. This results in a more inclusive “deal flow” that small businesses and entrepreneurs need to grow and prosper.

PEOPLE-CENTERED

The new NOLABA values the talent of all citizens as a key driver of economic growth. The integration of workforce development strategies into the organization better ensures employer access to a skilled and reliable workforce, along with providing job seekers access to career pathways that create family-supporting wages. In the new business model, NOLABA connects employers with job seekers, targeting high-growth, high-demand industry sectors with career paths.

PLACE-BASED

NOLABA’s new place-based program combines business and industry growth, real estate development, economic development incentive administration and small business development expertise for deployment to support development in New Orleans’ neighborhood commercial corridors.

THINKING GLOBALLY

New Orleans is competing in a global market where capital is nimble, flexible and mobile. Talent and financial investment are drawn to cities that are poised to produce profitability and growth. In this new global economy, while investors are looking for a return on their investment, there is an increasing demand for the double bottom line – the ability to do well and do good – in the capital marketplace. The new NOLABA business model provides a platform for innovation and gives business and industry leaders, investors, innovators, social entrepreneurs, financial institutions and local government a place to address issues of equity and sustainability using market-based approaches. “The new NOLABA builds upon the work that transformed it into one of fewer than 70 accredited economic development organizations in the world,” said NOLABA President and CEO Quentin Messer, Jr. “Together, NOLABA and The Network have launched a new brighter chapter for NOLABA that will enable more New Orleanians to win for themselves, their families, their neighborhoods and our great city.”

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WARD

ENGAGING 2017

BRAND GUIDE

Withisthe new Logo, we’ve streamlined our look so that on modern platforms. The core 504ward a robust talent retention initiative housed at it reads wellNOLA BOUND WEBINAR brand is still the clever name and of course the arrow—which points in the direction New Orleans is NOLABA since 2016. Founded by Leslie Jacobs now in ofitsthe “4”. The going 4ward. It is now placed discreetly on and the tail end arrow will be a reoccurring 504ward also debuted the NOLA BOUND webinar in design element that we will playfully use on fliers, banners, mailers, etc. when appropriate. 10th year, 504ward has encouraged young professionals to November 2017 to connect young professionals who want put down roots in New Orleans through twice-weekly emails Typefaces: to move back to New Orleans with the job opportunities that highlight opportunities for civic and social engagement, that abound in the city’s legacy and emerging industries. 1.) Bebas Kai: The logo is created in this font. When possible, use this font for writing the word career“504ward”. advancement and leadership development. and GNO, Inc. partnered to deliver the webinar, It is the best font for headers or short messages large NOLABA printing formats.

which attracted 85 participants. Half were from outside

2.) Filmotype Prima: The phrase “New Orleans Calling” and “504ward.com” is written in this font. When DINE AROUND the area, including cities such as Chicago, Dallas, Houston, possible use this font for subordinate copy.

The Dine Around has served as a signature event since the New York, Seattle and Los Angeles. The webinar will occur 3.) HELVETICA: For all long form copy. This is the default typeface when the other two are nonprofit was founded in 2008, and in 2017 it increased in unavailable. When using Helvetica to write “504ward” outside the twice logo- make “ward” is and fall. each sure year that in the spring always lowercase and there is no space between the “4” and the “W”—so that it reads as one word, both attendance and enthusiasm. 504ward.

Colors: On Oct. 19, 2017, 450 people gathered across the city for a night1.)of“504ward” dinner, conversations and new connections at Red 2.) Pure White the homes of 40 of New Orleans’ most prominent business 3.) Charcoal gray and civic leaders. Attendance increased by 18 percent, and The 504ward “Red”gave can bethe identified: 70 percent of people night 5 stars (up from 63 percent in 2016). Hex Code: #CF2030 CMYK: C:12%, M:100%, Y:90%, K:3% RGB: R:207, G:32, B:48

“The Dine Around is just one of many programs through which The 504ward connect rising leaders with 504wardseeks “Gray”tocan be identified: Hex Code:#444444 opportunities to make an impact across the region,” said 504ward Executive Director Mary Matthews. “The relationships built benefit not only the young professionals, but also the hosts, who get access to a new network of exciting young talent.”

NOLA MADE

NOLABA and GNO, Inc. partnered with 504ward to hold the second annual NOLA MADE on Nov. 24, 2017, part of 504ward’s “expat re-engagement strategy.” More than 300 young professionals attended the Black Friday event to get a glimpse of the professional opportunities in the city they once called home, while also shopping local for the holidays. New Orleans tech company Acrew also came on board to support a virtual career fair as part of NOLA MADE, where job seekers could apply for jobs by submitting firstimpression videos. Participating companies included Domain Companies, Globalstar, InspireNOLA Charter Schools, Lucid, Torsh and Whitney Bank. NOLA MADE’s intentionality is emblematic of a laser focus in New Orleans on becoming more aggressive about attracting and retaining human capital. “Today, we recognize that we must earn the talents of our children,” said NOLABA President and CEO Quentin Messer. “We must give them a reason to bring their talents home to New Orleans – because your talents mean more here.”

