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new hampton school

nonprofit us postage

new hampton, nh 03256-4243 www.newhampton.org

New Hampton School has launched its new web site. Please visit www.newhampton.org and learn more about your school.

hamptonia the magazine of new hampton school fall 2011

PAID lewiston, me permit no. 82

Hamptonia

the magazine of new hampton school fall 2011

fred smith ’45, usn

Honoring Our Veterans page 28 inside

Scan this QR code to go there now:

Lou Gnerre Celebration Commencement 2011 Reunion 2011

New Hampton School Fall 2011 Hamptonia magazine. Flat size is 11.0 inches tall by 17.31 inches wide (includes 0.31 inches for perfect-bound spine); folded size is 11.0 inches tall by 8.50 inches wide. Artwork prints in four-color process and bleeds all four sides. Cover artwork; Cover IV and Cover I.


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The 1821 Society

Introducing the NHS Family of Funds at New Hampton School

Unveil the power of your participation!

When you participate in the Annual Fund, you may

designate your donation to underwrite the area of New Hampton School that is most important to you. Annual Fund donations support financial aid, faculty and staff salaries, the upkeep of our beautiful buildings and grounds, athletic teams that wear the Husky green with pride, talented artists, and our signature academic programs that help to distinguish the New Hampton School experience.

International Baccalaureate Program (IB)/Global Initiatives: encourages international mindedness and emphasizes development of the whole student—physically, intellectually, emotionally, and ethically.

Experiential Learning: creates meaningful environments in which authentic learning occurs beyond the classroom setting.

Athletics: strives for excellence by providing opportunities for physical, emotional, and intellectual growth in each of our student-athletes at all levels of competition.

Faculty and Staff Professional Development: allows faculty members to develop and collaborate professionally within their field of expertise.

Visual and Performing Arts: offers students opportunities for selfawareness, self-expression, and artistic growth in a safe environment that promotes both skill development and personal character.

Residential Life: supports a healthy and rich living experience for boarding students, making them feel at home and part of a family.

Financial Aid: provides access to a New Hampton School education for the most talented and deserving youth.

Technology: offers cutting-edge tools and necessary skills critical to learning in the 21st century and beyond.

Academic Support Program (ASP): helps students build confidence in learning through skill development, providing greater awareness of themselves as learners.

General Annual Fund: choosing to not designate your donation allows New Hampton School to use your gift where the need is greatest.

Robert D. Kennedy ’50 A New Hampton School Education Is Priceless hen Robert D. Kennedy arrived at New Hampton School in

dence in our Head of School Andrew Menke and in the strategic planning

1947, the country was just emerging from World War II. New

process that is pointing toward a curriculum that meets the challenges

Hampton had a small cadre of veterans on campus who had

of the twenty-first century. New Hampton School is entering a very excit-

returned to finish high school, and their presence on campus was intim-

ing period, and I hope my estate gift might inspire other alumni, parents,

idating. “NHS had some lingering WWII veterans in the School,” Kennedy

and friends.”

explains. “The football team played college freshmen. The JV played

“Bob Kennedy is one of New Hampton’s most steadfast friends and

Holderness and Proctor. The big thing was to try out for football, and that

supporters,” says Head of School Andrew Menke. “His superior business

took a certain amount of courage. My goal was to make the starting team.

acumen, great love for his alma mater, remarkable generosity, and ener-

I weighed only 160 pounds.”

gy have already helped the School in so many ways. We are very grateful

Not only did Kennedy make the starting team, he played four years

for his extraordinary gift.” 

of football before matriculating to Cornell. Kennedy, of New Canaan, Connecticut, went on to become the CEO of the Union Carbide Corporation. He played football, basketball, and baseball for New Hampton and served as vice president of the senior class. And, he has made a major commitment to benefit New Hampton School is his estate plan. Bob’s devotion to the School has never waned during more than twenty years as a school trustee. “It’s been my privilege to see the School improve in so many areas over the years,” he says. “I have great confi-

 The New Hampton School 1821 Society

Give Today. Impact Tomorrow. Scan this QR code or go to www.newhampton.org/giving

recognizes alumni, parents, and friends of the School who choose to include New Hampton School in their estate plans. If you are interested in being a part of the 1821 Society, please contact Sandy Colhoun, Director of Development; scolhoun@newhampton.org; 603-677-3413.

For more information, please contact: Sarah DeBenedictis, Director of Annual Giving 603-677-3415; sdebenedictis@newhampton.org

New Hampton School Fall 2011 Hamptonia magazine. Flat size is 11.0 inches tall by 17.31 inches wide (includes 0.31 inches for perfect-bound spine); folded size is 11.0 inches tall by 8.50 inches wide. Artwork prints in four-color process and bleeds all four sides. Cover artwork; Cover II and Cover III.


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Hamptonia

the magazine of new hampton school fall 2011

editor Will McCulloch contributors John Bartel ’59, Cindy Buck P’01, ’05, Lou Gnerre P’76, Andrew Menke P’12, ’15, Will McCulloch, Karl G. Smith II ’61 designer Clay Dingman, Barking Cat Productions Communications Design photographers Jamie Arsenault P’13, ’15, Jon Chase P’13, Sandy Colhoun, Clay Dingman, Alan MacRae, Will McCulloch, Andy Moore ’65, Suzi Moore, Chip Riegel, Amy Wilson, Fah Zimmerman printer Penmor Lithographers © 2011 New Hampton School www.newhampton.org hamptonia is published twice a year by New Hampton School. The magazine reports news of the school, its students, teachers, and alumni. We welcome submissions for publication, news from and about alumni, and letters in response to articles. Inquiries, comments, and letters may be directed to Hamptonia, New Hampton School, 70 Main Street, New Hampton, New Hampshire 03256. Or, call 603-677-3417 or e-mail hamptonia@newhampton.org. New Hampton School does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, creed, national or ethnic origin in administration of its admissions and educational policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school administered activities. Hamptonia is printed on sustainably produced, chain-of-custody stock certified to Forest Stewardship Council (fsc) standards. Hamptonia is printed using only windgenerated renewable power, and inks derived from vegetable sources. on the cover: Fred Smith ’45 is one of many New Hampton School Alumni who have served their country over the years.

f e at u r e s 16 graduation 2011 by Cindy Buck 18 faculty profile Peg Frame

20 reunion 2011 by Cindy Buck 26 honoring a legend: new hampton salutes lou gnerre 28 service and sacrifice by Will McCulloch Military Alumni

44 student profile Will Callif ’12

67 campaign reporter 73 2010–11 state of the school report

d e p a rt m e n t s 2 Welcome

48 Where are They Now?

3 Heads Up

49 Trustee Profiles

4 In Brief

50 Class Notes

10 Campus Currents

60 In Memoriam

14 Sports Wrap-Up

66 Do You Know Your School?

25 Upcoming Events 46 Lou’s Corner 47 Memories

New Hampton School Fall 2011 Hamptonia magazine. Finished size is 11.0 inches tall by 8.50 inches wide. Document length is 96 pages plus cover.


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Welcome

I peered over at Lou Gnerre during the celebration in his honor at Reunion 2011 in early June (see page 26). Stoic and composed, he seemed to soak it all in with reluctance. All the support he gave to teachers, students, and peers—wasn’t that what you were supposed to do if you worked at a school? I imagined what he was thinking as former faculty, students, and old friends peppered the festive air with both laughinducing tidbits and tear-jerking testimonials. There stood a man who began working at New Hampton School in 1957 for meager pay and never wanted more than the opportunity to do good work with teenagers. As Lou is accustomed to saying, he was destined for dental school, but he took a detour at New Hampton School. Lou’s celebration got me thinking. It was a classic example of the delayed satisfaction that only teachers can truly appreciate. With students as the molding matter, teachers don’t realize the effect they have had on a kid until years later, when former students come back and say thank you. Those moments make the career so rewarding — albeit years later. Some folks have known from the beginning that they wanted to work at schools while others find their calling and passion in the way Lou did—by accident. So I asked New Hampton faculty—those determined souls who embrace teaching,

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coaching, advising, and dorm duty—why they have taken their path to work at a school, and not only a school, but a boarding school. Sara Tyson, a teacher in the Science Department and Academic Support Program shares: “Adolescence is such an exciting and sometimes challenging time in our lives. My teachers made such a difference for me in high school. Working at New Hampton is a way that I give back what was so freely given to me.” Dean of Students Chris Little recognized early the importance of adults in his own

faculty, notes: “I returned to New Hampton School to teach because I want students to experience the kind of connection I had with my teachers when I was a student. A boarding school provides more than just an education in the classroom. We are learning in the dorm, on the fields, learning lifelong skills, and building relationships with students and adults from around the world.” When I tell people I sit next to on airplanes that in addition to my duties as Director of Communications, I am a dorm parent, they immediately begin to look at me as if I have battled an eye-closing food allergy for most of my life. They are perplexed. They struggle to understand why I

With students as the molding matter,

teachers don’t realize the effect they have had on a kid until years later, when former students come back and say thank you. boarding school experience: “My four years as a boarding school student were some of the most important of my life. I wanted to participate in that life experience for others.” Arts Teacher Johnny Buck has been able to help students get out of their comfort zones: “I love teaching at New Hampton School because this is a place where students and faculty work together to find new ways to explore and create. I have been able to teach a unique class called Environmental Art that has allowed students who normally feel like they are not creative in other art classes to experience art in a more natural and unconventional way.” Jessica Kang ’02, a Meservey Medal winner who is entering her fifth year on the

live in an apartment attached to a boys’ dormitory with my wife and two kids, spitting distance and two doors away from 18 adolescent boys with more pimples than common sense (Phillips boys 2011–12 are pictured to the left). “Really?” is the most common remark. It takes neither a special person nor a deranged one—just an enigmatic one with patience, persistence, and an understanding of the vagaries of the boarding school world. These characteristics sound like Lou Gnerre, a model we can all feel good chasing. Q Will McCulloch Editor, Hamptonia Director of Communications

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Heads Up

elson Henderson said, “The true meaning of life is to plant trees, under whose shade you do not expect to sit.” In a challenging, chaotic, and increasingly turbulent world, this ethic of service and stewardship is critical to ensure future opportunities for our students and the long-term health of our planet. Our current mission, refined during this summer’s strategic planning process, focuses our collective resources on developing “lifelong learners who will serve as active global citizens.” Service is key to our mission, and evidenced by the alumni profiled in the pages that follow, resonates deeply with New Hampton School graduates. As chronicled in previous Hamptonias, evolution has been our watchword. And yet in this time of extraordinary growth, equal attention has been paid to retain the historical underpinnings of the New Hampton School experience. Service has been an essential philosophical tenet here in central New Hampshire for nearly two centuries. Last May, Alicia Burrows ’00 (page 30) enthusiastically endorsed active citizenship as our keynote commencement speaker. In her crisp Army blues, Captain Burrows stood beneath the Meservey elms and recalled numbing details of 9/11, an ensuing midnight flight to Baghdad, and the way in which New Hampton School prepared her to actively lead and selflessly serve. She spoke of relationships, seizing opportunities, and looking beyond immediate and self-centered needs to future opportunities. She is without question, a shining example of what it means to serve—her country, her community, and now her school as a newly elected member of the Board of Trustees. This summer Jason Pilalas ’58, current trustee, recalled how the legendary former faculty member David Rice and headmaster emeritus T.H. Moore ’38 (page 34) inspired him to serve his country, resulting in a distinguished naval career. He stressed that his time on campus

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imbued a passion for community involvement that has led to a lifetime of service to countless organizations, including his favorite—New Hampton School! We spoke about stewardship and service, longstanding commitment, caring for one’s community, and building for the next generation. Jason’s passion for service is only eclipsed by his generosity of spirit, modeling Winston Churchill’s adage, “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.” Service must be a ubiquitous and fundamental component of any healthy educational setting. Fortunately, independent school communities are intensive service incubators as they bring together idealistic adults and eager adolescents in a deliberate environment that engenders motivation and generative action. Here on campus, we teach service with intention. Service Saturdays feature students and faculty working for the public good, assisting at soup kitchens, shelters, and senior living facilities, as well as more pedestrian, but no less important, tasks of stacking wood, raking leaves, and shoveling snow for our campus neighbors. Seniors must complete a leadership program, which includes thirty hours of service to their communities prior to graduation. Remarkable projects such as teaching in India, working in Chinese orphanages, scouting endangered species in Costa Rica, and participating in Habitat for Humanity in Florida have been undertaken in the last few years. International Baccalaureate diploma candidates must complete fifty hours as part of the Community/Action/Service (cas) requirement. cas projects this year include fundraising for Free the Children, collecting books for the Orphanage Literacy Project, and initiating the first nhs Walk for Hunger, which will benefit two local food pantries. For years, New Hampton School has embraced The National Association of Independent Schools’ recent mantra of “the public purpose of private schools.” As ambitious as our mission may be, preparing students to “serve as active global citizens,” it is what drives us here on campus each and every day. There is no better place and no more important time for our current students to follow in the footsteps of so many inspiring alumni who have dedicated their lives to others, planting trees under whose shade they will not sit. They are stewards in the truest sense of the word. Q

Andrew Menke, Head of School

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In Brief Scott reflected on his time as one of the trailblazing African American Air Traffic Controllers. “People have often said It’s a stressful job, but I always say it’s more stressful being Black in America than it is being an air traffic controller,” Scott said. Q

Mona Chakkal-Adams ’86

Bill Scott ’64

bill scott ’64 ends historic career On April 1, 2011, The Atlanta Daily World recognized the legacy of the career of Bill Scott ’64, a New Hampton graduate who paved the way for so many others in his field. The story begins: W. A. “Rip” Scott IV backed away from his radar screen on March 31, ending a nearly 40-year career as an Air Traffic Controller for the United States Federal Aviation Administration. Scott, who worked his entire career at the Hampton, Georgia, regional facility, was praised by his colleagues. “It won’t be the same without Rip,” said Darryl Dudley, who has worked with Scott since 1987. “As one of the first AfricanAmerican controllers, he helped pave the way for all of us.” Dudley added, “He trained me on my first four radar positions. He’s been a mainstay around here. We’re going to miss him.”

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Scott began his career as an atc on August 16, 1971, after attending a training program in Oklahoma. In addition to Dudley, Scott has trained multiple dozens of new controllers over the years. “I think I’ve trained four generations of controllers,” Scott recalled. There were the ones who were hired in the mid- to late1970s. Then after the strike and subsequent firing of all strikers by President Ronald Reagan in 1980, there was another crew of recruits. Then with the mandatory retirement age of 56—implemented shortly after Scott was hired—at least two more generations of controllers have been trained by Scott. Fellow African-American controller Joseph Hambrite, who became a controller in January 1970, called Scott “an excellent trainer.” He called him an all-around good guy, who was a great role model. “There were not too many people who looked like us when we started,” Hambrite said. “We’ve been here a long time and we’ve seen it all.” In addition to his mentorship of others, Scott added fun to the Hampton Center by wearing bright colors and some unique outfits, including once wearing a Don King wig that got him a lot of attention, including some (unwanted) from the front office. Dudley said, “He was easy-going and fun to be around.”

alum visits everest base camp Mona Chakkal-Adams ’86 has always been an adventurer. Living in Saudi Arabia and most recently in Qatar, she is not afraid of a new challenge. A trip to the Himalayas confirmed this. Mona recently made the 31kilometer trek from Lukla to the Mount Everest Base Camp, a trip listed in the book The 100 Things to Do Before You Die and takes between 8 and 10 days. She shared her reflections. “Along the way you pass Sherpa villages, cross rivers, and wind around hillsides on a rugged trek up the Khumbu Valley,” Mona writes. “Just after Namche Bazaar; an ancient trading post, you get your first view of Mt. Everest, or ‘Chomolungma’ in Tibetan meaning: Goddess Mother of Earth. “You continue the ascent crossing many more rivers, always allowing the Yak the right of way over the bridges, passing through incredible rhododendron forests and small Sherpa communities always offering hospitality. The goal remains twofold; the summit of Kala Pattar, and Mt. Everest Base Camp,” Mona writes. “As you enter Base Camp and see the small city that it is, you realize that these tents will be home for many climbers for months to come. Clothing drying on lines, shoes lined up outside tents, and a group practicing ice climbing all remind you of the main objective of so many adventurers. The camaraderie is apparent as climbers from different countries sit together telling stories, compare notes and advise each other on how to attain the ultimate goal; to summit Mt. Everest. You feel lucky to catch a glimpse of that community, and

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be a part of it, if even for a day before you commence your descent back to Lukla, continuing flight to Kathmandu, and onward journey to your home country. “The memories of the adventure stay with you for a lifetime. You will never forget the hospitality of the Sherpa people, the beauty of the nature surrounding you, the reflection of the times you wanted to give up, your eventual success, and the feeling of sadness upon completion.” Q veterinarian finds a niche and passion with holistic approach Dr. Liz Hassinger ’77 was featured on the front page of the Providence Journal in January. Liz—who studied at the University of Montana and the University of Rhode Island before attending the Tufts University Veterinary School— has a practice in Exeter, Rhode Island. The story chronicles her discovery of holistic veterinary medicine and use of acupuncture with animals. Liz had a life-changing experience taking an animal acupuncture course in New Mexico and brought her experience back to her practice at Wolf Rock Center, which she opened in 1997. “There was very little out there at that time,” Hassinger says in the Providence Journal story. “It was really a grass-roots movement within veterinarian circles.” “The earth is sacred, and all the animals and all the plants. And it’s people, too. I love people just as much as I love animals and plants. “It all starts with a love for animals. In my practice, I’m really able to love animals. My staff members love animals. I encourage them to actually talk to the animals: ‘Don’t just hold the animal, but talk to them, say it’s OK, we’re going to help you. We’re taking this blood test because we have to find out what’s going on.’ “So, we actually treat them with the respect that you would if it were a person

Dr. Liz Hassinger ’77 and friend

you were working with. A lot of people say they wish they had a doctor that did the kind of stuff we do.” Q martin takes over tennessee men’s basketball program A former Purdue standout and head coach at Missouri State, Cuonzo Martin ’91— who spent a year as a postgraduate at New Hampton School—was hired as the 18th Men’s Basketball Coach at the University of Tennessee in March. “Cuonzo is among the most promising young coaches in the game, and we are excited about the coaching ability, toughness and energy that he brings to our program,” former Tennessee athletic director Mike Hamilton said. “He has a proven track record of success as a head coach at Missouri State and an assistant at Purdue as well as an outstanding career as a college basketball player.” Martin arrived in New Hampton in the fall of 1990 with bad knee, but despite playing at what Mark Tilton describes as 60 percent most of the season because of his knee, Martin helped the Huskies to a 23-3 record with all three defeats coming to Maine Central Institute. He relished the basketball experience playing alongside Lawrence Moten ’91 (Syracuse) and Kenya Hunter ’91 (Duquesne), but other aspects of his experience also resonated. He remem-

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Cuonzo Martin ’91 left Missouri State for Tennessee.

bers working in the dining hall to make a little money, hanging out with his teammate and roommate Jose Ocasio ’91, and taking long rides with the basketball team to places like Fork Union Military Academy where the team had to sleep on mats on a floor. He embraced New Hampton, and New Hampton embraced Martin. “It was a great year, just being in the state of New Hampshire coming from East St. Louis,” says Martin. “It was one humbling and two, a blessing. I’m forever grateful to Coach Tilton and Coach (Whit) Lesure for giving me an opportunity. ...Everyone was so genuine. They never saw color, and they embraced me as an individual. I like how they treated me and everybody across the board.” Q cooley ’89 returns home to coach providence Ed Cooley ’89 grew up in the public gyms of Providence and now he will try to provide inspiration to the kids from his old neigh-

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In Brief

Former faculty member Manny Brito invited some of his former and current players to play on May 27 following Commencement before moving to a similar position at Governor’s Academy. Standing (l–r): Coach Kyle Tufts, Alex Kent ’09, Erin Lanni ’09, Caroline Boyce ’10, Matt Dodge ’07, Barnaba Madol ’07, Winslow Mohr ’11, Matt Fay ’12, Jarod Rouleau ’11, Ross Attardo ’09, Will Burke ’08, Manny Brito;

Alumni, parents, and friends gathered at the house of Rena and Jason Pilalas ’58 in North Palm Beach, Florida, in March.

kneeling (l–r): Alex Dodge ’09, Guillermo Alvarez ’11, Matt McFadden ’08, Ray Boly ’12.

borhood as the new head coach of the Providence College men’s basketball team. Cooley, who enjoyed success at Fairfield University, takes over a Big East program that has struggled in recent years. espn recently chronicled his climb from povertyfilled adolescence as one of nine children to a successful college coach. “Ed Cooley did a great job rebuilding Fairfield into a consistently strong program,” Providence athletics director Bob Driscoll said. “Each season his team showed improvement and the win totals increased. Throughout this process he used hard work and dedication, and that is part of what makes him a good fit for Providence College.” Cooley attended New Hampton for one year before heading to Stonehill College, where he enjoyed a successful college career. As the story goes, Cooley needed to make a surprise trip to Central New Hampshire to gain admission.

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Ed Cooley ’89 is the new Head Men’s Basketball Coach at Providence College.

Cooley told the Providence Journal that he waited outside the Headmaster’s office even though he didn’t have an appointment. It all

worked out. Twenty-three years later Cooley will be back on campus to recruit current Huskies to his new team. Q

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2012 SUMMER PROGRAMS

Nothing But NET Basketball Co-ed camp for ages 4–14

Okaroh’s Ultimate Soccer Academy, Gordon Knox ’72

knox ’72 takes over at asu art museum Gordon Knox ’72 is a visionary. In a life that has brought him around the world as a professional and as a curious traveler, Knox has worked to make art a more interactive experience while allowing artists to do what they do best: create. Knox has found a new home as the full-time director of the Arizona State University Art Museum. According to the asu web site, Knox worked previously as a core collaborator for the Stanford Humanities Lab (shl) at Stanford University. His work explores the transformative role of the arts in society and was recently recognized by Forbes magazine for his work on collaborative projects at the shl that brought together experts in the arts, humanities and sciences and engages them in on-the-ground efforts to effect social change. Previous to the shl, Knox was the artistic director of the Montalvo Arts Center in Saratoga, California, developing ambitious projects such as Edge of Desire, the only West Coast exhibition of a comprehensive collection of recent art from India, and fuse, a new media collaboration with the cadre laboratory at San Jose State University. Knox also was the founding director of the Lucas Artists Program, a rescontinued on page 9

NIKE Sports Camps and other elite athletic and leadership programs

Accelerated English Language Program

English Language and American Culture Immersion for International Students! newhampton.org/esl

Friendship! Fun! Challenge! Adventure!

www.newhampton.org/summer T O E X P L O R E A N D R E G I S T E R

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In Brief either: after I’m gone, real people are going to be using them to get real work done. That’s an awesome feeling, and a great motivator to do the best job I can. How did New Hampton prepare you for college and an opportunity like this? Being a software developer means you will often run into questions that no one else can answer, and you have no choice but to buckle down and figure complicated things out on your own, either through experimentation or paging through dense technical writing until you find what you need. One of the best things I got from New Hampton was the ability to do this kind of open-ended research, where the goal isn’t defined for you and you need to figure out what has to be accomplished and how to get there.

