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NEW HAMPTON SCHOOL

nonprofit us postage

new hampton, nh 03256-4243 www.newhampton.org

PAID lewiston, me permit no. 82

H A M P T O N I A the magazine of new hampton school

spring 2010, volume 126, number 1

taking the powder keg back: athletic teams take care of tilton! story inside on page 12

inside: the pilalas center for math and science opens china exchange r ice cream cone king r capital campaign update

New Hampton School Spring 2010 Hamptonia magazine. Finished size is 11.0 inches tall by 8.50 inches wide. Artwork prints in four-color process and bleeds all four sides. Cover artwork; Cover IV and Cover I. (0.125 inches has been allowed for perfect-bound spine.)


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WHEN IT COMES TO PARTICIPATION,

WE NEED YOU. It is hard to put into words the importance New Hampton holds for me. I only know that while I was there and while I was walking around the campus recently, I really felt at home again. I am happy to see the school progress in such a positive direction under Andrew’s leadership. It was also terrific to see Bud and Jinga, as they and Lou Gnerre bring such heart and history to a wonderful school and community. I am honored to serve as the Annual Fund Chair for New Hampton School. The school had a tremendous impact on me as a student, and still has an important place in my life and my heart and I look forward to helping in this role. I hope you will join me today by supporting this great school to

RICK PEYSER ’68

help us realize our participation goals!

NHS ANNUAL FUND CHAIR GREEN MOUNTAIN COFFEE ROASTERS, DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL ADVOCACY AND COFFEE COMMUNITY OUTREACH

OUR ANNUAL FUND GOAL THIS YEAR IS TO RAISE $880,000 — TEN PERCENT MORE THAN LAST YEAR!

MAKE YOUR GIFT ONLINE TODAY

www.newhampton.org/giving For participation in the current Fund year, gifts must be made by June 30, 2010.

New Hampton School Spring 2010 Hamptonia magazine. Finished size is 11.0 inches tall by 8.50 inches wide. Artwork prints in four-color process and bleeds all four sides. Cover artwork; Cover II and Cover III. (0.125 inches has been allowed for perfect-bound spine.)


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H A M P T O N I A spring 2010

advisory board Jamie Arsenault P’13 Cindy Buck P’01, ’05 Sandy Colhoun Andrew Menke P’12 Will McCulloch contributors Cindy Buck Lou Gnerre P’76, GP’12 Andrew Menke Will McCulloch David Perfield T. Holmes Moore ’38 Jinga Moore

volume 126, number 1

welcome

2

Letter from the Editor

heads up

3

Letter from the Head of School Andrew Menke

in brief

4

Alumni Happenings

7

nhs Upcoming Events

campus currents

8

Campus Happenings

husky sports

11

Fall Sports Wrap-Up

12

Powder Keg

13

Football Team Wins Austin Bowl Title

hall of fame

14

2009 Inductees Cindy Buck

student profile

16

Merrill Clerkin ’10

18

China Exchange

19

Capital Campaign Special Section

24

Jason Pilalas ’58: The Building of Success

alumni profile

28

Dean Jacobson ’68

forty years of women

31

Celebrating Forty Years of nhs Women

faculty profile

32

Jennifer Shackett Berry ’83

lou’s corner

34

Column from Lou Gnerre

where are they now?

35

Update on Former nhs Faculty

memories

36

From the nhs Archives

trustees

37

New Board Members

class notes

38

Class Notes

48

In Memoriam

50

Pictorial

designer Clay Dingman, Barking Cat Productions Communications Design photographers Jamie Arsenault Dakema Besemer Sandy Colhoun Clay Dingman Library of Congress Alan MacRae Will McCulloch Chip Riegel Art Swenson Nick Tucker Amy Wilson

go beyond

printer Penmor Lithographers © 2010 New Hampton School www.newhampton.org Hamptonia is printed on sustainably produced, chain-of-custody stock certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (fsc). Hamptonia is printed using only windgenerated renewable power, and inks derived from vegetable sources. on the cover: Jason Pilalas ’58 and Rena Pilalas at the dedication ceremony for the new Pilalas Center for Math and Science.

do you know your school?

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welcome

detail from map of belknap county, new hampshire, circa 1860, from the library of congress

editor Will McCulloch, Director of Communications

alumni office staff Sandy Colhoun, Director of Development Cindy Buck, Director of Alumni and Parent Relations Sarah DeBenedictis, Director of Annual Giving Louis Gnerre, Alumni Ambassador Jerrica Gray, Gifts Administrator and Planned Giving Assistant Ryann McCann, Administrative Assistant Will McCulloch, Director of Communications David Per>eld, Development Officer Martha Shepp, Assistant Director of Communications Pamela Susi, Assistant Director of Annual Giving hamptonia is published twice a year by New Hampton School. The magazine reports news of the school, its students, teachers, and alumni. We welcome submissions for publication, news from and about alumni, and letters in response to articles. Inquiries, comments, and letters may be directed to Hamptonia, New Hampton School, 70 Main Street, New Hampton, New Hampshire 03256. Or, call 603-677-3417 or e-mail hamptonia@newhampton.org.

Four months after arriving on campus, my threeand-a-half-year-old son Santiago left his mark on New Hampton School. We had just exited the gymnasium on a cold Sunday morning in early December, minutes after my one-year-old daughter had taken an errant lacrosse ball off the back while playing in the lower gymnasium. Both kids felt the chill of the New Hampshire air and looked ready for naps as they walked outdoors. The only cold they knew in their previous home was the above-freezing air of a foggy afternoon in San Francisco. As we waited outside the gym, Santiago heard the sound of hockey pucks crashing against the boards and skates carving up the ice in Lindsay Rink. So, at his irrepressible urging, we headed over to the rink to absorb a little bit of this new sport that had captured his attention in recent weeks. As we watched a few students glide around during a post-brunch skate, I was preoccupied with my daughter and Santiago ambled up the walkway to the stands. Moments later, I heard a deafening screech to my left. My eyes darted in Santiago’s direction. There he was, seemingly frozen in time, with his tongue stuck to the pole that attaches the boards to glass. In the days following, I would show him the infamous scene from the Christmas Story, and we would laugh. But in the moment, I slipped into a panic mode and rushed to his side. With no available water and a crying baby in my arms, I extricated Santiago from the pole with my own saliva. I dragged the teary-eyed little guy to our car, and my wife drove back to the other side of campus to our home in Phillips House. A lollipop and some water pacified Santi as the bleeding subsided. Two days later, he was in the dining hall sharing his story. He told students, teachers, faculty kids, and anyone who would listen. They absorbed it all in playful astonishment, and Santiago reveled in the telling of his tale, his rite of passage, and his realization that he was in a new place where he had so many new friends. It was in those moments of watching my son communicate —“Do you know what I did? I licked the pole in the hockey rink and got stuck.”—that I realized, as a new person on campus, how caring a community we have here at New Hampton School. What truly makes this place special is that it’s a small and intimate enough community that people really get to know each other. Inside this magazine, you will find the stories of graduates, teachers, and students who are leaving their imprint on the world and this community. I encourage you to share your stories and celebrate the wonderful memories and the milestone moments in your life. There are plenty of folks in the nhs family that would love to hear about it. Just ask my son!

New Hampton School does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, creed, national or ethnic origin in administration of its admissions and educational policies, scholarship

Will McCulloch, Editor, Hamptonia Director of Communications

and loan programs, and athletic and other school administered activities.

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heads up

ss

franconia range of the white mountains of new hampshire, circa 1912, from the library of congress

go beyond is showing up everywhere here in Husky Nation. A wonderfully inspirational tag line, it graces the cover of the admission office’s viewbook, is prominently displayed on the Web site, and is the theme of our record-setting capital campaign. But go beyond is more than a marketing phrase. It has become a state of mind here at nhs. Energized by the adoption of our strategic plan in 2007 and embracing a mission to educate global citizens and a vision to become a national curricular innovator, New Hampton School is going beyond is some amazing ways. Back in 2006–07, we pushed ourselves to think beyond the traditional curriculum and consider the content and pedagogy of a twenty-first century school. With thoughtful departmental leadership, faculty melded classic, fundamental skills with more contemporary proficiencies and introduced the “Foundations of Learning”— a continuum of durable skills (critical thinking, persuasive written and oral discourse, inductive and deductive reasoning, and source credibility) to ensure preparation for higher education and beyond. With the “Foundations of Learning” in place, we have begun to explore dynamic course content. This fall we pushed beyond, introducing twelve new courses including Chinese, Engineering, Economics, and Science and Sustainability. Implicitly, global citizenship suggests literally going beyond. So this fall we launched the School’s first exchange program with Shibei School in Wuxi, China. This spring we will welcome Shibei students and faculty to nhs, and tentatively have begun exploration of exchange relationships with schools in India and Latin America. In perhaps our boldest curricular step in recent memory, nhs will introduce approximately twenty students into the International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma Program this fall, while many more students will take advantage of the IB curriculum and certificate. The International Baccalaureate is a rigorous international diploma program that aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable, and caring young people who will help to create a better and more peaceful

world through intercultural understanding and respect. nhs will lead from the front as the only IB boarding school in New England. Apart from curriculum evolution, so many Huskies go beyond every day, from Emma Berry ’10, who was recently named to the National Field Hockey Coaches Association National Academic Team, and Sophie Lawi ’12, who was invited to the prestigious New England Young Writers’ Conference at Middlebury College, to our student-led winter carnival, student-produced plays, and record-setting fundraising drives for earthquake victims in Haiti and survivors of childhood cancer. Every day there is tangible evidence of our students and faculty embracing the ethic of striving to improve not only themselves, but also the community in which we live and the one beyond our campus borders. go beyond is about how we provide the habits of mind and heart to prepare the next generation of leaders. It is a value, a way of thinking that we hope to imbue in every student. In addition to solid academic skills, we want students to become confidently curious, to embrace a world that is changing faster than at any time in human history, to welcome those changes as opportunity, to have a strong sense of who they are and where they come from, and to welcome working and living with those who share a different point of view. Vibrancy and enthusiasm seem to best define go beyond. With a new and energized mission, and a clear plan to deliver the mission, we are experiencing a renaissance of epic proportions. We are so very grateful to so many who have answered the personal call to go beyond and supported our record-setting campaign. Kennedy Field, a state-of-the-art synthetic turf field, has revolutionized our athletic program. The Pilalas Center, a world-class math and science facility, has transformed not only the teaching and learning of these critical disciplines, but also the overall pride in intellectual engagement. Our endowment commitments are growing exponentially. Yes, we are shattering the previous notion of what was possible here at nhs. And we’re just getting started! In these pages you will learn more about the amazing transformation that is occurring in your wonderful school. Be proud of your school, and join us as we go beyond and take nhs to exciting new heights!

Andrew Menke, Head of School

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in brief

clockwise, from top left: Barbara Lewis, Earl Lewis ’62, Ruth Haivanis P’04, George Haivanis, Deborah Leach P’96, Edwin Leach P’96; on Grandparents Day, Bob Kennedy ’50, Stephanie Kennedy ’10, and Sally Kennedy; Jacob Heal ’01 released “Live Free or Die” in December; nhs Class of 1980 alums at the Bruins game in January: Paul Altmeyer, Ray Desmarais, Kurt Schmakel, Bob Kelley, Scott Peters, and Brian Driscoll.

convocation What better way to start an academic year with the theme of curiosity than to welcome a graduate whose career has clearly illustrated an insatiable appetite for self-discovery? Rick Peyser ’68 was the Keynote Speaker as the school community gathered on The Pilalas Center Lawn for Convocation on September 13. Peyser, a two-year student at nhs and the Director of Social Advocacy and Coffee Community Outreach at Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, touched on his positive experience at nhs and told the story of how he became one of the leading advocates for reform in one of the biggest markets in the world— the coffee business. Less than a month after speaking at nhs, Peyser was quoted in a Time Magazine story about the struggles of Fair Trade coffee farmers. Q grandparents day Over one hundred grandparents arrived on the New Hampton School campus on September 25, for a program that included a tour

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of the campus, a performance from the jazz ensemble in school meeting, and a chance to sit in on their grandchild’s classes. Grandparents involved themselves in numerous science experiments during class periods and brought perspective and experiences to history classes that discussed the Cold War and the Korean War. Q parents weekend They came from all over the country and world between October 22 and 24, for Parents Weekend festivities. More than two hundred parents met with advisors, observed classes, watched performing arts programs, and were spectators of athletic competitions, despite rainy conditions on Saturday. Q debut album from jacob heal ’01 When Jacob Heal ’01 won the 2006 “New Hampshire Idol” competition on Gilford’s wlnh, he didn’t expect it to turn into a record deal. But that’s what Heal got when his prize of a two-song demo with Jimmy Landry of the Audiostrike label turned into a full record

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in brief

top, l–r: Frank McClelland ’76; Jean Blaise, Patrick Saunders ’08, and Sarah (friend of Jean’s) after a Princeton basketball game. bottom, l–r: Friends and Alumni gather in Chicago: (back row) Marko Punda ’97, Ronald Altman P’05, Michael Seigle P’13, George Kennedy ’43, Andrew Menke (front) Jennifer Berry ’83, Lynn Van Cleave ’85, Janet Seigle P’13, Valerie Kennedy; at Convocation, Rick Peyser ’68.

development deal. Heal’s appropriately dubbed, full-length album “Live Free or Die” was released on December 15, and is available on iTunes and at Walmarts throughout New England. The ten-song album is sure to capture an audience. Says Landry, an industry veteran, “When Jacob hit the stage and opened his mouth to sing, my jaw dropped. This is the kind of timeless voice that you can’t teach someone.” Heal credits nhs with allowing him to develop as a performer and artist. “I couldn’t have made it here without the wonderful people I had guiding me at nhs,” Heal says. “I will never forget my growth years at school. I love you all and can’t thank you enough for believing in my dreams!” You can order copies of the album at www.audiostrike.com/ jacobheal or at iTunes. “If you have any questions regarding the release or what is to come please contact me directly at Jacob.M.Heal@gmail.com or check out my Facebook page.” Q

a special night in boston Friends of New Hampton School gathered in Boston on November 10, as Frank McClelland ’76, father of student body president and third-generation nhs student Keppler McClelland ’10, put on a fabulous dinner at his restaurant, L’Espalier, and helped kick off go beyond: The Campaign for New Hampton School. Since McClelland purchased the restaurant in 1988, L’Espalier has become one of the top twenty restaurants in the country. L’Espalier’s numerous awards and accolades include being named No. 1 in Zagat, Boston for the last eight years and being the only independent restaurant in New England to receive the aaa Five Diamond Award for the last six consecutive years. Frank McClelland discovered his love of cooking while growing up on his grandparents’ farm in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. This interest grew to become a passion and a career as one of the nation’s top chefs. In the kitchen, as well as in the dining

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in brief

www.newhampton.org/summer T O E X P L O R E A N D R E G I S T E R

Friendship!

2010 SUMMER PROGRAMS Day and overnight programs including

Fun! Challenge! Adventure! GO BEYOND.