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2017 IMPACT REPORT


YOUNG TALENT VENTURE FOR AMERICA NOLABA participated for the first time as an employer in the Venture for America (VFA) fellowship program in 2017. VFA places highly talented recent college graduates at organizations in cities with emerging entrepreneurial ecosystems for two-year periods. NOLABA is hosting two VFA Fellows from 2017 to 2019: Thomas Krumins (Vanderbilt) and Sally Lindsay (Columbia), who are dedicated to supporting NOLABA’s business development and workforce development projects. Currently, New Orleans hosts 24 fellows at 15 companies, and nearly 30 alumni have chosen to stay in New Orleans after their fellowships. To show its continued commitment to the city, VFA held its first New Orleans Selection Day in January 2018, introducing aspiring entrepreneurs to many of the city’s small business leaders. “I’ve always been driven by the desire to create something…to build a business from the ground up and help my community, and I’m lucky to have that opportunity here in New Orleans,” Krumins said. “From the moment I arrived, I knew I was home.” Lindsay agrees, saying her placement at NOLABA was a dream. She spearheaded the New Orleans Health Innovators Challenge launch in 2017. “I still have a lot to learn and many complexities to grapple with, but working with the New Orleans community has been incredible,” Lindsay said. “Working to develop economic opportunities in the health and bioinnovation sectors keeps me on my toes. Conversations I have on the weekends seep into discussions about strategy. Development projects and community stakeholders I learn about at work resurface in the built environment as I bike through the city. Everywhere, life and work thread themselves together in beautifully productive ways.”

NEW HIRE:

THOMAS KRUMINS

Thomas arrived at NOLABA in September 2017 as part of the nationwide Venture for America fellowship program that places recent college graduates in cities with emerging entrepreneurial ecosystems. As a manager of business development and strategy, the Vanderbilt graduate is charged with leading NOLABA’s partnership with the City of New Orleans on a new initiative to place formerly incarcerated individuals into transitional employment opportunities. “I’m truly humbled to serve the wonderful people of this city and help them seize the opportunity to re-start their lives,” Thomas said. “Each and every day in New Orleans, I’m inspired by the thought that no matter the mistakes of our past, the hardships and struggles, the heartbreak and loss, we can always find a way to build a better future for ourselves, our families, and our city.”

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INVESTING IN TALENT & WORKFORCE SYMPOSIUM NOLABA raised awareness and fostered discussion of talent attraction and retention strategies in New Orleans at the inaugural “Winning in the Talent Marketplace” symposium on Sept. 28, 2017. Held at the Homer L. Hitt Alumni and Visitors Center at UNO, NOLABA’s symposium included a robust agenda of renowned talent specialists who presented and led discussions with the audience of 100 industry professionals. Talent attraction, development and retention are drivers of economic development because they contribute to business recruiting, innovation and entrepreneurship. Headline speakers included Linda Brenner and Tom McGuire, founders of Atlanta-based firm Talent Growth Advisors, who explained the value of hiring and retaining top talent. They also led a CEO Roundtable called “Choices that Underpin Breakthrough Strategies to Attract and Retain Talent” after the symposium that about 20 NOLABA stakeholders attended. Keeping New Orleans on the track toward growth and prosperity requires a focus on talent, because the economy can’t grow without skilled workers to fill available jobs. NOLABA’s lineup of speakers highlighted an array of talent-related issues, from creating a local talent pipeline to exploring workforce training programs to improving employee engagement by helping working parents. 504ward Executive Director Mary Matthews was the emcee of the meeting. The symposium also introduced the social media hashtag #NolaKNO to promote NOLABA as the connector to resources that will increase “knowledge network opportunities” for all New Orleanians to stay informed.

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OUR WORKFORCE ONLINE RESOURCES NOLABA is committed to connecting job seekers and employers in order to grow New Orleans’ workforce. In 2017 NOLABA developed a new webpage that compiles talent and workforce initiatives, higher education assets and dynamic content highlighting talent-related news stories and NOLABA staff-generated articles. This is an ongoing effort to provide resources and connect the New Orleans community to opportunities.

CAREER CONNECTIONS Combining job opportunities with a great talent pipeline is the key to economic growth. In October 2017, NOLABA launched the Career Connections series with the objective to retain local talent by facilitating connections with career advancement professionals, other talent and hiring organizations, and by creating strong cultural ties to New Orleans. The two sessions of 2017 were led by Amy Landry, founder of Fuel Success Academy, a consulting firm with a passion for professional development and workforce training. Together with special guests Michelle Jackson (PR Solutions LLC of Louisiana) and Crystal McDonald (Acrew), Landry and NOLABA’s VP, Program Development and Strategy Alejandra Guzman provided a high-level overview of the economic assets and resources New Orleans offers to families and professionals. The October and November sessions drew a combined 60 attendees. “We understand moving to a new city can be intimidating,” said Guzman. “We want to help people grow roots here immediately and learn about career avenues, so they can love New Orleans as a place to live and work as much as we do.” NOLABA, 504ward, and GNO, Inc. will continue Career Connections in 2018 on the last Friday of every month. Sessions will consist of an informal coffee hour to inform attendees about opportunities for professional development and career advancement in New Orleans.

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GROWING THE NEXT GREAT COMPANIES SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Support for existing local businesses ensures all residents can thrive and prosper here. NOLABA further demonstrated its commitment to helping New Orleans’ small businesses succeed by introducing new services and resources in 2017.

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SMALL BUSINESS SERVICES Small businesses are the driving force of the New Orleans economy and provide necessary resources for local residents. In 2017, NOLABA continued to show its commitment to efforts that aid our small business owners in growing and expanding their ventures through our Small Business Ecosystem Development work stream.

ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS

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NOLABA hosted Small Business Roundtable discussions in 2017 with small business owners and business assistance partners to gather information that has been instrumental in identifying critical gaps in the local small business ecosystem. Our team has amassed vital research and discerned best practices to develop solutions to fill those gaps. “The roundtables were powerful and intense,” said Lynnette White-Colin, NOLABA Vice President of Small Business Ecosystem Development. “Minority business owners engaged in frank dialogue about their difficulties, and technical assistance providers took a deep dive into structural, societal and policy issues. The roundtables provided the comprehensive discussions needed to develop meaningful, systemic changes in our ecosystem, changes that will break down barriers to growth for businesses owned by people of color and women.”

ONLINE PROVIDER DATABASE

In July 2017, NOLABA debuted a hub on nolaba.org dedicated to small business information. The set of webpages directs New Orleans-area small businesses to distinct application sites to apply for business certifications, find city services, and identify local business assistance and finance providers to help them grow. Businesses can easily navigate and connect to the diverse services available, and see an inclusive calendar of upcoming events in the business and entrepreneurial community. The homepage also includes a row of dynamic content featuring local small business success stories.


CONNECTING TO RESOURCES

NOLABA assisted emerging business owners with accessing the appropriate local resources that facilitate capacity-building, growth and access to opportunities for their ventures. Wayne Encalarde – a small business owner himself – wrote an article for nolaba.org outlining the process for Disadvantaged Business certification. “The various DBE programs are not designed to give smaller firms a competitive advantage, but instead to foster a more equitable and inclusive distribution of public procurement opportunities,” he wrote. “And the kind of DBE certification required for your business will depend on the source of the funding for the procurement opportunity.” NOLABA also works to connect our local businesses to these resources by directing more messaging toward local audiences to increase awareness of opportunities that can fuel their economic success. In addition to the enhanced online resource pages for small businesses and talent & workforce, NOLABA began publishing informative content through the NolaKNO initiative and success stories of businesses that have tapped into the resources that New Orleans’ local assistance providers offer.

SHARING SUCCESS STORIES

In our Small Business spotlight series, we share interviews with New Orleans business owners who have utilized the city’s small business ecosystem to connect to resources and support they need to achieve economic prosperity.

NEW HIRE:

WAYNE ENCALARDE, JR.

NOLABA welcomed Wayne to the staff as a small business ecosystem development manager in 2017. He previously worked at the Urban League of Louisiana as a business advisor for the Women’s Business Resource Center and the Contractor’s Resource Center. Wayne works directly with Vice President Lynnette White-Colin to research and develop strategies for connecting small business owners with assistance providers to meet their growth needs, especially minority and women-owned businesses. “Small business is one of the pillars that built New Orleans,” Wayne said. “My goal is to help foster a more robust and productive ecosystem because when small businesses are successful the community grows. Entrepreneurship is the gateway to prosperity.”

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PROVIDING FORUMS SMALL BUSINESS SYMPOSIUM NOLABA researches comprehensive data and constantly seeks best practices and innovative strategies from around the country that support growth and increase economic opportunity for local small businesses, in addition to aiding in corridor revitalization efforts in high impact neighborhoods. On July 20, 2017, NOLABA welcomed leaders from Benefit Chicago, Memphis Economic Development Growth Engine (EDGE) and Epicenter Memphis. During this comprehensive symposium that addressed methods and impact of invoking and utilizing public investment for small business incentives, the group discussed investment strategies for enterprises owned by people of color and women. The symposium “Raising Awareness: Urban Innovations for Equity” was aimed at political leaders and candidates, city administrators and other small business stakeholders. Throughout the day, national influencers delivered inspiring stories and outlined mechanisms for developing investment capital and strategies to deploy it as monetary incentives for minority business owners. The keynote speaker was William Towns, CEO of Benefit Chicago – a $100 million impact investment fund targeting the social enterprise sector in Chicago through diverse funding mechanisms. In addition to the funding donated from large national foundations, the Benefit Chicago fund accepts donations as small as $10 from private citizens throughout Chicago who are interested in growing the economy in some of Chicago’s poorest neighborhoods. Memphis EDGE created a capital impact fund expressly targeted toward black-owned enterprises in the city of Memphis and Shelby County. EDGE’s investment fund is largely built from fees assessed on sizeable incentives awarded to Memphis’ larger businesses. The investments are provided to small businesses in the form of low-interest loans and/or grants that ultimately help business owners attract more substantial mainstream funding that facilitates growth in their organizations. Public and private investments like those being made in Memphis and Chicago can facilitate critical incentives that build solid infrastructure in emerging businesses. Coupling those incentives with inclusive economic opportunity for small business owners in New Orleans will foster a more robust economy for the entire city.

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FOR CHANGE MAYORAL AND COUNCIL FORUMS NOLABA steered the conversation among New Orleans’ mayoral and city council at-large candidates about small business and entrepreneurship by hosting two forums at the Ashé Power House Theater on Oct. 5, 2017. New Orleans news icon Camille Whitworth moderated both forums. All four major mayoral candidates attended, including councilmember LaToya Cantrell, former judges Michael Bagneris and Desiree Charbonnet, and businessman Troy Henry. Kenneth Cutno, state representative Helena Moreno and councilmember Jason Rogers Williams were the council at-large participants. “The forums were substantive and enabled the candidates and attendees to engage in a meaningful exchange about the critical issues of accelerating the development of the local entrepreneurial ecosystem, small business growth and development, and opportunities to increase inclusivity for women and people of color in the building of wealth locally,” said NOLABA President and CEO Quentin Messer, Jr. NOLABA engaged several of our partner organizations to help formulate questions for the candidates.