Alex Slover ’08 Spends a Summer at Microsoft Alex Slover ’08, a computer science major at Cornell, worked as an intern for Microsoft in Washington state in the summer of 2011. Alex, who plans to earn his Masters after college, is also hoping to land a job with Microsoft after graduation. Here’s what he had to say about his experience. Responsibilities at Microsoft: I’m an sdet— Software Development Engineer in Test. This means my day is mostly spent developing automated testing tools to ensure that, when other developers have ideas they want to try, these ideas work properly and do not interfere with the system.

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What has been the most rewarding part of the internship? I had internships in the software industry for the two summers prior to this, but those were very much “interny” positions and I was either fixing bugs piecemeal, or just doing busywork. This is the first time I’ve ever been part of a professional software development project, with all the responsibilities that entails (meetings! reviews! Design documents!). Learning about the differences between how software is developed in the real industry versus how it’s developed in academia has been a great experience. The tools I’m developing are not just throwaway projects

How did you land the internship? When I was a sophomore, I handed my resume to some Microsoft people at a Cornell career fair. I ended up going to secondround interviews, but I didn’t get the internship--not only was that my first “real” job interview and I probably bungled it, but they said most MS interns are juniors and a sophomore really has to wow them to get a job. They said they were impressed, though, and kept my resume on file. When I got back to school last September, I didn’t even contact them. They contacted me, and said I could skip the first-round interview and go straight to Redmond to interview again. I did so, and this time I landed an internship. There’s a “don’t give up” moral there, I suppose. Q

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continued from page 7 idency program at Montalvo that identifies exceptional international artists and supports them as they develop new work while in residence in eleven newly designed live/work studios. During the 1990s, as the founding Director of the Civitella Ranieri Foundation in Italy, Knox envisioned and established a center for the arts designed to advance and widen the discourse of contemporary cultural practice by engaging the voices and thinking of practitioners from all parts of the world and providing them with excellent conditions to advance their work. Knox recently told the asu News, “a visit to an art museum is more than ‘standing behind a line looking at pictures.’ “An art museum is an active location for the articulation of ideas and a safe location for contemplative exploration,” he says. “My career has been built on developing opportunities to allow creative thinkers in the arts to do what they do best. “The arts provide society with the ability to adapt. The arts question assumptions and break down barriers. The arts provide society with a means to change.” Q

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10% discount off your next purchase (use coupon code 103111 at checkout); expires December 31, 2011

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and support its educational programs and historic preservation efforts? Go to www.historicalsocietiesnh.org/

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newhampton to learn more.

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Campus Currents

left: Former Poet Laureate Donald Hall spoke to students in February. right: Director of Performing Arts Joe Sampson and an amazing cast brought laughs and mystery to McEvoy Theater in May with the production of And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie.

legendary poet visits campus Donald Hall shared his poetry, insight on writing, and wonderful wit with New Hampton School students in February. Hall, the former United States Poet Laureate, gave some salient advice to aspiring writers in the audience when he said, “You have to love to read before you love to write.” Hall, who was invited to campus by former English teacher Sara Crowley ’01, grew up in Hamden, Connecticut, attended Phillips Exeter, Harvard, and Oxford before teaching at the University of Michigan. He decided at a young age tha he wanted to become a poet. “I decided when I was fourteen that this is what I was going to do and I’ve done it,” said Hall, who lives in nearby Wilmot, New Hampshire. Students were surprised to hear about Hall’s writing process. He explained that the last poem he wrote, set to be published in

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September 2011, took him two years to write and he went through nearly 200 drafts. English Department Head Darren Redman was thrilled to have Hall come to New Hampton, and was particularly pleased with the way Hall offered wonderful access into the world of poetry. “Perhaps Donald Hall said it best,” Redman said. “When asked what a poet is, he responded, ‘Someone who doesn’t want exact answers.’” Hall, who was named the Poet Laureate in 2006, is part of a stellar cast of poets who have received the honor. Other Poet Laureates include Robert Frost, Karl Shapiro, Conrad Aiken, and Billy Collins. Q going solar for the second time New Hampton School didn’t want to make its display of alternative energy a one-time thing. One year after the School became the first in New Hampshire to make a solar installation on a school building, students in

the School’s Projects in Sustainability class teamed with parei (Plymouth Area Renewable Energy Initiative) to install a solar-powered water heater on Smith House, the home of Head of School Andrew Menke and his family. The installation was part of an all-day Earth Day celebration that also included a keynote presentation from Rick Peyser ’68, an nhs trustee and Director of Social Advocacy for Green Mountain Coffee Roasters. Guillermo Alvarez ’11 spent most of the day on the Smith House roof helping the crew install the rack for the thirty solar tubes. “It was just a great experience working with the whole crew,” Alvarez said. “Getting out there and not knowing what to expect and not being that familiar with it, we were able to learn a lot and in a couple hours and pull this miracle together.” The Smith House system is different in several ways from the one installed on Veazey Dorm a year ago. Veazey is using

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only solar and electricity to heat its water. Smith House will continue to use oil for its hot water in the winter, when the boiler is fired up to heat the building, with the solar system heating up the water coming in off the street before it feeds the boiler. In the spring, the boiler will be shut off, and an electric water heater will then work with the solar system to produce the hot water. Q farr-williams receives teaching award When Ralph S. O’Connor created an endowed Excellence in Teaching Award in 2010, he wanted to recognize in a special way the tireless work and commitment of New Hampton School teachers. So it was no surprise when the first-ever Ralph O’Connor Excellence in Teaching Prize was awarded to Katerina Farr-Williams, who teaches in the math department and is the Director of the International Support Program. Farr-Williams, who arrived at New Hampton nine years ago, is one of the most dedicated educators on campus. The senior class officers, who served on the committee that chose the recipient of this professional development prize, described Farr-Williams’ far-reaching qualities as a teacher. “She has been known to make extra help sessions more than mandatory, in fact she can be seen on campus tracking down certain students to give them the help they so need, whether they want it or not. Student achievement is paramount to her educational philosophy. She is an advocate for authentic assignments and holding students’ accountable to the highest of expectations. She seeks to improve not only the quality of her teaching, but the resources, content, and practices of those around her. She is a natural advocate for education and educators.” Q years of service End-of-the-year meetings allow the opportunity for New Hampton School to recognize

above: Celebrated activist, author, and filmmaker Jean Kilbourne spoke to the School in March. top left: Katerina Farr-Williams, recipient of the first Ralph S. O’Connor Excellence in Teaching Prize, pictured with Student Body officers Mary Penniman ’11, Danny Frias ’11, and Andrew Menke. left: Faculty and staff honored for years of service (l–r), Eric LaCroix, Amy Wilson, Jeremy Mathison, Martha Flanders, Hans Mundahl, Beth Dodge, Carol Stazinski.

members of the community that have served the School for considerable amounts of time. Among the faculty and staff honored for their years of service in June were: Eric LaCroix, Director of Technology (15 years); Amy Wilson, Art Department Head (15 years); Jeremy Mathison, Music Department (10 years); Martha Flanders, Health Center Nurse (24 years); Hans Mundahl, faculty and Director of Technology Integration (10 years); Beth Dodge, Assistant to the Head of School (10 years); Carol Stazinski, Campus Store (10 years). Q ib students raise money in first-annual walk for hunger When nhs introduced the International Baccalaureate Program in the Fall of 2010, it knew that students would benefit from a globally minded curriculum that would prepare them for the rigors of college. Additionally, the IB is proving to be a valuable tool for community service and

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leadership opportunities. The School hosted the First Annual “Walk for Hunger” in May. Five International Baccalaureate students from the class of 2012, Will Callif ’12, A.J. Lederman ’12, Anna Menke ’12, Grey Rubin ’12, and Katie Solman ’12 planned the event as part of their IB requirement of “initiating an activity.” Over fifty community members walked the 10-mile course along the Pemigewasset River. Money raised will benefit two local food pantries: Ashland Food for All and Plymouth Meals for Many. Q jean kilbourne meets new hampton As part of the School’s Community Meeting Speaker Series, New Hampton welcomed one of the most respected names in the analysis and criticism of advertising in America in March. The talk was made possible by the generosity of a current nhs parent. In a 50-minute presentation in McEvoy Theater, Jean Kilbourne explored how alcohol and tobacco companies try to

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Campus Currents

above: (l–r) Nam Soo Kim ’11, Connor Slover ’11, Boe Vachiraprasith ’11, NaRam Moon ’11, Lyle Kim ’11, Allie Andrews ’11, Chan Lee ’11. Not pictured, Winslow Mohr ’11. top left: Andrew Menke, Stephanie Couturier of the American Red Cross, and Mary Penniman ’11. left: An Art Auction organized by faculty Rene Martinez and Martha Shepp raised more than $2,000 for Japan Relief efforts.

glorify the use of their products and stop at no expense to attract more users. Kilbourne illustrated how both industries rarely show anything about the quality of their products or what they do to you. “When people are blindfolded, they can very rarely pick out their own brand of anything... what they’re selling us is image,” said Kilbourne, who is the author of the award-winning book Can’t Buy My Love: How Advertising Changes the Way We Think and Feel and So Sexy So Soon: The New Sexualized Childhood and What Parents Can Do to Protect Their Kids. Q cum laude society inducts five more students Five seniors were inducted into the prestigious Cum Laude Society during Baccalaureate. Chan Lee ’11 (Seoul, Korea; Case Western), Kamron Vachiraprasith ’11 (Bangkok, Thailand; Brown University), Winslow Mohr ’11 (South Bristol, Maine; Clemson University), Nam Soo Kim ’11 (Seoul, Korea; Emory University), and

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Connor Slover ’11 (Wilmot Flat, New Hampshire; Syracuse University) joined fellow seniors NaRam Moon ’11 (Seoul, Korea; University of Rhode Island), Lyle Kim ’11 (Seoul, Korea; University of Chicago), and Allie Andrews ’11 (Wakefield, New Hampshire; New York University). Q arts day For the first time ever, Arts Day became an all-school event this spring, with every student and faculty member participating in more than sixty different workshops. With the help of guest artists, community members participated and learned more about dance, music, photography, graphic design, and studio art. Q community efforts lead to $4,500 check to japan relief effort Husky Nation left its mark on a necessary humanitarian movement this spring. During one of the final School Meetings of the academic year, Student Body President Mary

Penniman ’11 presented Stephanie Couturier of the American Red Cross’s Concord Office a check for $4,520.25 that went to the Japanese Red Cross and the relief effort in Japan. The donation was the result of four different fundraisers. A dance sponsored by the sophomore class, a dodgeball tournament, an art auction, and “Meatless Mondays” all added up to fund the donation. “We are very proud of our community members and their ability to serve those in need,” Head of School Andrew Menke said. “New Hampton School strives to cultivate global citizens, and this is another example of how our students and faculty think globally and act locally in order to make a difference.” The School generated savings by not serving any meat during lunches on Mondays for seven weeks, and designated the savings toward the relief effort. Martha Shepp and Rene Martinez, two faculty members, spearheaded a successful Art Auction during nhs’s annual Arts Day that raised $2,194 by selling wonderful pieces of art produced by students, faculty, and staff. Q student scores perfect score on national math exam nhs math students enjoyed unprecedented success in the American Invitational Math Examination, and one student earned a perfect score. Boe Vachiraprasith ’11, a senior student from Thailand who will attend Brown University, answered every question on the exam correctly. Boe, who was a Royal Thai Scholar, joined a select group of students in the last decade who have scored a perfect score on the aime. Between 2001 and 2009, there were between three and nine perfect scores on the aime annually. Nearly 200,000 students take the amc-10 and amc-12 and from these examinations, approximately 10,000 students are invited to take the aime. Fellow New Hampton students Justin

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left: Head of School Andrew Menke leads the annual Parade of Nations during International Night. right: Boe Vachiraprasith ’11

Suh ’12 and Seung Wook Lee ’12, were also invited with Boe to participate in the usa Mathematical Olympiad. “Boe is in a very select group of high school math students,” says New Hampton Math Department Chair Justin Freeman, who noted his student also scored in the top 100 at the Harvard mit Math Tournament. “It is hard to say just how good he is. …I was very excited just to see so many students willing to give up their free time to enter a math contest. We have some extremely bright and talented students at New Hampton School. ...I think that this success could really catalyze more interest in mathematics competition next year and I suspect that we will have more successes in the future.” Q international night showcases cuisine, music, and dance It began days before in the kitchen of the Dining Hall. For innumerable hours, New Hampton international students cut vegetables, seasoned meat, stirred ingredients, and cut pastries in preparation for the annual International Night celebration. And once again the lines were long in the

Dining Hall, and the applause was loud in McEvoy Theater. The energy, creativity, and sense of collaboration was outstanding as nhs International students, who add so much to contribute to the sense of a Global community, showcased their cultures and all of their talents to their peers and teachers in their annual celebration of culture. Yes, International night has become a night that anticipated for the culinary delight and the performance. Q seniors receive excellent college matriculation results The College Counseling Office enjoyed unprecedented success in guiding New Hampton School’s Class of 2011. Seniors were accepted to over 180 different colleges and universities. According to Head of School Andrew Menke, the number of highly selective schools accepting nhs students and the options seniors now have in the college process speaks to the renaissance at New Hampton School. “We are incredibly proud of the work of Director of College Counseling Marty Elkins and her team,” Menke says. “The

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strong results validate the hard work and innate ability of the senior class, and the acceptance of our seniors to so many different colleges mirrors the diversity, and inherent strength, of the class as a whole.” Marty Elkins, who is beginning her third year running the New Hampton School College Office, is thrilled with the results. “The 180 different colleges and universities [at which nhs students were accepted] reflects the breadth and scope of our student body. That diversity also means our students are not focused on any one region or selectivity ranking, but look nationally at a wide range of colleges,” says Elkins. Seniors were accepted to colleges and universities all around the country including Bard, Brandeis, Brown, Boston University, Bucknell, Connecticut College, Cornell, Lafayette, Lehigh, nyu, Trinity, UC Berkeley, University of Chicago, University of Michigan, University of Virginia, and Williams. Students with ambitions to study the arts were accepted by some of the premier art schools in the nation including Rhode Island School of Design and Parsons School of Design. For a complete college matriculation list, visit www.newhampton.org/college. Q

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Sports Wrap-Up

brittany gallagher ’11

winter season highlights Husky Nation enjoyed another successful year of athletics with the final weeks of the winter season providing the most excitement. The Women’s Basketball team lost a semifinal contest to longtime power Noble and Greenough to end its run. The 17-4 season was the last for four-year senior Brittany Gallagher ’11, who will continue her career at Maine Maritime Academy. The Huskies, whose season was highlighted by a victory over defending nepsac champion Tabor Academy, return three starters in the Class of 2012 who have committed to Division I programs. Team mvp Sam Brenner ’12 (Vermont), Maddy Blais ’12 (Marist), and Lizzy Ball ’12 (Fairfield) should make the Huskies a title contender under New Hampton graduate Freddy Petkus ’01, who takes over the reigns of the program. …Second-year Men’s Hockey Coach Matt Wright—who won a national title with Boston University in 1995 and whose brother Christian Wright ’88 spent a year at nhs—led his team to the nepsac Small School Final. After dramatic

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connor gorman ’11

victories over South Kent and Gunnery behind the quality play of goaltender Max Schwan ’11, the Huskies lost to Dexter in the final. Connor Gorman ’11 ended a stellar career, leading New England prep school hockey with 39 goals and 30 assists. Gorman, who will play junior hockey for the New Hampshire Monarchs, will likely play for a Division-I program beginning in 2012. …The Men’s Varsity A Basketball squad returned to its first nepsac Final since 2002. Behind the play of All-New England selection Jordan Laguerre ’11, the Huskies

jordan laguerre ’11

knocked off Bridgton and St. Thomas More, which featured nba prospect Andre Drummond, to get to the final. Despite a quality effort, the Huskies ran out of gas and dropped the final to Maine Central Institute. Head Coach Pete Hutchins ’01 once again sent players to promising college careers with Laguerre headed to umass. Nick Paulos ’11 will play for former Husky and college assistant Wes Miller ’02 at unc Greensboro, Will Davis ’11 and Travis Souza ’11 are headed to UC Irvine, Carter Trent ’11 will take his game to the nescac at Trinity College, and Joey Ptasinski ’11 signed with Lafayette College in the Patriot League. … The Women’s Hockey Team promises to make even greater strides after a solid season under first-year coach Craig Churchill. The Huskies graduated only three seniors and will move up to Division I. …New Hampton maintained a strong presence on the slopes again this past winter. Taber Engelken ’11 wrapped up a stellar three-year career and was awarded the Peter Bixby Skiing Award for his contributions to the program. Q

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2011 NHS Athletics

2011 lakes region champs

Winter Varsity Men’s A Basketball Men’s B Basketball Women’s Basketball Men’s Hockey Women’s Hockey

W 21 11 17 25 10

L 13 5 4 11 17

T 0 0 0 1 0

Spring Varsity Baseball Softball Golf Men’s Lacrosse Women’s Lacrosse Women’s Tennis Men’s Tennis

W 9 1 0 8 6 1 9

L 4 7 10 6 6 4 0

T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Note: Some NHS teams do not have win-loss records.

craig churchill

spring season highlights Despite late melting snow and one of the rainiest springs in recent years, the spring athletic teams persevered. The Men’s Tennis Team, under the tutelage of longtime coach Veronica Lima-DeAngelis, won a Lakes Region Championship with a 9-0 record. It was the program’s first title since 2008 and fifth since 2002 under Lima-DeAngelis. The season included a 9-0 victory over rival Holderness. It was the first victory for the Huskies over the Bulls in 18 years. “These tennis players were extremely athletic,”

erin moran ’12

Lima-DeAngelis said. “However, they had their own style. As a coach, I had to teach them how to keep the ball in play and not give a lot of unforced errors to their opponents. I kept them in shape with my “Basic Training Program,” just for tennis.” The Huskies benefited from a No. 1 player in Nathaniel Colp ’11 who continually challenged other teams’ top players. Meanwhile, the Huskies leaned on their depth and a ladder of players that included a number of multi-sport athletes who put in the necessary conditioning time during the early season.

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Phil Lux ’11, Mike Vollmin ’11, and Clay Allen ’11—all hockey players—brought consistency to the team while captain NamSoo Kim ’11 and Stephen Bouzianis ’13 also had standout seasons. … Erin Moran ’12 helped the Women’s Lacrosse Team to a .500 record in a season in which the Huskies lost leading scorer Anna Menke ’12 to a knee injury Moran was named the female winner of the Skip Howard Award, given to the top scholarathlete in the freshman, sophomore, or junior class. Moran, an International Baccalaureate Diploma candidate, also excels in soccer and ice hockey. …Ryder Arsenault ’13 was the male recipient of the Skip Howard Scholar Athlete Award. Arsenault, who also plays football and ice hockey (despite his father being the former Men’ Varsity A Basketball coach), hit .425 and drove in 25 runs in a shortened season. Q

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190th Commencement

the confidence we have now as brand new

adults, setting out to prove ourselves and change the world, should not be seen as delusion. there is nothing false in knowing that you have the potential for

greatness, more so than you have already achieved of course. it only becomes a lie when you lose the drive to achieve it.

– Valedictorian Allie Andrews ’11 as she reminds her classmates that “You Are Awesome.”

New Hampton School graduated 108 students on a beautiful spring morning, May 27, 2011. United States Army Captain Alicia Burrows ’00 (see page 30) returned to campus and gave an inspiring speech to the new graduates. The following awards were presented to students at Commencement (college destinations are also included): r allie andrews (Wakefield, New Hampshire) was the valedictorian of the class and received the World Languages Award. (New York University) r naram moon (Soul, Korea) was the class salutatorian. (University of Rhode Island) r david winking (Stonington, Connecticut) received the Meservey Medal, the School’s most prestigious medal that is awarded to the student who has unselfishly contributed to making New Hampton School a more stimulating and productive community. (Connecticut College) r reiva keith (Sanborton, New Hampshire) received the Citizenship Award as well as the Ben Cecil Jury of Your Peers Award for being selected by her classmates to be the Commencement welcome speaker. (Dickinson College) r meiqi tian (Beijing, China) was awarded the Multicultural Diversity Medal, given to the senior who consistently fosters an understanding, acceptance, and celebration of diversity while encouraging others within and outside his/her cultural grouping to see different people as a source of learning in the classroom, in the community, and around the world. (Boston University) r brian alexander (Rumney, New Hampshire) received the Intellectual Curiosity Award. (Clarkson University) r paul piscitelli (Campton, New Hampshire) received the Academic and Personal Growth Medal. (Plymouth State University) r kevin messier (Burlington, Vermont) and daniel frias (Lawrence, Massachusetts) received Faculty Citations, awarded to students who do not receive a major medal but whom faculty wanted to recognize. (Wagner University and Providence College)

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Other awards, presented at Baccalaureate on May 26, included: Dara Levitan (Weston, Massachusetts), English Department; Casey Goll (Winthrop, Massachusetts), Golden-Tilton PG Athlete; Baxter Mattes (Duxbury, Massachusetts), History Department; Kamron Boe Vachirapresith (Thailand), Mathematics Department; Connor Gorman (Shrewsbury, Massachusetts) and Reiva Keith, Joe Plaia Outstanding Athletes; Zhengyi Liu (Wuhan, China), Science Department; Mack Willingham (New Hampton, New Hampshire), Performing Arts; Yeo Jun Song (Seoul, Korea), Visual Arts Award. r

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graduation 2 0 1 1

clockwise, from above: Max Cormier ’11 blows some bubbles; Andrew Menke hands Reiva Keith ’11 the Citizenship Award; Brittany Gallagher ’11 and Taylor Sirles ’11 embrace; Meservey Medal Winner David Winking ’11 with his sister Andrea ’08 and brother Keith ’07; Mack Willingham ’11 (center) and family; Daniel Frias ’11 displays his Faculty Citation.