Nothing But NET Basketball

Co-ed camp for ages 4–14 NIKE Sports Camps

and other elite programs in r soccer r baseball r tennis

r basketball r lacrosse

Accelerated English Language Program

A six-week immersion in English language and American culture; www.newhampton.org/esl room, Frank is known for his pursuit of perfection, his intensity, and a love for what he does. Frank continues those traditions with his team by living on and working the land of the restaurant’s fourteen-acre organic farm, Apple Street Farm, in Essex, Massachusetts. He has made a significant commitment toward sustainable agriculture to provide one of the region’s most memorable and environmentally friendly dining experiences. Q chicago reception Friends of New Hampton School turned out on November 5, in Chicago and shared memories and stories with a small group at Gabriel’s Restaurant. Development Officer David Perfield, Director of Studies Jennifer Berry ’83, and Head of School Andrew Menke were in attendance. Q huskies hoops in the ivy league Three former nhs Husky Men’s Hoopsters earned headlines in late November. Of the seven players on the Ivy League Men’s Basketball

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Honor Roll in addition to the two players of the week, three of the seven were New Hampton School graduates: Patrick Saunders ’08 (Princeton), Mike Howlett ’08 (Penn), and John Daniels ’09 (Columbia) are all contributing in valuable ways to three teams in one of the most celebrated leagues in college basketball. Saunders recently played a game at George Washington University, and the late Guy Alang-Ntang’s ’07 cousin Jean Blaise and friend Sarah attended the game and the Princeton Alumni reception after the game. Saunders had the opportunity to spend a little time with them, and they were able to see Patrick play while wearing No. 22, Guy’s New Hampton jersey number. bruins game New Hampton School parents, alumni, and friends gathered in Boston on January 21, for the Boston Bruins game against the Columbus Blue Jackets at TD Garden. The crowd enjoyed appetizers and drinks and caught up with old friends in a promenade suite reserved for nhs. Don’t miss this exciting event next year. Q

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nhs upcoming events

april 2

april 2

april 27

june 4–6

young alumni reception Friday, April 2, 5 pm Seoul, Korea Join Director of Studies Jennifer Berry ’83 and Director of Development Sandy Colhoun at the Intercontinental Hotel for an evening of fun and catching up with old friends.

parent/alumni reception Friday, April 2, 7 pm Seoul, Korea Meet fellow parents and alumni and catch up on nhs news with Director of Studies Jennifer Berry ’83 and Director of Devlopment Sandy Colhoun at the Intercontinental Hotel.

spring phonathon Tuesday, April 27 Berry Hall, 6 pm Please join the fun and help raise money for the Annual Fund. For more information, contact Director of Annual Giving Sarah DeBenedictis in the Development Office.

celebrating 40 years of women

june 4–6

september 2010

november 13

november 13

reunion weekend 2010 In addition to honoring classes ending in 5 and 0 and celebrating reunions, all alumni are welcome for a great weekend at nhs. Come back for an exciting schedule of events and reconnect with old friends.

boston alumni regional gathering The Alumni Office looks forward to sharing news of upcoming nhs events in Boston for alumni interested in networking, as well as social and program-specific activities.

athletic hall of fame Saturday, November 13, 9 am Celebrate this year’s inductees into the nhs Athletic Hall of Fame. The induction ceremony will be followed by a luncheon and Powder Keg festivities.

powder keg/homecoming Saturday, November 13 Each fall the Powder Keg, a day of athletic contests, is held between the Huskies and historic rival Tilton School. This year the host Huskies try to take the Keg for the second straight year.

at nhs and alumnae art show

The show will feature works from a variety of media and runs throughout Reunion 2010, as part of Celebrating 40 Years of Women at nhs. For details on submitting art for this show, please visit www.newhampton/alumni.

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campus currents

international baccalaureate diploma program update Three evaluators from the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program arrived on campus in early December for the final phase of the school’s candidacy to become the first New England boarding school with the program. For two days, groups of faculty, administrators, parents, students, and trustees met with the IB representatives and discussed nhs’s qualifications. If accepted by the IB, nhs students would have the option to gain access to a two-year program in their junior and senior years that would offer an internationally recognized diploma. “It is a natural fit for nhs’s globally relevant curriculum. The IB does not just try to give college credit, they provide the best possible high school courses with internationally recognized standards,” says Global Curriculum Coordinator Dan Love, who led the school through the process. The IB program connects more than two thousand eight hundred schools in one hundred thirty-eight countries. In addition to class work, the program demands three core requirements: the extended essay (an independent, in-depth study of a question relating to something they are studying), theory of knowledge (a required course that encourages each student to reflect on the nature of knowledge), and a creativity, action, service requirement that brings learning outside the classroom to a local community. Q Editor’s Note: At press time, New Hampton received authorization to offer the IB Diploma program. Look for more news on the Web site and in the next Hamptonia. the 25th annual putnam county spelling bee Funny, irreverent, touching, and dramatic, the fall musical—The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee—left a resounding impression on the school community and crowds that converged on McEvoy Theater in mid-November.

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Director of Performing Arts Joe Sampson chose a compelling piece that had garnered Tony Awards and brought together a gifted cast that delivered wonderful acting and singing. It resonated as one of the most impressive theatrical productions in recent years at New Hampton School. “It was an amazingly talented group of kids and some who had never taken part in a play at all,” says Mr. Sampson, “and a lot of students new to the school took part. We were a group of strangers for the most part at the beginning and we became pretty tight. It was a great group of kids.” Q gables house renovation As the school continues to attract and retain the finest faculty and staff, there are efforts being made to improve campus housing. Restoration of Gables House began in November. Gables will provide two additional faculty residences, and the restoration offers another aesthetic upgrade to the village of New Hampton. Q introduction to engineering one of 12 new courses Twelve new courses were added to the nhs curriculum in September as the school continues to put content into context for students. Among the new additions were Projects in Sustainability, Art History, Economics, and Introduction to Engineering, a course that not only took advantage of superior space and technology in the new Pilalas Center, but also utilized a creative end-of-the semester evaluation. After studying the history of bridges and, in particular, the various types of common truss bridges, students in Justin Joslin’s two sections were then given the opportunity to design, draw to scale, and construct their own bridges in a class competition that would serve as their final exam project. The students built their bridges out of balsa wood stock (1/8 inch by 1/8 inch) and wood glue. The bridges had to be free standing and meet several other design requirements before being tested. Each bridge was placed

over a nine-inch span, and a five-gallon bucket was suspended from the bridge. Students were able to see the load being applied to their bridge on an Interwrite board as a force sensor was attached to the testing device. Q music makers Among the numerous musicians who shared their talents in two different musical performances in December was Kellon Olusola ’11, who was selected to participate in the New Hampshire All State Festival after a successful audition in November. Olusola, a baritone, competed against some of the best high school musicians from across the state. A Kentucky native, Olusola will participate in a two-day rehearsal, beginning on April 8, 2010, in preparation for the All State Festival Concert on April 10. Q

fal

new hampton school tv One of the new courses being offered this year is Hans Mundahl’s Media Productions class. In addition to learning the technical aspects of media production, the class produces a weekly live news show at 9:15 am est every Monday morning while school is in session. Webcast on New Hampton School TV (www.newhampton.org/tv), the show includes feature stories about school life, interviews with administrators, and athletic reports. New Hampton School TV was also the platform for a live State of the School address from Head of School Andrew Menke and the school’s first live athletic webcast. Director of Communications Will McCulloch provided play-by-play duties throughout the winter while Mr. Mundahl handled production duties for numerous home athletic events. Q speaker series The inaugural year of the Evening Meeting Speaker Series, headed by English Department faculty Matt Altieri, produced a number of evocative presentations from community members as well as visitors. continued on page 10

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fall theater production: the 25th annual putnam county spelling bee

introduction to engineering

gables house renovation

nhs ib-trained teachers

cooking club

winter music concert

environmental art

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campus currents

continued from page 8 Milos Bohonek ’10 and Math faculty Justin Freeman shared their respective experiences. Bohonek, a native of the Czech Republic, shared images and memories from his numerous mountain climbing excursions with his family throughout Europe while Freeman, a New Hampshire native, presented his rise from a fledgling athlete to an Olympian who represented the United States in Nordic skiing in Italy in 2006. Carl Hobert, founder and director of Boston University’s Axis of Hope Center for International Conflict Resolution and Prevention, visited nhs in January. He discussed his experiences bringing young students to Rwanda as part of a service learning effort that seeks to aid orphan children and end conflict in that region. Q andrew menke, “harry the husky,” and harrison golden

mascot named in honor of harrison golden The New Hampton School Mascot has a new name. The always jovial husky that can be seen at athletic events and school meetings was named in honor of longtime faculty member Harrison Golden, who retired from New Hampton two years ago after 38 years as a beloved mentor, coach, and teacher. In a ceremony during school meeting, Director of Athletics Jamie Arsenault explained that though the mascot had taken on a few different names in previous years, it seemed only natural to give the Husky a name that would stick for eternity. He is now “Harry The Husky.” “Harrison Golden stands for everything New Hampton School is all about,” Mr. Arsenault said. Harrison graciously accepted the honor and then, in a manner that only Harrison could provide, spun the tale of the first time he had something named in his honor. “It was a Faculty Member of the Week Award,” explained Golden, noting that the award was a stuffed animal of a dog that he called a “mutt.” “I’m truly honored to have my name on the mascot,” he said. “It’s definitely better than the first time.” Q

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speaker series: milos bohonek ’10

nhs tv, media productions class

fall foliage day

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fall sports wrap-up

By Will McCulloch The football team was the only squad to make it to the postseason, but there were other bright spots during the fall athletic schedule. The victory for the Huskies in the Powder Keg capped a season in which a number of teams made enormous strides.

emma berry ’10

field hockey An 8-6 record and a victory over Tilton in the Powder Keg didn’t get a playoff bid for the Huskies, but the season was packed with exciting moments including two wins over Tilton and Proctor as well as a victory over Brewster late in the season that avenged an earlier 3-0 defeat. Emma Berry ’10 (New Hampton, New Hampshire), who will play at St. Lawrence University, was the team’s Most Valuable Player and Mary Penniman ’11 (Leominster, Massachusetts) led the Huskies with nine goals.

Fay ’12 (New Hampton, New Hampshire) was solid in net and kept the Huskies in numerous games while Dillon Harrington ’11 (Fort Myers, Florida) anchored the defense and was named Most Valuable Player. The defining game of the season was a 2-0 victory over Holderness on Parents Weekend in which Brent Leighton ’11 (Center Harbor, New Hampshire) scored two goals. women’s soccer The Huskies, who were slowed by injuries much of the season, didn’t fare well against their Lakes Region League neighbors, but showed promise in the closing weeks of the season. With the fine play of mvp goalkeeper Katelyn Ladd ’10 (Billerica, Massachusetts), the Huskies knocked off Phillips Exeter 1-0 behind a penalty kick from Anna Menke ’12 (New Hampton, New Hampshire). mountain biking Injuries slowed Justin Freeman’s squad throughout the year, but a big victory in the Powder Keg was the highlight of a season. Jon Frame ’10 (Center Harbor, New Hampshire), the winner of the Tilton race, won the Coach’s Award and Owen White ’13 (Thornton, New Hampshire) was the Most Improved Rider.

2009 Fall Sports Varsity Football Men’s Soccer Women’s Soccer Field Hockey

W 8 4 6 8

L 1 6 10 6

T 0 5 2 0

Junior Varsity Men’s Soccer A Men’s Soccer B

W 3 3

L 11 6

T 3 1

Other Cross Country: Third at the Lakes Region Championship; Mountain Biking: 14-22 against opponents in races.

ninth in the field of almost 100 runners to capture an individual medal. football The Huskies took advantage of a postseason berth and knocked off Canterbury School in the nepsac Austin Bowl to cap an historic season (see story on page 13).

sophie lawi ’12

cross country had a pack

dillon harrington ’11

men’s soccer Coach Manny Brito’s team endured a rebuilding season, but it wasn’t without its encouraging moments. Goalkeeper Matt

cross country The Cross Country team utilized the determination of some first-time runners and managed to finish third in the Lakes Region Championships. Dan Calley ’12 (Sanbornton, New Hampshire), winner of the prestigious Tottingham Award, finished

rock climbing Ted Stiles once again had a curious group of new and experienced climbers who navigated the natural landscape in nearby Rumney each afternoon. Sophie Lawi ’12 (Westmount QC, Canada) won the Coach’s Award for her determination and effort. The team hiked to the top of Rattlesnake Mountain with headlamps in the dark for its annual “sleep out under the stars and full moon” in September.

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powder keg comes home

Huskies Bring Powder Keg Back Up North By Will McCulloch

or the first time since New Hampton School and Tilton School formally reignited their athletic rivalry two years ago, the Huskies edged the Rams of Tilton 7-5 on a rain-soaked Saturday in November in Tilton to secure the Powder Keg. The Huskies, who watched Tilton take the Keg the previous two years, sealed the victory with a 42-0 win in football, the final competition of the day that brought out large crowds despite the poor weather. The Huskies will defend The Keg on November 13, 2010. “This is a great rivalry between two great schools,” New Hampton Head of School

F

Andrew Menke said. “I’m glad that we were able to win after losing the last two years, but more importantly, all the games showed the wonderful sportsmanship that exists between the two schools.” After Tilton’s women’s varsity soccer team beat New Hampton 2-1, the Rams had a slight lead. But New Hampton pulled off a surprise 2-2 tie in the men’s varsity soccer game and the women’s field hockey team got a goal halfway through the second half from Mary Penniman ’11 to earn a 2-1 victory. The New Hampton/Tilton rivalry dates back to 1895 when the two schools first played football against each other, and the twelve-mile trip down the back road, aptly dubbed “Devil’s Den Road,” was a half-day affair. The nhs/Tilton rivalry is the third-oldest prep school rivalry behind Andover/Exeter (1878) and Groton/St. Mark’s (1886), and was called the “Harvard/Yale of the New Hampshire preppies” by the Boston Globe in 1969. r

2009 Powder Keg November 14 at Tilton School New Hampton 7, Tilton 5

Event Men’s Varsity Soccer Men’s JV-A Soccer Men’s JV-B Soccer Cross Country Mountain Biking Women’s Varsity Soccer Field Hockey Football

Result NHS 2, T 2 T 5, NHS 0 T 2, NHS 1 NHS def. T NHS def. T T 2, NHS 1 NHS 2, T 1 NHS 42, T 0

inset: Andrew Menke receives the Powder Keg from Tilton headmaster Jim Clements; background: Dan Calley ’12 led the Huskies cross country squad to victory.

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Football Team Wins Austin Bowl Title hey endured the most heartbreaking of losses, but rebounded like champions. The 2009 Huskies football team walked off Kennedy Field on a chilly November night in New Hampshire with a 27-26 loss to Kimball Union Academy after a fifty-yard bomb deflected off a few Husky fingertips into a kua receiver’s hands with no time left on the clock. The only defeat of the season left the squad shaking their heads and wondering how close they had come to perfection. Still, a week later the Huskies responded with a 42-0 victory over Tilton to seal the Powder Keg and then capped an 8-1 campaign with a 15-0 victory over Canterbury School in the nepsac Austin Bowl at Williston-Northampton. It was the end of a special season and the first championship for the program since 2004. “This is the closest team I’ve ever been a part of,” says head coach Ed Kiley P’12. That chemistry remained a constant with the help of senior leadership, even when the kua defeat could have thrust the squad into cruise control. “That loss actually brought this team closer together,” Kiley says.

T

Running back/linebacker Eric Dean ’10 scored the winning touchdown in the championship game. A twosport standout from Gilford, New Hampshire, Dean scored on an eighty-five-yard touchdown pass from sophomore quarterback Jake Kiley ’12 (Plymouth, New Hampshire) that would be all the points the Huskies would need. Dean led a stubborn defense from his linebacker position that allowed only seventy-six points in nine games. With two-way, postgraduate lineman Andrew Lebowitz ’10 (Andover, Massachusetts) leading the way with sixty tackles and six sacks and postgraduate defensive back Alex White (Brockton, Massachusetts), the Huskies featured elite players at every level of the defense. Offensively, nhs leaned on a balanced running attack led by All-Evergreen selection Jet Kollie ’10 (Lowell, Massachusetts), a 5-foot-5 senior headed to Lafayette College who electrified crowds with his cutback runs. Though Jake Kiley was a game changer on defense, intercepting seven passes from his safety position, his guidance of the offense was his defining trait. The sophomore threw for 12 touchdowns and over 850 yards in nine games.