THANK YOU TO THE FOLLOWING PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS:

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INFORM

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EMPOWERING ADVOCATES FOR NEW ORLEANS’ ECONOMY COMMUNICATIONS Awareness is key to ensure all available information, assets, resources and opportunities have the maximum positive impact on our economy. In 2017 NOLABA utilized attraction-based and growth-based messaging to tell New Orleans’ story and capture our audiences, while also working diligently to keep open lines of communication with city officials, investors and other ambassadors for our city.


REFINING OUR BRAND

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Developing a clear and consistent brand is essential to communicating with a unified voice. Our brand must tell our story in a way that seamlessly ties the core principles of economic development, the assets that make New Orleans a great city in which to do business, and the work NOLABA is doing to maximize those assets and facilitate economic growth.

STREAMLINING OUR LOOK

In 2017, the organization embraced the equity that has grown in “NOLABA” as shorthand for “The New Orleans Business Alliance” by updating its logo to reflect the boldness of its moniker. Along with the new logo came brand standards in design to help solidify the look across all mediums and materials, and to speak in a professional, progressive and authoritative voice.

EXPANDING DYNAMIC CONTENT

An important way to live our brand was to become premier providers of timely and relevant information. We made updates to our website to put dynamic content front and center, making it a one-stop shop for the latest in economic development in New Orleans, and optimized the content for multiple digital channels.


CAPTURING OUR AUDIENCES Another primary focus of NOLABA’s marketing team was to identify ideal audiences and reach them with the most relevant messaging. By defining clear intended audiences from each of NOLABA’s work streams, the team segmented and directed its marketing to specific groups, discovering new opportunities like attendance at conferences and within organizations for a direct personal approach. The team developed digital advertising campaigns in 2017 with ads that targeted specific audiences based on business initiatives and behavioral drivers, and sought the best opportunities for engagement. The ads exceeded industry standards for click-through rate and interaction.

TOP PERFORMING DIGITAL POSTS:

NEW HIRE:

RACHEL WHITTAKER

Rachel joined NOLABA as a part-time marketing associate in 2016 before a promotion to full-time marketing and communications manager in April 2017. She works to tell the story of NOLABA as the authority on economic development in New Orleans, with three pillars of business friendliness, talent and workforce, and quality of place as the framework for all programs and events. “I enjoy communicating the importance of economic growth to New Orleanians across a variety of platforms at NOLABA,” Rachel said. “The message that economic development matters only to the extent that people matter is a notion I will carry with me throughout my career.”

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NATIONAL, ATTRACTION-BASED MESSAGING In order to position New Orleans as a great American city for business, we must tell the story of our economic opportunity on a national stage. NOLABA aims to celebrate the culture that makes New Orleans a great place to visit and tie that asset to the business advantages and economic drivers that attract financial and human capital.

In 2017 NOLABA evolved its WhyNOLA campaign to position New Orleans as the ideal intersection of commerce and culture by collaborating with the New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corporation on a series of videos. The videos combine the city’s beauty and the authenticity that tourists love with the stories of how companies and entrepreneurs have built thriving businesses by taking advantage of the resources in New Orleans. By sharing personal success stories from citizens across a variety of industries, the campaign appealed to the many types of businesses NOLABA seeks to attract to the city.


LOCAL, GROWTH-BASED MESSAGING

I MOVED TO NEW ORLEANS TO OPEN MY BUSINESS BECAUSE I BELIEVE DEEPLY IN THIS SPECIAL CITY. NOLABA’S AMBASSADORSHIP PROGRAM GAVE ME THE TOOLS TO HELP TELL OTHERS WHY THEY SHOULD LOCATE THEIR VENTURES HERE, TOO. -JODI JORDAN,

2017 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AMBASSADOR

NOLABA also recognizes the importance of growing local businesses, and works to connect them to the resources and opportunities in the city that can fuel their economic success. In 2017 we made a conscious effort to direct more messaging toward local audiences to increase awareness of the great things happening in New Orleans, the opportunities available to them, and the impact of economic development within our community. TALENT IS IMPORTANT for economic development because the better equipped our community is to attract and retain talent, the better we’ll fare in attracting and retaining businesses. Some of New Orleans’ talent-related pain points are structural, but we can tackle others through programmatic work that you’ll find in these pages.

Talent is increasingly being recognized as a DRIVER OF

PAUL HELTON serves as Executive Director of the INSPIRING TOstateLEARN nation’s leading workforce training program, LED FastStart®. A founding

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT because of its contribution to business recruiting, innovation and entrepreneurship.

member of the FastStart management team, Helton has served as Director of

Putting New Orleans on the track toward growth and prosperity requires a focus on talent. Let’s keep the conversation going around the challenges and opportunities to attract and retain talent in New Orleans.

New Orleans Business Alliance @NewOrleansBA New Orleans Business Alliance

NEW ORLEANS TALENT PROGRAMS

Putting New Orleans on the track toward

A specific goaltheinprogram 2017since wasearly to 2009 inspire the city’s residents to get2017. informed and reach a deeper growth and prosperity requires a focus and became Executive Director in March on talent. Let’s keep the conversation going understanding ofNavy economic development New Orleans, to connect that desire with the A U.S. veteran, Helton served as a seniorin maintenance technicianand for commuaround the challenges and opportunities nications systems and a Master Training Specialist for the nation’s nuclear submamany events and programming opportunities thatforexist. rine fleet. In 2002, Helton became training coordinator Georgia’s Quick Start to attract and retain talent in New Orleans. Our goal is to develop a

HOLISTIC APPROACH that will

help us attract highly skilled workers, retain talent across the board and connect hard-to-hire populations with job opportunities.

program, managing and administering all aspects of training for 62 client projects through 2007. Prior to joining LED FastStart in 2009, Helton served as director of economic development for North Metro Technical College (now Chattahoochee Technical College) near Atlanta. Throughout his career, Helton has cultivated productive relationships with local and regional economic development officials, as well as the managers and executives of client companies. He is the incoming president of the National Association of Industry Specific Training Directors.