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faculty profile

peg frame p’04 ’10 married to rick frame ’76, science teacher, yearbook advisor 5 years at nhs: six what do you teach and why is it important for students? I teach in the science department, chemistry mostly. Last year I taught the freshman science class, Science and Sustainability, for the first time. In my eyes, science is everything and everywhere. We can’t live and share this planet without understanding the basic workings of our universe. In order to be good stewards of our resources, we should understand the workings of them. how have your own children been prepared for college and beyond at nhs? This little oasis allowed them to feel safe enough while they were here to be completely themselves. Many school environments are so judgmental and the students feel they need to fit in at any cost. New Hampton School has always been unlike that. Here, you are free to be who you are. Afterall, it is much easier being who you are than who you aren’t. This leaves you energy to learn and be creative. what makes new hampton the community it is? Authenticity. It is hard to explain. It is a place where people are genuine and caring. how has the transition to pilalas center for math and science been? Pilalas is the most amazing space in which to teach. I have been able to do so much more in the way of hands-on lab activities in this building. F

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above: Former Faculty gather, front (l–r), Peter Bixby, Skip Howard, Lou Gnerre, Norm Farwell, Carol Dulac, Van McLeod ’65, Richard Dulac; back (l–r), Peter Gulick, David Jones, Mark Tilton, Carol Brooks, Larry Lougee, Fred Willingham ’72, Mark Trivett, C.J. Willingham, Al Keith, Joe Marsh, Diane Finlay, James Shaw ’63, Jacques Finlay, Denny Blodgett, Harrison Golden, Tom Diehl, Robert Simpson, Charlotte Simpson, John Conkling. left: Bill Fisher ’61 and Paul Dupee ’61 at the Class of 1961 50th Dinner celebration during Reunion 2011.

reunion 2011 new hampshire’s long-awaited summer finally arrived and was appreciated by the more than 400 alumni, former faculty, current faculty and guests who arrived on campus June 3–5 to celebrate Reunion Weekend 2011. Friday evening’s festivities included the Class of 1961 50th Reunion dinner, and a separate reunion kickoff reception for alumni and former faculty. A full slate of activities unfolded on a warm and sunny Saturday: the Manitou Circle Brunch (recognizing alumni who have celebrated 50-plus years since their New Hampton School Commencement), an estate-planning seminar, a women’s speaker series, student panel, state of the school overview, softball, lacrosse and soccer games, hike on Burleigh Mountain, a reception, fabulous dinner, alumni awards and most

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importantly, the Lifetime Achievement Celebration honoring veteran teacher, coach, mentor, and headmaster, Lou Gnerre. Sunday morning brunch wrapped up a busy weekend of activities as alumni bid farewell to classmates, teachers, and coaches, made one last stop in the Campus Store, and headed back onto all roads leading away from New Hampton. The campus has never looked better, and a memorable weekend was had by all who took the time to return to Central New Hampshire for shared stories and camaraderie. Photos speak louder than words. These are a brief representation of the positive energy and corresponding warmth of a beautiful June weekend as alumni and faculty gathered to celebrate the importance of nurturing these meaningful relationships. — Cindy Buck

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reunion 2011

class of 2001: front (l–r), Lisa Falconi Perfield, Hallie Patch LeBlanc, Maria Davis, Erin Glidden Janelle; back (l–r), Pete Hutchins, Nick Scolamiero, Chris McKinnon, Rocky Milot, Ross Starr, Craig Hoffman, Eric Buck, Lesley Robbins. above: Carol Brooks, former faculty and Dr. Carolyn Richards Crosby during the women’s speaker series at Reunion 2011.

class of 1991: front (l–r), Melissa Barnett Brouilliard, Joe Plaia, Elizabeth Pickel Doda; back (l–r), Kevin Burke, Brian Ahearn, Tim Ames, Geoff Carlton, Delaney Carrier, and Michael Katz.

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class of 2006: front (l–r), Garrett Lemke, Allison Swift, Warren Wilson, Dylan Frazao, Krystin Polucha; back (l–r), Brian Toczko, Ida Dyment, Mel Julien Foster, Sarah Lutkevich, Allyson Campion, Arica Mooney, Stephen Woodaman, Kate O’Hara, Katelyn Karkos, Lance Morrison, Jessica Carpenter, Amelia Feigenbaum and Kenny Torsey; far back (l–r), Diego Zambrano, Jay Buckley, Tommy Tessier, Tommy Black and Mike Bill. at left: The Reunion tent near Kennedy Field.

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reunion 2011

class of 1963: sitting (l–r), Kevin Kavanagh, Tom Beeler, Evi Metcalf; standing (l–r), Jim Noonan, David Gasssenheimer, Stuart Bicknell, Doug McIninch, James Shaw, Jack Metcalf, Tom Moore. above, right: Andrew Menke and Bob Greene ’61 at the Class of 50th Reunion Dinner at Alumni Hall. class of 1956: (l–r) Tom Vohr, John Clark; missing from photo, Bob Pollard.

class of 1976: sitting (l–r), Jay George, Gino Gnerre, Elibet Moore Chase ’75; standing (l–r), Jay Lena, Mark Zurwell, Rick Frame, Polly Worthen ’74, Nate Dow, Bruce Canty ’75. class of 1971: sitting (l–r), Matt Rutter, Andy Barr, Rob Kennedy; standing (l–r), John MacLeod, Clancy Phillipsborn, Steve Lindquist, Joe Del Grosso, George Thorlin, Bob Galletly, Jeff Whittaker, Sam Worthen, Bob Lapointe, Doug Viles, Nick Richmond, Steve Thibeault; missing from photograph, Patty Harris Merrill, Chuck Eastman, Bob Merrick, Proctor Chandler.

2011 reunion awards r headmaster’s award: given to recognize an alumnus for his or her service to the school in a particular year. Class of 1961 50th Reunion Committee: Karl Smith, Chair, Bill Fisher, Bob Greene, Geoff Hickin, George Robinson, Fred Tripp r the hazeltine-merrill lifetime achievement award: recognizes an nhs alumnae, former faculty or present faculty who has demonstrated leadership in her community and her profession. Dr. Carolyn Crosby ’81

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r marco polo award: given each year to the alumnus or alumna who has traveled the farthest, geographically to be with us for the weekend. Paul Dupee ’61, United Kingdom r lifetime achievement award: awarded to a member of a Reunion class in recognition of exceptional achievement in his or her personal or professional work. Lou Gnerre r the smith-moore service award: recognizes a member of nhs alumnae, former faculty, or present faculty for her service to New Hampton School. Jennifer Shackett Berry ’83, P’07,’10,’15

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reunion 2011

above, left: (l–r), Bill Pankey ’69, Hershell Norwood ’66, Frank Motley ’66, Al Dempsey ’65 and Milton Brown ’66. class of 1986: front (l–r), Bonnie Anderson, daughter of Eric Anderson ’87, Gabrielle Cohen, Amanda Gunter, David Hanswirth, Daryl Thomas and his son Asher; standing (l–r), Erik Anderson ’87, A.J. Vazifdar ’89, Chris Collins, Bill Gratton, Kim Cordima, Vincent Every, Greg Dulchinos, Robert Hill, Anna Brinitzer Hill ’85 , Hugh Hare ’87.

class of 1981: ; sitting (l–r), Robert Bianchi, Chris Burns, John Marrapese; standing (l–r), David Paul, Chris Willingham, Richard Fahy, Mike Sampson.

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class of 1966: sitting (l–r), Frank Motley, David Noyes, Tom Lochhead; standing (l–r), Don Porter, Milton Brown, Tom Mleczko, Bill Fedorowicz, David Coen, John Powell, Hershell Norwood, Art Coucouvitis, Peter Tonissi. above: (l–r), Lisa Falconi Perfield ’01, Caitlin Foley ’01, Jennifer Shackett Berry ’83, Maria Davis ’01, and Eric Buck ’01

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reunion 2011

at left: Alumni, faculty, current students, and faculty children competed in the annual Alumni Lacrosse Game on Saturday of Reunion. above, right: (l–r) Tommy Tessier ’06, Head of School Andrew Menke P ’12, ’15, Doug Mcininch ’63, and Van McLeod ’65.

above: Director of Development Sandy Colhoun and Andrew Menke present a check for $100,000 from an anonymous donor for the Annual Fund after the Annual Fund reached 1,000 donors as part of the $100,000 Challenge.

class of 1961: sitting (l–r), George Robinson, Bill Fisher, Dick Ekholm; standing, middle row (l–r), Don Cummings, Julian Harrison, Al Dyson, Karl Smith, Geoff Hickin, George Winlock, Mills Williams, Paul Dupee; standing, middle row (l–r), Charlie Booth, Bob Green, George Bierlin, Fred Tripp and Skip Howard, former faculty. at left: Class of 1961 50th Reunion Committee receive the Headmaster’s Award, Bob Greene, Bill Fisher, George Robinson, Geoff Hickin, Fred Tripp and Karl Smith.

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Upcoming Events

october 20–22 parents weekend Thursday, October 20 through Saturday, October 22 Parents have the opportunity to meet with faculty, visit classes, watch athletic games and theatrical performances during foliage season in Central New Hampshire.

november 9

november 12

museum of science event Wednesday, November 9, 5:30–9 pm Join Andrew Menke and his wife Jennifer for a a cocktail reception followed by dinner (featuring Wolfgang Puck Catering) and the imax classic, “Everest” in the Omni Theater.

powder keg Saturday, November 12 Join fellow alumni, former faculty, and the entire nhs community for what promises to be a wonderful fall day of cheering for the Huskies as we head to Tilton School to try to beat the Rams for the third straight year.

february 2 nhs at the bruins Thursday, February 2, 7 pm Join fellow alumni and friends of nhs in special promenade seating for an evening watching the defending champion Boston Bruins host the Carolina Panthers.

Register for events at www.newhampton.org/alumni r Alumni Hockey Games, Men’s and Women’s games, Sunday, January 8, 2012 (Lindsay Arena) r Florida Gatherings, March 2012

come on back reunion 2012 r june 1–3 r register now r all alumni and former faculty are welcome r celebrating classes ending in “” and “” contact cindy buck, director of alumni and parent relations at --; cbuck@newhampton.org, to register

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HONORING A LEGEND

New Hampton Salutes Lou Gnerre

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Alumni, friends, and former faculty came from

He has left his mark in the office, on these pages

across the country on Saturday night of Reunion

(see page 46), and beyond. Lou officially retired from

2011 to honor Lou Gnerre for his service to New

New Hampton this June, and we were lucky to have

Hampton School. Between 1957 and 1992, Lou did it

a few of his fondest admirers and colleagues speak

all—math teacher, coach, dean, college counselor,

at the celebration. Here are a few highlights from an

and headmaster among other duties. He returned to

evening in which the Louis Gnerre, Jr. Endowed

the School in 2004 to teach math and then worked

Scholarship Fund for New Hampton School was

part-time for the Alumni and Development Office.

established. Thank you Lou!

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honoring a legend

facing page: Lou was always at home on the baseball field; clockwise, from top left: standing (l–r) Brittani Gnerre, Sue O’Laughlin, Suzi O’Laughlin, Jordan O’Laughlin, Joyce Meaney, seated (l–r) Lou Gnerre and Patricia Gnerre; the Alumni softball game; Lou Gnerre at the Alumni softball game with Robert Galletly ’71; Joe Marsh, former faculty; Gino Gnerre ’76, Lou and Patricia’s son; Lou Gnerre with Robin Gulick Pino ’82.

host the event at his home. He served us up a great lunch of salad, potatoes, and juicy New York strip steaks, and he did this year after year. The only way to account for such behavior is to realize that Lou just knows how to take care of people.” — Al Keith, Former Faculty

on always being there During my four years as a student at nhs, Lou was omnipresent and always checking in. I assumed he did this just for me, but I know now, he did this for all of the New Hampton students.” — Jennifer Shackett Berry ’83 Director of Studies

on lou and his wife, pattie I would be in error to assume Lou did this alone. For if Lou was our mentor, Pattie was our surrogate mom. Always there with a hug and a kind word, she was also always there to reassure us even when Lou wanted to fire our ass.” — David Jones, Former Faculty

on caring What I didn’t know that first day, and would come to figure out over time, was Lou was a person who really cared¸ not just about baseball, not just about this school. Lou Gnerre had a great passion and really cared about people of all kinds. This is his legacy.” — Chris Collins ’86

on taking care of people When I was Chairman of the Math Department we had to have our annual math department meeting off campus, and Lou graciously offered to

on commitment to nhs He is a faithful member of Husky Nation and he represents for us that connection that is generational for

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those of us in the room. With the exception perhaps of the Moores, he is the next person who is most responsible for why we know each other.” — Victoria Blodgett ’80, Member of the Board of Trustees

on unstuffing stuffed shirts

He’s wonderful at unstuffing the stuffed shirt. If anyone would have come in here with any pretenses like that, they would find out in a hurry that’s just not New Hampton. He led by example. I’ve been at this for a while now. …I’ve never—and I say this with the deepest sincerity—I’ve never worked for anybody like this guy. To me, he’s the best guy as a person that I’ve ever worked for in my life.” — Joe Marsh, Former faculty and St. Lawrence Men’s Hockey Coach

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rom its earliest days when it was known as the New Hampton Academy, this small school in Central New

Hampshire has impacted the Armed Forces of the United States by preparing students for a commitment to service. Whether it was an alumnus fighting in the Civil War or a more recent graduate jumping out of planes in Afghanistan, New Hampton School has been well represented in wartime and in peace.  By Will McCulloch perhaps headmaster emeritus t.

While the following pages include the sto-

Holmes Moore ’38 serves as an appropriate

ries of graduates who made the ultimate

metaphor for what New Hampton has

sacrifice, there also are the enriching stories

meant to the military and what the military

of those who used the military as a spring-

has provided to graduates of the School.

board to other endeavors and those who

Almost twenty years before John F.

continue to serve. For their efforts, military

Kennedy uttered the words, “Ask not what

service has provided lasting values, enduring

your country can do for you, but what you

friendships, and a way of expressing their

can do for your country,” Moore and so

patriotism. These stories are those of only a

many other New Hampton men spent large

small fraction of the New Hampton School

chunks of their life not only serving their

graduates that have served, but they are

country, but doing so with the pride that this

offered as a way of thanking all the graduates

institution hopes to instill in all graduates.

who made the commitment to their country.

The United States military has, since the Civil War, used medals to recognize service. above, left: the American Defense Service Medal recognized American active duty military service from September 8, 1939 to December 7, 1941. above, right: the National Defense Service Medal is awarded for active duty military service during the Korean, Vietnam, and Gulf Wars, as well as any conflicts during the War on Terrorism. The medal is oldest service award still in circulation by the United States armed forces. All medal images in this feature courtesy the US Department of Defense; background image courtesy the National Archives.

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Eric Buer ’84 Eric Buer ’84 spent countless hours in attack helicopters, risked his life during innumerable missions in Iraq as a Lieutenant Colonel in the Marine Corp, and found himself hunkered down in the Pentagon reporting to the joints staff in recent years. But Buer—who found his facility for intellectual engagement as a four-year student at New Hampton— might have discovered his true calling recently as an associate Professor at the National Defense University. Buer traded the long hours of pondering strategy in hallowed offices of the Pentagon in 2010 for standing before a cast of future decision makers in his classes on Strategy and Policy and Ethics. The soldier turned strategist is now a professor, and life seems to be pretty good for the married father of four. “Preparation for class for me is two or three times as much as it was as a student,” says the San Francisco native who received a Bachelor’s in economics from Ohio Wesleyan; an mba from La Salle, and Master’s degrees in military studies and strategic studies from the Marine Corps Command and Staff College and the War College. “With teaching you need to put everything in context. You need to read things a couple of times and actually know what you’re talking about.” Buer carries a sense of humor that was needed during the more challenging moments of his military career, which included three tours in Iraq. In 2004–05, he was based in Al Anbar province between the flashpoint cities of Fallujah and Ramadi. His command of 400 included pilots and air crew, maintenance and healthcare workers, and administrative and logistics specialists. Buer carried incredible responsibility, which led to a bump to Colonel and a posting at the War College. After three years of traveling

the world and helping to determine the policies of nato, he now spends his late hours reading for class. He is no less inspired by the rewards that come with the military life. “What keeps me going is the sense of service,” Buer explains. “The traveling is great; the three tours in Iraq were not so great. But fundamentally, the satisfaction I get from service is above all about the people. You meet the most incredible people. …As you get older, it’s a cool job because you’re with a younger people—18- and 19-year-olds. It amazing what we put on those folks. And to lead them and mentor them, it was a big part of what I did.” Buer believes that New Hampton School pushed him toward a career in service. “I think you get exposed to a lot of opportunities there,” he explains. “You have a chance to go to Golden View Health Care Center and show prospective students around. With all the sports I played, there was camaraderie and teamwork. There is a sense of family there, and the Marine Corps are very similar. At New Hampton, I got exposed pretty quickly to a sense of volunteerism.” After three years working for the Chairman of Joint Chief’s staff, Buer is settling into his new role, commuting to the nation’s capital from Fredericksburg, Virginia. His days of flying attack helicopters are over, but Buer carries with him all his experiences from Iraq, Somlia, Kuwait, and the former Yugoslavia, and is proud of the Distinguished Flying Cross with Valor he earned with more than 35,000 flight hours and 370 combat missions, many aimed at rescuing wounded soldiers. As the United States of America tries to navigate through the treacherous global landscape and the conflicts in which it is involved, friends of New Hampton School can feel proud to have a soldier in their midst that has provided hands-on service, shaped policy, and is now molding the next generation of military leaders. r

inset: the Distinguished Flying Cross with Valor Device (bronze “V”). The cross is awarded for “heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight, subsequent to November 11, 1918,” while the Valor Device is awarded for heroism in combat. Eric Buer ’84 was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross with Valor Device in 2005 for his service in the Middle East. above: Eric Buer ’84.

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Alicia Burrows ’00

Alicia Burrows ’00, spoke at the 2011 New Hampton School Commencement.

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Alicia Burrows ’00 was sitting in her dorm room at Colby College in 2011, preparing for a French class when the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2011 struck. It changed the way Americans think about homeland security and the career path of a freshman college student from Meredith, New Hampshire. Four years later, Burrows was an Army platoon leader headed to Iraq, responsible for forty men and women and far away from the athletic fields, classrooms, and campus spaces that had been a far less turbulent setting for her maturation as a leader. “I’ve learned a great deal from my experiences in the military and what sticks out the most is leadership,” says Burrows, a Captain who has completed seven years in the service and endured two combat deployments to the Middle East. “Young Army officers are purposefully introduced to the military by a sort of ‘baptism by fire.’ My particular experience

was taking charge of a platoon of 40 soldiers as a 22-year-old lieutenant and leading them through a yearlong deployment to Iraq.” Burrows believes she was ready for the challenge, though, with her experiences at nhs and Colby tucked away in her toolbox. A class president, standout athlete, and exemplary student during her time at New Hampton who won the Meservey Medal, Alicia tackled leadership roles and responsibility from a young age. “Fortunately, my preparation for that moment began years ago right here at New Hampton School,” Burrows told New Hampton School graduates in May 2011. Now a full-time student at the College of William & Mary’s Mason School of Business, pursuing a Master's in Business Administration, Burrows appreciatively looks back on her service thus far. With all the challenges that come with a military life, there are also the opportunities for travel and exploration. Alicia calls living in Germany for five years and travelling throughout Europe her biggest thrill. Now she’s taking advantage of the educational benefits of the armed services. For Burrows, military service began as something to keep her personal grade book filled, but morphed into something more holistic in its meaning. “I initially joined the Army Reserves in college because I wanted a challenge,” says Burrows, who remains on active duty as a full-time student and will return to Army responsibilities next summer. “At the time I had no plans to serve on active duty, but then 9/11 happened shortly after I completed basic training. Unsure about my post-college career plans and with my country at war, I decided to pursue and accept an rotc scholarship for active duty service.” Yes, Alicia Burrows’ plans changed, and with it, so did the good fortune of the United States Army. r


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Robert Crum ’59 Robert Crum ’59 uttered revealing words to Private David Dolby as he passed away at the age of twenty-six from multiple bullet wounds in the Central Highlands of South Vietnam on May 21, 1966. “How are my men? How are my men?” On that horrific day, Lieutenant Crum and his Army platoon walked into an ambush of almost insurmountable circumstances, and on that day Crum, with his final words, continued to exhibit the character that made him a respected student at New Hampton School, a caring family member, and an enigmatic college-educated officer among teenage soldiers. In a detailed chapter of S.L.A Marshall’s Battles in the Monsoon: Campaigning in the Central Highlands, Vietnam, 1966, Crum’s final day is detailed, painting a picture of Dolby’s courage and Crum’s leadership under fire. Awarded the Purple Heart as well as the Silver Star and Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm, posthumously, Crum was first shot in the shoulder on that day in Binh Dinh Province before suffering fatal wounds. According to firsthand accounts, “he continued to direct his men to cover the personnel in the area who had become casualties, demonstrating his fearlessness and courageous leadership to his men.” While the chapter in Battles in the Monsoon chronicles the manner in which Dolby selflessly charged up a hill and tried to protect his platoon’s casualties from a barrage of gunfire, it also elucidates the magnitude of Crum’s leadership. Providing guidance to the end, Crum recognized that the unlikely position of machine gunner, Dolby, was the man who needed to make the strategic decisions for the platoon. “Take control and get these men out,” Crum said to Dolby.

Crum’s nephew John Leonard was not even born yet when his uncle died in Vietnam, but he has made considerable effort as an adult uncovering what happened in Vietnam and honoring his uncle’s bravery. What resonates more than the details of the ambush, is the man Crum showed himself to be before and during his tour in Vietnam. Leonard recalls the story that Dolby told him about Crum. Dolby—a five-tour veteran who received the Congressional Medal of Honor and died last year—walked into Crum’s tent in the early days of his time in Vietnam and immediately recognized that Crum was not the classic officer. On his bunk was a book that was battered, highlighted, and tabbed. Crum, who loved consuming the poetry of Rudyard Kipling and Walt Whitman, was doing more practical reading. The book was about what it is like to be an infantryman. As Dolby recalled, he knew that Crum was “different. He wanted to know about us. I appreciated that.” Long before he adorned his Army uniform, Crum distinguished himself as anything but an ordinary guy at New Hampton. A hockey and football player, Crum was also the business manager of the Belfry yearbook. Jason Pilalas ’58 recalls “a smiling happy-go-lucky kid. He had a huge streak of common sense and saw the humor in every situation.” Olivia Thompson married Crum in 1965 in a “beautiful military wedding.” She had met him six years earlier when Crum was a college freshman at Wake Forest and she was a waitress in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. “He was a young man full of life, full of energy, and full of fun,” Thompson recalled during the dedication of the Crum Campus Center at New Hampton in 2004. “He had a curiosity, warmth and eagerness that drew you to him—charisma and a zest for life that see “crum,” on page 40

inset: the Silver Star, awarded to members of the US military for valor in the face of the enemy; Crum was a recipient of this. top: Robert Crum ’59 before enlisting in the Army. above: Robert Crum ’59 in active duty.

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Donald Galletly ’41

above (l–r): Donald R. Galletly ’41; the carrier USS Bataan returns from Korea in 1951; Grumman AF Guardian anti-submarine aircraft of the type flown by Galletly. The aircraft consisted of two airframes: the AF-2W (bottom) “hunter” that carried detection gear and AF-2S (top) “killer” that carried the weapons.