Championship Season 2009 Football Team Record:

8-1

Opponent Portsmouth Abbey Dexter Vermont Academy Hyde Pomfret Proctor Kimball Union Tilton Canterbury

Score 40-13 48-8 47-6 48-0 48-0 46-22 27-26 42-0 15-0

Memories for each of the players certainly will endure, and as Alex White confirmed, there was something else working for the 2009 Huskies. “It was always about the team,” White says. “It was never about one person.” r — Will McCulloch

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at

hall of fame 2 0 0 9

wit

tro

Un

La

Pa

Ste

tea

Ga

’68

kn

We

’68

Ro

Jam

’55

An

jamie arsenault, lou gnerre, coaching inductee harrison golden, andrew menke, mark tilton

athletic hall of fame The Fourth Annual Athletic Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony on October 3, 2009, showcased athletes and coaches from a multitude of decades. The male athlete recipients included Richard “Yogi” Cote, Class of 1955, a football, basketball and baseball player extraordinaire, who adds the nhs Hall of Fame to three previous inductions, and Andrew M. Cohen, Class of 1967, who was an enormously gifted soccer, basketball, and tennis player who continued to shine in tennis at the University of Maryland. Lisa Sher, Class of 1987, the female athlete honoree, was an outstanding three-sport athlete (soccer, ice hockey, and lacrosse) at nhs and won a national championship in lacrosse at St. Lawrence University. The 2009 coach inductee was New Hampton’s beloved Harrison Golden, a mentor, teacher, and coach for almost forty years whose presence on the Husky football fields was legendary. The team award honored the 1967 Men’s Varsity Soccer Team, a unique combination of talented and determined athletes who ended their season undefeated. Their fall campaign in 1967 featured wins

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by Cindy Buck

against a number of independent school rivals, including traditional power Phillips Exeter. A rainy afternoon of home football and soccer games rounded out a special day in New Hampton School’s history. Refer to the box below to add your own nomination(s) to the growing list for consideration by the nhs Athletic Hall of Fame Committee. r

bel

wif

nhs is currently seeking nominations for its 2010 Hall of Fame. For more information, please go to www.newhampton.org/halloffame. Nominations can be made through an online form, by mail to Director of Athletics, New Hampton School, 70 Main Street, New Hampton, NH, 03256, or by e-mailing jarsenault@newhampton.org.

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at right: Steven Parmelee ’68 with the 1967 championship

hall of fame 2 0 0 9

trophy; below left: The 1967 Undefeated Soccer Team (l–r), Lansing Deane ’68, Steven Parmelee ’68, Coach Austin Stern, Vicki Filson (widow of team member Mark Filson ’69), Gary Lemberger ’68, Neil Stalker ’68, John Romagna ’68 (both kneeling), Robert-Grant Wealleans ’68, Dean Jacobson ’68, Bill Ness ’68, and Gordon Rose ’68; below right: (l–r) Jamie Arsenault, Ralph Brown ’55, Richard “Yogi” Cote ’55, Andrew Menke.

on

below, left: (l–r) Kevin Burke ’91, Zack Costello ’02, Billy Anfiero ’96, Mark Tilton, Scott Tkachuk ’97, Gregory McTigue ’91. below, right: Andrew Cohen ’67 with his wife Johanna and daughter Cassie.

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student profile

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merrill clerkin ’ 1 0

merrill clerkin ’10 four-year senior from beverly, massachusetts 5 activities/athletics: student body vice president, soccer, skiing, and lacrosse 5 college destination: st. lawrence university what will you remember most about your experience here? New Hampton might have been memorable to some for the sports, arts, or academics. However, for me, what I will never forget are the hundreds of close relationships I have made with both my peers and faculty members. New Hampton’s close-knit community will be my reason to return. nhs is celebrating forty years of women. how would you characterize the experience of women at nhs today? The community of women at New Hampton to me is made up of strong, talented women who follow what they want and strive for the best. The adult women in my life here at school have empowered me to be the confident young woman I am today. Women’s achievements all around are recognized and appreciated. F

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china exchange

a defining experience The inaugural China Exchange is a smashing success of Chinese students their age and experience the culture for two weeks.” While the students enjoyed the tourist experience in a new country, the real learning moments occurred during the five-day stay at Shibei. “ We saw a transformation when students went beyond just seeing sights and were able to see how people lived, and that happened at Shibei,” says Love. For Grant Ballou ’11, a Philadelphia native, the essence of the growing relationship between China and the United States became obvious when a Shibei teacher talked about the two countries. “ Toward the end of one class, the teacher was talking to our guide and he said the U.S. and China have a strong Global Curriculum Coordinator Dan Love, Merrill Clerkin ’10, Ollie Long ’11, Anthony Bicchieri ’11, Luca

economic relationship but he’d like to

Perotti ’10, Grant Ballou ’11, and faculty member Charles Custer at the Great Wall of China.

see more of this type of relationship.”

I’ve been around the world a

The Great Wall, the Forbidden City, and

ing those moments when it is possible to

Tiananmen Square were a few of the his-

share experiences, ideas, and questions.

torical landmarks that five New

Merrill Clerkin ’10 discovered those oppor-

and other landmarks was fun,

Hampton School students and two facul-

tunities in the most casual of settings.

but going to a school was

China. But the nhs representatives were

were some of the conversations we had

not simply tourists. The inaugural China

with some of the students in Wuxi,” says

Exchange Program afforded students the

Merrill. “ When (the guys) were playing

opportunity to spend considerable time

basketball it got really personal.

At the heart of educational travel is find-

lot, so seeing the Great Wall

different. I don’t usually go to schools when I travel to places like Argentina, Columbia, Spain or France. That’s what really stood out about this trip. —Luca Perotti ’10

ty members visited in a recent trip to

at the Shibei High School in Wuxi, and

“The most interesting part of the trip

“ When they think of America, they

opened their eyes to different customs,

think great things. It was interesting to

cuisines, and educational culture.

hear what they had to say. It was really

According to Dan Love, nhs’s Global Curriculum Coordinator who led the trip, the students’ healthy curiosity and willingness to embrace a different culture made the trip successful. “The expectation was that students would find the opportunity to learn out-

interesting to have that interaction.” The differences in the educational setting were striking to the nhs students, too. “(Shibei) is so much different than nhs,” Grant says. “It’s so strict and there are fifty kids to a class.” New Hampton School now awaits the

side the classroom in a real life travel

second part of the exchange when Shibei

experience,” Mr. Love says. “Our expec-

students will find their way to Central

tations were far exceeded when students

New Hampshire and experience the

were able to see China through the lens

school in all its splendor in the spring.  — Will McCulloch

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The campaign reporter

New Hampton School

GO BEYOND. the campaign for new hampton school

W W W. N E W H A M P T O N . O R G / G O B E YO N D

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go beyond: the campaign for new hampton school

a message

from the campaign chair at left: Debbie Pilalas O’Malley, Dean Jacobson ’68, Andrew Menke and Robert Kennedy ’50 toast the kick-off of GO BEYOND.

dred years. GO BEYOND brings together our longstanding strengths and traditions with vital, relevant, and cutting-edge curriculum, programs, and facilities for the twenty-first century. We are off to a strong start. In the last twenty-four months, New Hampton School has raised over $23,000,000 in gifts and pledges towards our goal of $30,600,000. With your help, we have constructed The Pilalas Center for Math and Science and Kennedy Field, a synthetic turf field. The last two years have seen unprecedented growth in the Annual Fund with an increase of eighteen percent, and we are just beginning! We hope you will visit campus soon to see for yourself the exciting direction your school is headed. There is at once

As New Hampton School approaches its third century of college preparatory education, we enter an exciting chapter in the school’s venerable history. We are proud to announce the kickoff of GO BEYOND: The Campaign for

A product of the school’s strategic plan

much to celebrate and work to be done.

and comprehensive in nature, GO

In the coming months, we will begin a

BEYOND will support initiatives in three

major restoration project of Meservey

critical areas: construction and restora-

Hall, and we will set to work on signifi-

tion, growth of the school’s endowment,

cantly growing the school’s endowment.

and growth of the Annual Fund. Each

Now, more than ever, New Hampton

will have a powerful impact on the

School needs you.

school, providing the leverage and

We appreciate your support and hope

resources to reach its greatest potential.

you will join us in taking New Hampton

The campaign represents New Hampton

School to new heights.

School’s commitment to preparing stu-

Together, we will GO BEYOND!

dents for life and learning in the

New Hampton School.

twenty-first century.

All the best,

New Hampton School today is healthy and vibrant. Empowered by a distinctive, three-pronged strategic plan that stresses a global approach, local application, and purposeful exploration, the school

Dean Jacobson ’68

has embarked on a historic journey to

Trustee and Campaign Chairman

meet the challenges of the next one hun-

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go beyond: the campaign for new hampton school

campaign briefs GO BEYOND $30.6 million campaign goal

campaign reaches 77 percent New Hampton School alumni, parents, friends,

$23.80 million to date

faculty, students, and sta have rallied to support excellence in education. With a combination of capital gifts, annual fund participation, and support of the endowment, GO BEYOND has surpassed seventy-seven percent of its goal of $30.6 million.

Campaign progress as of March 1, 2010

campaign goals r construction and renovation: r Meservey Hall: $4.5 million r Pilalas Center for Math

$15.4 million

and Science: $9.7 million

r Kennedy Turf Field: $1.2 million r endowment support: r Faculty Chairs: $3.0 million r Facilities Endowment: $3.0 million r Student Scholarships: $3.0 million r Creating Global Citizens: $1.0 million r annual fund: above: Lydia Gill ’10 performs an experiment in the new Pilalas Center for Math and Science.

GO BEYOND campaign goal:

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$10.0 million

$5.2 million $30.6 million

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go beyond: the campaign for new hampton school

campaign briefs steve delaney ’65 on supporting nhs On The Importance of The Pilalas Center There has been a transformation in the academic focus by the Board of Trustees to heighten the educational experience at nhs, and the new math and science center has been physical proof of that. The Pilalas Center is devoted to math and science, two of the most important disciplines in our economy today. On The Impact of Giving at a Small School Being a small school, New Hampton does not have a large universe of alumni. I have found that whatever contribution you can make to the School—whether it is financial or expertise—will have a meaningful impact. The School is interested in what you have to say and how you would Peter Galletly ’73 P’09, Steve

like to help. They want you to participate. New Hampton is a place where you can make a differ-

Delaney ’65, and Andrew Menke

ence and see the visible results.

A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and Villanova Law School, Steve Delaney was elected to the Board of Trustees in 2006. A trial lawyer in the Navy JAGC and the SEC in the 1970s, Steve worked as Assistant General Counsel at Merrill Lynch before a twenty-two-year stint at Lehman Brothers in the capital markets arena. Steve is currently the General Counsel for Advanced Portfolio Management in New York. r

bill guardenier ’62 talks about giving back On His Service to New Hampton School I felt like I could make a commitment and contribution at nhs. And, through the voice of the Board of Trustees, it has been rewarding to see the continued development of nhs. On Why He Gives Back The School provided me a platform to go to a college which was a good fit for me. I came out of a public school system in New Haven, Connecticut, that was at that time in “transition.” New Hampton prepared me for college and, I believe, provided the foundation for my future endeavors. It’s not only the affinity I have for the school, but also the respect and gratitude I have for Bud Moore ’38, a true mentor. I don’t know where I would be, or for that matter, many nhs alums would be without his guidance. “ TH” made a difference, along with several memorable teachers Betsy and Bill Guardenier ’62

such as “Joe” Rice and Bert Lamb.

A member of the New Hampton School Board of Trustees since 1999, Bill is currently a Senior Managing Director of First Manhattan, Co., a New York investment management firm. He received his BA in Economics from Hobart College and a MBA from the Rutgers University School of Business. r

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go beyond: the campaign for new hampton school

meservey hall

h

istorically, Meservey Hall has been home to New Hampton School’s

math and science programs. In the summer of 2009 these disciplines moved into

r meservey hall cost:

$4,500,000

r Building Cost $3.5 million r Endowment $1.0 million

The Pilalas Center for Math and Science, creating an opportunity for the restoration of Meservey Hall.

Inclusive by design, this new wing off

With a concentration on connecting

the back side of Meservey will be a major

the past with our current global econo-

dents hailing from outside the United

campus transformation. The front por-

my, history at New Hampton School will

States from eighteen different coun-

tion of Meservey will be restored in

focus on linking historical trends to

tries, creating a home for the school’s

keeping with its original, historic style.

social science issues such as water usage,

International Programs is critical. The

The front doors of the building will be

power, and energy.

new International Studies Center will

opened once again as the main entrance.

be a place in which different cultures

The history department will move into

the Office of Admission will move into

are celebrated.

the second and third floors of this space.

new space created in this building. r

With twenty percent of nhs stu-

In addition to these improvements,

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top: Ian O’Malley, Debbie Pilalas O’Malley, Jason Pilalas ’58,

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Rena Pilalas, Troy Pilalas, and Alyson Wycoff. bottom: Jason

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Pilalas’ yearbook photo.

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The Building of Success

By Will McCulloch

Jason Pilalas ’58, a Portrait of Loyalty

Jason Pilalas ’58 has accumulated

said. “ The school always treated me right

Moore recalls how Jason “operated

and bent over backwards for me. They

just under the surface” around campus

treated me with a lot more mercy than I

during his four years. He was well liked

prominent analyst, thoughtful

deserved at the time.”

by his peers and was the manager of the

leader, passionate usc alum,

Science is a tangible foundation for the

a mischievous side to Jason. So Mr.

school’s promising future and continued

Moore made sure that their relationship

evolution. Likewise, it is evident that a

was cemented in trust.

numerous identities in his lifetime:

military history buff, Naval officer, and above all—family man. He also, undoubtedly, is one of New Hampton School’s dearest friends. On October 30, with the School com-

The Pilalas Center for Math and

small independent school in central New

soccer and hockey teams. Still, there was

“I have a sense of why I put quite a bit

Hampshire helped provide a defining

of energy into my relationship with him,”

foundation for the later success of a boy

Mr. Moore said. “He was the type of kid

from Greenwich, Connecticut.

who if he wasn’t with you, could raise a lit-

In addition to his financial support,

tle trouble. I always let him know that he

Jason has provided priceless service to

could talk to me and trust me. There was

munity, the Board of Trustees, friends,

the school as a member of the Board of

modicum of understanding between us.”

and the entire Pilalas family in atten-

Trustees since 1989 and the chairman

dance, a new math and science building

from 1998 until 2008.

was officially dedicated to Jason and his

During his tenure as chairman, Jason

And there was a shared passion. Mr. Moore had served in the Navy, and Jason consumed his stories with fond-

wife Rena. The ceremony included

ushered the school through some chal-

ness and appreciation. Jason did not

remarks from Andrew Menke, Chairman

lenging moments and into a time of

leave the school as one of its most

of the Board Peter Galletly ’73 P ’09,

optimism and innovation.

accomplished students in the class-

Keynote Speaker Dr. Ross Virginia of

“Rena and Jason’s gift has given a boost

room. As Moore recalled during the

Dartmouth College, Headmaster Emeritus

of confidence to New Hampton School,”

dedication ceremony, “Jason started off

T. Holmes Moore ’38, and Jason and

Head of School Andrew Menke said.

slow and tapered off.” Still, the former

Rena’s son Troy Pilalas, who called his

More than fifty years ago, New

headmaster saw his passion for military

father “my hero” in an emotional speech.