New Orleans Business Alliance

NOLABA is committed to keeping you informed. Stay in the #NolaKNO.

@NewOrleansBA NOLABA.ORG

935 Gravier Street, Suite 2020 • New Orleans, LA 70112 504.934.4500 • www.nolaba.org

New Orleans Business Alliance The marketing team introduced the NolaKNO initiative, which stands for “Knowledge Network @LEDFastStart Opportunities” and encompasses all content and endeavors that present opportunities to grow your knowledge via NOLABA’s network of information, people, events and resources. The hashtag was used to mark all content that could help you “stay in the NolaKNO,” and L. MESSER, JR. was selected to lead aimed to build awareness QUENTIN surrounding the following: the New Orleans Business Alliance in July 2015, having spent the previous

SEPT. 28, 2017

for Economic Development in New Orleans

three years at Louisiana Economic Development (LED), most recently as Assistant Secretary. At NOLABA, Messer leads initiatives and programs related to business intelligence, economic competitiveness, small business services, business principles of economic development attraction and retention, including the Bioinnovation and Health Sciences cluster, and has overall responsibility for executing the ProsperityNOLA strategy.

• The basic • Why economic development matters a member of the executive management team at LED, serving as and how itMesser playswasout in people’s lives President of the Louisiana Economic Development Corporation (LEDC); Secretary’s designate to the Research Park Corporation board, where he is the Board Treasurer • Economic development trends and topics and Chairperson, Audit Committee; staff lead for the Louisiana Innovation Council (LIC); and the agency’s representative on ratings agency calls related to the State’s • The currentGeneral NewObligation Orleansandeconomic landscape other indebtedness. In 2015 he was selected as a Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Distinguished Leadership recipient of the Fannie Lou • New Orleans assets, challenges and statistics Hamer Community Service and Leadership Award by Grambling State University. • Resources, @_qlmesser programs and events available in New Orleans • Business-related news • The role NOLABA plays in economic development and making New Orleans a better place for its residents

NOLABA is committed to keeping you informed. Stay in the #NolaKNO.

NOLABA.ORG

NOLA. BUSINESS. PEOPLE.

CONFIRMING OUR COMMITMENT

Another goal was to reassure residents we are working for their well-being, and call them to learn more about our work, available opportunities and other ways to “stay in the NolaKNO.” We reached out to specific communities through local publications to help spread awareness.

A great place to live, a business-friendly environment, and a talented workforce: When these things all work together, they form an indestructible foundation for widespread prosperity. At NOLABA, our mission is to assure a diverse, sustainable New Orleans economy, rich with opportunity for all residents in every neighborhood. To learn more about our work and how economic development can help your business thrive, visit nolaba.org and look for our Knowledge Network Opportunities to keep you in the #NolaKNO.

935 Gravier Street, Suite 2020 • New Orleans, LA 70112 • 504-934-4500 • www.nolaba.org • #NolaKNO

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AMBASSADORSHIP PROGRAM AN OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN, THEN SHARE

NOLABA’s Economic Development Ambassadorship Program (EDAP) is the singular program in the city of New Orleans that provides in-depth insight into the work of growing and diversifying the city’s economy. Launched in March 2017 and occurring twice a year, the unique program has enabled NOLABA to empower 75 individuals to be better-informed ambassadors for the city. Because economic development is a cross-cutting issue affecting businesses in every industry – and the economic security of all New Orleanians – NOLABA brings together in this 7-week program experienced professionals from a variety of sectors. “You really get an insider’s perspective into what is unique about economic development in New Orleans, and you get the opportunity to learn about the strategies the city is pursuing to diversify and grow the city’s economy,” said Mary Matthews, 504ward Executive Director and architect of the program. The landmark program dives into each of NOLABA’s work streams – industry attraction and retention, workforce development, talent attraction and retention, bioinnovation and health services, and small business development. A strategic neighborhood development session will debut in 2018.

SHARING KNOWLEDGE THROUGH NETWORKS

“By far the best part of the program that our ambassadors really love is the open dialogue that happens when we’re bringing these really talented people from across the city together to talk about these issues,” Matthews said. “I moved to New Orleans to open my business because I believe deeply in this special city,” said Jodi Jordan, founder of CrossFit Algiers and a member of the Fall 2017 cohort. “NOLABA’s Ambassadorship Program gave me the tools to help tell others why they should locate their ventures here too.”

SUPPORTING THE MISSION

NOLABA has raised funds to support the program thanks to the 2017 sponsorships of AT&T, Benefit Administration Group, ERG Enterprises and LCMC Health.


-EVAN BERGERON,

2017 AMBASSADOR

IF YOUR GOAL IS TO IMPROVE THIS CITY AND COMMUNITY, THE ECONOMIC ANGLE IS ONE YOU MUST UNDERSTAND TO BE SUCCESSFUL.

WE ALL HAVE A PART TO PLAY IN THE ECONOMIC SUCCESS OF NEW ORLEANS, AND I WANT TO MAKE AN IMPACT. -SERINA PHOENIX

2017 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AMBASSADOR

-ANDREAS PASHOS

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INDUSTRY EVENTS NOLABA continues to use a variety of methods to provide our audiences with meaningful information. As a way to promote conversations around economic development, NOLABA hosts events that serve as networking hubs within our key industries.