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His only son tears up over the telephone when he considers the father he only knew for five months, but grew to love and appreciate even more as he became an adult and built his own family. “He loved to fly,” says Donald Galletly Jr., son of Donald R. Galletly ’41. “He was very close to his friends in U.S. Naval Reserve and thought very highly of them.” A little more than ten years after graduating from New Hampton School, Donald Galletly Sr. was shipped out to the West Coast to prepare for a combat role in the Korean Conflict. Galletly was activated for duty. He was an experienced pilot who had grown up flying planes as a youth around his hometown of Great Neck, New York. He was flying a Grumman AF Guardian plane based at Los Alamitos that was landing on the aircraft carrier USS Bataan off San Diego in December 1951. When turbulent seas created difficult conditions, his plane crashed into the deck and sank. Donald Galletly perished in the high seas. He was twenty-eight years old and left behind a young wife, Barbara, and two children. “My mother never spoke about it much, because it was such a hole for her,” says his son, who now lives near Philadelphia after a successful career in business. “He was very

special to her. He was a wonderful person and family man.” During his two years at New Hampton, Galletly was every bit the team player. Well liked by his classmates, he played football, JV hockey, varsity baseball, and also contributed to the Manitou newspaper. A graduate of Lafayette College, Donald Galletly worked in advertising for the New York Daily News and was in the U.S. Naval Reserve, based out of Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. When he became an active member of the Navy, he embraced the opportunity to serve his country. His brother Robert ’42, father of Peter Galletly ’73 and Robert Galletly Jr. ’71, also served in the War (see photo insert, page 43). Young Don was forced to paint a picture of his father, a sketch that became more clear when he encountered his old friends. They didn’t fill the air with exaggerated descriptions. It was always sincere and genuine. “From talking to them, I would say he was the kind of guy who would walk into a room and light it up,” says Donald Jr. “He had a big personality and was very thoughtful. He loved the outdoors and sailing. …He was a true patriot, loved being in the service of country, loved that aspect of his life.” r


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Victor Lima-Deangelis ’03 The sacrifices that military folks make for their country tend to dwarf those of the civilian man. For Victor LimaDeAngelis ’03, son of longtime faculty member and head of the tennis program Veronica Lima-DeAngelis, each treacherous deployment into the warzone is exacerbated by a simple fact: he must leave his family behind. “I have a beautiful wife named Emily, who is currently in nursing school and will graduate January 2012,” he explains, “and a beautiful daughter, Sophia Valentina. It is so hard to go home and see them, and spend such an unbelievable time creating great memories throughout the year, and then when it’s time to deploy, having to tell them, especially my daughter who is almost four, that Daddy is leaving for a year, and she won’t be able to see him until he is done working. That has got to be the worst thing ever, because you always wonder what if that is the last time you will see your family.” A six-year veteran of the Army, LimaDeAngelis is awaiting his Sergeant pin and is a team leader in a Scout/Sniper/Reconnaissance platoon that is currently serving in Afghanistan. He is part of the 3rd Brigade Combat team (First Battalion, 32nd infantry regiment), which is a subordinate unit of the 10th Mountain Division based out of Fort Drumm, New York. It is Lima-DeAngelis’ third deployment after stints in Abu Gharib, Iraq, and Kirkiurk, Iraq. In the middle of September, Lima-DeAngelis wrote from the Zari district of Kandahar, Afghanistan, where he was excited about his unit’s progress. “We recently pushed to the Arghandab River for the first time,” Lima-DeAngelis explains. “And let’s say that it has definitely been a wild one. We are the first unit to push that far south to the river.”

Since arriving in Afghanistan six months ago, Lima-DeAngelis has endured the totality of wartime, the reality of losing comrades, but also the thrill of trying to accomplish a mission. “I would have to say my biggest thrill was a few weeks ago, when we got into a pretty good fire fight and we were pinned down,” he explained in September in an e-mail. “And we used our amazing Air Force and definitely showed them up. Oh man, when you hear that gun run from an A-10 Jet, everything just stops.” The military was an option that LimaDeAngelis thought would make the most sense given his desire for a challenge and activity. see “lima-deangelis,” on page 41

inset: the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal was awarded for US military for service from September 11, 2001 to 2005 within Iraq and Afghanistan. top: Victor Lima-DeAngelis ’03 in the wake of a Blackhawk helicopter in Afghanistan. above: Victor (right) with cohort in Afghanistan.

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T. Holmes Moore ’38

top: Vought os2u Kingfisher, similar to the one flown by Bud Moore, on the deck of the battleship USS North Carolina. The aircraft was catapultlaunched (see open catapult on left of deck) and then retrieved from the water using the crane at back. above: Bud Moore in 1943.

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Headmaster Emeritus T. Holmes Moore ’38 was about to enter his senior year at Middlebury College in the Summer of 1941, spending a few months on the shores of Newfound Lake playing music for money with his band the Black Panthers in Harry Meehan’s Jungle Ballroom. He played tennis and golf and took hikes to the neighboring peaks in between swims in Newfound Lake. But life would take an aerial twist. “In spite of our separation from the real world, we became increasingly aware of the fact that something was wrong with the world,” Moore writes in his unpublished memoirs. “This awareness was sharpened when the Navy announced the V5 program, a newly established program which enabled young men who had completed two years of

college and could pass a flight physical to qualify for enlistment into flight training to become Naval aviators.” A few months later, Bud Moore was learning how to fly and beginning what would be a four-year stint in the Navy. Only a few months removed from playing music, he was the Junior Ensign on a ship of 2,109 men and the Junior Officer in the V (Aviation) Division. He flew os2u Kingfishers off the battleship Indiana and embraced the time-draining process of flying the main float seaplanes with two wing floats. The planes were catapulted into the air and then returned to the vessels when they landed on sleds that were pulled by the battleships. Moore, who became the Senior Aviator at the age of twenty-two to his disbelief, spent most of his time in the South Pacific where he transitioned from the battleship USS Indiana to the USS New Mexico, another battleship. All the while, his responsibilities were consistent. “Our job was to take islands back from the Japanese,” Moore says of his flights over the Marshall and Solomon Islands, “and spot the guns firing from the shore—soften them up for when the Marines and Army landed. That was my major duty. There was a lot of reconnaissance. But mostly it was the spotting.” For his efforts in the South Pacific, he was presented with the Air Medal for “consummate skill and daring beyond the call of duty in the performance of duty as Senior Aviator of the Indiana and the New Mexico in the Gilbert Islands, Marshall Islands, and Marianas campaigns.” During his time in the Navy, he managed stop-offs in Pearl Harbor and Australia between patrols in the South Pacific. His travels continued in 1944 when he was assigned to see “moore,” on page 41


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Jason Pilalas ’58 Jason Pilalas ’58 was a student at Harvard Business School in the early 1970s and did not have the same weekend schedule as many of his peers. Once a month, Pilalas hopped in his car and made the trip to New York for Naval Reserve training. He would return early on Monday mornings for classes, a seemingly inconvenient part of life for an ambitious young man attempting to cull the most out of his graduate school experience. But few people shared the affinity for the Navy that Pilalas developed and maintains to this day. For if there was any experience that paved the way for his success more than his time at New Hampton School, it was his 23 years in active and reserve duty. “I always loved going to sea,” Pilalas says. “I like being with a bunch of people with a shared mission who are determined to accomplish the mission.” And his missions were rarely cruises through the harbor during peace time. Pilalas was not ready for college in the spring of 1958 when he left New Hampton before graduation and enlisted in the Navy. He spent six months “chipping paint” as a seventeen-year-old enlistee before finding his way to the Naval Prep School. Then the Navy, in exchange for his service, paid his way through the University of Southern California on an rotc Scholarship. Pilalas graduated in 1963, and the Vietnam War greeted him with his diploma. A young man in his early twenties, Pilalas quickly earned a great deal of responsibility. He made three tours in Vietnam and was the second commander of a ship with 26 officers and 260 crew. Though his first two tours included more pedestrian missions, “moving from peace time to war time” and “running with the carriers and supporting Marines,” his third tour proved to be the

most challenging. Pilalas found himself on the Mekong River in South Vietnam where he was on a converted Landing Ship, Tank (lst) that had ten pbrs (Power Boat, River) and Huey helicopters among other resources. The bulk of Pilalas’ missions involved planning and giving orders for the rescue of downed aircraft. “There was so much energy dedicated to getting there, aiding the wounded, and not getting killed. The most harrowing part of Vietnam was dealing with people who were badly injured,” Pilalas recalls. The images from that final tour lingered with him in the ensuing years. “I don’t know that I had post-traumatic syndrome, but for the first one-and-a-half years of my marriage, my wife told me she would wake up and I would be yelling. It eventually went away.” What didn’t evaporate was Pilalas’ passion for helping people. A loyal supporter of New Hampton School as well as so many charities, Pilalas believes that his experiences in rescue situations made a profound impact on how he lived the rest of his life. “I think the Navy and my experiences in Vietnam made me a more caring person,” says Pilalas, who with his wife Rena was the lead donor for the construction of the Pilalas Center for Math and Science at New Hampton (opened in 2009). “When you are involved in saving people’s lives, you get a great sense of satisfaction and have a desire to do it again. You want to do it again. …I have a generous streak that was magnified by my experience there.” Pilalas’ loyalty to the Navy never wavered. With his work as an investment titan at the Capital Group in Los Angeles taking him around the world on business travel and a wife and two children, he finally left the reserves in 1981 as a Lt. Commander. see “pilalas,” on page 41

inset: the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, awarded to members of the US military for service in the Vietnam War, until the creation of the Vietnam Service Medal in 1965. top: Jason Pilalas ’58, from the 1958 issue of The Belfry. above: a Navy Landing Ship, Tank (lst) in Vietnam.

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The Poh Family: Alexandra ’99, Tristan ’02, And Brendan ’05

top: The Poh clan, back (l–r) Brendan Poh ’05, Tristan Poh ’02, Timothy Poh; front (l–r) Alexandra Poh ’99, Diane Poh, and grandmother Peg Plumer. above: Navy P-3C Orion maritime patrol aircraft, similar to the type flown on by Tristan Poh ’02.

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When Tristan Poh ’02 considers his military service in the United States Navy, his thoughts don’t immediately drift toward covert missions and complex military tactics. “Many of these missions have long names and can sound impressive at cocktail parties,” says Tristan, “but the more meaningful missions have been humanitarian. My squadron was called upon to aid in the search and rescue of the Air France crash from Brazil and to assist Haiti after the earthquake in 2010. Whether it was trying to bring closure to the French and Brazilian families or helping guide aid to the victims in Haiti, the humanitarian efforts put forth by the United States military force is where our training is most evident.” For the Poh family of Meredith, New Hampshire, service in the Navy is as much about being citizens of the world as it is about defending their country. A family tradition of military service has long been a staple of the success of the United States Armed Forces, and the citizens of the United States depend on the dedication of this familial tradition. The trio of siblings from Meredith perhaps embodies this more than any New Hampton School family of the last thirty years. Alexandra ’99, Tristan ’02, and Brendan ’05 all graduated from New Hampton with exemplary achievements in

and out of the classroom, only to be matched by their service to their country. Alexandra “Sasha” Poh spent more than eight years in the Navy, receiving her official honorary discharge in July of 2011. Sasha left the Navy with the rank of Lieutenant, and her years of service provided enduring values and access into a career as a nurse. “The Navy further instilled in me integrity, honesty, accountability, and leadership,” says Sasha, who earned a Masters in Nursing at the University of New Hampshire, before beginning work in the icu at Concord Hospital in the state capital while remaining in the reserves. Today, Sasha lives in San Diego with her husband Chris. She is a registered nurse in the Cardiac Care Unit at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla. Her New Hampton experience resonated in her military travels to Hawaii, Singapore, Dubai, and Australia and now, as she embarks on civilian life and a career in healthcare. “The School’s powerful motto, ‘in a world that expects you to fit in, we teach you to stand out,’ was an inspiration to me and it challenged me to believe in myself and follow my dreams,” Sasha says. The eldest Poh lives around the corner from baby brother Brendan, who in 2009 was the third Poh child to graduate from the College of Holy Cross. A Lieutenant Junior Grade, O-2, Brendan is surface warfare qualified and was the Auxiliaries Officer onboard the USS Princeton (cg-59) until October. He recently moved to the USS Curts (ffg-38) as the Navigator onboard. Already, Brendan has accrued some adrenaline-inducing experience. “My biggest thrill as a Surface Warfare Officer is being able to drive a billion-dollar see “poh family,” on page 40


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above: Nick Robillard ’05 (second from left) with his fellow Pararescue Jumpers. inset, below: the Purple Heart, awarded to any member of the Armed Forces of the United States who has been wounded or killed while serving with the U.S. military on or after April 5, 1917.

Nick Robillard ’05 Nick Robillard ’05 is frustrated. Forget about the painstaking yet speedy recovery he is making after getting shot four times on August 19, 2011, while serving his country in Afghanistan. Robillard wants to be back in the game, with his comrades and helping the United States’ cause in his highly specialized role as a Pararescue Jumper. “My guys are still out there,” he explains. “It kills me to not be out there with them.” Robillard does not sensationalize the moments that led to a broken femur, soft tissue damage in his leg, and the broken bones and tissue damage two other bullets caused in his hand. Rather, he points to the fact that his skill set demanded more than two-and-a-half years of training compared with other United

States soldiers who carry basic training and six months of preparation with them on the front lines in Iraq and Afghanistan. Robillard can’t be too specific in his detail of the events on the day of his injuries, noting that he was performing additional ground duties with Navy Seals and Special Forces in Afghanistan. He brushes it aside like a determined athlete who has sustained a torn acl. “I knew what I was getting into,” he explains. Robillard feels more comfortable talking about the work he was doing, the almost addictive nature of finding himself in a warzone, charged with the important task of helping soldiers in need. He is more inclined to talk about the 70-plus missions that went according to plan. “Every time we went out it was like our hands just started working,” he explains.

“There were multiple patients and chaos everywhere. You always fall back on your training. Everything gets done quickly and efficiently.” Robillard did not always know that helping people as a “PJ” was his destiny. After he graduated from New Hampton School in 2005, he found himself on the Seacoast of New Hampshire, working construction and trying to figure out what he was going to do. College didn’t seem to be the right fit; he was searching for a passion. In 2007, he enlisted in the Air Force in Concord, New Hampshire. What followed was one of the most comprehensive trainings in the United State Military. There was basic training for six weeks followed by the Pararescue indoctrination for nine more see “robillard,” on page 40

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Frederick Smith ’45

top: Fred Smith ’45 (far left in back row) and fellow officers aboard the tanker vessel USS Platte. above: the USS Platte (center) refueling two ships in the the western Pacific in July 1955.

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When Fred Smith ’45 entered Officer Candidate School in 1953, the son of former New Hampton School headmaster Fredrick Smith had plenty of people trying to coax him into service in the United States Judge Advocate General’s Corps. Unlike so many other enlistees who were interrupting their studies, Smith already had completed his undergraduate work at Dartmouth and carried a law degree from Cornell. But Smith was compelled to see the world outside of courtrooms during his time serving his country. “I could have gone into the jag and lived in New York City or Boston doing legal work and created a good resume, but I decided that if I was going to go into the Navy I wanted to see the world,” Smith says. That’s exactly what Smith did. From September 1953 to February 1957, Smith served his country as a line officer and traveled throughout the Pacific. “I spent three years aboard the USS Platte (a 550-foot tanker named for a river in Nebraska) in the Pacific, most of the time fueling, underway at sea, ships of all shapes and

sizes—minesweepers, submarines, destroyers, supply ships, cruisers, and aircraft carriers,” Smith says. “…I served initially as Gunnery Officer. The ship’s complement of officers was supposed to be 20 but, during all my time aboard ship, we never had more than 13.” He also experienced some interesting moments during his time in the Navy due to his legal expertise. “When I was aboard the ship,” Smith says. “I would have to attend special court marshalls because I always had to represent the person who had done bad things. I was a lawyer.” Though military service wasn’t on Smith’s immediate list when he graduated from New Hampton, he knew that public service was in his future, especially after his corporate law experience. When his time in the Navy was complete in 1957, he transitioned to a long and successful career as a Foreign Service Officer and U.S. State Department Attorney with stops in Washington D.C., Mexico City, and Toronto. For Smith, who grew up attending a single-room elementary school in bucolic New Hampton and attended prestigious institutions, the military provided exposure to a global society as well as different cultures in the United States. “It was an experience in the Navy,” Smith recalls. “There were people like me who were doing it after college. In contrast, the crew, sailors, and enlisted men, the great majority were from south and southwest—Alabama, Texas—a different culture. …We were exposed to different cultures. It was eyeopening, and that’s what I found most interesting.” r


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William Stirrup ’61 William “Bill” Stirrup ’61 knew after he graduated from Marietta College in 1965 that his draft into military was imminent. So instead of waiting for the military to call him, Stirrup, who already was working for Price Waterhouse in New York City out of college, enlisted in the Army. According to Bill’s father, Al Stirrup, who lives in Florida, his son knew that he would have a different experience if he enlisted. Opting to stay out of the front lines, he went off to Officer’s Candidate School and became a second lieutenant in the financial corp. Meanwhile, he got married and served his time while based in Indianapolis, Indiana. Between Christmas 1967 and New Year’s Day, Bill was shipped off to Vietnam where he was soon promoted to a full lieutenant. “He was very impressed with the Army,” Al Stirrup says. “He was happy with his service, and was very willing to go to Vietnam.” Bill was in Vietnam for five or six months, according to his father. During that time he wrote home to his parents. “He would write about what was going on and how they would hit the foxholes once in a while,” Al Stirrup says, “but he didn’t do any fighting.” As Al tells it, Bill was handing out pay to soldiers one day in Vietnam when he collapsed. He was airlifted to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington D.C. where he was diagnosed with advanced cancer. Two weeks later, on May 15, 1968, Bill died in Walter Reed Hospital. A wonderful man who made the ultimate sacrifice for his country, Bill Stirrup—who would have celebrated the 50th Anniversary of his graduation from New Hampton School this past June—was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star Medal for service. r

inset: the Bronze Star Medal; Stirrup received one posthumously. left: William “Bill” Stirrup ’61 from the 1961 issue of The Belfry. above: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where Bill passed away on May 15, 1968. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.

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wild guy, but in the military where he had a responsibility, he was a completely different Rob,” Leonard says. “…He wasn’t worried about this or that. I can’t think of a better example of accountability. He was accountable for his men until the end.” Each day at New Hampton, hundreds of students walk beneath a plaque with Robert Crum’s likeness on it. The Crum Student Center remains a place for students to enjoy each other’s company, something Robert Crum, a hero, did so well. r

nick robillard ’05

“crum,” from page 31 endeared him to all. …I respected him as a person with a strong value system whose internal compass led him to embrace the military life as his duty.” Thompson believes Crum’s time at New Hampton and the patience of T. Holmes Moore ’38, who called Crum into his office on occasion, had a profound effect on her late husband. “New Hampton molded him into becoming a young man of courage and principles,” said Olivia Thompson, who still lives in Crum’s home state of New Jersey. “His budding maturity was acknowledged and rewarded. He received and cherished the medal for the most improved student. He followed his Headmaster’s instruction to the end.” Crum’s passion for his country and his duty was only surpassed by his commitment to his men. The military seemed to allow the once mischievous Crum to embrace his innate capacity to lead. “What I knew from my mother and from his pictures was that he was a fun-loving,

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“poh family,” from page 36 warship,” Brendan explains. “In the United States, there is no more than one percent of people that can say they have accomplished this feat at the age of twenty-five.” Military service has its benefits, but for the youngest Poh the learning outside the classroom is the enduring payoff. “I have learned that anything is possible,” Brendan says. “As long as you work hard, have enthusiasm, and never forget your goals in life you will succeed.” Brendan believes he had a leg up on his peers when he entered the Navy because of the diverse community at New Hampton. “A lot of the countries on the other side of the world have great cultures which are a learning experience,” Brendan explains. “New Hampton prepared me in that I was able to learn about these diverse cultures and mingle with people who are from different countries prior to my college experience and the Navy.” Middle child Tristan lives in the other corner of the country, stationed in Jacksonville, Florida, where he lives with his wife. He is a Naval Flight Officer flying on the p-3c Orion as a Tactical Coordinator and Mission Commander. Carrying the rank of Lieutenant, Tristan has been deployed to Japan in support of the global War on Terror, El Salvador to help in the fight against illegal drug production, and most recently Italy and Djibouti, Africa. To all corners of the globe the Poh family has taken their skills and commitment, and it is the Navy, the United States, so many coun-

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tries, and New Hampton School that are better because of three siblings’ shared passion for service. r “robillard” from page 37 weeks. “Every day was the worst of my life,” Robillard says. Then came the Pararescue pipeline, a succession of nine different courses including combat dive school, survival school, Army airborne, parachuting, free fall, free fall jumper, Air Force emt, and a civilian emt

paramedic course. He graduated in September , and moved on to two different deployments, one in Okinawa, Japan, and the next in Djibouti, Africa, the latter involving search and rescue in a country that pierced a young American’s emotions. “We had the opportunity to go into orphanages. We brought soccer balls and frisbies, mres and water,” Robillard says. “…I remember a kid grabbing me and he brought me out to the field and begged me to play soccer with him. I almost got heat exhaustions we were out there so long.” When his third deployment arrived, Robillard clutched the adrenaline that was in the envelope with orders to serve in Afghanistan. “I was pumped up,” he explains. “I couldn’t wait to get there and do my job. I couldn’t wait to get there and help people on the ground.” And that is what Nick Robillard has done and hopes to do soon. Though the Pararescue Jumpers have carved out an enigmatic place in the military with their prodigious training and versatility, Robillard has learned so much from his service. “It’s humbled me a little,” he explains. “I definitely developed a maturity. And overall, this career field has caused me to become a ‘silent professional’—the less you say the better off. It’s taught me humility. When you are working in military it’s not about you anymore, it’s about your country.” Four bullets might have taught others to stay home and figure out the next stop on the career, but Nick Robillard has found something in which he believes. And his two