Hampton School provided Jason with a

history, his radiant intelligence, and the

The dedication officially marked the

similar boost. It was former headmaster

curiosity that engulfed him when he was

first time that the Pilalas name was put

T. Holmes Moore ’38 who first met Jason

interested in a subject.

on a New Hampton School building, but

and his father in 1954 at the Waldorf

not the first time Jason has showed his

Hotel in New York City.

passion for nhs. “It’s a great feeling to help out the things you love,” Jason said to the crowd. With the vision and acumen that

“I had a feeling about him,” Mr. Moore recalled. “He was a bright, bright kid.” Mr. Moore saw a little bit of himself as

It would serve him well as he moved on to the Navy and then matriculated to usc, where he benefitted from a scholarship and continually improved as a student. “I suspect Bud Moore had a lot to do

a teenager in the youngster with a

with me getting a scholarship to usc,”

defined his success in his professional

demanding father. Jason had plenty of

said Jason, who raised his two children,

life for thirty-six years, Jason saw the

academic potential, but his self-confi-

Debbie and Troy, with Rena in the Los

demand for a new building on academic

dence did not tip any scales. That

Angeles area. “And that’s where the idea

row and possessed the generosity to

meeting began a relationship between

of excelling took hold.”

address it with a gift to New Hampton

Mr. Moore and Jason that the former

School that will resonate for decades.

After three tours serving his country in

headmaster considers an illustration of

Vietnam, Jason went on to Harvard

“I have a real feeling of indebtedness

how education, especially in a boarding

Business School, and then helped Capital

and affection for New Hampton,” Jason

school setting, can accomplish so much.

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go beyond: the campaign for new hampton school

an inspiring pledge the pilalas family eyes preservation Debbie Pilalas O’Malley (above) was supposed to give a

through the crowd gathered in the lobby of The Pilalas

the dedication of a new building in the family’s name that

Center. It was another example of the family’s fondness for

helped launch the largest capital campaign in New

The School and its direction. Jason and Rena made a lead

Hampton School history.

gift of $5 million to build the $10 million-dollar Pilalas

But the proud daughter of Jason ’58 and Rena Pilalas happily played the part of messenger as she surprised

Center for Math and Science. “ We are exceedingly grateful to Jason and Rena and look

alumni, parents, and friends who gathered for the official

forward to many years of wonderful teaching and learning

kickoff of GO BEYOND: The Campaign for New Hampton

in this exceptionally beautiful space!” added Menke.

School. Pilalas O’Malley announced that her parents have

The gift has helped the school reach the $23 million mark

committed another $2 million in support of New

in its quest to raise over $30 million over six years.

Hampton School.

Comprehensive in nature, GO BEYOND addresses needs in

Only hours after cutting the ribbon at the official dedication ceremony of The Pilalas Center for Math and Science, Jason and Rena promised to make accommoda-

three critical areas: construction and restoration, annual fund, and endowment. “I can’t think of a more inspiring way to kick off our

tions in their estate plans for a $2 million endowment for

campaign than to learn of the $2,000,000 endowment

The Pilalas Center for Math and Science.

commitment made by Jason and Rena Pilalas,” said Sandy

“ The Pilalas family announcement was amazing,” Head

26

The announcement of the gift sent a burst of excitement

toast to her parents on October 30, 2009, commemorating

Colhoun, Director of Development. “ With Dean Jacobson

of School Andrew Menke said. “ This kind of phenomenal

at the helm as our campaign chair and with the momen-

support just takes our breath away, and inspires others to

tum the school has generated, there is nothing we can’t

generously step forward.”

accomplish.” r

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jason pilalas ’5 8 : the building of success

clockwise from left: Jason Pilalas ’58, Rena Pilalas, and Andrew Menke; Troy Pilalas and Jason Pilalas; the Board of Trustees after the dedication.

“ Jason has an amazing ability to listen to a lot of different points of view, and then quickly synthesize, summarize, and suggest a game plan for moving forward,” says New Hampton School Head of School Andrew Menke. continued from page 25

“He has been extremely instrumental

“Jason is the type of guy for whom it

Group morph into a giant in the financial

in forwarding the mission of the school,”

really comes from the heart. He’s a very

sector with his willingness to take calcu-

Galletly said. “He has served diligently in

emotional man,” Galletly said. “He hon-

lated risks and think unconventionally

several key areas. For Jason to look back

ors people who have served in the

for nearly four decades.

and fondly remember all the things that

military, especially those who have given

got him to where he is today, that is

the ultimate sacrifice.”

“ What he has accomplished in his business and personal life has been amazing,” current Chairman of the Board Peter Galletly ’73 said. Jason never forgot New Hampton School, though. He notes a chance encounter with former Board of

extraordinary.” According to Head of School Menke,

And so New Hampton School has honored Jason and his family for not only their

Jason’s leadership has been invaluable to

contribution to the building of a modern

the school and his example has guided

facility for math and science, but also for

others.

their unwavering loyalty and a lasting lega-

“He has an amazing ability to listen to

cy that will inspire others to continue to

Trustees Chairman Bob Kennedy ’50 in a

a lot of different points of view, and then

business meeting in Los Angeles in the

quickly synthesize, summarize, and sug-

1980s “reawakened all the feelings I had

gest a game plan for moving forward,”

School students to take advantage of the

about New Hampton.”

Menke said.

opportunity.

The ensuing years merely have show-

Jason’s generosity was apparent long

invest in New Hampton School. Now Jason just wants New Hampton

“If you tear it down, I’m going to be very

cased Jason’s feelings for the school and

before The Pilalas Center came to fruition,

disappointed,” Jason said as he closed his

innate capacity to lead.

and his gifts to the school over the years

speech. “If you wear it out, I’m going to be

have reflected his personality and ideals.

very happy.” r

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alumni profile

ice cream cone king dean jacobson ’68 takes a bite out of novelty biz By Will McCulloch

When Dean Jacobson ’68 considers the connection between the four years he spent at New Hampton School and his booming business that fills ice cream trucks from coast to coast, he points to a lonely place: the goal. Jacobson was a three-sport standout at nhs (soccer, hockey, lacrosse) and culled an understanding of teamwork, compassion, and hard work from all his experiences in central New Hampshire in the 1960s. Still, it was his experience as a goalkeeper in hockey and lacrosse that perhaps provided him with his most defining traits. “It hardens you,” says Jacobson, who went on to Colgate University. “It makes you not afraid to take risks. You have to be confident, almost cocky to be successful as a goalie. It made me fearless.” Fearlessness brought Dean Jacobson and his wife Bo to Le Mars, Iowa, a decade ago. After turning around businesses like Chicago Tissue and Ace Baking Company as a ceo, Jacobson and his wife founded BoDeans Baking Company in 2000. Jacobson identified a monopoly in the production of cones for ice cream novelties like Drumstick, and set out to shake up the industry. “I went to the main dairy accounts,” says Jacobson, a Long Island, New York native. “And I said you can’t be happy being supplied by a monopoly supplier.” Jacobson immediately signed three different supply agreements with dairy companies and built a new factory in Le Mars, know as the ice cream capital of the world. BoDeans now has approximately fifty percent of that market. They make six hundred million ice cream cones and four hundred million continued on page 30

dean jacobson ’68 in bodeans baking facility in le mars, iowa

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dean jacobson ’6 8

continued from page 28

“BoDeans is very well respected in the

It was classic Dean, according to Adler,

sleeves for the cones each year. They also

community with its team concept,” says

displaying his ability to communicate

produce three billion ice cream sandwich

Neal Adler, the Executive Director of the

easily with employees and partners while

wafers each year in a market that required

Le Mars Business Initiative Corporation,

never hiding his competitive streak.

them to break a thirty-year monopoly.

who has worked with Jacobson over the

While many American companies

years. “It’s made it a popular place, and

took to the Jacobsons’ style immediately.

it’s refreshing.”

BoDeans not only created jobs, but it also

have struggled in recent years, BoDeans continues to grow, investing millions in

Adler tells the story of when Dean and

Adler says that the Le Mars community

created a workplace that defies common

technology and adding new jobs. The

Bo Jacobson first moved to Iowa in 2000.

company’s cone and wafer numbers cer-

They were living in a hotel in Sioux City

tainly show the company’s rapid growth

for the first three months, and Adler

ple have taken ownership,” Jacobson

and expansion. Nevertheless, they don’t

would drive to see them for visits.

says. “They have personal pride invested

tell the true story of the company’s effi-

“By the time Dean and Bo moved out

practices in corporate America. “The most important thing is that peo-

and they feel good about the place where

ciency and culture. BoDeans has

of the hotel, everyone who worked at the

they work. We have an upbeat working

achieved its place in the market with the

hotel wanted to go work for them,” Adler

environment. When people go through

help of an unconventional approach to

recalls. “They’re just great people.”

the plant they see that there’s a whole dif-

manufacturing that is grounded in a

And even better business people.

ferent attitude that’s being projected than

basic philosophy.

Jacobson and the company have

most places.”

“Professional people come into an

earned their share of awards. Dean was

The couple logged countless hours cre-

organization with motivation, and man-

named Entrepreneur of the Year by Ernst

ating BoDeans’ enigmatic culture. In the

agement stifles creativity and

& Young in 2003, and BoDeans was

early days of the company, Bo worked on

innovativeness,” Jacobson says.

ranked No. 252 in 2005 in Inc. Magazine’s

the production line with employees and

annual ranking of the five hundred fast-

Dean helped clean the facility on

company that tries to “enable its

ing growing privately owned companies

Saturdays.

employees.” There are no supervisors,

in America.

Jacobson describes BoDeans as a

and he says quality manufacturing

Dean and Bo now split time between

When BoDeans was named business of

Delray Beach, Florida, and Park City,

comes from self-directed work teams.

the year in Le Mars only two years after

Utah. With technology and a management

He empowers his employees on the floor

being founded, Adler recalls Dean making

team in which he is confident, Dean

and gives them ownership in the compa-

a humorous acceptance speech in which

needs only monthly trips to Le Mars.

ny with end-of-the-year profit sharing.

he said the ice cream capital of the world

The amount an employee receives is

might soon be dubbed “the ice cream

directly related to anonymous evalua-

cone capital of the world.”

tions from fellow team members.

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“ We’re in play mode now,” Jacobson says. And the fun fact is that there will always be a demand for ice cream cones! r

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forty years of women

celebrating forty years of women at new hampton school

one of new hampton’s first women’s lacrosse teams in the 1970s

W

hen former headmaster T. Holmes Moore recalls the coeducation of New Hampton School, he points to two isolated presentations to the Board of Trustees that shaped the decision. “The first time we ran the idea of going to coeducation by the Board was in 1968,” Moore says. “I made the presentation purely on the fact that it is natural for boys and girls to live together. That didn’t fly at all. So the next year I did another presentation to the Board purely on financial considerations.” The rest is history. The Board voted for coeducation in less than fifteen minutes. The group recognized, like so many other educational institutions, that the time had arrived for boys and girls to be educated together. For the last forty years, women have helped define New Hampton School as an institution. During Reunion Weekend 2010, the School will celebrate Forty Years of Women at New Hampton School. In recognition of this anniversary, a special reunion sub-committee was created to encourage as many women as possible to return for Reunion 2010 to col-

before 1970 Long before women enrolled in New Hampton School in 1970, the school produced spirited women graduates. Pauline Swain Merrill: One of three siblings who grew up in New Hampton on Old Bristol Road, Pauline Swain graduated from New Hampton Literary Institution in 1921 and was the valedictorian of her class. She and her sister Hope made the two-mile walk to the village and lived in Draper Hall in the winters on the third floor. Pauline graduated from Northeastern University Law School in 1928 and became one of the first women lawyers in New Hampshire. She was active in the town community

lectively celebrate this milestone in New Hampton School’s history. A few events throughout reunion weekend will highlight nhs alumnae including an art

watercolor by taryn houghton ’08

and became a trustee of New Hampton School while raising four children and practicing law. Martha Hazeltine: A native of Rumney, New Hampshire, Martha was one of the last students to attend the New Hampton Academy before it became the New Hampton Academic and Theological Institution. After graduating in 1827, Martha became the principal of the school’s Female Department and left a resonating imprint on students with her passion for teaching, strong moral foundation, and personality. After resigning as principal in 1839, she married Rev. Joseph Smith. She became sick soon after and passed away in 1841. r — Courtesy of Jinga Moore

show and a Women’s Round Table Luncheon (please see the Reunion schedule on inside cover of this magazine). r — Will McCulloch

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faculty profile

jennifer shackett berry ’83 director of studies/english faculty 5 years at nhs: twenty-three 5 “i thought i would stay for a year or two, then go to law school.” what makes new hampton, new hampton? A lack of pretension; I think nhs students and faculty are true to themselves. For years, we called it authenticity, but it is more than that. New Hampton is such a supportive environment for all community members that individuality can flourish and people are respected for their diverse talents. how has nhs changed over the years and what has stayed the same? nhs has become more programmatically focused. This is due to the focused leadership of Andrew. What has not changed is the sense of community and the lack of pretension. nhs is celebrating forty years of women. how would you characterize the experience of women at nhs today? The women are more confident and powerful. When I arrived at nhs, in the fall of 1979, I was a girl who attended a boy’s school. There were few female faculty mentors. It was not uncommon for me to be the only girl in a class. Athletically, I knew I wanted to be a college athlete, but there were few mentors in this area as well. Now we have strong and multiple female role models on campus. F

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lou’s corner

Hello friends, Recently I was talking to Richard Thall ’55 about the induction of Yogi Cote ’55 into the Athletic Hall of Fame. Health issues prevent Richard from getting back and he asked if I could send him a map of the campus so he could compare New Hampton School in 1955 to New Hampton School at present. So it got me thinking, how has the campus changed in the past fifty-two years since I arrived in 1957? In 1957, classes were held in Meservey and Lane. Meservey also housed the gymnasium with a balcony that served as an indoor track. There were nine dormitories: Preston, Lewis, Randall, Berry, Pillars, Moore, Caswell, Draper and Ebbels. The mansion had burned down the year before I arrived and Lewis Hall (a nightmare) was built in the dead of winter on the site formerly occupied by the Mansion (front gate). Berry, in addition to housing freshmen boys (there were only boys), accommodated the Admission Office and the Administration Office. We all gathered in Berry lounge before meals, which were served in the basement. Edith Sheen ran the dining room and Irwin Shaw the kitchen. There was a small cottage on “Blueberry Hill.” It was the infirmary as well as the home of Virginia McMaster, the school nurse who was on call twenty-four hours a day. The cottage occupied the site of the current Academic Research Center and was the location of our fledgling photography program and school radio station. In 1957, there were twelve total buildings with many of them serving more than one purpose. Berry was a dorm, the administration building and the dining room. Meservey was the gym and the classroom building. Lane held classrooms and in the basement a pottery shop with classes conducted by Rich Sanderson, and later, Barbara Rankin. Draper was a dorm, but the Maintenance Department was also located in the basement. What about athletic facilities? We had one field behind Berry Hall, the Meservey gym, two tennis courts behind Randall, and the pond served as the hockey rink. There was a spring that fed the southwest corner of the pond so often that a section of the “rink” was water instead of ice. Skip Howard tried other locations for the hockey rink, including the tennis courts and parking lot behind Randall. Our Zamboni was a 56-gallon drum on wheels. What has happened since 1957? Frederick Smith Gymnasium was constructed. This enabled the renovation of Meservey. Memorial Hall

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was constructed, freeing the basement of Berry to become a print shop operated by Harold Elliott, and a bookstore run by Clara Frame. Later, this area was remodeled to make space for the business office. Still later, the bookstore moved to the Moore Center/Crum Campus Center and the technology department moved in. The basement of Meservey became Madan Auditorium. Meservey will soon be renovated once again. McEvoy Theater was built and then The Moore Center. It contains Galletly Gallery, a photo lab, a student lounge, a post office, classrooms, the bookstore, and the snack bar. The field house was constructed adjacent to the gym, creating a large, campus-center complex (gym, classrooms, theater). Nine clay tennis courts were built, along with a covered hockey rink. Dow infirmary was constructed, but the infirmary later moved to Pillars, which was remodeled when Dow became a dorm. The Academic Research Center was built next to the pond on the former site of the Cottage. Most recently, Randall Hall was demolished to make room for The Pilalas Center for Math and Science. New dormitories have been built: first Veazey, then Lindsay, Small, Phillips, Rice and Galletly, creating a new residential complex on the western side of campus. The Upper Field (Farrelly Gilmore), later known as the “Dust Bowl,” became our second field and is now the site of Kennedy Field with synthetic turf and lights. Palazzi Field was created off Route 132, east of the main campus. A ski area was created on Burleigh Mountain, which was later abandoned for lack of snow-making equipment, and is now the site of an our Alpine Tower, a ropes course, and hiking trails. Preston Hall no longer exists. What have I forgotten? So many changes have taken place. I must have left something out. When is the last time you have seen the campus? It’s spectacular! Let me hear from you about your memories of the school.