TECH CAN COOK

NOLABA piloted future programming to connect new technology with New Orleans’ strong legacy industries via a panel discussion on food technology in October 2017 called “Tech Can Cook.” NOLABA Vice President Louis David moderated the expert panel consisting of Ron Emonet (Reily Foods Company director of innovation), tech entrepreneur Knud Berthelsen (Free Your Tea) and Patrick Morin (Morsel Law PLC) at The Shop at the Contemporary Arts Center. Sponsored by French Market Cold Brew, the panel, during NOLATech Week, highlighted how New Orleans startups are leveraging the city’s tech boom. “It’s a natural evolution for New Orleans to be on the forefront of food technology innovations,” Emonet said. “You mix a rich food culture with the growing entrepreneur base in the city, and you have the perfect ecosystem for the development of cutting-edge technology within the food space.” NOLABA will continue developing programs in 2018 to show opportunities for innovation in New Orleans’ legacy industries, including food, music, maritime and transportation.

REAL ESTATE BREAKFASTS

In addition to maintaining a vital presence at the International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC) RECon conference, NOLABA connected the New Orleans retail and real estate community to knowledge opportunities by hosting monthly Real Estate Breakfasts for yet another year. Latter & Blum and Stirling Properties each hosted a breakfast in 2017, on the hotel and hospitality industry and the City of New Orleans One Stop process, respectively. The Real Estate Breakfasts are a chance for local brokers and real estate professionals to convene and discuss upcoming projects after hearing a guest speaker. Other subjects from 2017 included storm-water management and hostels in New Orleans. David Gindin (of The Quisby on St. Charles Avenue) and Sarah Berger (of Hostelling International USA) both spoke Sept. 14 on hostels in New Orleans.


THOUGHT LEADERSHIP We are also constantly staying engaged in conversations, delivering perspectives as an authority on all aspects of the New Orleans economy, and maintaining confidence in the organization as thought leaders in our communities.

ADVOCATES FOR OUR CITY

When Gambit posed the question, “Is New Orleans Worth It?” in its article of that name, NOLABA President and CEO Quentin Messer, Jr. responded with a resounding, “Absolutely yes.” He passionately advocated for New Orleanians to come together to find solutions to limitations in the city’s talent marketplace and to educate others on the importance of talent retention in New Orleans’ competitiveness for capital.

IN THE NEWS: Part of reaching our audiences includes coverage by notable news outlets

AUTHORITIES IN OUR INDUSTRIES

NOLABA was featured in 808 news stories related to the city’s economic progress, and members appeared 11 times on WWL-TV’s Eyewitness Morning News throughout the year. Amritha Appaswami also continued her bimonthly column, “First Steps,” in Healthcare Journal of New Orleans. Alejandra Guzman debuted an economic development column in Meridiano90, a Spanish printed and online newspaper based in New Orleans, and she was quoted in a Forbes Nonprofit Council article about supporting racial and social justice in organizations.

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INVESTOR ENGAGEMENT NEW HIRE:

STEPHANIE BELL

NOLABA welcomed Stephanie to the staff as the director of investor relations in June 2017. For the previous three years she oversaw outreach for the Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses program, managing communication, recruitment, alumni engagement and ecosystem partnerships. At NOLABA, she is the liaison between investors and the organization, securing event and program sponsorships and communicating NOLABA’s work as a public-private partnership between the City of New Orleans and the local business community. “I was amazed at the impact we created when private and public entities came together at 10,000 Small Businesses,” Stephanie said. “Having that experience and seeing the great work we did together will really help me in my position here.”

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INVESTOR LUNCH

NOLABA rolled out a new format for its Investor Update Lunch in 2017, engaging investors by displaying developments in the New Orleans healthcare arena. Under the direction of Investor Relations Director Stephanie Bell, NOLABA’s guest speakers were Charlotte Parent of LCMC Health and Nicholas Adams, Vice President of Marketing and Public Relations at Tulane Health System. These NOLABA investors highlighted how their institutions are moving healthcare forward by forming partnerships and creating strategic growth strategies. The spring 2017 class of NOLABA Economic Development Ambassadors was also recognized at Manning’s Stadium Club. These 27 professionals were the first participants in the program, which expanded from five to seven weeks for the fall cohort.

NOLAHI

NOLABA secured more top-tier investments in 2017, including Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana and Ochsner Health System’s title partnership supporting the NOLA Health Innovators Challenge. “At Ochsner Health System, innovation is part of our mission, and we believe in the power of innovation, entrepreneurship and new thinking to lead to better health outcomes in our communities,” said Aimee Quirk, Chief Executive Officer of innovationOchsner and NOLABA Vice Chair of the Board. “Through NOLAHI we – together with our partner Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana – have a unique opportunity to engage some of the brightest and most creative minds to work alongside us to improve our region’s health.”


CREATING A BRIDGE

Mayor Mitch Landrieu established NOLABA in 2010 to be New Orleans’ official economic development partnership and the hub of its business community. This allows for big, long-term visions for the city to develop and for the work that goes into realizing them to seamlessly transcend administrations.

OPENING THE DIALOGUE

As New Orleans prepared to elect its next Mayor and City Council in 2017, NOLABA embraced the role of educating candidates on the importance of economic development in a city like New Orleans. The team developed an in-depth presentation showing NOLABA’s history, accomplishments, resilience and goals for working with the City moving forward. NOLABA President and CEO Quentin Messer met with the candidates individually to discuss the presentation and answer questions before the elections.