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years at New Hampton seemed to have helped prepare him for every challenge and life- altering moment in training, Japan, Africa, and Afghanistan. “All the different cultures that are at nhs really set me up for success,” he says. “I honestly didn’t think anything was that different because I had a lot of friends from around the world.” r “lima-deangilis” from page 33 “I chose to join the military because I have always wanted to fight for my country and college just wasn’t for me,” he explains. “I am a guy that needs action all the time, and sitting in a classroom listening to people lecture, just wasn’t exciting for me.” Meantime, Veronica Lima-DeAngelis is the picture of a proud mother overwrought with the fear that is expected when your son is thousands of miles away in such a precarious location. “Having a son in Special Operations is very difficult,” Veronica Lima-DeAngelis says. “Victor has had two tours in Iraq and this one in Afghanistan. Working in the New Hampton community has given me the strength to persevere during these trying times. … I am very proud that my son is in the United States Army and serving his country. I feel a strong passion and feel for all who are in harm’s way. Victor chose this path, and I support him totally.” Lima-DeAngelis opted to leave New Hampton early to finish his education where he could train for tennis, but remains thankful for his experience and the values it taught him. “New Hampton will always be a place that I will never forget—great memories and great people.” The military has provided enduring lessons. “The military has definitely taught me not to take anything for granted,” he says. “You never know when your last day is going to be, and you should definitely enjoy and make the best of every day.” r

diane poh with her son brendan ’05 and daughter alexandra ’99

“moore” from page 34 Pensacola, Florida. He was trained to fly the f4u Corsair, a single-seat fighter-bomber, a combat plane that demanded a departure from his previous responsibilities. His extensive training included a move to Michigan where Moore and his colleagues flew countless training missions. Bud became a skilled aviator of this plane, despite a trepidationfilled final flight that included a spray of hydraulic fluid in his face. “I got into the Navy because I wanted to learn to fly and serve my country,” he explains in his memoir. “The Navy served me well. I realized my childhood dream of being a fighter pilot and along the way learned a lot about leadership, problem solving, performing under pressure, decision-making and managing people.” These were all skills that helped him in his transition to a life of service to his alma mater. Indeed, Bud Moore led New Hampton School with the precision and passion of a pilot. r

“pilalas” from page 35 A collector of Naval artifacts who shared a passion for Naval History with then-Headmaster T. H. Moore ’38 during his time at New Hampton, Pilalas believes he was shaped by his Naval experience in a dramatic way. “It made me a much more mature and confident person,” he says. “I have been in a lot of situations that required good judgment and rapid judgment and I did well in those situations. …Going to the Navy and getting a scholarship opened up everything for me—a progression of good events in my life. I met my wife at usc.” Pilalas certainly gained some wisdom from the time when he was an enlisted man to the time when he was an officer carrying the load of so many lives in his hands. In addition to discovering a keen sense of his strengths and limitations, he developed an appreciation for his fellow soldiers and its role. “It’s not McDonald’s that makes this country great,” Pilalas says. “It’s the the people risking their lives so the rest of us can live.” r

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New Hampton School Alumni Who Have Served in the Military (Listed alphabetically, with service branch and last year of attendance. This list reects the New Hampton School Alumni records. Please send corrections and additions to Cindy Buck in the Alumni Office, cbuck@newhampton.org.) Adams, Basil R., Jr., usa, 1949 Adams, Jeffrey T., usa, 1981 Alder, Anderson C., usmc, 1985 Allen, Kenneth R., usmc, 1949 Bailey, Walter E., usa, 1951 Becker, Robert E., usn, 1948 Benson, Gardner R., usmc, 1947 Bernhard, Leia N., usaf, 2004 Borrego, Krystal Corbeil, usa, 1999 Bray, Stephen R., usn, 1959 Buer, Eric F., usmc, 1984 Burke, F. Thomas, III, usn, 1945 Burke, Stephen P., uscg, 1989 Burrows, Alicia M., usa, 2000 Carey, Daniel M., usa, 1989 Carter, John P., usa, 1960 Casey, William F., Jr., usa, 1957 Casterline, Arthur B., Jr., usn, 1947 Cavicke, Richard J., usn, 1949 Champney, William A., usa, 1958 Connare, John A., Jr., usn, 1951 Cooke, Bennett W., III, uscg, 1976 Cowe, Marc A., usaf, 1987 Crothers, Jeffrey K., usa, 1957 Crowell, George R., usa, 1938 Crowell, William B., usa, 1949 Crosby, Carolyn Richards usn, 1981 Crosby, Peter, uscg, 1981 Crum, Robert H., usa, 1959 Cutler, Hooper W., usn, 1958 Delaney, Steven V., usn, 1965 Descary, William C., usaf, 1960 Dexter, Clark O., usa, 1959 Diaz-Silveira, Jorge T., usa, 1960 Dickie, Jason S., usa, 1960 Doherty, William F., usa, 1947 Drake, John E., usa, 1936 Drake, William M., usaf, 1943 Dyson, Albert O., usn, 1961 Eames, John B., usa, 1960 Ecker, J. Arlen, usa, 1982

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Eddy, Burton A., usa, 1951 Egner, John, Jr., usa, 1951 Ernst, Charles A., III, usa, 1960 Etmon, Sean F., usmc, 1989 Fahy, Richard H., Jr., usn, 1981 Fairbank, David P., usa, 1960 Farris, Douglas M., usa, 1985 Feldman, Robert A., usa, 1960 Fendler, Donn C., usa, 1945 Ferdinando, Normand V., usa, 1954 Fitzgerald, James F., usaf, 1990 Fitzgerald, Thomas J., usa, 1958 Gallagher, Daniel A., usa, 1939 Galletly, Donald R., usn, 1941 Galletly, Robert C., usa, 1942 Gaudette, Alan C., usa, 1960 Gilmore, David S., usaf, 1974 Gilmore, Jefferson K., usa, 1979 Glidden, Barrie R., usaf, 1953 Glidden, Elmer G., Jr., usmc, 1934 Goode, Alan P., usa, 1965 Gordon, George F., usa, 1965 Green, Richard J., usn, 1989 Greenbaum, Thomas L., usa, 1960 Hamel, Matthew S., usmc, 2008 Harmon, Christopher D., usmc, 1995 Harrison, Webster L., usmc, 1959 Healy, Richard D., usa, 1938 Heckman, Debra L., usa, 1974 Henry, Karl W., usn, 1965 Hill, William H., III, usa, 1960 Hill, David L., usaf, 1960 Hiller, Berton B., usn, 1950 Hinchcliffe, John H., III, usa, 1960 Hirst, Judith A., usmc, 1973 Hollis, Peter B., dmd, usn, 1959 Holman, Rockwell, usn, 1944 Howley, Bryan A., usaf, 1989 Huber, David E., usaf, 1951 Keane, Garrett, usa, 2001 Kennedy, Thomas R., Jr., usa, 1942

Kimball, Christopher, usmc, 2002 Kirchhoff, Charles W., usn, 1960 Kleager, James S., usa, 1992 Klein, Christopher M., usmc, 1964 Knapton, John D., usa, 1950 Knox, Robert, usa, 1937 Kurtz, Robert J., usn, 1946 LaFlamboy, Wayne L., usaf, 1953 Larkin, Charles D., usa, 1963 Leary, Brian E., Jr., usmc, 1993 Lemke, Garrett, usa, 2006 Levine, Samuel J., Esq., usn, 1959 Liebert, Jacob, usn, 2010 Lima-DeAngelis, Victor, usa, 2003 Lucey, David T., usaf, 1960 Lynch, Kevin K., usa, 1965 Marren, Mary E., usa, 1999 Martins, Jack D., usa, 1956 Masters, John F., usmc, 1958 McDonald, John D., usa, 1991 McIntosh, Henry H., usa, 1960 McKeen, Robert W., usa, 1958 Mead, John C., usn, 1960 Meckfessel, Ronald W., usaf, 1960 Middleton, Curtis T., usn, 1971 Miller, Hien, usn, 2007 Mizell, Jackson P., usa, 2004 Moore, T. Holmes, usn, 1938 Morrison, Richard D., M.D., usa, 1953 Mudgett, Donald M., usa, 1963 Nichols, Chester E., II, usa, 1954 Noe, Keith, usn, 1983 Norris, Olivia, uscg, 2008 Ochse, Bernhardt A., usa, 1982 Pearce, Frederick P., usa, 1946 Perkins, Gilbert S., usa, 1960 Perkins, Donald F., usaf, 1939 Peterson, Richard T., usaf, 1985 Peterson, Walter R., usn, 1942 Philippi, Eric T., usa, 1959 Pilalas, Jason M., usn, 1958


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service & sacrifice in world war ii

left: Robert C. Galletly ’42 (back row, third from left) and the crew of B-24 Liberator bomber “The Brat,” circa 1944. Galletly was a pilot in the US Army Air Force’s 454th Bombardment Wing. He survived the war and passed away in 2007. above: Chandler Sargent Whipple ’39, US Army Air Force (forerunner of today’s US Air Force), piloted a B-25 Mitchell bomber that was shot down in October 1943 over New Guinea. None of the crew survived.

Plaia, Joseph S., Jr., usmc, 1991 Poe, William H., II, usaf, 1988 Poh, Alexandra C., usn, 1999 Poh, Brendan T., usn, 2005 Poh, Tristan D., usn, 2002 Provencher, Gregory J., usn, 1993 Raftery, Jill A., usa, 1997 Reardon, Michael P., usaf, 1955 Richards, Ernest H., usn, 1974 Richards, Edward L., uscg, 1975 Richardson, Hugh B., usa, 1957 Roberts, Erling R., usa, 1959 Robillard, Nicholas A., usaf, 2005 Rodriguez, Richard S., usaf, 1976 Roy, Michael T., usaf, 1997 Sadler, M. W., usn, 1959 Sanborn, Alan M., usmc, 1959

Sims, Frederick R., Jr., usn, 1941 Smith, Carey T., usa, 1950 Smith, Craig A., usaf, 1973 Smith, David L., usa, 1960 Smith, Frederick, Jr., usn, 1945 Snyder, Christopher H., usn, 1996 Spear, Mark A., usa, 1988 Sprague, Nathan, usaf, 1999 Stachelski, Mark E., usa, 1990 Staples, Joseph M., usn, 1960 Sterling, Scott E., usn, 1992 Stirrup, William D., usa, 1961 Strickland, Andrew P., usaf, 1999 Swan, Robert S., usn, 1951 Topercer, Terry J., II, usn, 2006 Tripp, Fred R., uscg, 1961 Underhill, Robert, usn, 1949

Uttley, Harold A., Jr., usa, 1953 Vohr, James C., Jr., usn, 1953 Walker, James H., Jr., usa, 1959 Wallace, Robert S., usa, 1959 Ward, Robert N., Jr., usmc, 1970 Warthen, John G., usa, 1968 Westland, John, usaf, 2007 Wahl, Robert, usn, 2001 Whipple, Chandler S., usa, 1939 Whitcomb, Barrett S., usa, 1960 Whiting, Joel D., usa, 1961 Whitten, Bertwell K., usa, 1959 Williams, William J., usmc, 1973 Winkemeier, Howard R., usn, 1941 Worthen, Christopher S., usaf, 2003

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student profile

will callif ’12 four-year senior from hancock, new hampshire 5 cross country, jv ice hockey, lacrosse, bruce paro jv athlete award, class president sophomore year, international baccalaureate diploma candidate, presidential service award, two-time ib student of the month, cum laude society why did you pursue the ib program? It’s above and beyond an AP class because you’re driven to teach yourself and that’s what you’re going to have to do in college your freshman year. Professors don’t hold your hands. Before the IB, I was someone who would look at the notes I got in class and learn them, but now I’m someone who creates his own notes—things I find interesting— and then I apply them. I’ve taught myself to learn in a way that fits me and best prepares me for college. what is your favorite ib class? IB Biology. I get to design labs like a real scientist would. It’s evolution all the way to molecular biology, so I have a chance to see the whole field. And it’s something I’m thinking about pursuing in college. I think it’s great preparation. what teacher has had a huge impact on you here? Mr. Redman was so enthralled in the subject of English and so passionate about it, so it rubbed off on me. Coming out of middle school into Freshman English Honors, we jumped into the Odyssey, which is a pretty heavy read for your freshman year. We read the whole thing. And we read a lot of Shakespeare. It was something new to me and different from a public middle school in Southern New Hampshire where I had never heard of the Odyssey before. I never thought of myself as a writer, but I’ve learned to love writing essays for my English classes. F

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New Hampton School Fall 2011 Hamptonia magazine. Finished size is 11.0 inches ta


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Lou’s Corner On Saturday afternoon, those of us who are still able played a softball game in which the Bruisers defeated Dupee’s Dodgers 14-1 and, Robert-Grant “Crash” Wealleans ’68— either in his enthusiasm or clumsiness— crashed into second base and broke his wrist. He will be the first recipient of the Broken Bat Award for trying too hard. Former faculty Joe Merrill was the umpire, and the lopsided score is the result of his accepting a bribe. Thank you Joe. A men’s lacrosse game was also played at the same time as softball on Kennedy Field, resulting in a great game between alumni and current students, coached by current teacher and coach Steve Fay. Later on in the afternoon, a co-educational, multi-age (ages 3 to 56) soccer game was Hello friends, Well another Reunion Weekend concluded. The Class of 1961 was well represented for their 50th Reunion. We enjoyed dinner at Alumni Hall hosted by Head of School Andrew Menke and his wife Jennifer, and after dinner, we were treated to stories of punch spiking, jumping from windows, and drinking in the kitchen, but best of all, friendships long ago made and now remembered. Bob “Stinky” Greene ’61 was a terrific MC and even volunteered to take up a collection to purchase me a new tooth!

Bob “Stinky” Greene ’61 was a terrific MC and even volunteered to take up a collection to purchase me a new tooth.

DO YOU KNOW… Do you know who was the outstanding male athlete for the following years: 1952, 1953, 1954, 1956, and 1957? Please send your answers to cbuck@newhampton.org, cbuck@newhampton.org; 603-677-3414.

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played on Kennedy Field in memory of Diane Day Brigham ’92 with her family in attendance. The Saturday evening Reunion celebration, attended by over 400 people, doubled as my retirement dinner. It was wonderful to see so many of you, especially my former ball players and opera lovers. David Gassenheimer ’63 serenaded anyone who was willing to listen. I’m sorry I didn’t get a chance to thank each and every one of you. Trust me when I say you have my heartfelt gratitude. Special thanks to Dr. William Walsh for his painting of Randall Hall (place of our first apartment), the Tiltons and Harrison Golden for providing my favorite beverage, and those who spoke so eloquently that evening: Andrew

STAYING GREEN Help keep New Hampton School Green! Send us your current e-mail address to cbuck@newhampton.org.

Menke, Joe Marsh, Al Keith, Victoria Blodgett ’80, Chris Collins ’86, Jennifer Shackett Berry ’83, and Dave Jones. Also, my thanks to those of you who sent in material for the scrapbook. It’s on the coffee table and will provide memories and conversations for many years to come. It’s my plan to remain retired this time (Al Keith will be disappointed); unless of course I get too restless. Patricia and I are not going very far, so we hope you will visit when you come to campus. Lou Gnerre Alumni Ambassador

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Memories The Former Governor and the Would-Be Governor by John Bartel ’59 hile there were no political internships at New Hampton when I was there, nonetheless as a student I came face-to-face with a United States senator and provided help on the campaign of another man running for governor. In the fall of 1956, I had been at New Hampton only about a month when a campaign caravan blew into town and mingled with us on campus one morning. Among the visitors was U.S. Senator Styles Bridges. He had served one term as governor and had been in the Senate since 1937. Senator Norris Cotton may have been in this group as well as they made a whistlestop tour before the general election. Unless our postgraduate students were older than they let on, there weren’t a lot of votes to be garnered on campus that day. But that didn’t seem to matter. This was a lesson in New Hampshire direct democracy. Politicians in my suburban Boston environs were more distant, existing in newspaper stories, not in the flesh. I hadn’t yet learned that almost everyone or a close relative eventually served in the capacious New Hampshire Legislature (and to save the state money brought their own chairs). The favorable impression of New Hampshire politics this left on me made me an easy sell two years later when Mr. Moore asked for volunteers at the end of glee club practice for a special project on behalf of a candidate for governor. In a few minutes, he taught a group of us a campaign song for Laconia Mayor Bernard Boutin—the word “boutonniere” not surprisingly was prominent among the lyrics. With the tape recorder turned on, Mr. Moore banged out the song on the piano while we sang with vigor. Presumably, citizens around the state were subjected to this ditty for the next several weeks over the radio. Despite our best efforts, Mayor Boutin was not successful in his bid to move to Concord. Nor

clockwise, from top left: Bernard Boutin was active throughout his life in New Hampshire politics. He passed away in August. Photograph courtesy of the New Hampshire Historical Society; the author, from the 1959 edition of The Belfry; the 1959 glee club (the author is in the back row, seventh from left).

was he two years later. But in 1960 he also worked on behalf of John F. Kennedy’s presidential campaign and was invited to Washington to help the new administration as director of the General Services Administration. r About the Author: John Bartel is a graduate of Harvard University and lives in Santa Barbara, California. He retired as an editor for the

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University of California Santa Barbara Alumni Association. Do you have a New Hampton School memory for publication in the next Hamptonia? E-mail alumni@newhampton.org or send your story to Editor, Hamptonia, New Hampton School, 70 Main Street, New Hampton, NH 03256.

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Where are They Now?

Joe Marsh

Former New Hampton School faculty member Joe Marsh (1976–80) has been the head coach at St. Lawrence since 1985. Joe, who returned to campus in June for the Lou Gnerre celebration, has not limited his teaching to the Hockey rink, though. returning to his roots: st. lawrence men’s hockey coach inspired to join classroom ranks A generation ago, men’s hockey head coach Joe Marsh stood at the front of a classroom. The subject was not hockey, but math. It was 1976 and Marsh was teaching, and coaching, at the New Hampton School in New Hampshire. After a detour to the Choate School, Marsh found himself at St. Lawrence and at the doorstep of his future career as a collegiate head men’s hockey coach. His teaching took on a less traditional form. “We teach all the time; it’s just a very unconventional classroom,” Marsh said. “Appleton Arena is a classroom. (The coach-

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es) have always wanted to be considered part of the educational process.” For 22 years, Marsh was resigned to his role as hockey coach, teaching the intricacies of the college game to his players. But he wanted something else. “There’s some great stuff out there that has nothing to do with what we do here,” Marsh said. “It can enhance it; it can augment it. If you had a rough week at practice, you may find some things that have great rewards separate from (hockey).” Heeding his own advice, Marsh sought an old but familiar position: the front of the classroom. “I wanted something different, something fresh,” Marsh said. “At my age, I’ve seen enough Xs and Os to last me a lifetime.” He approached former St. Lawrence University First-Year Program (fyp) director Steve Horwitz about helping teach an fyp course. “I didn’t think there was any way I would end up doing it,” Marsh said. “He said, ‘Well, we have this one (course) where we might have room.’ “I was like, ‘Whoa.’ I started thinking that if the door opens you have to think about (going through) it sooner rather than later.” But Marsh needed help, because fyp courses are team-taught. He found Peg Kelsey Cornwell, who was offering a community-based learning fyp course. With Cornwell in place, Marsh became the only ecac hockey coach who was also teaching a required undergraduate course. “She helped me out so much,” he said. “She was only here for one more year, though.” Cornwell’s husband, Grant ’79, became president of Wooster College. Marsh needed someone else to teach with. He approached mathematics professor Patti Fraser Lock. “I knew him. I had spoken to him, but we weren’t close friends,” Lock said. “I happened to see him at a social event. He said he was looking for a teaching partner.”

Lock accepted, taking a share of the reins of the course, titled Having an Impact: Leadership, Teamwork and Motivation. She helped Marsh and their third team member, John Pezdek ’03, who was assistant golf coach when he joined the trio but is now assistant director of alumni and parent programs, learn subtler approaches to teaching in the classroom, delivering material in various ways to help make the course enjoyable for both the professors and students. “The first question we got the first year we did it was, ‘So are we going to beat Clarkson this year?’” Lock said. “The students quickly learned it’s about the course; it’s about talking about the readings; it’s about seeing what we can learn. All three of us have a lot to say on the topic.” Marsh added a community-based learning requirement to the course. Each student must volunteer with an organization in the community. Students have volunteered at the Ogdensburg Boys and Girls Club, organic farms and Meals on Wheels, among other organizations. “That was really Joe’s push,” Lock said. “The students, even though they might gripe, all say it’s one of the best things about the course. Many of them keep doing it after they’re done.” Each professor is also responsible for academic advising for a portion of the class. In Marsh’s case, that’s 17 students. The trio decided to split the class evenly, and all the grading is done the same way. “This is a course on leadership and motivation, which makes it plausible for me to do it,” Marsh said. “I don’t have a Ph.D., but I’ve coached for a lot of years.” F Adapted originally for St. Lawrence, the magazine of St. Lawrence University, Fall 2010, copyright St. Lawrence University with permission from an article by Daniel J. Cassavaugh in the February 21, 2010, Watertown Daily Times, copyright 2010 by the Watertown Daily Times.

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Trustee Profiles

jun yao

The first member of the Board of Trustees from China, Jun Yao joined the Board of Trustees in April. With connections to families that have sent children to New Hampton School, Jun brings a passion for education and the growing relationship between China and the School, which is entering its third year of an exchange program with the Shibei School in Wuxi, China. Since 2005, Jun has been the chairman of Beijing Wisdom Investment Advisors inc, which he also founded. The company provides services to large financial institutions in China including balance sheet improvement underwriting allocation. From 2001 to 2005, Jun worked for Hathersage Capital llc where he structured Foreign Exchange products and marketed FX products to Chinese banks and other financial institutions. Jun earned his BS in applied mathematics and MA in finance from the Renmin University in Beijing. He studied at Bowling Green University in Ohio for one year before earning a Masters in economics and philosophy at Columbia University, where he is a Ph.D candidate in philosophy. Jun is a board member of the Zigen Association in China for Rural Education and Development, a non-profit organization

karl v. kimball, ’74

that focuses on rural education development in China. Karl V. Kimball ’74 also joined the Board of Trustees in April, bringing with him extensive experience in financial sector, a commitment to work with non-profits, and a history of aiding the School’s Alumni and Development office in educating friends of nhs in planned giving and financial planning. A resident of Doylestown, Pennsylvania, Karl has worked as an Independent Financial Advisor and Registered Representative as the founding partner and supervising principal of Strategic Wealth Partners, llc, since 2003. A graduate of New Hampton School and Ohio Wesleyan University, where he received a BA in economics and accounting, Karl earned his Chartered Life Underwriter Designation and Chartered Financial Consultant Designation from The American College. Active in his church, Karl is a ruling elder in the Covenant Presbyterian Church. He has served his church as a treasurer, a capital campaign manager, a writer of the employee policy manual, and as a member of the pastoral search committee. — Will McCulloch

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officers Peter W. Galletly ’73, P’09, Chairman Mahwah, New Jersey Steven G. Delaney ’65, Vice Chairman Harrison, New York Samantha M. Jewett, Esq. ’77, Secretary Gilford, New Hampshire members Roger Ballou P’11, ’13 Palm Beach, Florida Victoria A. Blodgett ’80 New Haven, Connecticut Alicia Burrows ’00 Norfolk, Virginia Alford J. Dempsey, Jr. ’65 Atlanta, Georgia James L. Elcock P’12 Westwood, Massachusetts Sarah R. Goos P’13 Concord, Massachusetts William F. Guardenier ’62 Mount Kisco, New York Ruth Haivanis P’04 West Newton, Massachusetts Paul Hamel P’07, ’08 Walpole, Massachusetts Mark Hayes P’14 Atlanta, Georgia Herman A. Hassinger P’77, ’78, Trustee Emeritus, Block Island, Rhode Island Charles E. Hutchinson GP’12 Canaan, New Hampshire Dean P. Jacobson ’68 Delray Beach, Florida Robert D. Kennedy ’50, Chairman Emeritus New Canaan, Connecticut Karl V. Kimball ’74 Doylestown, Pennsylvania Earl R. Lewis ’62 Sudbury, Massachusetts Robinson C. Moore ’73 Groton, Massachusetts T. Holmes Moore ’38, Headmaster Emeritus, New Hampton, New Hampshire Frederick M. Peyser III ’68 Underhill, Vermont Jason M. Pilalas ’58 North Palm Beach, Florida Eugene E. Rainville ’57 Blu=ton, South Carolina Hugh B. Richardson ’57 Bristol, Rhode Island Karen M. Saunders P’08 Gilford, New Hampshire Jun Yao Beijing, China

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Class Notes The Class Notes below reflect information received through June, 2011. Please send news and/or photos of yourself or other alumni to include in these pages to Hamptonia Class Notes, Alumni Office, New Hampton School, 70 Main Street, New Hampton, NH 03256 or e-mail alumni@ newhampton.org. Thank you.

copies of my book Sunrise in Shadow Valley printed (one for me and one for Jen). Copies for our children — her three and my two — will be put on a disc should they be interested.”

correction to last issue: Janet Coombs, wife of Richard Coombs ’47 is the niece of Maurice Smith, not the daughter of Maurice Smith as was reported in the previous issue of the Hamptonia. Additionally Maurice Smith was the brother of Fred Smith ’10, former Headmaster, not his son. Appreciation is extended to Fred Smith ’45 for providing the correct information.