Lou Gnerre Alumni Ambassador P.S. If you know the recipient of The Outstanding Male Athlete Award for 1952 and between 1954 and 1957, please let me know. Thank you!

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former faculty: where are they now?

photograph from the library of congress

The Alumni Office asked me to track down a handful of New Hampton School faculty legends and find out what they are up to now. Send me a note with someone you’d like to hear about, and I’ll do my best to

retired from teaching in 2009. The last decade has been an exciting one as he transitioned to life without working. “Went crazy and bought an apartment in Paris (in 2000),” Peter says, “and the following year bought a fifteenth-century house in the town of Dinan in Brittany in France. Needless to say, life has not been the same since.” F

find them. Contact me at lgnerre@newhampton.org. — lou gnerre

peter bixby

peter a. bixby After joining the nhs faculty in September 1966, Peter was chairman of the math department and coached skiing (The Bixby Award is named for him), cutting two ski trails on Burleigh and installing the rope tow using only student labor. He left nhs in 1978, and worked for the next eight years at Choate Rosemary School in Wallingford, Connecticut, where he taught math, coached girls soccer and skiing, oversaw the spring projects period, became a class dean, and according to Peter “taught actor Paul Giamatti all he knows.”

nancy and john conkling

After leaving Choate in 1985, Peter divorced his first wife and married Francelle Carapetyan, the former Vice Principal for Student Life at Choate, and moved back to New Hampshire, where he started his own company, Bixby Restorations. His first-born son, Mason, came to live with him in 1986 and graduated from Conval High in 1989. Meantime, Peter and Francelle adopted a four-day-old baby, Alexander Locle Bixby, born in Nashua in 1987. Peter returned to teaching in 1994 with stints in the Hillsborough-Deering (NH) district and then in Peterborough. Peter sold his company in 2000 and then

john conkling During his tenure at nhs, John Conkling filled a variety of roles. He taught math, coached skiing, and worked as a guidance counselor at nhs beginning in September 1958, and left in June 1966 to begin his own real estate company. John married Nancy Wiesner in December 1960, with Lou Gnerre and David Rice serving as ushers. They moved into the old Merrill Farm on Blake Hill Road in 1964, and still reside there today. John ran Conkling Real Estate Company until June 1984, when he closed it down and bought New England Appraisal. He ran that company until June 2000, when he retired. His three sons all graduated from nhs: John, Jr. “Cas” is Class of 1982, Sam is Class of 1985 and Robert is Class of 1989. All three sons, their wives, and six grandchildren reside in the Lakes Region of New Hampshire, which allows the family to spend considerable time together. Nancy and John ski all winter and spend summers at their camp on Squam Lake. They run off to Sanibel Island, Florida, for a couple weeks in the fall and spring. They continue to love the outdoors and especially canoe trips in Maine. F

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memories

The Jordan B. Miles Conspiracy As the Hamptonia ushers in a new feature in the magazine that will allow readers to sift through the last two centuries of the New Hampton School history, it is only appropriate that we lean on Headmaster Emeritus T. Holmes Moore ’38 for a start. New Hampton School was a vastly different place before Vietnam, the 1970s, and the last forty years of coeducation. As Bud recalls, “They were halcyon days for the school. The boys sometimes had to be quite inventive in the way they passed the time.” During the 1960s, we had a group of selfappointed intellectuals who took an advanced placement history class in which the teacher lectured and quoted noted historians to support his views. He also assigned thesis papers to his students and he was puzzled when two of the students quoted a “noted historian” named

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new hampton school

Jordan B. Miles to support their ideas because he had never heard of Jordan B. Miles. So, he went to the library to check up on this historian and lo and behold, there were several cards in the card catalog that represented resource books written by Jordan B. Miles. When the teacher sought the actual books, they were, of course, always out. Further investigation revealed that the students had conned the librarian into allowing them to put the cards in the catalog. It was an elaborate prank: these students were quoting from the writings of a historian who didn’t exist to substantiate their views. At this time, the School ran a Concert and Lecture Series to bring prominent authors and lecturers to the campus. The general plan was to have a reception for the guest followed by dinner

with the students, a talk, and then be around in the classes the next day. It was during the reception for the noted author Robert St. John that I caught wind of what the kids were doing, so I decided to stir the pot by enlisting the services of Robert St. John, who lived in Switzerland, the same place where the students had Jordan B. Miles living. I asked Robert St. John, posing as Jordan B. Miles, to write to the editor of the school newspaper, “I understand that there is a cell of young intellectuals at your school who are interested in my writings.” He agreed and wrote the letter soon after returning to Switzerland. In due course, the visibly incredulous editor of the Manitou came into my office and dropped a letter on my desk, saying “Read this!” I read the letter deliberately and, after a pause, said “you and I both know that Jordan B. Miles doesn’t exist and therefore someone is pulling your leg.” After another longer pause, I said to him, “Why not answer his letter, and when you don’t get a reply you’ll know this is a hoax.” So he answered the letter, thinking that this was the end, but almost overnight he got a letter which he shared with me. It read, “I was pleased to receive your recent letter and as luck will have it, I will be in the United States in April for speaking engagements and I would really like to come by and visit New Hampton and meet you and other members of the cell on the weekend of April 30th.” I thought that a face-to-face meeting with the New Hampton Cell and Jordan B. Miles would be a fitting dénouement, so I set about finding an intellectually nimble ninety-year-old to impersonate this mythical character. I found him in Alexandria, New Hampshire, and he was game. The meeting, however, never took place. In the winter issue of the Manitou, an obituary appeared marking the passing of Jordan B. Miles, 90, in Geneva, Switzerland. r — T. Holmes Moore ’38 Do you have a New Hampton School Memory for publication in the next Hamptonia? E-mail alumni@newhampton.org or send your story to Editor, Hamptonia, New Hampton School, 70 Main St., New Hampton, NH 03256.

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trustees officers Peter W. Galletly ’73, P’09, Chairman, Mahwah, New Jersey Richard W. Maine ’60, Vice Chairman, Avon, Connecticut Steven G. Delaney ’65, Finance Chairman, Harrison, New York Samantha M. Jewett, Esq. ’77, Secretary Gilford, New Hampshire

members Roger Ballou P’11, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Victoria A. Blodgett ’80, New Haven, Connecticut Alford J. Dempsey, Jr. ’65, victoria blodgett ’80

judge alford j. dempsey ’65

Atlanta, Georgia Sarah R. Goos P’13, Concord, Massachusetts

Two new trustees officially joined the Board of Trustees in January 2010. Both are graduates of nhs and will provide the board with a diverse set of credentials. Victoria A. Blodgett ’80 brings many years of experience in higher education to her service on the Board. Victoria has worked as the Assistant Dean and Director of Graduate Career Services at Yale University for the last four years. Victoria, a Connecticut native, received a Bachelor’s in American Studies (1985) and her a Master’s in Education (1990) from Keene State College. After stints working at Keene State and in the New Hampshire Department of Education, Victoria was employed in various capacities at Cornell University’s Graduate School, rising to become the chief student affairs officer overseeing 4,200 students before she left for Yale in 2006. An active volunteer who is currently working to organize nhs’s celebration of “Forty Years of Women,” Victoria is also a board member for the New Haven ymca Youth Center.

The Honorable Judge Alford J. Dempsey ’65 joins the board less than a year after giving a stirring commencement speech to the Class of 2009. Al attended New Hampton for four years, was a threesport athlete, and won the Meservey Medal before enrolling at Columbia University where he became a student activist. After returning to his native Georgia, Al enrolled at Morehouse, graduating cum laude in 1972. Al went on to Harvard Law School where he graduated in 1976. A resident of Atlanta, Georgia, Al has been a Superior Court Judge in Fulton County since 1995. Before becoming a judge in the Magistrate Court of Fulton County in 1992, Al worked for fifteen years as the Assistant City Attorney in Atlanta. Al has been a member of numerous boards in the Atlanta area, and is currently a member of the board of Aniz, Inc., a non-profit organization providing comprehensive hiv/aids/Hepatitis C health awareness. He was married to the late Colleen B. Dempsey for thirty-two years and has three children. — Will McCulloch

William F. Guardenier ’62, Mount Kisco, New York Ruth Haivanis P’04, West Newton, Massachusetts Paul Hamel P’07, ’08, Walpole, Massachusetts Herman A. Hassinger P’77, ’78, Trustee Emeritus, Block Island, Rhode Island Dean P. Jacobson ’68, Delray Beach, Florida Robert D. Kennedy ’50, Chairman Emeritus, New Canaan, Connecticut Earl R. Lewis ’62, Sudbury, Massachusetts Robinson C. Moore ’73, Groton, Massachusetts T. Holmes Moore ’38, Headmaster Emeritus, New Hampton, New Hampshire Jason M. Pilalas ’58, North Palm Beach, Florida Eugene E. Rainville ’57, Blu=ton, South Carolina Hugh B. Richardson ’57, Bristol, Rhode Island Karen M. Saunders P’08, Gilford, New Hampshire

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The Class Notes below reflect information received through December 18, 2009. Please send news and/or photos of yourself or other alumni to include in these pages to Hamptonia Class Notes, Alumni Office, New Hampton School, 70 Main Street New Hampton, NH 03256 or e-mail alumni@ newhampton.org. Thank you.

44 George Ahl, Jr. is writing a book titled Northwest Connecticut, 17th and Early 18th Centuries. The manuscript was completed in January 2010 and is a fascinating study of this area, including 23 field trips to founding towns. Writes Ahl: “There are direct descendants of the Founders still living here and willing to share their family history going back 367 years. A great experience at this time of my life. It is such a pleasure to read the Hamptonia and see the results of planned growth at New Hampton.”

Ted Jones ’49 and Malla Pizzuto sailing on Thanksgiving Day.

Duncan Grandin ’50 enjoying the sunshine in Montana.

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49 Theodore “Ted” Jones checks in from Beaufort, North California, where as of September 5, his boat Ocean Gypsy has been joined by Malla Jane Pizzuto from SedroWoolley, Washington, as first mate. “We’ve been working to prepare the ship to continue the voyage I started a year ago and took time out to smell the flowers of the little town where I used to live. We are waiting for a solar panel to supplement our engine driven generator (alternator) with 12 volts DC so we can run our computer(s), autopilot, and sundry auxiliaries while sailing.”

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NH/ME friends. Had some medical issues but just drove from Florida to New Hampshire to Taos, New Mexico, then to our Florida home. We visited with our children and grandchildren.” J. Philip O’Hara informed the Alumni Office at New Hampton School in December of 2009 that retirement will arrive for him on June 30, 2010, after 22 years at Brown University, where he is the Director of the Brown University Mediation Project. He said he will miss the student interaction, but that it will be fun to spend more time with Pat and their many grandchildren. His daughter was expecting twin boys in December of 2009. He said he may even return to mediation to maintain his awareness and energy.

Duncan Grandin writes that after battling some health problems he was able to travel to Montana, his first trip in a while. “I really got some great photos at Animals of Montana, Yellowstone, and Teton National Parks. Fourteen-hundred miles and hundreds of shots — loved it. No more plane travel for me. Only car trips nearby. Went to the Oregon coast over the Fourth of July Weekend. It was so foggy on the fourth that no one could see the fireworks over the Newport Bridge. I guess you can say that my age and problems have really caught up with me. But I still never leave without my camera. This is my life and interest.” Charles “Pokey” Haggerty stopped by campus in the Fall of 2009 with his wife and family members to say hello and show off his school. They were in New Hampshire for a family reunion. He recalled living in Berry and Draper. James Conrad was his roommate and he had plans to visit him during the trip as well. He lives in Florida.

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Mrs. William Cox is looking for a copy of the Double Quartet and/or Glee Club records from her late husband’s class. If you have either of these that you would consider loaning to the Alumni Office to make a copy for our archives and for Mrs. Cox, please contact Cindy Buck. Many thanks!

Allan Hodgkins writes: “I did get a chance to drive by the school in September. I see Randall Hall has been replaced. We are still volunteering at Manattee State Park in Chiefland, Florida. I looked up a few

William MacKinnon shared an update after a long absence. “I graduated from Boston College after a stint in the Navy, became an apprentice die cutter and was not happy, taught high school in Avon, Massachusetts, left and went into drug sales for Endo Labs, and then returned to teaching at Silver Lake Regional High School in Kingston, Massachusetts, and coached basketball, cross-country, and track. I also coached in Falmouth, Massachusetts, for twenty years, all the while, was a member of the Massachusetts Track and Field Official and Track and Field usa Associations. I actually officiated a meet between nhs and Thayer Academy. Of course I got married some time along the way. Carol was my date at the Winter Carnival. Small world.”

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Pete Charron ’54 and pups.

54 Peter Charron would love to attend reunion if it is in July or August. He recently moved 1.5 miles from previous abode to 8606 Centre Court, Largo, FL 33777. His old contact number is still valid. James “Jim” Wright writes he is “still kicking! Working on the 49th year in teaching (take that Bonzo). With any luck, I’ll be pretty good at it soon. Oh and I’m still coaching, now golf after a glorius career of baseball, football, hockey, etc. When is that 55th reunion at New Hampton? Did I miss it? See you at No. 60, Bonzo (maybe Toni and Tommy). Hello to Lou Gnerre.”

Carter ’57 and Vonnie Haff in Norway.

57 Carter Haff and his wife Vonnie took another wonderful trip in July of 2009 with Lindblad/National Geographic Expeditions. This time they went to Svalbard, Norway, where they boarded the NG Explorer, almost 900 miles above the Arctic Circle. They saw polar bears, seals, walruses, etc. They also got pretty close to the North Geographic Pole before the ice stopped them.