A HOLISTIC LOOK FORWARD

Messer explained to the candidates that economic development matters only to the extent that it touches and changes citizens’ lives. Furthermore, cities that win in attracting financial and human capital develop economies in which all citizens have greater access to economic opportunity. NOLABA looks forward to writing the next chapter of progress for New Orleans’ economy beyond 2017 using a holistic model for economic development that connects residents in all neighborhoods with opportunities for success.

SUPPORTING LEADERSHIP EMPOWERED TO ADVOCATE

TRANSITION FOR ELECTIONS

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RECOGNIZING ACHIEVEMENTS ANNOUNCEMENTS & REPORTS Celebrating our hard work gives us great hope for things to come at NOLABA.

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NOLABA ACCOLADES

ANNOUNCING OUR 2017 IEDC AWARD WINNERS IEDC Chairman’s Award for Lifetime Achievement in Economic Development: HENRY COAXUM, JR.

NG OUR AWARD WINNERS

OLABA,

ATIVE

portunity undation)

HENRY COAXUM, JR. NOLABA Board Chair

CHAIRMAN’S AWARD

NOLABA,

ANCHOR COLLABORATIVE

(with The Network for Economic Opportunity and Greater New Orleans Foundation) NOLABA VP of Program Dev. & Strategy

YOUNG ECONOMIC NOLABA, DEVELOPMENT OUTLET COLLECTION PROFESSIONAL OF THE YEAR

AT RIVERWALK

GOLD AWARD/

Human Capital category NOLABA,

WHYNOLA CAMPAIGN

GOLD AWARD/

OLABA,

SILVER AWARD/

PAIGN

NOLABA VP of Program Dev. & Strategy

YOUNG ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROFESSIONAL OF THE YEAR IEDC Gold Award for Excellence

in Economic Development (Human Capital): GOLD AWARD/ ANCHOR Human Capital COLLABORATIVE category

ALEJANDRA GUZMAN,

OLABA,

CTION WALK

IEDC Young Economic Development Professional of the Year: ALEJANDRA GUZMAN ALEJANDRA GUZMAN,

Real Estate Redevelopment & Reuse category

New Media category

IEDC Gold Award for Excellence in Economic Development (Real Estate Real Estate Redevelopment Redevelopment and Reuse): & Reuse category THE OUTLET COLLECTION AT RIVERWALK

GOLD AWARD/

SILVER AWARD/ New Media category

IEDC Silver Award for Excellence in Economic Development (New Media): WHYNOLA CAMPAIGN

Biz New Orleans New & Notables: ALEJANDRA GUZMAN Millennial Award in Economic Development: ALEJANDRA GUZMAN

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AEDO CERTIFICATION

NOLABA secured a third-party validation of its commitment to best practices when the International Economic Development Council (IEDC) certified NOLABA as an accredited economic development organization (AEDO) on April 21, 2017. IEDC is a nonprofit, nonpartisan membership organization serving economic developers. With more than 5,000 members, IEDC is the largest organization of its kind. In addition to opportunities for networking and learning from community leaders, industry experts, and federal policymakers at technical and annual conferences, the AEDO program provides organizations with independent feedback on their operations and recognizes excellence in local economic development efforts. Culminating an intensive application process that included a 600-page written submission and a site visit from the accreditation review team, the news came the same day as the announcement that Provision Healthcare chose New Orleans for the Louisiana Proton Therapy Center. “There are three recommendations that were particularly helpful from the review team,” said NOLABA President and CEO Quentin Messer. “The first was the observation that we have a relatively young team, and that it will be essential going forward to focus on employee retention and giving them opportunities for growth. The second was the need to have a CEcD (Certified Economic Developer) on staff, and I’ve committed myself to take the exam. The third was thinking about how we go about fundraising. In the past, we’ve always hoped for a lot of unrestricted funds. But after receiving the team’s feedback, we realized it would be more beneficial to focus on programmatic fundraising.”

RECOGNITION FOR EXCELLENCE

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL

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2017 BOARD OF DIRECTORS EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE HENRY L. COAXUM, JR. Chair President, Coaxum Enterprises, Inc.

KIM BOYLE, ESQ. Secretary Partner, Phelps Dunbar, LLP

AIMEE QUIRK Vice Chair CEO, innovationOchsner

HON. MITCHELL J. LANDRIEU* Mayor of the City of New Orleans

JUSTIN T. AUGUSTINE III Treasurer Vice President, Transdev Services, Inc. MICHAEL W. KEARNEY, SR. Secretary President and CEO, The Kearney Companies, Inc.

CHARLES RICE President and CEO, Entergy New Orleans, Inc. THOMAS MABON Senior Vice President & Business Banking Group Manager, IBERIABANK *REBECCA CONWELL (Mayoral Designee) Senior Advisor for Economic Development, City of New Orleans

BOARD MEMBERS R. ERICH CAULFIELD, PHD Founder and President, The Caulfield Consulting Group

RICHARD TALLANT Asset Manager - Gulf of Mexico East, Shell Exploration & Production Company

GREGORY FEIRN CEO, LCMC Health

HON. JASON R. WILLIAMS Councilmember-at-Large, New Orleans City Council

RITA LEBLANC Owner, Bold Sphere

ROBERT WOLLFARTH Shareholder, Baker Donelson

MICHAEL SMITH General Manager, Hyatt Regency New Orleans 44 |

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NOLABA TEAM EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP QUENTIN L. MESSER, JR. President and CEO