John Linscott and his Whoopie Pie Song lyrics appeared in the Portland Press Herald (Maine) on February 1, after he appeared at a hearing before the Legislature's State and Local Government Committee in Augusta to support making the whoopie pie the official state dessert.

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Jefferson Hodges and T. Holmes Moore ’38 exchanged e-mail correspondence last winter. Jeff reminded Bud that after he graduated from New Hampton School, he attended Trinity College for three years before shifting his attention to the Unviersity of Denver where he earned his mba. He originally joined Sealtest Foods in New York City but choose to live and work instead in West Hartford, Connecticut, where he began an upscale gift shop, which was expanded and branched out to include direct importing from Europe. He later became a professional chef and worked for a Marriott Hotel before retiring. He remembers the nhs days of Glee Club and Double Quartet and still studies music, a lifelong passion.

George Ahl informed the Alumni Office that he completed writing his book in July of 2010. The title is Northwest Connecticut 17th and Early 18th Centuries. The book’s main character is Rev. Thomas Hooker, a founder of Connecticut and the author of the Fundamental Orders, which is the first written Constitution for government by the will of the people. George traveled to 25 towns and villages over two years to study this history and found it to be a wonderful experience. He sends his best to Bud and Jinga. Bob Lyons recently connected with the Alumni Office, sharing, “I had hoped to be in New England this past summer, but my wife and I decided to spend five weeks at the U. of Minnesota campus at Duluth. It got us away from the Arizona heat and allowed us to enjoy an important remembrance: We had taken a bus with our bikes, and touring gear to Duluth from Maine in 1980. We biked to Lake Itasca, the source of the Mississippi, and headed in a roundabout direction, following the river, toward Venice, Louisiana, at the Gulf of Mexico. Jen had to return to Connecticut and her job but biked 995 miles to the Quad Cities. I continued on and made it to Venice. It was a real treat to drive those first miles from Duluth to Itasca! I just had two

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51 John Egner also recently corresponded with T. Holmes Moore ’38 bringing him up-to-date on John’s family. He and his wife Debbie have three sons, two daughters, 14 grandchildren and were eagerly anticipating the arrival of their first great-grandchild at the time this message was shared. Edmund Hill contacted the Alumni Office last winter and shared the following update: He has not visited New Hampton School since graduation but is hoping to

Chris Parlanti ’59 with his twin daughters Andrea (left), Jessica (right) and his first grandchild, Sidney.

stop by this summer for a visit during a trip to New Hampshire and Maine. He recalls Headmaster Fred Smith ’10 as well as T. Holmes ’38 and Jinga Moore, whose children were quite young when Edmund was a student here. After graduating from nhs, Edmund attended and graduated from Tufts University in 1955 and was shortly thereafter inducted into the U.S. Army. After his military discharge, he relocated to La Jolla, California, and graduated from law school. During his career, he worked for various trust offices in San Diego and Santa Barbara, retiring from Northern Trust bank in 1998. Each year Edmund and his wife Jo Ann travel to Vail and Beaver Creek and he was happy to share an impromptu meeting with fellow nhs alumna, Lois Dehls Cornell ’75 and her husband Linc, as they were patrons at the same restaurant in Vail. Lois and Edmund shared many pleasant New Hampton School memories during their shared dining experience.

54 Chester “Chet” Nichols II is setting up a drilling program for uranium in Texas where he first drilled for Union Carbide in 1968. The drilling permit was to be submitted in late spring of 2011 and took several individuals many months to put the massive document together. Nichols wrote, “Be assured that the

environment will be protected to the nth degree!”

57 George McEvoy recently returned from the Bahamas and upon sorting through his mail and reading the most recent issue of the Hamptonia, shared the following, “I read with interest, the article ‘The Big Wind of ’38: A Lesson Learned.’ Actually, I was born in Worcester just twenty days before the storm hit. In those days, newborns remained in the hospital for approximately five days before returning home, and when one did return home, all drinking water had to be boiled as a safety precaution in that era. So, just before the storm actually hit Worcester, an ambulance was sent to my parents’ house to return my mother and me to the hospital as a safety precaution, as they knew there would be a lengthy power outage very shortly in the City. My father reports that while riding through Lincoln Square on the way back to Memorial Hospital on Belmont Street, he looked out of the rear window of the ambulance, just in time to witness the steeple of the Baptist Church lifting off the building and then crashing through the roof of the structure where it remained for quite some time. So naturally, I found this article by Mr. Meloney so very fascinating.” A small world indeed!

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alumni spotlight

My ’35 Woodie

My father used to drive my sister and me to school in a ’35 Ford Station Wagon, but then he got a new ’49 Ford and shut the garage door on the old woodie. Maybe he hoped I’d find it someday and fix it up. I was fourteen and a half when I did, and he didn’t say yes, but he never said no, either. All my friends checked it out. John Reed and Jim Lombard said it could be the hottest car on the Central Coast, something any surfer would give his gnarly left knee for. I tried to start it, but it wouldn’t turn over; the station two blocks down the street told me the battery was good. I got a crescent wrench and took the head off: the cylinders were corroded from a leak in the gasket. I took the grommets and screws out of the sides and replaced them with stainless steel ones. I sanded the birdseye maple sides and put on some marine varnish. It was rotten underneath the auxiliary wheel, and Parke Kooser, who owned Built Right Lumber, milled a replacement at no charge. Mr. Kooser was

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by Karl G. Smith II ’61

my kind of guy—a Princeton grad like my father, he liked his martinis straight up. Actually, I figured Mr. Kooser made the biggest mistake in his life not charging me. My gosh, he had four kids: Ellie, who was bigger than he was in height and girth, ended up marrying Ira, a puny ne’er-do-well from Hollywood; Julie, who married a San Francisco investment banker—they’re probably practicing their golf swings in Boca Raton; Bill, who was a year younger than me and went to Wesleyan—he was killed in a motorcycle accident somewhere in Europe when he was a junior; and Curtis, who was smart as hell, went to Caltech, and has been working for the irs ever since. I never had any dealings with him; he probably came across my returns and chucked them, as any self-respecting guy would do. For an engine, I cannibalized a ’49 Ford that had seen better days. While my friends were sanding the original green paint off the body, I decided to paint it black and the spoked wheels tire engine red. I spent most of my hard-earned money from mowing lawns getting it tuned up. Finally it ran, and it ran real, real, good. Shortly thereafter, my parents sat me down and said it would be good if I went East to school. My girlfriend, Gail, whose father owned Cecil’s Jewelry Store, lobbied my parents on my behalf, but the following fall, I went to New Hampshire, leaving Gail behind and the ’35 Ford Station Wagon back in the garage. When I returned for the summer, I discovered that Gail had left me for a freshman at ucsb. That August, during the annual Fiesta, I invited all my friends to ride with me and harass the revelers. They’d all been drinking, and when the police pulled me over for making an illegal turn, the officer not only ticketed me, but said, “If I ever catch you and your underage, inebriated friends riding in this station wagon again, I am going to impound the car and throw you and all your friends in the drunk tank.”

I put a For Sale ad in the paper the next day, and a dude who worked for an electronics firm bought it for $500 cash. Old Parke Kooser was still sipping his straight-up Martini, and I cannot repeat what my father said to me. I still see my ’35 Ford Station Wagon driving around when I visit Santa Barbara, which is not all that often. An architect in San Francisco, Karl G. Smith has also found literary success in recent years, publishing this story in the prestigious West Coast literary journal, zyzzyva. “My ’35 Woodie” originally appeared in the Fall 2010 issue of zyzzyva, www.zyzzyva.org. Top image courtesy of Stephen Foskett; bottom image courtesy of Conceptcarz.com.

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Seated (l–r), Richard Sizer ’61 and Karl Smith ’61 and Bill Fisher ’61 (standing) at a recent mini reunion in Tucson, Arizona.

59 Chris Parlanti recently shared a photo of his family, including his first granddaughter Sidney. Chris’s daughters Andrea and Jessica are twins. Jessica is currently teaching high school social studies in Cali, Colombia. Andrea recently finished her mba, specializing in human resources and lives in Lake Forest, California.

60 Thomas Greenbaum recently moved from New Canaan, Connecticut, to New York City to start a new life in the Big Apple, after spending 35 years in New Canaan. Greenbaum returned to New Hampton School for his 50th Reunion in June of 2010 and really enjoyed seeing everyone. He informed the Alumni Office that it was “a mind altering experience!” He is glad to see New Hampton School is doing so well and looks forward to another visit north in the future.

61 Michael Shub reached out to the Alumni Office to inform them that he could not make it back to campus for his 50th Reunion in June

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Stephen Goldman ’64

because he will be out of the country. Since Michael’s retirement from college teaching three years ago, he spends his winters in Vail, Colorado. A friend of his skiied this past winter with Penny Pitou, who won silver medals in the downhill and giant slalom at the winter Olympics in Squaw Valley in 1960. Michael met up with them for an apres-ski drink. Back in the winter of 1960–61, Penny coached the nhs ski team (of which Michael was a member) along with John Conkling P’82, ’85, ’89 (former faculty). While Penny didn't recognize Michael, she did remember the New Hampton ski hill with its own rope tow and the picture that appeared in the 1961 yearbook of her, John and the ski team. She’s still friendly with John and talked about his family. As for life after New Hampton, Michael continued his skiing, never missing a season in 50 years. Academically, he went on to teach mathematics for 40 years.

62 Thomas Steinmetz is retired and living in Park City, Utah, home of the best powder snow in the country. He skis three to four times a week in the winter and enjoys golf, biking, and hiking in the summer. In spring and fall, he and his wife Barbara live in Washington, DC. He stated that life in DC is as different from Utah as it gets. Two years ago, Thomas and Barbara went to the presidential inauguration and met President Obama. They enjoy the city life in

Grechen and Larry Churchville ’66 on a Burleigh Mountain hike during Reunion Weekend 2011.

DC (theater, museums, embassy events and lectures at the Smithsonian), and they enjoy the outdoors in Utah. They also squeeze in travel: China, Galapagos, Europe, Thailand, Nepal, Turkey, national parks, and more to come. Thomas’s son, Bill, is working and living in Seattle where he is a software developer. Barbara’s daughter, Jenny, is in Santa Barbara, California, and her son, Brian, is in New York. Brian’s daughter, Mia, is their first grandchild.

63 Kevin Kavanagh and Jim Noonan took the ferry to Martha’s Vineyard and saw John McSweeney. John resides at the Windemere Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Oak Bluffs. John had a stroke a few years back and then another in the fall of 2010. He told Kevin and Jim some old stories as his mind is good, but his left side is mostly paralyzed. His spirits are remarkably good and he has a significant other, Victoria, who pays very special attention to him. Kevin and Jim planned to go back in April of 2011 and break him out for a road trip and lunch on the island.

64 Stephen M. Goldman, executive director of the Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Family Campus in Farmington Hills, Michigan, is one of several contributing authors of a

recently released book entitled, The Radical Museum: Democracy, Dialogue & Debate.

65 Christopher Delaney, son of Steven Delaney and Beth Delaney, married Lydia Fenet at Christ Church Cathedral in New Orleans on February 19. Steven is the general counsel of Advanced Portfolio Management in New York and Vice Chairman of the nhs Board of Trustees. Christopher is a senior analyst at J. Burke Capital Partners, in New York and his bride is a senior vice president at Christie’s auction house also in New York. Dr. Henry “Jay” Melosh IV informed the Alumni Office that he bought a house in West Lafayette, Indiana, from Peter Neisel ’57 during his move from the University of Arizona (after 27 years in Tucson) to his current position at Purdue University. He recently completed a book entitled Planetary Surface Processes that is intended as a graduate-level textbook that treats all of the forces that shape the surfaces of the Earth and other planets in our solar system. The book is being published by Cambridge University Press and is scheduled to appear in September 2011, although it is already being advertised on Amazon.com. Jay participated in two successful nasa missions to explore comets in our solar system, the epoxi encounter with comet

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Class Notes Hartley 2 that took place on November 4, 2010, and a second encounter, the Stardust-NExT mission to comet Tempel 1 on February 14. He and the Purdue computer visualization team released a very popular Web site, the Impact Earth! site at www.purdue.edu/impactearth. Jay was also was elected this year to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and will be inducted into the 2011 group of new fellows on September 30, 2011 at the aaas in Boston. He was amused to see that the Arts category this year includes Bob Dylan and Paul Simon.

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vate practice, active in research, teaching, and writing my ninth book to be published later this year. I have two children, 17 and 13 years old, who keep me and my wife forever young. Next year marks the class of 1967’s 45th Reunion, so I'd love to see Rick Ball, Andy Cohen, Ted Clark, Randy Martin, Dale Wilkie, Jim Faulkner, Barry Spodak, Wes Carder and others after all these years. I hope you guys are well and can make it back in 2012. I’ll be there.”

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John Powell contacted the Alumni Office to request contact information for members of his class following Reunion 2011. He would like to follow up on conversations that he started over the weekend. He stated that he had a “great time” and was glad he made the drive.

Matthew Hinzpeter writes: “Please tell all of my brothers in the class of 1968 how great it was to see them at our Reunion a few years back. It was as though time had stood still and we were all at New Hampton just like it was those many years before. I think of them often. I wish them all the very best and want them to know how much it meant to me to see them all again. Be well.”

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James Luiselli writes: “After 40-plus years away, I returned to nhs for Reunion Weekend 2011. What a fantastic event, filled with fun and fond memories. I’m a clinical psychologist with a large behavioral healthcare organization and in pri-

Randall “Randy” Johnson and his crew were nominated for an Academy Award for sound for True Grit this year. He was sorry he couldn’t attend Reunion 2011 and informed the Alumni Office that he thought it “looked great.”

Randy Johnson ’69 (far right) poses with Jeff Bridges and members of the cast of True Grit.

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70 John Horton writes: “I missed Reunion but was able to fly from the Detroit area to New Hampton during the 2011 Bike Week. We arrived at T.H. Moore and Jinga’s 1780-era home on Thursday, June 16. They filled my wife Pat and me in on what the School is doing and what it is all about. Then they rode with us to campus and showed what they had been talking about. The pleasant evening was concluded with a delightful dinner at a restaurant located toward Bristol. You have to understand how many people love the Moores. Half a dozen people stopped at the table, usually introduced someone or brought their spouse just to say “hello” and say how nice it was to see them. Due to it being Bike Week, there weren’t many rooms easily findable so the Moores’ frog (formal/furnished room over the garage) was offered and gratefully accepted. I missed the chance to see Beth and Rodney Bascom ’70 and their home due to getting into town late and Friday being a workday. We drove to Plymouth, New Hampshire, Waterbury (Ben and Jerry’s) and Underhill, Vermont (where my family was holding a reunion). All in all, it was a terrific five days with only six hours of rain.”

71 Raymond Brewster contacted the Alumni Office to inform them that he could not attend his upcoming 40th Reunion at New Hampton School. He passes on his best regards and good wishes to all of his classmates and hopes to make it back for his 50th. He has been in touch with Cindy Buck, of the Alumni Office, along with classmates Steve Lindquist and John Moran. He also recently renewed contact with former New Hampton School English teacher Denny Blodget, who lives in Danby, Vermont, and keeps in touch with former faculty member Tom Diehl. Ray currently works for the Vermont Fuel Efficiency Partnership and stated that Vermont (where he has worked for the past 20 years) is

Emma and Ariel Brewster, daughters of Ray Brewster ’71.

doing exciting things in energy conservation and alternatives. His organization is still cleaning up the mess following the floods that struck his whole town and nearby Montpelier during Memorial Day weekend. Ray’s daughters, Emma and Ariel, are 23 and 28, respectively. They first attended Northeastern University and New York University and then both transferred to Cornell and earned his undergraduate degrees there. Ariel went on to a graduate degree in journalism from Columbia University. She lives in Toronto and spent a couple of years on the staff of Toronto Life and now edits Eye Weekly, an alternative newspaper. Emma lives in Seattle, Washington and works for the Puget Sound Food Network, a local foods information organization. Ray’s brother, Tim Brewster ’69, attended Reunion a couple of years ago and reported that the Memorial Hall food is much improved, and apparently they got rid of the ice-cold metal trays. As a key member of the Class of 1971 Reunion Committee, Stephen Lindquist writes: “Reunion Weekend for the class of 1971 began at 6 pm on Friday, June 3, at a reception hosted by the school, which was attended by many, including the Rice House lodgers, fellow classmates Rob Kennedy, John MacLeod, Clancy Philipsborn, Nick Richmond, Steve Lindquist and Matt Rutter (along with Matt’s son Malcolm). Rice House lodger Ehrhardt Groothoff ’72 also attended. The Boulders Motel lodgers within the class of 1971, Bob LaPointe, Andy Barr, Jeff Whitaker, George Thorlin, and Joe Del Grosso, were there as well. Bob Galletly ’71 and his wife Joni and Steve Thibeault ’71 and his wife Paulette rounded out the Friday evening arrivals. On Saturday, fellow

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H. William “Bill” Smith III ’71.

Whitney Ward ’71 (right) with wife Vicki.

classmates Proctor Chandler, Bob Merrick and Chuck Eastman drove up to view the afternoon alumni sporting events. Doug Viles ’71 arrived with his wife Amy Bright and children Taylor and Jaimini, with Doug tending goal during the soccer game. Nick, Clancy, Steve and Bob Galletly had a good time playing in the alumni softball game, coached by Lou Gnerre and umpired by Joe Merrill. The Saturday night dinner honoring Lou Gnerre was the highlight of the weekend and was well attended by the Class of 1971, including the Rice House lodgers, the Boulder Motel lodgers, Bob and Joni Galletly, Steve and Paulette Thibeault, Doug Viles and family, Sam Worthen ’71, and Patty Harris Merrill. Holli Hamel Siff ’72 and Fred Willingham ’72 joined us at our tables. The Sunday morning farewell breakfast was the final event of the weekend and was attended by the Rice House lodgers, the Boulders Motel lodgers, Bob and Joni Galletly, Rodney Bascom ’70 and his wife Beth.” H. William “Bill” Smith III writes: “As you know, we have many first-time East Coast visitors who observe our seemingly mystical

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Northern California climate. They often question, ‘How do you San Francisco Bay Area residents experience and characterize your summer?’ We explain, ‘we live and work in a cold fog.’ We experience sensations and share memories similar to those we created years ago while attending New Hampton School! Like when you would breath deeply when participating in a 15K cross country ski competition that is held in twenty-four degrees below zero temperatures and when you are cooled down with frozen California orange slices and provided a thickened cup of New Hampshire honey. For some obvious reasons, at this juncture, our inquisitive conversations usually drift or become juxtaposed. So… I wish to extend my best wishes to all classmates, alumni, faculty, staff, and parents. Please come to San Francisco and experience the fog for yourself.” Whitney Ward writes: “Since retiring from Invesco as a global partner in 2000, I have been involved in a biotech and an oil company start-up, both in Canada. Meg Energy and Resverlogix are now publicly traded and after 10 years on the board of both, I am now free to enjoy our home in the Vail Valley in Colorado and our home in Naples, Florida (where I have lunch every Wednesday with my 86-year-old father (another nhs alum!). I also still remain involved in a variety of real estate ventures in Steamboat Springs, Colorado. But as we all know, the important part is family. My daughter is a professor of Marine Biology at the University of Miami, my oldest son is an emt and ski patrolman at Snowmass, CO, and my youngest son is married and lives in Dallas, Texas. Any old friends that want to go mountain bike riding in Colorado or fishing in Naples should give me a call. I have had calls from a few nhs alumni that I am remiss in returning, but I look forward to connecting at some point soon.”

73 While Tom Prue was not the first individual to correctly identify the common bond between Men’s Ice

Hockey Coach Matt Wright and John Corriveau ’74 (both played on National Championship Boston University hockey teams), he further shared that Olympic hockey hero Mike Eruzione played with John Corriveau and coached Matt Wright. Small world indeed! Charles Smerlas ’79 (right) at Springfield College.

76 Akihisa Sugita sent the following reply to Head of School Andrew Menke’s e-mail outreach to families in Japan following the devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 2011: “Dear New Hampton School, Thank you for your concern about the earthquake and tsunami of 3.11. I live in Chiba prefecture, which is couple hundred miles south of Touhoku area where the damages concentrated. The damages from the earthquake were very little where I live. Although we still have difficulty in electric power, e-mail, shortage of gasoline and food and so on. It is nothing compared to the victims of this great earthquake and tsunami. There is something I want the people of the U.S. to know. Since the early stages of this catastrophe, US fleets have been staying in the still dangerous water to help the victims of the earthquake and tsunami. It is great to have a good friend like New Hampton School and the United States in a time of crisis or in time of peace. If there are students who are from Japan having a hard time contacting their families, please let me know. Any other way that I can be of help to the school or to the students let me know. With a friend like New Hampton School and United States, we shall overcome this difficult time. Best wishes and thank you again for your concern.”

second prize for editorial cartooning from the Society of Professional Journalists for three of his cartoons, which also won first prize for editorial cartooning from the Virginia Press Association. Joseph Saturley is currently hosting a monthly radio program on RadioIO (www.radioio.com), an internet-based radio network that Joe said will, in time, compete successfully against Sirius and Satellite radio. His show, “The Doctor Is In,” is on Bubba Army Radio, Channel 2. Joe and his wife are moving to Tampa, Florida, because his wife was accepted to University of Southern Florida to pursue her PhD. She has received a Fellowship and a teaching assistantship as well.