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alumni spotlight an interview with david abraham ’57

Finding his way to New Hampton School in the spring of 1956, David Abraham recalls his first interaction with T.H. “Bud” Moore. “He made an immediate impact on me and my father. We had driven in our farm truck from our home in New York Mills, New York. Mr. Moore gave me a sense of hope and offered me an opportunity I desperately needed.” Forever grateful for the challenges he’s encountered and conquered, David is most proud of the time in his life when he was asked to “return home because the family could not make ends meet.” Following graduation from New Hampton School, David spent a short time at Bethany College in West Virginia before returning home to work in a paper mill and be a full-time student at night. He earned his undergraduate degree from Syracuse University and pursued law school in Idaho. Because of the experience he had at New Hampton School, David chose to transfer from law school and earned a Masters of Education at the University of Idaho. After a few months in the western part of the country, David and his wife, Johanne, relocated to the Utica, New York area. There, David became a well-respected school administrator, and active participant in theatre productions, and an author of four books. Today, David and Johanne split time between New Hartford, New York, and Lake Suzy, Florida. q: How did you become involved with theater? a: I was injured in a construction accident prior to my arrival in 1956 (for a postgraduate year). I played running back for the football team that season and after the game against Dartmouth, one of my wounds had reopened and I was told to stop playing. I immediately had too much free time and learned a hard lesson after finding trouble with some friends who were visiting from home. I met with Bud the next morning and he commented on the amount of free time I suddenly had. Instead of sending me home, Bud encouraged me to try to Glee Club. Due to my lack of singing skills, I chose to audition for the upcoming play and earned the lead role of Robert Yank in Eugene O’Neil’s, The Hairy Ape. After all these years, theater continues to be big part of my life because I have the same rush from acting as I did playing football.

q: Can you explain what has kept you involved with education for so many years? a: Johanne and I returned to the Utica area after our time in the western part of the country. I started working in the South Lewis school district because of a connection with Johanne’s uncle. For two years, I taught history and coached football. After two years, I was encouraged to be a Guidance Counselor because I “was good with kids,” something I got from New Hampton School. I earned my certificate as a guidance counselor and after another two years I was offered a position as an Assistant Superintendent. This role opened my eyes to the many responsibilities of a school administrator. The responsibilities were endless and after 10 years in that role, I became a high school principal because the school could no longer afford to pay me as an assistant superintendent. Prior to the nhs Reunion in 1992, I had considered retirement. Fortunately, I had a long conversation with Bud and Jinga at Reunion and they encouraged me to “stick with it.” Bud told me I was “too young to retire. You need to do more.” From that day forward, I took advantage of several opportunities to help restructure school districts in close proximity to my home. I continue to be involved with the New York State Department of Education by reviewing education grants and serving as a consultant to administrators. q: You have written four books and are currently working on a fifth. What motivated you to start writing? a: My family history is very interesting. My father’s father came to the U.S. from Syria/Lebanon. His family was Christian. The Mohawk Valley is replete with people who came from all parts of Europe. My grandfather worked his way from Poland to the U.S. and got a job at a textile mill. After several years in the mill, he started his own farm. Eventually, I got to a place where I was telling the same story and one of my friends suggested I write a book about my family. Thy Father’s Seed was the first book. Then came Flight from Alberobello. My third book focused on my own life. Love and Promise told a story about a young boy growing up on a farm and what he had to do to reach his goal. New Hampton School is referenced in Love and Promise, too. The Principal is the most recent book. Right now, I’m working on my fifth book, Body Town. Because of my love for theater, I decided to write a musical. Sin City is written about Utica. Utica used to be known as the sin city of the east. I’ve completed the writing task and am currently waiting for a friend to complete the score. Upon completion, I will register the musical, produce it, and then try to sell it. The first one that becomes successful goes to New Hampton School as my way of saying thank you. q: What has kept you connected to nhs? a: I am who I am because of nhs and that is why I keep going back. Every time I go to nhs I have a sense of renewal in me. It’s hard to explain…it’s a pride. If you came from New Hampton you are special. I feel that way. — David Perfield, Development Officer

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59 Frederick Slamin was able to reconnect with the Alcaine family from El Salvador using Facebook. Migel ’49, Jose ’59 and Salvador ’59 (all attended nhs). Migel studied Business Administration at Fordham University and passed away in 1993. Jose studied at Rochester Polytechnic Institute, married in 1964, had three daughters, founded a printing business, Artes Graficas Publicitarias, and passed away in 1997. Salvador has five children and was thrilled to learn of his soccer team’s induction into the nhs Athletic Hall of Fame. He suffered a stroke two years ago and has difficulty walking and speaking. Fred was able to connect with his sister who indicated that Salvador is able to receive phone calls and letters. Those classmates interested in connecting with him can contact the Alumni Office at New Hampton School.

William Descary and his wife Sandra traveled from Bakersfield, California to Boston in July to enjoy several events that were part of Red Sox outfielder Jim Rice’s induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Bill was raised in New Hampshire and has remained a lifelong Red Sox fan. Their two sons, who are Californians, are also proud Red Sox fans. The Hall of Fame trip was part of a 40th anniversary celebration for the Descarys. The extensive trip included several events at Fenway— two days at the Park, time on the field, photos with the 2004 and 2007 World Series trophies and rings, autographed bats, baseballs, and photos with Jim Rice. In Cooperstown, Bill and Sandra had pictures taken with Hall of Famers Harmon Killebrew, Rollie Fingers, and Yogi Berra—yes, even Sox fans love Yogi. They plan to attend the 50th reunion of the Class of 1960 in June 2010. David Lucey contacted Cindy Buck following the passing of Senator Ted Kennedy and wrote: “In early 1959, a young Ted Kennedy was pressed into service on behalf

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61 Geoffrey Hickin stopped by campus in mid-September 2009. He came up from Massachusetts to visit Gordon Rose ’68 and to walk around and see campus and check out the new Pilalas Center for Math and Science. He was hoping to see Bud and Jinga Moore while in town and was excited to hear Lou and Patricia Gnerre were still here. Geoffrey’s father taught at New Hampton School in the late 1950s.

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of his brother Jack’s campaign in the New Hampshire Democratic primary. One of his stops was the New Hampton campus where he addressed a full school assembly. I recall him as being youthful, tall, thin, and a very nervous public speaker. He obviously got better. I’m guessing (T. Holmes Moore) would remember the event.”

Frank Dennen is living in San Luis Obispo California. He is on Facebook and would enjoy hearing from his classmates. He also says to please not Twitter him as he thinks Twitter is evil and sooner or later will be the bane of our existence.

65 Stephen Schultz sent in a photo of himself that was taken during a trip for the installation of his exhibition at the Museum of the Verena Foundation in Hydra, Greece. Please visit www.swspaint.com for more information. He writes: “I keep bumping into people with New Hampton affiliation, even in our little north Idaho town. The other side of the world, but Idaho has provided a home base for my wife, Romey, and I for nearly twenty-five years. Romey is off to an ashram in India for most of the winter, leaving me here to suffer skiing and actually spend most of my time painting in the studio. My best to all.”

Craig Corson ’68 and Gary Lemberger ’68 at the 2009 Athletic Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony when the 1967 Men’s Soccer Team was honored.

69 David Hinman and Scott Carr went on a scuba diving adventure in the Bahamas in October 2008. Scott began diving right around the time he was at New Hampton and ended up in a career studying underwater pollution (see article in previous Hamptonia). Dave started diving in the mid-90s, became a scuba instructor, and then opened a scuba

Stephen Schultz ’65 visiting Hydra, Greece.

diving shop in northern New York after a previous career. “We had a great time at the Reunion last June and would encourage everyone to keep in touch more often.”

70 Rodney Bascom and his wife Beth recently opened two unique assisted living homes in Belmont,

Dave Hinman ’69 and Scott Carr ’69 diving in the Bahamas.

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Larry ’74 and Barbara Blood, Karl ’74 and Wendy Kimball during a summer visit.

Ferncrest Knoll and Ferncrest Meadows. As an alternative to traditional large facilities, the Bascom’s vision included personalized care in a home setting, meadows and woods, all conveniently located near hospitals and i-93. They are also offering stay-at-home consulting services; assisting families in developing and managing quality in-home services at a reduced cost. They are expecting their ninth grandchild in December 2009 and still enjoy living in the lovely town of New Hampton, where their oldest granddaughter participates in New Hampton School sport camps.

72 Barry Smiley writes: “Dear Friends. Psalm 107 is all about thankfulness. Gratitude unlocks the fullness of life. It turns what we have into enough and more. It turns denial into acceptance, chaos into order, confusion into clarity. It can turn a meal into a feast, a house into a home, a stranger into a friend. Gratitude makes sense of our past, brings peace for today, and creates a vision for tomorrow. The spirit of Thanksgiving and Christmas lasts all year long (and forever). Greetings to my classmates from class of 1972 especially Donnie, Mike C., Mike S., Ronnie, Tom M., Alice, Holli, Phil K.. Miss you. Love and blessings, Barry.”

74 correction: Class Notes erroneously listed Maron Thorne as a

male in the Class of 1974. As Maron noted: “I am and have been for 54 years a female of the species!” Our apologies to Ms. Maron Thorne for this error! Laurence “Larry” Blood and his wife Barbara were able to spend an evening with his sophmore and junior year roommate Karl Kimball and his wife Wendy in the summer of 2009 at their home just north of Philadelphia. See the photo of the four of them, in which Karl, in the words of our other good friend Steve Perry, “looks like a crusty old sailor.” “The visit was wonderful, filled with great reminiscing of our days at good ol’ nhs.” On a sad note, Larry’s father, Lawrence Blood Sr. (former nhs Business Manager) recently passed away (see page 49). Our condolences to the Blood family. Douglas Friedman checks in with this update: “Our summer vacation with the boys brought us to Mystic, Connecticut and to Montauk, New York for some great fluke fishing! Our boys Jake and Jared had a blast! Jake kept saying he had a ‘shark’ on the line and guess what?? He did—a sand shark! Our marketing company, The Dawson Group, is still working with nascar, nhra, and now has moved into sponsoring and event activation with the ufc. We continue to produce television, radio, and print campaigns for our clients. New footage of our work is up at www.dougfriedman.com.” Robert Goodman writes from nyc where he is living for the first time since moving to London 25 years ago: “After raising my family in Shaker Heights, Ohio, my daughter now creates desserts at the Union Square Café and my son is a filmmaker currently making music videos. We all live in and around Brooklyn. I’m still a financial geek and my wife still loves me after 28 years. I would welcome hearing from anyone who remembers me; I’m confident I remember everyone. Cheers to all.” Baker Young II hopes all is well at nhs. He is living in Grand Prairie, Texas. He is getting a divorce and has moved. The good news is his life is great and he is glad he has found nhs on Facebook. He is finding a lot of old classmates.

75 Elibet Moore Chase, Andy Hargrave, and Lois Dehls Cornell are excited to be chairing the Class of 1975’s 35th Reunion this year, June 4–6, 2010. It will be so much more fun if everyone returns. Through Facebook, Elibet has reconnected with Mary Conaway, who Lindsay Brown ’78 had found. Mary writes: “I’m single, currently living in Pikesville, Maryland, and spend a lot of time (mostly weekends) at the beach in Dewey Beach, Delaware, where I also own a home with my sister. I have three grown sons, Chris, Josh and Taylor Coady. My oldest, Chris, is a record producer in nyc and the two younger ones are in the computer field. I have spent the last 20 years with the loudspeaker company, Definitive Technology (www.definitivetech.com), as a sales coordinator. In my spare time I enjoy photography, playing piano and guitar (all still by ear), the beach, and writing. Wish I had made it big—still holding out for my son Chris.” Elibet also has had the pleasure of recently communicating with Doc Wyche ’76 on Facebook, which has been really nice. Doc suggested that she friend Reggie Barnes. Reggie writes: “I am still living in the Bronx; I have one son (age 14) and I am doing okay. I work as a Social

Worker with the New York City Housing Authority (nycha), and also work part-time doing in-home therapy.” Reggie asked after the Moores and the Bloods, particularly Kenny, and she hopes to come to Reunion in June.

76 Howard Packer and his wife Vivian stopped by during a recent Northeast visit to see Howard’s son, who is at the Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut. They have been visiting each other’s “roots,” Vivian in New York City and Howard in Acton, Massachusetts. The Packers spent some time touring campus and were extremely impressed with the new Pilalas Center for Math and Science. T. Holmes ’38 and Jinga Moore joined the Packers for lunch in Memorial Dining Hall and spent time reminiscing about life at nhs in the mid-1970s. A visit with Lou Gnerre followed, and the Packers were on their way once again. They reside in Hollywood, Forida, where Howard has his own DJ business. His wife Vivian is a realtor. They have two children each by previous marriages, two aged nineteen and two aged twenty-three.

(l–r) T. Holmes Moore ’38, Howard Packer ’76, and Jinga Moore during a recent visit to nhs.

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84

(l–r) Andrew Menke, Head of School, Pittsburgh Penguins General Manager Ray Shero ’80, and Associate Director of Development David Perfield, on home ice of the Pittsburgh Penguins, 2009 Stanley Cup Champions.

Adam Smith ’83 with Deborah Finleon ’84 visiting the Turks and Caikos.

78 Joseph Saturley appears monthly on the “Bubba the Love Sponge” radio program heard in Tampa, Orlando, Ft. Myers, Jacksonville, and Miami, Florida, as well as Dayton, Ohio, and Richmond, Virginia. He addresses listeners who call in about mental health issues. He also anticipates releasing a satirical look at custody issues in a self published book entitled How To Lose A Custody Battle. It should be available through Amazon.com later this month. Nanci Walker is living in West Hollywood and working as the Senior Director of A&R at Universal Music Publishing Group. “I sign recording artists and songwriters. I’ve been working in the music business as an A&R executive for twenty-five years and I have an exciting roster of clients that keep me extraordinarily busy. I was diagnosed with breast cancer in August 2007 and had several operations, chemotherapy, and radiation so it has been rough going over the last two years, but I am healthy now and excited to see what 2010 brings! I hope to visit New Hampton soon.”

82 J. Arlen Ecker called the Alumni Office to update nhs that his second son, Jack Arlen Ecker, made his appearance on Thursday, November 5, 2009. He weighed

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Allan Crocker III was reading the Facebook posting and thought “I would offer up a bit of what I’ve been doing since nhs. Allan Crocker is a portfolio manager for a hedge fund in Manhattan Beach, California. He has been living in California for the last four years with his wife Juliette and two sons. Yung Shin’s twin boys, Adrian and Julian Shin, were born on June 16, 2009. Mike Sudderth sent some photographs from Foliage Day 1983. He wasn’t sure where they went but knew it was a day trip and that it was not Burleigh Mountain.

85 1983 Foliage Day, photo compliments of Michael Sudderth ’84.

Lynn Hetherington Van Cleave was promoted in the summer of 2009 to Executive Vice President of Lake Forest Bank and Trust in Lake Forest, Illinois! She is balancing work and family and also sits on two boards.

Abby Weiss checked in from Connecticut: “Hi New Hampton. I am still living in the town and state I grew up in Fairfield. I do talk to a bunch of my old classmates on Facebook. I went to beauty school right after I graduated and became a nail technician for 21 years and am now freelancing as a nail tech and make-up artist. Sorry, but never married and no kids. I have a cat who is my child. I have been in a long-term relationship, but that is about what’s going on with me. I am going back to school for medical billing and coding in January. I am currently working for Macy’s.”

89 Sarah Rice Cutler was expecting a baby any day in December 2009. John DeTemple has been busy over the last couple years, working in the entertainment industry in Los Angeles. “I am still running my own design production firm d.inc design in Hermosa Beach. This past year I

87 Paul Glatte has moved back to Ohio but still has his home in Charlotte, North Carolina. He has taken a new position with McKesson Health’s Connectivity group RelayHealth. Twin sons Adrian and Julian, of father Yung Shin ’84.

7 pounds, 3 ounces, and was 20 inches long. Family is doing well.

83 Adam Smith is working on an mba in Organization Development at Johns Hopkins University and continuing to grow his management consulting practice (www.adamsmithsearch.com). He and Deborah Finleon ’84 went scuba diving at Turks & Caicos in May 2009, and are planning to travel to Asia and South America over the next year.