TIM HEMPHILL Chief Administrative Officer

STAFF AMRITHA APPASWAMI Vice President, Business Development and Strategy, Bio and Health Services Innovation STEPHANIE BELL Director, Investor Relations BRENDA CANADA Vice President, Retail Attraction, Development and Strategy

ALEJANDRA GUZMAN Vice President, Program Development and Strategy LISA HELLRICH Special Assistant to the President and CEO THOMAS KRUMINS Manager, Business Development and Strategy (VFA Fellow)

LOUIS DAVID Vice President, Business Development and Strategy

SALLY LINDSAY Manager, Business Development and Strategy (VFA Fellow)

KATY DUPRE Manager, Economic Competitiveness

MARY MATTHEWS Executive Director, 504ward

WAYNE ENCALARDE Manager, Small Business Ecosystem Development

KEN WEATHERUP Vice President, Human Capital and Culture

AMY FERGUSON Director, Communications

LYNNETTE WHITE-COLIN Vice President, Small Business Ecosystem Development

DOMINIQUE FLUGENCE Manager, Finance

RACHEL WHITTAKER Manager, Marketing and Communications 2017 IMPACT REPORT

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2017 INVESTORS LEADERSHIP INVESTORS ($20,000 AND ABOVE) Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana Entergy New Orleans Harrah’s New Orleans Leslie Jacobs JPMorgan Chase Foundation

LCMC Health Ochsner Health System Shell Oil Company Stone Pigman Walther Wittmann, LLC Surdna Foundation

FOUNDATIONAL INVESTORS ($10,000 - $19,999) Barriere Construction Co., LLC Business Council of New Orleans & the River Region Capital One Coaxum Enterprises, Inc. Downtown Development District Goldring Family Foundation Helis Oil & Gas Company, LLC IBERIABANK

Jones Walker, LLP Laitram, LLC Liberty Bank New Orleans Saints and New Orleans Pelicans RazorLine, LLC Transdev Services, Inc. Whitney Bank

PARTNER INVESTORS ($5,000 - $9,999) Adams and Reese, LLP Baker Donelson Bellwether Technology Boh Bros. Construction Co., LLC Canal Barge Company, Inc. EnwaveUSA (New Orleans) FOGO Data Centers

HCA MidAmerica Division The Kearney Companies, Inc. Laurel Outdoor Loving Family Fund New Orleans Board of Trade Phelps Dunbar, LLP Port of New Orleans

Postlethwaite & Netterville CPAs Stirling Properties, LLC Transcendent Legal Transoceanic Development, LLC Tulane Health System Woodward Design+Build

SUPPORTING INVESTORS (UP TO $5,000) ADP Algiers Development District Algiers Economic Development Foundation Annala + Wills, LLC AT&T Louisiana The Boeing Company Rebecca Conwell The Domain Companies Ernst & Young, LLP

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2017 IMPACT REPORT

First Hartford Realty Corporation Health Education Authority of Louisiana John C. Hope III Howard Hughes Corporation Hyatt Regency New Orleans Image360 Mathes Brierre Architects MCC Real Estate Group Kenya L. and Quentin L. Messer, Jr.

Perez Architects PSAV Aimee M. Quirk Sherman Strategies SOCIALSTEP, Inc. Solomon Group Southwest Airlines The Warehouse


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS* OPERATIONAL REVENUE CITY OF NEW ORLEANS

(Includes: Restricted funding to Greater New Orleans, Inc.)

$1,556,000

PRIVATE INVESTMENT & FOUNDATIONS

$828,400

GOVERNMENT GRANTS (pass-through)

$444,600

(Includes: Restricted funding for 504ward and small business development)

(Includes: Pass-through grants with partner organizations)

OTHER REVENUE

(Includes: Interest, fee for service and miscellaneous revenue)

TOTAL OPERATIONAL REVENUE

$35,700 $2,864,700

OPERATIONAL EXPENSES BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT $897,300 (Includes: Digital media and bio attraction, business retention and expansion, retail attraction & development)

GOVERNMENT GRANTS (pass-through)

444,600

MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS

497,100

FINANCE & OPERATIONS

436,600

PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT

135,900

INVESTOR RELATIONS

271,300

504WARD

141,200

ECONOMIC COMPETITIVENESS

203,000

(Includes: Pass-through grants with partner organizations)

(Includes: Marketing and public relations efforts)

(Includes: Financial management, administrative and support services)

(Includes: Research, financial analysis, bio and incentive review)

(Includes: Financial management, administrative and support services)

(Includes: 504ward initiative)

(Includes: Economic research, marketing support and program support services)

TOTAL OPERATIONAL EXPENSES

$3,027,000

*Unaudited as of the date of this report 2017 IMPACT REPORT

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2017 IMPACT REPORT


OUR MISSION: To unite a diverse community of stakeholders to catalyze job growth, create wealth, and build an equitable and sustainable economic future for New Orleans.

Putting New Orleans on the track toward growth and prosperity requires a holistic approach. Let’s keep the conversation going around the challenges and opportunities for making our city equitable, sustainable and prosperous for all New Orleanians.

OUR VISION: To reposition New Orleans as the next great American city for business investment, quality of life and economic opportunity.

New Orleans Business Alliance @NewOrleansBA New Orleans Business Alliance @nolabusinessalliance

NOLABA is committed to keeping you informed. Stay in the #NolaKNO.

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Profile for New Orleans Business Alliance

NOLABA 2017 Annual Report  

Read narratives of NOLABA's accomplishments in fiscal year 2017.

NOLABA 2017 Annual Report  

Read narratives of NOLABA's accomplishments in fiscal year 2017.

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