79 Greg Clancy recently accepted a position as Major Gifts Officer at The Cambridge School of Weston in Massachusetts. Charles “Chuck” Smerlas writes: “nhs, hope all is well. I was recently asked (spring of 2011) to be a keynote speaker for Springfield College’s first annual mba Celebration Dinner. Have a great summer.”

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78 Bill Lemmond writes: “I finally completed my bachelor’s degree, a B.S. in Economics, graduating magna cum laude with University Honors. He is working as an intern for the Virginia Center for Urban Development, at Virginia Commonwealth University. He also recently received

Brian Driscoll had the pleasure of playing against (and beating!) Ray Desmaris in a local hockey outdoor charity tournament in January of 2011. Ray played for a Merrimack College alumni team and was wearing Jon Davis’ old jersey! Brian had two of Joe Ardagna’s old Bowdoin teammates on his squad so he was able to enjoy a few more “Joe” sto-

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Carson Fowler, son of Holly and Gregg Fowler ’83.

2011 Bud Cup Championship Game: Ray Desmaris ’80 (third from left back row) and Brian Driscoll ’80 (front row, second from right).

ries (shin splints, no pre-season training for Joe) at the postgame celebration.

81 Christopher Burns, who attended his 30th nhs Reunion in June, also recently visited with fellow classmate Art Ferren at his home in Charlotte, North Carolina. They have their own annual reunion around the Memorial Day weekend nascar auto race at the Lowe’s Motor Speedway. Christopher visits with his nephew in Raleigh and then drives to Charlotte and meets up with Art. He sends his best to Lou Gnerre and Peter Gulick. William Fitts writes: “After completing high school, I moved to Berkeley, California, and in 1983 began working in the comic book business (some of you may remember that I doodled and drew a lot). I worked in both professional and small press comics, worked on comics like ‘Miami Mice’ in the mideighties, and later in the early ’90s worked for Mirage Studios in Northampton, Massachusetts, home of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! After working with them for some years, I moved back to California, where I continued my comic book work until this day. I was married for a while, have a son who is growing up fast, and currently reside in Mountain View (home of Google and other internet companies),

where I oversee a digital printing center for a financial company.”

82 Bernhardt A. Ochse was hoping to attend Reunion 2011 and Lou’s celebration but was unable to do so. He shared that he has been out of touch with his classmates as during his last deployment in Iraq, he was seriously injured, transferred to Germany and ultimately back to the United States. He has more recently participated in fundraising for a Run to Home Base 9K/mgh and Red Sox Foundation event. Classmates wanting to connect with Bernhardt can e-mail him at baochse@gmail.com. William Shaw Jr. graduated from Massachusetts Maritime Academy in 1986. He sailed the deep sea for 20 years, achieving rank of Captain in 1995. William is currently employed as Port Captain, serving oil majors on chartered oil tankers. He was married in 2001 and has two children, ages 16 and 14. William and his family reside in Rhode Island.

83 Gregg “Casey” Fowler informed the Alumni Office that he and his wife Holly enjoyed the snow they received in Somersworth, New Hampshire, during the winter of

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2010–11. They had a great time playing in the snow with their threeyear-old son, Carson. He loved to ride on Gregg’s atv as he plowed their driveway. Gregg added that the New Hampton School campus “looks very pretty with all the snow and the improvements that have been made to the buildings, etc.” Pamela Sanderson Jordan and Michael Jordan were married on January 11, 2011 in the Wedding Chapel at Graceland, Memphis, Tennessee. They both are big fans of Elvis Presley and went to Memphis from Wales as part of a tour group to the home of the legendary singer. The highlight of the event was the arrival of a large bouquet of flowers with a note of congratulations from Priscilla Presley. They also stayed in the wedding suite of The Heartbreak Hotel. Even though there were changes in the schedule due to winter weather, that only added to the memories of a most memorable trip. Pamela and Michael both work and live in Newport, Wales, if any of her classmates happen to be in that area.

85 Robert Hill married Anna Brinitzer ’86 on the steps of Meservey Hall on July 2, 2011 in a beautiful ceremony followed by a reception off campus. Anna’s son, Lucas Perry, was the best man while her daughter, Kate Perry, was the maid of honor. Members of the wedding party consisted of groomsmen Bill Gratton ’86, Erik Anderson ’87, and Greg Dulchinos ’86. The bridesmaids were Susan DiStefano ’88, Kim Cordima, and Krista Cronin. Greg Peverill-Conti ’84 was Rob and

Pamela Sanderson Jordan ’83 and Michael Jordan on their wedding day in Memphis, Tennessee.

Anna’s wedding photographer and did a wonderful job. In attendance were Jane and Fred Smith, Jr. ’45, CJ and Fred Willingham ’72, Nancy and John Conkling, and Amy NeidhardtGregorie ’87, along with numerous other alumni. (Please see web site and next issue for photo)

86 Please see Anna Brinitzer’s 1985 class note.

87 Bartolo Governanti was selected Man of the Year as part of the Northern New England Lacrosse League Awards. Christopher Kovacevich recently contacted Lou Gnerre and provided him with an update. He is married to Gabrielle and has two girls (Carolina and Natalie) and is finishing up his secondary educational mathmatics degree and looks forward to teaching. The company Chris was working for in 2001 was on the 83rd floor of One World Trade Center. After 9/11 and a few other things, Chris decided that he would do exactly what he wanted to do. He looks back to a moment in Mr. Paro’s English class when he said to himself “I want to be a teacher.” Now, he is close to obtaining that goal. Andrew Lowenstein has recently joined The Bullfinch Group, a general agency of The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America as a financial representative. The offices are located in Needham, Massachusetts. Andrew graduated from

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Owen Douglas Webster, son of Kim and Sam Webster ’95. Christine Willis Bellivea ’93 announces the birth of daughter Emma, pictured here with dog Chloe.

From left to right during Reunion 2011: Tonya Carlton (wife of Geoff ’91), Elizabeth Pickel Doda ’91, Tim Ames ’91, Delaney Carrier ’91, Lee Anne Ames (wife of Tim), and Pierre Doda (husband of Beth).

the University of Hartford, and earned his mba in finance from Suffolk University Sawyer School of Management. He is a member of Falmouth Young professionals, the Cape Code Young professionals, and a member of the South Shore Chamber of Commerce. Andrew “A.J.” Vazifdar writes: “I went to Reunion 2011 and loved it. It was awesome to see the Great Lou Gnerre get his due. The Class of 1986 invited me to sit in on their class reunion photo. I naturally ruined the whole thing. I also loved seeing and chatting with Charlene Joyce and Fred Willingham ’72, Mark Tilton, sharing a cigar with Harrison Golden, and talking tennis with Al Keith and Tom Diehl. My big news: My wife Amy and I bought a house and moved back to Manchester, New Hampshire, last fall. We were in Merrimack, NH, for nine years, but they kicked us out. I’m still working as Creative Services Director (basically, it’s Production Director and Imaging Director) and some on-air (as “Crozby”) for wxrv-fm 92.5 The River in Haverhill, Massachusetts. Much love to nhs.”

90 Elizabeth “Betsy” Steele Basile completed a Master of Arts in Museum Studies in December 2010. In May of 2011, she was hired as the

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great help. His boys are extremely involved with competitive sailing during the summer so they are busy almost every week with races or practice. Maggie tried skiing this past winter and had a blast. George looks forward to seeing her progress as her brothers have over the years. George says “hello” to all at nhs and hopes to get back to campus soon.

93 Jack Fearons, son of Jilline and George Fearons ’92, was born on June 14, 2011.

Collections Coordinator for Design Arts at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. In this role, Elizabeth is working with the museum's senior curator of Design Arts to develop a post-modern exhibition of international design objects opening in the spring of 2013.

92 George Fearons informed the Alumni Office that his son Jack was born on June 14. He was about a month early and weighed 5 pounds, 9 ounces. George and his wife Jilline are so excited to have another family member in the house. Jack’s brothers Patrick and Seamus as well as his sister Maggie have been a

Christine Willis Bellivea and her husband Joe welcomed their first child Emma Delia Belliveau on March 21, 2011. They are living in North Smithfield, Rhode Island, and enjoying every minute with their baby girl.

94 Jason Burbank writes: “I recently received a Master of Liberal Arts degree in Information Technology (concentration in Software Engineering) at Harvard University. I was working on the degree parttime while still working at the Broad Institute, where I help support a High-Throughput Screening facility as part of the Chemical Biology and Novel Therapeutics Platform. My wife, Dr. Nilupa Gunaratna, is at Harvard School of Public Health where she is working on projects related to maternal and child health and nutrition in East Africa. We just celebrated our fourth wedding anniversary and were pleased to see some familiar faces when we dropped in for Reunion 2011!”

95 Samuel Webster and his wife Kim are proud to announce the birth of their son, Owen Douglas Webster. Owen was born on January 13, 2011, weighing 8 pounds and measuring 21 inches.

96 Jed Leach has been working hard, growing his opt Eyewear Boutique Business in recent months. This business sells high-end reading glasses and sunglasses, modeling a European style of haute couture. opt is located in Providence, Rhode Island, conveniently close to several ophthalmologists. Jason “Skip” Silver writes: “Hope all is well with everyone. It certainly has been too long. I do think of my times at New Hampton often, and seeing how its been 15 years since ’96, well... I wanted to say hello. While I most likely won’t be making it back for Reunion, I wanted to update all with my info and let the nhs family know what I’m up to. It’s been a long and winding road, but I have taken my experiences both educationally and professionally and last year formed my own Sport Management Firm. The final piece to the puzzle before I opened up shop was to become nflpa certified as an nfl Agent, which I obtained last summer. Yes, I am an nfl agent, though I haven’t found it to be exactly as they script it in the movies. I formed Apex Management Group (www.myapexagent.com) in 2010 and currently live in San Diego, California. It’s been an interesting first go of it with the current landscape in the nfl, but its been a very

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Matthew Dorsey ’02 with girlfriend Nicole Lee.

present faculty and staff. The couple resides in Bristol. Kendra graduated from Springfield College in 2006, and works for Rehab Fit as an exercise specialist, Certified Golf Conditioning Specialist, and personal trainer. Her new husband works for Metrocast Cablevision as a cable technician.

Chris McKinnon ’01 and Briana Moran were married on September 25, 2010.

productive and exciting first year. It’s a grind and we'll see where it takes me, but I’m enjoying the journey. I encourage all to touch base, it would be great to reconnect, share stories, just get back in touch. Again, hope all is well.”

98 Megan Collins has been participating in triathlon races as part of Team Fight in 2011. She is inspired to be able to help Young Adults with Cancer and their families. She adds, “Team Fight and the Ulman Cancer Fund are wonderful groups and I am so proud to be involved.” Mandy Cronin was a proud and enthusiastic member of the Boston Blades Women’s Ice Hockey Team during the 2010–11 season. She split her time between traveling with the team and continuing to grow her M-Power Hockey business in Toronto.

99 Brian McLaughlin recently contacted the Alumni Office to update his address. Brian and his wife Jennifer (married almost five years) live in Columbus, Ohio, and run a solar design firm, Nalu Energy. Brian graduated from the Air Force Academy with a degree in engineer-

Naomi McDonough, daughter of Will ’03 and Nicole McDonough.

03 Anna Elizabeth, daughter of David and Lisa Falconi Perfield ’01, was born on May 7, 2011.

ing. He sends his best to his former teachers and fellow classmates. Alexandra Poh married Christom Sullivan on September 24 in San Diego, California.

01 Christopher McKinnon married Briana Moran on September 25, 2010, at Harkness Memorial State Park in Waterford, Connecticut, followed by a reception at Eolia, The Mansion at Harkness. Lisa Falconi Perfield writes: “It was nice to see everyone at Reunion! Those who were there were able to meet the newest addition to our family! David and I welcomed our daughter, Anna Elizabeth, on May 7, 2011. She was a healthy 8 pounds, 9 ounces and was 21 inches long. We are all doing well, and motherhood is treating me great!”

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Kendra Gilpatic ’02 and Mike LaPlume.

02 Matthew Dorsey and his girlfriend Nicole Lee visited Bob and Chris Pollock P ’94, ’97 in March 2011. Matt is working in the field of marketing, primarily in Europe. Tanya Gallagher recently caught up with the Alumni Office and shared that she is living in Paris, loving Paris and going to school to learn French. Friends can contact her at tanyamarie11@gmail.com. Asako Matsuura contacted her nhs host parents Chris and Bob Pollock, P’94, ’97 following the earthquake and tsunami in Japan to let them know that she and her family were all doing well. Asako was on the thirteenth floor of a building when the earthquake hit. Kendra Gilpatric and Mike LaPlume were married in summer 2011 at a ceremony held on Newfound Lake. The reception followed at the family field. The wedding was attended by nhs alumni and numerous past and

Will McDonough and his wife Nicole welcomed their first daughter Naomi June McDonough into the world on November 6, 2010, in New Haven, Connecticut.

04 Ramsay deGive, already a talented photographer by the time he graduated from New Hampton School, is currently a contributing photographer for The Wall Street Journal. Bridgette Polite is currently living in Reston, Virginia and is engaged to Peter Romm. Leia Weaver Bernhard writes: “Hello! I just finished reading the Spring edition of the Hamptonia and realized how long it has been since graduation! Figured I would ‘check-in’ after graduating. I decided not to attend any of the colleges I had been accepted to and instead joined the military. I decided on the Air Force and was sworn in to active duty and sent to Basic Military Training (bmt) in February of 2005. After basic, I was sent to raf Mildenhall, England for two years and deployed to Kyrgyzstan while stationed there. This is where I met my husband! After returning from

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Leia Weaver Bernhard ’04 with husband Joshua and son Jakob.

deployment, I moved from England to Eglin afb, Florida until 2008 when my husband proposed. I separated from active duty, joined the AF Reserves, and moved to San Antonio, Texas. My husband, Joshua, and I are still stationed at Lackland afb where I work as a GS9 Air Reserve Technician (art) in Emergency Management for the 433 Airlift Wing. I was recently promoted to Technical Sergeant (TSgt), which is an E-6 in the military pay grade system, and hope to someday be a Chief! My husband and I were married in New Hampshire on October 12, 2008, and our son Jakob Charles Bernhard was born on May 19, 2009 at Wilford Hall Medical Center on Lackland afb. I am currently working on an Associates in Applied SciencesEmergency Management through the Community College of the Air Force (ccaf), and an Associates in Weapons of Mass Destruction (wmd) through American Military University. I still keep in touch with some friends and faculty from New Hampton and hope to visit with some of them during my trip home this summer!”

05 Kristen Casadona contacted the Alumni Office to update her address. She has recently relocated from New York City to California. Michael Chambers contacted the Alumni and Development Office and informed him that he and his team succesfully summitted Mt. Kilimanjaro at 7:45 am on January 7,

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From left to right at Reunion 2011: Randy Zimbone ’06, Dylan Ferguson ’06 and John Mitchell ’05

2011. He added that the trek was everything he imagined it would be and more. Stephanie Grumbacher called to report that she recently began her own film production company called Smoking Joker Films. She is working on her first, full-length feature film, a dark comedy entitled Cheated. Filming began in July with a scheduled showing in January 2012. She currently travels back and forth between San Francisco and Newton, Massachusetts where she currently lives. She added that nhs classmate, Will Eurich, is also living in Newton and works for clear Internet Company. Fellow nhs alumni interested in learning more about Stephanie’s exciting film endeavors may contact her at sgrumbacher@gmail.com.

06 Amelia Feigenbaum and Kenny Torsey recently became engaged. Both joined a huge contingency from their class to celebrate their 5th nhs Reunion in early June. Congratulations! Radar Onguetou, whose home is Yaounde, Cameroon, was recently recognized in The University of New Hampshire Magazine (Fall 2009) for his inspiring words at a unh pep rally. Radar was a captain of the unh Men’s Basketball Team and proudly wore his jersey (No. 32) over his shirt and tie while addressing the plethora of Wildcat fans.

Radar, who recently received his Master’s Degree, is currently working at unh.

07 Kelsey Berry received her BA in Government and History Magna Cum Laude from St. Lawrence University at their Commencement Exercises on May 22, 2011. Kelsey will receive her Master's degree in Education from Plymouth State University in August 2011. Since completing her coursework at slu in December 2010, Kelsey has been teaching and coaching at Holderness School. She will assist the New Hampton School Alumni Office with an archives project of her own design early this summer and joins the faculty at Ethel Walker School in Connecticut, in late August, teaching history and coaching field hockey as well as lacrosse. Kelsey is engaged to be married to Harris Philpot, of Gilmanton, New Hampshire, and also an slu graduate. Harris taught at New Hampton School for the last year and a half and will begin working at a local law firm this fall in preparation for law school. Kelsey and Harris will be married in August of 2012. Jean Troiano recently graduated from Keene State College with a BS in Athletic Training. She will be attending Western Michigan University to receive a Master’s in Athletic Training. Jean will also work with the men's soccer team and

women's softball team for wmu while attending school. Jean informed the Alumni Office that this will be her first time far away from New Hampshire for a long period of time but that she is very excited! Jean is also engaged. Her fiancé Randy proposed on February 13 at Fratello’s Restaurant in Lincoln, New Hampshire. They will marry following her completion of her Master’s program. Jean added that she misses New Hampton School every day. Keith Winking recently graduated from Connecticut College with a degree in behavioral neuroscience. His fellow New Hampton School graduates Warren Chao and Mike Levine were able to make it out to the ceremony and it was a wonderful time. Keith accepted a teaching position at the St. Thomas More School in the fall for biology and environmental science. Keith informed the Alumni Office that his new path includes challenges and opportunities, and he could not be happier. He is looking forward to his five-year reunion.

08 Dana Buckley writes: “I've had the chance to come back and visit a few times, but couldn't make it to Reunion. I'm entering my senior year at Worcester Polytechnic Institute and am still very involved in the wpi admissions office, my sorority, Alpha Xi Delta, and the Society of Women Engineers. This past spring I traveled to Bangkok, Thailand, to complete a social science project for wpi. My team

Dana Buckley ’08 in Bangkok, Thailand.

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Nick Maggio ’08 of Merrimack College.

worked with a local university and a non-profit organization to evaluate quality of life for elephants in Thailand! We presented our findings to local officials and organizations that will use our data to help relocate elephants out of urban areas and into healthier environments. I got to travel all over the country, visiting beaches, helping tsunami victims, and doing research. On my way home in the Tokyo airport, I spoke with a gentleman who had

been very involved with nhs in the ’70s. It was great to have a touch of home so far away. This summer I'm working as a research and development engineer at a medical device development company and loving every minute of it. I plan to complete my masters degree in biomechanical engineering at wpi within a year of graduation and hope to continue my work in the medical device industry!” Justin DeLuca continued to be a star player, undefeated in his college tennis career thus far playing for Nichols College. Nicholas Maggio collected his 228th ground ball in March for Merrimack College, setting a school record for most ground balls in a career. Nick proudly wears jersey number 31, playing Men’s Lacrosse for this Division II College. Congratulations, Nick! Kyle Raynor recently completed his junior year at the University of Southern Maine and is having a

Kyle Raynor ’08, Leanne Galletly ’09 and Zach Godwin ’15.

great experiencece. He is a sports management major and is spending this summer as an intern for cbs Sports. Earlier this summer, he traveled to Mahwah, New Jersey, for the graduation of his friend and incoming nhs student Zachary Godwin (Class of 2015). Patrick Saunders helped the Princeton basketball team to an ncaa tournament berth this past season and started 29 games for the Tigers. Patrick had an internship with nike in Beaverton, Oregon, in the summer of 2011.

09 Alex Lazerowich was a key contributor to the Quinnipiac University’s men’s tennis team this year, which began its season by sweeping Fordham University 7-1. Alex earned double wins in the season’s opening victory. (l–r) Alice Jones (wife of David Jones, former faculty), Jim McMahon P’12, ’13, David Jones, Jennifer McMahon P’12, ’14, Director of Academic Support and James “Fuzzy” Thurston attended Reunion 2011 and specifically recognized Lou Gnerre’s Lifetime Celebration.

Alumni, family, and friends gathered for the annual Coed Alumni Soccer Game in honor of Diane Day Brigham ’92.

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10 Former nhs Cycling coach Julie Tallman shared the following: “Jonathan Frame returned to New Hampton School in the spring of 2011 to help coach the cycling team and his dedication to this team should not be overlooked. Jon was a member of the cycling team all four years of his nhs career. His contribution to the team this spring was invaluable and as the season progressed he grew as a coach and mentor. He was patient, knowledgeable and a good role model for the students.” Jon will enroll at Warren Wilson College in North Carolina, in the fall.

Jacob Liebert ’10 and father Carl P’10, ’11, ’15 at the U.S. Naval Academy.

Andrew George, a freshman at High Point University, made the Dean’s List for the Spring 2011 semester. Andrew and his father, Jay George ’76, both recently attended Reunion 2011 where Jay celebrated his 35th Reunion with fellow classmates. Alex Kent made the Dean’s List at Hobart and William Smith Colleges his first semester as a college freshman last fall. Congratulations, Alex! Q

former faculty Stephen Crocker called the Alumni Office recently to reconnect with Harrison Golden as he was traveling east from Colorado and would be near Gloucester, Massachusetts. He taught English at New Hampton School in 1968–69. He then moved to Stamford, Connecticut, where he was a substitute teacher before returning to Denver, Colorado where he was from originally. Stephen worked in the plumbing supplies business, worked as a technical writer for Quest and retired a couple of years ago. Q

Former faculty member Dr. William Walsh and Jennifer Shackett Berry ’83 at Reunion 2011.

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In Memoriam 1933 Richard H. St. Clair, 95, of Laconia, New Hampshire, died April 27, 2011 after a brief illness. He was raised in Laconia, attended Laconia High School and graduated from New Hampton School. He was also a graduate of Northeastern University in Boston in 1937. Richard was predeceased by his loving wife of 61 years, Constance S. St. Clair, and by three brothers, Howard St. Clair, Charles “Ray” St. Clair and Robert St. Clair. Surviving members of his family include his sons, Richard T. St. Clair and Charles G. St. Clair; daughters, Sandra (St. Clair) Nauman, Nicole (St. Clair) Piscopo and her husband, James S. Piscopo, of Sanbornton, NH and Cindi St. Clair; six grandsons, and one granddaughter. Richard was an avid pilot and helped to develop the Laconia Airport. He was a past member of the Laconia Masonic Lodge.