88 Alitia Cross has this update: “I am still working for Benjamin Moore & Co., but my position has changed to Architectural and Design Representative for western part of Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia. My job is to get our products specified and used on commercial and residential projects, as well as support their needs for color tools and product information. I currently live in Richmond, but I’m never there and plan to move either back to Northern Virginia or Pennsylvania in the mid spring of 2010.

Kristen Guardenier Quackenbush ’89 and husband Glen Quackenbush.

John DeTemple ’89 on the set of surfing video shoot.

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directed a number of music videos and surf films, performing in the latest Rise Against video ‘Savior.’ Beyond that I have been filming surfing with a water housing, getting some amazing imagery.” Paul “PJ” Hunt is currently living in Franklin, Massachusetts, with his wife Jennifer and three children: Owen, Aiden, and Emma. He is self-employed, providing project management and financial application consulting services. He does stay in touch with fellow Husky Alison Kirk Isabelle ’90 and would like to hear from anyone else from the class of 1989! John Montesa wrote that after upgrading an IT system for the Federal Reserve at the height of the recent credit crisis, I have moved on to a contract assignment with Lockheed Martin for software development and analysis in service to our military. I have recently relocated from Washington DC to Houston Texas, but continue to telecommute to Washington (often in my pajamas). Kristen Guardenier Quackenbush writes: “Quite a lot has happened in my life actually! I am not sure when the last time I wrote in, but here is a recap: I sold my enrichment center in 2007 and became an upscale matchmaker and started working with Steve Ward with the company Master Matchmakers. We have a show every Sunday night at 9 pm on vh1 called Tough Love. It is very entertaining! I married an amazing man named Glen in the summer of 2009 and we are expecting a little girl in the spring of 2010! This will make our family quite complete as I have two children from my previous marriage, Sydney (7) and Cooper (4), and he has two teenage boys as well. The soon to be seven of us all live in Ashburn, Virginia, with our rescued Papillon Fergie.” Rosemaria Recchia spent the summer of 2009 in Taiwan to brush up on her Chinese. She teaches English to refugees from Asia and Africa in Buffalo, New York.

90 Alison Kirk Isabelle writes: “Greetings! On the Cape this past summer, we all shared a great week

of fun and sun with all our kids and shared memories of days at nhs!”

91 Elizabeth Pickel Doda writes: “It’s official. I am now going to be a monthly columnist for the website wdw Daily News (www.wdwdailynews.com). I am in the process of coming up with a column name and writing my first column, but I couldn’t wait to tell everyone. Please check out the site and/or send the link to someone you think could use it. The creator of the site is a teacher and wanted to have a site to help families plan vacations during peak season at Disney. My column is going to be strictly about tips for travelling with children to Disney. I can’t wait!” Joseph Plaia, an attorney in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, recently opened his own criminal defense practice. Joe served in the Marine Corps, honorably discharged in 1997 when he began to pursue his degree in Criminal Justice at Franklin Pierce College. He shifted plans to become a lawyer and relocated to New York City where he attended John Jay College of Criminal Justice and worked for a large litigation firm as a senior litigation paralegal. After graduating Magna Cum Laude from John Jay in 2003, he pursued graduate studies in Criminal Justice and was accepted to Pierce Law Center in 2004. He returned to Portsmouth, studied law, and worked at the Criminal Practice Clinic that is part of Pierce Law Center. He received his Juris Doctor from Franklin Pierce in 2007 and

Melanie Kirkman ’94 lives in Bucks County, Pennsylvania.

joined the New Hampshire Public Defender’s Office in Rockingham Country as a Law Clerk and an Attorney where he gained extensive experience in criminal defense. Joe and his daughter live in Portsmouth. Geoff Carlton writes: “Maximum Velocity worked with Extreme Makeover Home Edition in Lyme, New Hampshire. We turned the front yard, backyard, and house into a skate park, then destroyed the house. It aired on November 29, on abc. Our stunt team performed at nhs on March 5.”

92 George Fearons writes that he and Mike Collento get together on a regular basis. “We recently got together

for some upland bird hunting. He is in Metro Boston and I have moved to Mattapoisett, Massachusetts, which is just six miles from where we were in Marion. Maggie turned one in October, and Patrick and Seamus are very helpful big brothers! Jill is busy keeping us all in line and helping me on a daily basis with the new business.” Alexandra (Schenck) Lynch is still living on Cuttyhunk Island with her husband and two children, ages six and four. She just completed her first year of managing Pete’s Place Rentals, which is a compound of several rental properties here on the island (www.petesplacecutty hunk.com). She still keeps in contact with several of her former classmates and was recently on campus for Homecoming with Kate (Garden) Tkach ’94, Chrissy (Willis) Bellivea ’93 and Rex Dickson ’91. They were able to spend time with their good friend Jen Berry ’83, who is also our former dorm parent. Alexandra writes: “Campus looks amazing. Keep up the good work.”

94 (l–r) Tracy Turgeon Jenkins ’91, Harry Jenkins ’91, Renee Tocci Cerqua ’92, Alison Kirk Isabelle ’90, Abbee Hounsell Hoyt ’91, Patty Germani ’92 gather for a miniReunion on Cape Cod.

The Fearons family: George ’92 and Jill with their children Patrick, Seamus and Margaret.

Valerie Fischler-Vermeulen recently held an Art Show displaying her most recent work in pastels at Wholly Tara in Ashland, New Hampshire. Melanie Kirkman writes: “All is well with me. I live in Bucks County, Pennsylvania with my two cats

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96

Ann DuLong married Mike Close ’96 in May.

Sunny and Lulu. Working in the restaurant business for a close friend who owns two Italian restaurants. Looking forward to relocating to Florida in 2010. Happy to announce that Facebook has helped me reconnect with lots of friends from New Hampton.”

95 Taylor Heal and his wife Mackenzie Daly Heal are now the proud parents of a little boy. His name is Quinn Donovan Heal. He was 7 pounds, 7 ounces, and 20½ inches at birth.

David Ackerknecht is now working as a revenue accountant at Bridgeline Software Inc. in Woburn, MA. He sends his best regards to nhs and all of his classmates! Michael Close married Ann (DuLong) Close on May 15, 2009. Kerri Ann Shaughnessy is happy to report she graduated on December 12 after a long awaited journey. She is healthy, happy and loving life in North Carolina.

98 Megan Collins participated in the Iron Girl Triatholon on August 23, which included swimming, biking, and running for a great cause! She worked with team fight and the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults. Amanda Cronin continues her professional hockey career as a goaltender for the Brampton Thunder in the Canadian Women’s Hockey League in Toronto. A cofounder of the cwhl, Cronin has been living in Canada since graduating from the University of Maine in 2002 and is trying to build the new league after the collapse of the National Women’s Hockey League. Cronin is also in her third year run-

ning a year-round hockey school, “M-Power Hockey”(www.MPowerHockey.com). “We are busier than ever,” says Cronin, “I am on the ice every day of the week and two to three times per week most nights. I have also started to work with usa Hockey as a coach.” Amanda also has camps thoughout New England and can be reached at mcronin@m-powerhockey.com. Jason Feldman has had a busy year: “I got married on August 7, to Erin Anderson, passed the California bar exam, and started an immigration law firm with my mom out in San Diego. Feldman, Feldman & Associates has been up and running since July of this year. Anyone in the neighborhood should feel free to stop by or check us out online www.immigrateme.com. Best wishes to all.” Gregory Friel sent this note: “I am running my own financial planning practice in Boston and bought a beautiful condo in the South End three years ago. I am still playing basketball here and there in leagues around town. I am also a new Miss usa pageant judge, so I have been doing that in my free time as well. Just did the Miss Louisiana usa and the Miss Earth usa pageants—pretty cool gig. I keep in touch with Darius Songaila and Brent Klassen from my class, as well as Junior Medina and Alex Cartegena. I am in Boston when not travelling for business or pleasure. Hit me up fellow Huskies in the city at gfriel20@hotmail.com.”

Soo-Yung Cho recently communicated with Director of Studies Jennifer Berry ’83. Cho wrote: “I am in Pittsburgh now. After graduating from nhs, I also had a great time at Johns Hopkins. I did one more year of study at Cornell, and I was back in Korea for three years. I missed life in the U.S. and wished to learn more, so I decided to come back. Currently, I am studying software related work. After this study, I am planning to get a job in U.S. It is hard to get a job these days, but I hope it turns out well. I am so glad to hear from you, and please tell others that I am alive. I will make sure to visit nhs this year since I am not that far way from New Hampshire. Warner Nickerson made his first World Cup start since 2006 in October. The former ncaa AllAmerican who posted a bronze medal in the Giant Slalom in the 2009 U.S. Alpine Championships spent much of the winter trying to get enough points for consideration for the U.S. Olympic Ski Team. Follow his progress at www.warnernickerson.com.

01 Caitlin Andrews is engaged to Lucas Turton. They are getting married at Sankaty Head on Nantucket October 2, 2010.

99 Kyung Jin contacted the Alumni Office looking for some of his old art work to include in his portfolio for the graduate application process. He finished his B.S. of Architecture at University of Michigan and has been working for Gould Evans Architecture Firm since graduation.

00 Marissa Mumma, Rob Mumma ’98, his father Michael, and Patti Emerson P’13 at the go beyond kickoff celebration recent weekend at New Hampton School.

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Patricia Ditolvo Bordokan was married in October 2009, and resides in Sao Paulo, Brazil, with her husband.

Sarah Francesco Harris ’01 with Fennell L. Harris II.

Sarah Franceso Harris got married on September 19. She writes: “A fun date 9/19/09. The love of my life is Fennell L. Harris II (pronounced Fa-Nell everyone always asks) from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. We had been dating for five years when

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Lisa Falconi Perfield ’01 and David Perfield were married on August 1, 2009.

he proposed in February. It was a very fun day. The celebration was at my parents’ house on Squam Lake in Holderness, and we set up a tent in the yard and partied all night. We asked Jenny Bentwood if she would get her Justice of the Peace for the state of New Hampshire and do the ceremony. Of course, she agreed

and she did a great job. It was a short fun ceremony outside under a birch tree arbor over looking the lake. Rocky P. Milot Jr. was in our wedding as my bridesman. Other nhs attendees were Lisa and Jack Travis, Cameron Torrey ’04 and Collin Torrey ’08 with their parents, and of course, my younger cousin

Eric Barlow ’08. We live in Jersey City, New Jersey and take the train into Manhattan each day. I work as the lead toddler teacher for Bright Horizons (Fortune 500 best company to work for).” Jacob Heal has a new album out. See “In Brief” for more information. Lisa Falconi Perfield writes: “It’s been a busy year. I graduated in May 2009 from Boston University with my M.Ed. in counseling, and I am working as a school counselor at the Fay School in Southborough, Massachusetts. David Perfield and I were married on August 1, 2009, in Massachusetts, and were able to celebrate with our family and friends, including many of our friends from the New Hampton School community. Halary Patch LeBlanc and Euginnia Manseau were both in the wedding party. David and I traveled to the Greek Isles, Croatia, and Italy for our honeymoon, which was amazing!”

02 Stacia Jeroulis is currently living in a little town in New York, called Trooupsburg, a temporary residence right now. She writes: “I am doing awesome and am enjoying my life. I am living on a farm with cows and a few horses.” Asako Matsuura was contacted following the August 9, 2009, earthquake in Tokyo by her former host parents, Christina and Robert Pollock P’94, ’97 of New Hampton. She replied via e-mail, writing “Thank you for checking on us. We are OK. The earthquake lasted pretty long but wasn’t that big. I am doing fine. I just hung out with Eiko Yamada ’00, Remember her? Also Yoshio Ogura ’00. Japan is hot and humid. I don’t like it, but I’m in the office most of the day so only weekends I get to go out.”

03 Lucas Turton is engaged to Caitlin Andrews ’01.

Jesse Marquis shared this update: “I have been living in Montana for almost four years now, and after entirely too many major changes, I’m finishing up my undergraduate degree in Exercise Science at

Jesse Marquis ’03 and her fiancee Josh Heinemann.

Montana State University. In addition to school life, I am getting married July 17, 2010! My wonderful fiancee is Josh Heinemann, who is in the midst of earning his Phd in Biochemistry at msu as well. I plan on making a trip back east after our wedding to show Josh where I grew up, and the beautiful school I was lucky enough to attend! Hope all is well at nhs.” Will McDonough married Nicole Chenell on August 29, 2009 in East Lyme, Connecticut. Will’s sister, Ruth McDonough ’04, and Abel Bascom ’02 were in the wedding party, while Carson McDonough ’08 and former faculty member Jason Haynes (2002–04) were also in attendance. Will and Nicole McDonough now live in New Haven. Will teaches eighth grade English and World Cultures and coaches cross country and basketball at the New Canaan Country School. Sarah Teed moved to Australia about three years ago to join the military and to continue to play and assist in the development of the Women’s Australian National Ice Hockey team. She writes: “I am now in the Australian Army. I have recently graduated from my Basic Medical Course and am posted in Sydney, Australia, and am active in the Ice Hockey world. I plan to finish my undergraduate degree in nursing and continue on to medical school as I continue to serve the Australian Army.”

04 Chelsea Graham is a Fulbright Scholar currently living in Mexico

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Visit the Online Campus Store and Buy Husky Gear Our new and improved online campus store lets you choose

the color and screen printing,

and you can even order embroidery

of the

school seal. Our shirt, caps, jackets, and other items

are brand-name quality, and the store

also features accessories, grads,

gifts for alums and

and much more.

Visit http://store.newenglandapparel.com/newhampton, or call 603.677.3464 to show your Husky pride — in style!

City. She is a senior and pre-med major at Simmons College. Antony Haivanis graduated from Stetson in December of 2008 with a BS majoring in Sports Management. Currently, he works for the Boston Red Sox as a clubhouse assistant, assisting the equipment manager in the day-to-day operations of the team. During the offseason, he works for his family business and currently lives in Newton. Tracy M. Wright writes: “All is well, I am still in New York working as a legal assistant at Davis Polk & Wardwell, and preparing to take the lsat.”

06

05 In the fall of 2009, Brendan Smith became only the eighth player in Northwestern University football history to become a repeat captain. A native of Andover, Massachusetts, Smith was named a Phil Steele’s first-team preseason All-Big Ten safety. He struggled with injuries during his senior season, but

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became the first player in school history to play in three bowl games. Nicholas Robillard joined the United States Air Force and is in Special Operations, Pararescue. He has been traveling the country, getting all kinds of excellent training and great experiences with a lot of amazing people. He was deployed to Afghanistan in January. Classmates Jamey Watkins, Jonah Hanowicz, and Matt Buck joined some of Nick’s college friends for a send-off gathering in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Radar Onguetou, a senior at the University of New Hampshire who plays on the basketball team, delivered an inspiring speech during a recent rally highlighting a new event on campus, “Cat Pack Kick-off Rally,” held specifically for the incoming freshman class. Radar is an International Business major. Allison Swift is finishing up time at the University of Redlands’ Johnston Center for Integrative

Nicholas Robillard ’05 is in Special Operations for the Air Force.

Studies with an emphasis in Theater, Film and Studio Arts. She writes: “I spent six months on a Greek Island this year studying art and working at a locals’ cafe/bar. I am planning on returning to the Greek Islands this summer and possibly staying into the fall season until I figure out what comes next in my life! Dylan Frazao visited me there last spring. Hope all the Huskies from ’06 are doing well and keep in touch!” Kate O’Hara, a student at Nichols College just returned from a Semester at Sea, a unique learn-

ing experience sponsored by the Fischer Institute as a way to help Nichols College students explore international social and cultural issues. For two and a half months this summer, she visited nine countries, four continents and swam in the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean, Black, and Adriatic seas. Among the highlights was when the captain turned off all the ship’s lights at 11 pm to allow students to star gaze in the middle of the black Atlantic. “I saw five shooting stars and the Milky Way and felt unbelievably lucky.”

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Owen McMahon, Jamie Arsenault, Katie Connolly ’06, Kristen McWhirter ’07, Jen Gureckis ’07, Dempsey Arsenault, Lara Arsenault.

07 Emilie Cram has this update: “Life has been fantastic! As I think I have said before, I had a fantastic Spring in Wyoming and Utah with a nols semester. I then headed to work for nols for the summer in Boulder, Wyoming, at their ranch packing rations for other hiking and climbing groups. Fall 2009 brought a few snowy months of hunting camp for me outside of Pinedale, Wyoming.

Here we hunted, quartered, caped, and packed out elk, moose, and even a buffalo for clients! I was surrounded by horses here, and acquired numerous hours of riding in the Wyoming mountains! I also met my boyfriend, who is my best friend and co-worker. I haven’t ever been able to share so much with someone! Now, I am in Utah in the midst of the dreaded job search, as well as the transfer back to school. I am looking forward to what is next and hope to run in to some classmates along the way! Hope that all is well there in NH!”

best wishes to the class of 2008 and upcoming graduates! Be sure to keep in touch at www.theartofillusions.com.” Matthew Hamel visited faculty member Ted Stiles in Rumney, New Hampshire during the summer of

2009. They had a great day kayaking on the Baker River and dinner out afterwards. He took summer classes at Boston University over the summer, and he drove out west with his dad to start at Lewis and Clark in Portland, Oregon in late August. Ryan Janvrin writes: “I received my Associate of Science in Recording Arts from Full Sail University in October. I am taking a three-month break before starting the Bachelor portion of my degree which I will complete in September of 2010. During my break I will be working at J. Stanley Productions in Orlando. Anthony Smalls was named Northeast-10 Player of the Week on September 28, 2009. A sophomore running back for Merrimack College, he earned this honor for rushing for a career-high 219 yards and two touchdowns on 28 carries in Merrimack College’s 41-31 win over Saint Anselm and for producing even more impressive numbers in three prior games. Dean College’s football team lost 10-9 in the Valley of the Sun Bowl against Glendale Community College, but Long Ding had three field goals including a 42-yarder in the first quarter. Long was featured in the Boston Globe in October. He is hoping to land a football scholarship after a successful season in which he made 10 of 16 field goal attempts. Q

08

Matthew Hamel ’08 on a recent visit in New Hampshire with Ted Stiles.

Benjamin Brewster was named Atlantic 10 Player of the Week on October 26, 2009, after scoring two goals in the University of Richmond’s 2-1 victory over Xavier. Marc Hamel has an update: “Hey, I hope everyone is doing well. I have been really busy filming for my first TV special. It will be out on TV networks in New Hampshire so be sure to watch for that. I send my

Ryan Janvrin ’08 with his sister Zion at his graduation from Full Sail University.

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1932 Robert C. Plumb died June 16, 2009. He graduated from nhs in 1932, and from Columbia College and Business School in 1936. He became a New York cpa in 1942 and soon specialized in corporate taxation. He retired in 1979, after 25 years with American Cyanamid Company as Director of Taxes and Assistant Treasurer. He served on a number of tax committees in the chemical industry, pharmaceutical industry, and the American Institute of cpa of which he became an Honorary Member. He is survived by his wife, Eleanor Powers, of Southbury, Connecticut; a son; three daughters; and seven grandchildren. His first wife, Carol, died in 1996.

1941 John M. Robinson died October 26, 2009, in Hanover, New Hampshire. Born in Rochester, New York, John graduated from New Hampton School in 1941 and from Dartmouth College in 1945. He joined the Army Air Corp when he was a sophomore at Dartmouth, flying thirty-three missions as a tail gunner with the 8th Air Force in Europe. After college, he joined A.J. Knott Tool and Manufacturing Corporation, a small firm in Milford, Massachusetts. He retired thirty-eight years later as the company’s President and Owner. He resided in Wellesley for thirtythree years and retired to Hanover, New Hampshire, for the next 23 years. He is survived by his wife of sixty-two years, Shirley, two sons, four grandchildren, five great-grandchildren, a sister, brother, and many nieces and nephews.

1942 Andrew Nichols of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, died on June 11, 2006.

1943 Charles Cole of Lyman, Maine died November 19, 2009, at Southern Maine Medical Center after a lengthy illness. He attended

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Kennebunk High and New Hampton School before matriculating to Bowdoin College, where his studies were delayed when he joined the Army Air Corps during World War II. He returned to Bowdoin after the service and graduated in 1949. He was a fourth-generation member of Cole Harrison Insurance Agency in Kennebunk for thirty-five years, serving as its president for many years before retiring in 1985. He loved music and played clarinet with a dance bank that performed on the Old Orchard Beach Pier. He was very involved in local civic organizations including the Arundel Yacht Club of Kennebunkport, Conservation Committee, Rotary, and his church. His first wife, Nancy, died in 1979. He is survived by his second wife, Karin, three sons, two stepsons, a step daughter, seven grandchildren, five step grandchildren, two sisters, six nieces and nephews.

and Florida before settling in Greensboro in 1963. He was the tennis pro at many of the local clubs including Greensboro Country Club, Forest Oaks Country Club, and Latham Park. John was also the head tennis coach at Guilford College. John is survived by one son, one cousin, seven nieces, a sister-in-law, and a brother-in-law. He was preceded in death by his wife, Anne, and brothers, Dean and Charles Payne.

twenty years of service and as Commander in the US Naval Reserve after twenty-eight years of service. He served in various capacities in many civic organizations including President of South Knoxville Rotary Club, volunteer for the Second Harvest Food Bank, and Commodore of the Fort Loudon Yacht Club. He is survived by his wife of fifty-four years, Cornelia, three sons, four grandchildren, and a sister.

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1949

Barry H. Robinson of West Knoxville, Tennessee, died March 19, 2009, at his home. He graduated from New Hampton School in 1948 and Cornell University College of Engineering. Originally from the United Kingdom, Barry became a U.S. citizen in 1953. He retired as Vice President and General Manager of Stevens Aviation after

Gilbert S. Chase, of Painesville, Ohio, passed away May 27, 2009.

1956 David Scott Roeder died suddenly at home in the Taylor Community in Laconia, New Hampshire, on October 17, 2009. Originally from

Dudley E. Whitney died on November 17, 2007, at Cobblestone/Park Springs in Stone Mountain, Georgia.

1947 Andrew A. Train, of Darien, Georgia, died Monday, March 9, 2009, at Hospice of the Golden Isles in Brunswick, Georgia. John R. Payne passed away Thursday, February 12, 2009, at Wesley Long Hospital in Greensboro, North Carolina. Originally from Worcester, Massachusetts, John was educated at Wilbraham Academy and New Hampton School, and attended Dartmouth College where he lettered in basketball and tennis and later transferred to Becker College where he received his degree in Business Management and also lettered in basketball and tennis. John enlisted in the United States Coast Guard in 1943 during World War II and served in the Pacific Theater as a stm First Class. He was employed by Norton Abrasive Company as an industrial engineer. He had a long career as a tennis teaching professional in Massachusetts, California, Nevada,

Connect with NHS friends on Facebook and learn what’s happening on campus and on the road.

Follow NHS on Twitter and get up-to-date news and sports scores at www.twitter.com/NHSHuskies

Join New Hampton School group on LinkedIn to assist us all in our networking efforts.

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North Andover, Massachusetts, he graduated from Laconia (NH) High School in 1955, New Hampton School in 1956, and Cornell University School of Hotel Administration in 1960. He served in the Air Force as a pilot during the Vietnam War and continued his love of flying throughout his life. He joined the family business managing the Hickory Stick Farm Restaurant for many years before retiring to travel extensively with his wife Linda across the United States. He is survived by his second wife, Linda, two sons, one stepson, two stepdaughters, seven grandchildren, and two great grandchildren. His first wife, Mary, died in 1989.

1961 Donald A. Stine of Parkland, Florida died on August 15, 2008.

1967 Dr. Michael Charles Rubin died on September 23, 2009, in Uxbridge, Massachusetts, after a brief, but courageous battle with cancer. A Director of psychiatric emergency service in the Blackstone Valley area, Dr. Rubin was born on December 15, 1949 and raised in Worcester. He resided in Holden before moving to Uxbridge with his wife, Carla Rubin. Dr. Rubin attended Bancroft School in Worcester, and graduated from nhs before earning his Bachelor’s of Science degree magna cum laude from Worcester State College. He went on to complete a master’s degree in counseling psychology from Anna Maria College. Dr. Rubin received his doctorate in psychology from Antioch New England Graduate School. Dr. Rubin began his professional career in the 1970s and 1980s employed at various sites for the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health. He worked as a unit psychologist at Worcester State Hospital, later joining the psychology department at Westboro State Hospital. His work also included several years in the forensic division of mental health. Dr. Rubin was working for Riverside Community Care as the director of psychiatric emergency services in the

Blackstone Valley area until three months prior to his death. Dr. Rubin was instrumental in developing an urgent care model for providing mental health services for patients of primary care practitioners unable to find adequate responses for mental health needs of their patients. In addition, Dr. Rubin conducted evaluations for the Social Security Administration for the past five years. Dr. Rubin’s parents, Dr. Richard Rubin and Helen Rubin, predeceased him. He is survived by his wife, Carla (Bruhn) Van Loon Rubin; his children, Angela Rubin of Millbury, Jason Rubin of Worcester, Samuel Rubin of Holden, and Emma and Alexandra Van Loon of Uxbridge.

former faculty Former nhs Administrator, Laurence A. Blood, of Laconia, New Hampshire’s Woodside-Taylor Community and formerly of New Hampton, died December 12, 2009, at his home. He graduated from Phillips Andover Academy in 1941, from Dartmouth College in 1948, and from the Amos Tuck School of Business Administration in 1949. He served in World War II as a medic in the U.S. Army Air Corps, 82nd Medical Battalion, 12th Armored Division eto. He was employed at J. B. Blood Co. from 1949 to 1953; Chevrolet Motor Division of General Motors Corp. from 1953 to 1969; New Hampton School from 1969 to 1977; and State of New Hampshire Department of Revenue Administration from 1977 to 1988. His years of faithful service to numerous organizations enriched the lives of individuals and communities. He was a member and former trustee and treasurer of Laconia Congregational Church and also a member and former treasurer, deacon and choir member of the New Hampton Community Church. He was a trustee and treasurer of the Gordon-Nash Library; a selectman, member of the planning board, moderator pro-tem and auditor for the town of New Hampton; a trustee, president and treasurer of the Newfound Area Nursing Association; treasurer of the New

send a tribute We accept any number of materials to help us in preparing obituaries. Please send a copy of an obituary, a note listing a few facts about the deceased, or an e-mail version of these. You can also send a photo. Mail information to Hamptonia, Alumni Office, New Hampton School, 70 Main Street, New Hampton, NH 03256 or e-mail information and photos to alumni@newhampton.org.

Hampton Cemetery Association; and a member of the Pemi Choral Society and the New Hampshire Music Festival. Larry is survived by his wife of sixty-two years, Patricia; four sons, Timothy, Laurence ’74, Kenneth, and Geoffrey ’74, a daughter, Elizabeth “Beth” Bascom, of New Hampton; 13 grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren; two nephews and three nieces. In addition to his parents, Mr. Blood was predeceased by a brother, Robert E. Blood Jr., in 1998 and by a sister, Elizabeth B. Grimes, in 1999. Charles Stuart Lane, of Meredith, NH, died Saturday, November 28, 2009. He lived on Bear Island on Lake Winnipesaukee as a child. And served in World War II in New Guinea and the Philippines. Upon discharge from the service, he attended graduate school in American history and literature at Boston University. He taught at Boston University, Northeastern

University in Boston, Bennington High School in Vermont, New Hampton School, Northfield High School, Winnacunnet High School, and he opened the Dunbarton Academy (summer school), one of the first in the state of New Hampshire before the public schools started summer programs. He taught in Massachusetts in Lynnfield, Sharon, and Winthrop, where he was a supervisor of English teachers, grades K–12 until 1980. Charles loved teaching, coaching debate teams, and hiking. He climbed 45 of the 48 four-thousand-foot mountains on the New Hampshire White Mountains trails. He also loved visiting museums and collecting artwork. Charles has been a member of the American Legion in Meredith for many years, as well as the Veterans of Foreign Wars in Laconia. Charles is survived by his wife, Sophia Lane. Two of his distant cousins are Nathanial Schultz ’07 and Irene Schultz ’12. Q

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do you know your school? A distinguished man in the history of American letters, this writer, philosopher, and poet delivered a lecture the night before graduation and then gave the Commencement Address at New Hampton School (then called the New Hampton Commercial College) on June 30, 1875. He wrote in a letter to a friend: I knew little of the School except that it was not far from the Mountain region, and my daughter Ellen, who always goes with me when I travel entered heartily into the project of the journey‌

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The first person to identify the gentleman in the picture will win a free gift from the New Hampton School Campus Store. Answers can be sent to Director of Alumni and Parent Relations Cindy Buck; cbuck@newhampton.org. fall hamptonia winner: Congratulations to Cheryl Geerhold Qulity ’78, who was the first to correctly identify the photo of Burleigh Mountain in the late 1970s. Cheryl won an NHS fleece jacket.

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WHEN IT COMES TO PARTICIPATION,

WE NEED YOU. It is hard to put into words the importance New Hampton holds for me. I only know that while I was there and while I was walking around the campus recently, I really felt at home again. I am happy to see the school progress in such a positive direction under Andrew’s leadership. It was also terrific to see Bud and Jinga, as they and Lou Gnerre bring such heart and history to a wonderful school and community. I am honored to serve as the Annual Fund Chair for New Hampton School. The school had a tremendous impact on me as a student, and still has an important place in my life and my heart and I look forward to helping in this role. I hope you will join me today by supporting this great school to

RICK PEYSER ’68

help us realize our participation goals!

NHS ANNUAL FUND CHAIR GREEN MOUNTAIN COFFEE ROASTERS, DIRECTOR OF SOCIAL ADVOCACY AND COFFEE COMMUNITY OUTREACH

OUR ANNUAL FUND GOAL THIS YEAR IS TO RAISE $880,000 — TEN PERCENT MORE THAN LAST YEAR!

MAKE YOUR GIFT ONLINE TODAY

www.newhampton.org/giving For participation in the current Fund year, gifts must be made by June 30, 2010.

New Hampton School Spring 2010 Hamptonia magazine. Finished size is 11.0 inches tall by 8.50 inches wide. Artwork prints in four-color process and bleeds all four sides. Cover artwork; Cover II and Cover III. (0.125 inches has been allowed for perfect-bound spine.)


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NEW HAMPTON SCHOOL

nonprofit us postage

new hampton, nh 03256-4243 www.newhampton.org

PAID lewiston, me permit no. 82

H A M P T O N I A the magazine of new hampton school

spring 2010, volume 126, number 1

taking the powder keg back: athletic teams take care of tilton! story inside on page 12

inside: the pilalas center for math and science opens china exchange r ice cream cone king r capital campaign update

New Hampton School Spring 2010 Hamptonia magazine. Finished size is 11.0 inches tall by 8.50 inches wide. Artwork prints in four-color process and bleeds all four sides. Cover artwork; Cover IV and Cover I. (0.125 inches has been allowed for perfect-bound spine.)

Hamptonia Spring 2010  

The alumni magazine of the New Hampton School.