Richard and his wife, Constance, founded and operated five retail businesses in New Hampshire from the 1950s to the 1970s, including The Hathaway House on Union Avenue in Laconia, founded and restored in 1957; and The Old Country Store in Moultonboro, founded and restored in 1955 and still a tourist destination today. Albert F. Wild, of Dennis, Massachusetts, died October 15, 2010 after a brief period of declining health. He was 95 years old and graduated from New Hampton School in 1933.

1934 Kenneth Langdon Winkley, 96, of Exeter, New Hampshire, died on June 10, 2011 at Exeter Healthcare after a long illness. He was a graduate of Winthrop (Massachusetts) High School, New Hampton

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School, and Northeastern University with a chemical engineering degree. Kenneth was a technical director of the Hodgman Rubber Co. of Framingham, MA for many years. He was an officer and director of the Boston Rubber Group for a period of 20 years and an emeritus member of the Division of Rubber Chemistry acs. He is survived by his wife of 65 years, Mary (Falconi) Winkley; two daughters, Sandra G. Ray and Virginia M. Winkley-Cohen; two sons, Kenneth L. Winkley Jr. and Paul W. Winkley; as well as eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Ken was an ardent golfer, and enjoyed woodworking; he created many toys for his grandchildren as well as for Toys for Tots at Christmas time.

1938 George Robert “Bob” Crowell, 86, of Randolph, Massachusetts, an insurance agency owner and an Army lieutenant in World War II, died in November of 2006. After his World War II service, Bob opened an insurance agency, George R. Crowell Associates, in Boston and on the South Shore. He also established a detective agency, International Detectives, and served as a special police officer in Randolph. He was a former member of South Congregational Church in Brockton, now Christ Congregational Church, and was a member of St. George Lodge, af&am, of Brockton, MA. He is survived by his wife, Irene Crowell; a son, Robert G. Crowell; two daughters, Cheryl P. Frank and Pamela Vigneau; six grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. George Stanton, 91, of Marblehead, Massachusetts, passed away at the Devereux House surrounded by his family on January 5, 2011. He was the husband of the late Gertrude (McClure) Stanton. He was a graduate of Salem High School, New Hampton School, and Burdett College. George served his country during wwii and is a Navy Veteran. He worked for the gte/Sylvania Lighting Company for 40 years. He was active in the American Production Inventory Control Society, serving as president at one

time, and attended many national conferences. His hobbies were golf, skiing, woodworking and lobstering. He most enjoyed traveling and visiting his children and grandchildren. George leaves a son, George Stanton; two daughters, Cheryl Conrad and Cathy Roberts; 11 grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren.

1941 Howard “Wink” Winkemeier passed away at home in his sleep on April 18, 2011. He was 88 years old and had lived in Hampstead and Wilmington, North Carolina with his wife, Sue, since retiring in the late 1970s. Wink was raised in New Jersey, served in wwii as a US Navy aviation radioman in the torpedo bomber force, graduated from Tusculum College in 1948, and went on to enjoy a 36-year career with NJ Bell Telephone that left him with nostalgic memories for his years in Bayonne, NJ. Wink enjoyed birding, fishing, and landscaping, and valued the many people in his life. He was passionate about environmental issues and acted on that by founding the Pender Watch & Conservancy organization, volunteering at the Fort Fisher Aquarium, and serving as curator of the Arboretum’s water garden.

1942 Paul W. Berglund died on April 18, 2010. Howard L. Bickford, 86, died on January 7, 2011 at Indian River Medical Center in Vero Beach, Florida. He was born in Nashua, New Hampshire, and lived in Port St. Lucie, FL for 43 years, coming from Frederick, Maryland. He was one of the developers of Port St. Lucie proper and was vice president of General Development Corp. He was the general manager of Florida Home Finders retail sales division and one of the founders of Port St. Lucie National Bank, now known as Seacoast National Bank. He was a World War II veteran of the Army Air Forces. He was a lifelong financial supporter of The Salvation Army and was on the board of continued on page 62

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In Memoriam

Walter Peterson Former New Hampshire and New Hampton School trustee Governor Walter Rutherford Peterson, 88, died June 1, 2011 at Monadnock Community Hospital of complications of lung cancer. He was born on September 19, 1922, in Nashua, New Hampshire, to Helen Reed and Walter R. Peterson, Sr. He graduated from Nashua High School and from the New Hampton School. Governor Peterson attended William and Mary College and the University of New Hampshire before serving as a naval officer in the Pacific Theater of World War II from 1942–46. After the war, he graduated from Dartmouth College and worked as a special education teacher. In 1948, he, with his father and brother, founded the Peterson’s Inc. Real Estate in Peterborough. He was a past president of the New Hampshire Realtor's Association and the Monadnock Board of Realtors. He served as the Hillsborough County Republican County chairman and chaired three senatorial campaigns for Sen. Norris Cotton. Governor Peterson served four terms in the New Hampshire Legislature, one as majority leader and two terms as speaker. He was elected governor in 1968 and served two terms. He served as president of the New Hampshire Constitutional Convention in 1974. He also served as president of Franklin Pierce

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College for 20 years and then as interim president of the University of New Hampshire and as interim commissioner of the New Hampshire Community Technical Colleges. Governor Peterson’s involvement in higher education includes service as chairman of the New Hampshire Post Secondary Education Commission, chairman of the New Hampshire College and University Council, chairman and delegate from New Hampshire to the New England Board of Higher Education, and as director of the New England Education Loan Marketing Corp. He also served as a member of the Presidents Commission of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. He served as a director of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities and was an ex-officio trustee of Dartmouth College. Family includes his wife, the former Dorothy Donovan, whom he married in 1949; two children, Meg Petersen, a professor of English at Plymouth State University, and Andy Peterson, a partner in the Peterson's, Inc. Real Estate firm. He is also survived by seven grandchildren. He was appointed by Governor Stephen Merrill as a trustee of the University System of New Hampshire. Governor Jeanne Shaheen appointed him as a trustee for the New Hampshire Technical College System in 1999. He was awarded numerous honorary degrees: doctor of law degrees from the University of

New Hampshire, Franklin Pierce College, Notre Dame College, Daniel Webster College, Dartmouth College and New Hampshire College, as well as doctor of humane letters from Nathaniel Hawthorne College, New England College and Plymouth State University. Governor Peterson received the Alumni Service Award from Dartmouth College in 1983. In 1992, he received the AntiDefamation League Award for Community Service. He was awarded the Robert Frost Contemporary American Award from Plymouth State College in 1993. In 1996, the trustees of Franklin Pierce College voted him the designation of president emeritus. He and his wife Dorothy were recipients of the Pettee Medal Award from the University of New Hampshire Alumni. Governor Peterson received the Chancellor's Award for Outstanding Service to the University of New Hampshire in 1996, and the Yankee Award from the Yankee Chapter of the Public Relations Society in 1997. He also received the first “Profile Award” in 2004. He and his wife Dorothy were the 2010 recipients of the Hubbard Family Award for Service to Philanthropy from the University of New Hampshire Foundation. Q

Annie Rice Annie Russell (Nicolson) Rice, an adventurous and independent woman who by happenstance met her husband, David E. Rice, and found herself happily settled in New Hampton for over thirty years, died on May 25, 2011. She was born on December 24, 1931 in Brooklyn, NY to Rosina Agnes (King) and James Nicolson and was the devoted stepdaughter of William Erxleben. After graduating from high school in New York City, Annie traveled to Panama to live with an aunt and uncle in the Canal Zone; thus, she commenced a lifetime of travel that took her around the world more times than anyone can recall. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, she taught elementary school in Indonesia for Standard-Vacuum Oil Company and traveled extensively throughout Southeast Asia. She exchanged a first-class return ticket from Indonesia for 27 one-way tickets and skipped her way back home over four months staying on a houseboat in Kashmir and in the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo. At the wedding of two of her friends and colleagues from Indonesia, she was introduced to the bride’s brother, David. She cancelled her scheduled return to teaching overseas in order to remain in the United continued on page 65

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In Memoriam continued from page 60 directors for The Salvation Army of Port St. Lucie since 1998. He was preceded by his wife, Theodora K. Bickford. Dr. Merritt “Doc” Cornwell, 85, of Lake Worth and Jupiter, Florida passed away on August 31, 2009 in his home after an extended illness. He was born in East Hampton, Connecticut. Dr. Cornwell was a graduate of Dartmouth College in New Hampshire. He was a retired chiropractor and naturopath. He loved to read and study health and nutrition. Doc was unusually loved and respected for his caring nature. He is survived by his two sons, Merritt Cornwell, Jr. and Peter Cornwell and two daughters-in-law, Eileen Cornwell and Kimberly Cornwell; two grandchildren, Ashley Rae Cornwell and Summer Cornwell; one great-grandson; one brother, Winthrop Cornwell; sister-in-law, Priscilla Cornwell and many nieces and nephews.

1944 Francis “Frank” J. Holleran Jr., age 83, of Plainview, New York, died on June 10, 2011. He was the loving husband of Margaret and cherished father of Francis J. Holleran III, Patricia Kosiba, Joan Bindrim, and Michael Holleran. Frank was also a devoted grandfather of 10 grandchildren and a great-grandchild and the dear brother of John and the late James. He was a physical education teacher and coach for over 30 years for Great Neck Public Schools.

1945 Allen E. McCarthy, Jr., 83, passed away peacefully in April of 2011 in Exeter, New Hampshire. He was educated in the Worcester schools and was also a student at Lawrence Academy in Groton, Massachusetts and graduated from New Hampton School. From 1945 to 1948, he further pursued his studies at the Merchant Marine Academy in Kings Point, New York. Allen then transferred to the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, graduating in 1951. He enlisted for active duty with the Naval Reserves, serving on

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the USS Gherardi and spent extended cruises with the Sixth Fleet, in the Mediterranean. Allen stepped into the family plumbing business, started by his grandfather Timothy W. McCarthy in 1896. In later years, Allen was the founder and past president of Dacor Manufacturing in Worcester until his retirement in 1989. He was also the past president of the Massachusetts Master Plumber’s Association. A compassionate man with a heart of gold, Allen's quiet strength was a source of inspiration to his children and many of those who crossed his path. Allen is survived by his wife of nearly sixty years, Mary Jane “Jane” (McGourty) McCarthy and his seven children.

1946 Daniel Alfred Badger, age 81, of Crystal River, Florida, passed away on May 10, 2010 at Munroe Regional Medical Center in Ocala, FL. Frederick Pearce passed away peacefully at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Lexington, Kentucky on January 23, 2011. He was drafted into service in the U.S. Army and served during the Korean War. After his return to civilian life, he did administrative work for the Keuffel & Esser and the Homelite Outdoor Product Companies. He married Dorothy Turkish in 1961 and had a daughter and a son. He is survived by his brother, Jim Pearce of Costa Rica and Florida; his daughter, Jan Pearce (Robert Fairchild); his son, Doug Pearce (Amy Train Pearce); and his three lovely granddaughters, Taylor, Nicole, and Addison Pearce.

1947 Gardner R. “Ben” Benson, 81, died on April 24, 2011. He grew up in the Concord, New Hampshire area, attended New Hampton School and graduated from the University of New Hampshire. Gardner was a Navy corpsman during the Korean War, attached to First Medical Battalion, First Marine Division, Reinforced and Fleet Marine Force. Mr. Benson participated in the amphibious assault and seizure of

Inchon and the assault and liberation of Seoul, for which he received a Bronze Star and Purple Heart. He was a former Brookline selectman, former town manager of Goffstown; Springfield, Vermont; Tamaqua, Pennsylvania; and Provincetown, Massachusetts. He also was an extensive traveler who spent a number of years in the western United States and Alaska, finally settling in the Prescott, Arizona region. Gardner’s family includes four children and six grandchildren.

1949 Basil R. Adams, Jr. passed away on April 24, 2007. He attended the University of New Hampshire and went to law school at Georgia State. He served thirty years with the United States Army and retired with the rank of full Colonel. During his military career, Basil was deployed to Korea and Vietnam. After retiring from the military, he had a second, illustrious, twenty-year career as a hospital administrator for a private psychiatric hospital in Virginia Beach, Virginia. Basil and Jean lived in Virginia Beach for many years. He is survived by his wife, Jean Adams and many other family members.

1950 Samuel Duncan Grandin, 78, of Meridian, New Jersey, passed away on January 29, 2011 surrounded by his dearest friends. He was the son of the late Frank S. and Mabel (Duncan) Grandin. He was born on May 13, 1932 in Englewood, NJ and raised in nearby Tenafly. Duncan graduated from the New Hampton School and received degrees from Nichols College and the University of Denver where he was active in the glee club, tennis and ski teams. Following service to his country as part of the U.S. Army Occupational Forces in Wiesbaden, Germany, he returned to Colorado in 1955 where he began what was to become a long relationship with the growing ski industry. He had a lifelong passion for photography. He traveled all over the world with his camera, and his pictures of rustic barns, western landscapes, bucking bron-

cos, African wildlife and centuriesold rock formations are displayed in homes, shops and offices around Boise. He was a multiple First Place and Peoples Choice winner at the Idaho State Fair, won numerous ribbons from the Columbia Council of Camera Clubs, and has been recognized by the Photographic Society of America. In 2000, his photo “Ray’s Hands” was chosen as a finalist by Photographers Forum magazine in their international competition. “Uncle Dunc,” as he was affectionately known, is survived by his sister, Elizabeth Wilcox; numerous relatives and friends. He was predeceased by his brother Douglas Grandin Sr. John G. Landrine, 78, of Delmont, Pennsylvania died at his summer home in Moultonborough, New Hampshire on July 20, 2010. He was born on November 28, 1931, in Manchester, the son of the late John P. and Esther (Gillis) Landrine. He was raised in Manchester, and served in the Army. He was a longtime resident of Delmont and had been employed at Weyerhauser Co. for more than 40 years. John was a member of the Lions Club in Meredith, NH and Delmont. He loved his summers on Lake Winnipesaukee. He is survived by his wife, Marcia A. (Martin) Landrine; a son, a daughter, three stepsons, a granddaughter, and four step-grandchildren.

1951 Ralph Y. Battista died on December 19, 2010. He is survived by his wife Carolyn Battista. Terry F. Bebo passed away March 9, 2011 after a courageous battle with cancer. He was the devoted husband of Joan Mary Bebo for over 41 years. Terry is survived by four daughters from two previous marriages, as well as a great stepfather to six children, a loving grandpa to all 12 grandchildren and 11 greatgrandchildren, three brothers, and several nieces and nephews. Terry was a member of Thomas Road Baptist Church. John A. Connare Jr., of Rindge, New Hampshire, died on November 5,

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In Memoriam 2005 at home after a month-long battle with cancer. He was a 1950 graduate of the former St. Joseph High School for Boys in Manchester, NH. He attended New Hampton School and in 1955 received his bachelor’s degree from The College of the Holy Cross in Worcester. John served as an ltjg with the U.S. Navy during the Korean Conflict, and was assigned to the USS Layce and the USS Samuel Roberts. He was a summer resident of Rindge since 1970 and became a year-round resident in 1999. He was an avid fan of Franklin Pierce College basketball and Holy Cross football. His family includes his wife of 30 years, Marcelle “Marcie” Connare of Rindge; two daughters, a step-daughter, a stepson, seven grandchildren, two brothers, a sister, several nieces and nephews. Another son predeceased him in 1993. Walter S. Crosier of San Jose, California, died peacefully on August 25, 2010. He was determined to make his 50th wedding anniversary to see all of his family prior to passing, which he did. He graduated from the New Hampton School and Hamilton College in Clinton, New York. Walt moved his family to California in 1970, settling in the Willow Glen area. He leaves his wife of over 50 years, Betty, and three sons, a brother, and was a loving brother of Jane Crosier (deceased). Walt cared about many people, and leaves behind thousands of cherished memories from all the loved ones that have come to know him over the past years in Willow Glen, San Jose, and Massachusetts. Dewey Charles Kadra Jr., of Pensacola, Florida, died on December 4, 2007 after a brief illness. He was preceded in death by both parents and a grandson. He is survived by his children, Kathleen (Herb) Cotton, Mike Kadra and Maureen Kadra; sister, Phylis McManus; brother, Malcom Kadra; granddaughters, Kathy (John) Sharpe, Stephanie Mezdez, Jessica Kadra; and five great grandchildren.

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Douglas G. Grandin, longtime Simsbury, Connecticut, resident, passed away on December 24, 2007 at Governor's House. He leaves his wife of 50 years, Deborah (Lecraw) Grandin. A graduate of the New Hampton School and Lehigh University (1959), Doug served in between high school and college in the United States Army Signal Corps. as a part of the Allied occupation forces in Berlin, Germany. After college graduation, he and Debby moved to Hartford, then to Simsbury in 1961. A mechanical engineer who earned his mba from the University of Hartford, Doug worked for several area machine tool companies including New Britain Machine and Waterbury Farrell. He was an active member and officer of the Society of Mechanical Engineers and was involved as a volunteer in numerous local organizations. His brother, S. Duncan Grandin ’50, predeceased him.

David W. Nevins of Watertown, Massachusetts, passed away on April 15, 2011 at his home. He was the beloved husband of Nancy A. (Perry) Nevins and devoted father of Brenda C. Ryan; Brian J. Nevins; and Paula J. Nevins. David was also the loving grandfather of Sean P. Ryan, Tess C. Ryan and Marcelino La Bella. He retired after working for General Motors for a long period of time.

John Mead died on November 13, 2010 of congestive heart failure. He played baseball and football at New Hampton School. John often spoke about the good friends he made and the fine teachers who awakened his intellectual curiosity. He is survived by his wife of 43 years, two daughters and two grandsons.

Hugh Leon Spitzer, of Bethesda, Maryland, died on July 2, 2011. He was the beloved husband of Dinah Stevens; devoted father of Elizabeth Spitzer, Jennifer Spitzer, Barry (Melissa) Spitzer, loving brother of Joseph (Barbara) Spitzer of Geneva, Florida; Fern Spitzer of London, England, Neal Spitzer, Sarah (Neal). In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy in his memory may be made to the Development Office of New Hampton School, 70 Main Street, New Hampton, NH 03256.

Jeffrey P. King, of Littleton, Colorado, passed away on January 11, 2010. He is survived by his wife of 41 years, Sharon; children, Daniel, Kevin, and Kate (Mike) Williams; grandchildren, Aidan and Ryleigh Williams; sisters, Jackie Sutcliff and Cindy Morin.

Harry H. Houlden Jr., of Peabody Massachusetts, died on April 1, 2005. He was raised in Peabody, was a 1951 graduate of Peabody High School, attended New Hampton School, and Wentworth Institute and Northeastern University. He continued to live in Peabody until he moved to Greensboro for 22 years. He returned to Peabody in 2004. Harry was part owner of the former Bayoil Co. in Peabody. The company moved to Greensboro in 1981 and became Stockhausen Inc., and is presently known as DeGussa Co. In addition to his wife, he is survived by two daughters, four sons, one sister, two brothers, 13 grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews. David F. Runnals, 72, of Dover, New Hampshire, passed away on November 15, 2006 after a long battle with cancer.

1953 Lisle Page “L.P.” Kramer died on September 23, 2010. A memorial service was held in Brooksville, Florida.

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1955 Thomas O. Morrison died on February 1, 2011 at his home with family, after a courageous battle with cancer. He attended local schools and graduated from New Hampton School. He was a U.S. Army veteran. Thomas was a heavy equipment operator, a surveyor, and worked in sales for Grappone Industrial, Jordan Milton Caterpillar and Gilman’s. He also worked at RP Williams and Sons, and as a road agent in Bristol, New Hampshire. He managed Homeland Cemetery, also in Bristol. He served on the Kelly Park Commission and was a supporter of the Slim Baker Conservation Committee. Thomas enjoyed spending time with his family and friends, golfing, camping, hunting and skiing. His family members include wife, Joan (McCarthy) Morrison; three sons, a daughter, several grandchildren, four brothers, including George Morrison ’51, two sisters, and many nieces and nephews.

1961

1962 Christopher C. Doane, of Manchester, New Hampshire, died on December 29, 2010. He attended Bishop Bradley High School in Manchester, and graduated from New Hampton School. He served in the United States Navy from 1962 to 1966 and was awarded the National Defense Medal. He was a supervisor at Pandora Industries for 14 years, worked at Vista Allegro, and was a manager at Walmart. Christopher collected record albums, loved to cook and was a big supporter of the rejuvenation of downtown Manchester. After retiring, he volunteered at Maple Leaf Health Care Center and the Food Bank in Manchester. He will be missed by friends and family as a kind, caring and humble person. Family members include his parents, a stepson, two sisters, two brothers, and numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his daughter, Michelle.

1966 Jeffrey Bowen Macbeth, of Tucson, Arizona, passed away on August 19, 2010 after a courageous battle with cancer. He is survived by his wife of 26 years, Lynn; son, mother, brother, and cat Milo, all of Tucson. He is

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send a tribute We accept any number of materials to help us in preparing obituaries. Please send a copy of an obituary, a note listing a few facts about the deceased, or an e-mail version of these. You can also send a photo. Mail information to Hamptonia, Alumni Office, New Hampton School, 70 Main Street, New Hampton, NH 03256 or e-mail information and photos to alumni@newhampton.org.

also survived by two stepbrothers, one stepsister and many nieces and nephews. Jeff had a Masters in Social Work from Boston University and a Masters in Education from the University of Arizona. He worked at University Medical Center for the past 25 years as a social worker, and touched many lives through his work and his wry sense of humor. He was the facilitator for the Epilepsy Support Group, taught medical interviewing and mentored social work students. Jeff was wellrespected and loved by the umc staff and honored as employee of the month in March 2001. Jeff and Lynn were foster parents with The Casey Family Program, and opened their home to many young men. Jeff was a great dad, coaching ayso soccer and little league baseball. He was an avid University of Arizona fan. Jeff loved to read, to eat, to watch TV, to sit beside the ocean, to play with the cats that shared his home and to travel. Visiting National Parks and getting his Passport book stamped was imperative!

1972 Peter Webb Marsters of Ashfield, Massachusetts, died at home on September 25, 2009 at the age of 55. He was a gardener, entrepreneur, tinkerer, and potter and was devoted to his wife of 23 years, Amy Shapiro, and to his daughters, Rosie and Emma. He was deeply loved by family, friends and neighbors for his gentle and generous nature. Peter devoted much of his life to collecting and repairing machines. He was the consummate engineer and architect. He attended high school at the New Hampton School and graduated from the University of Oregon. He moved to western Massachusetts in the early 1980s, and opened a pottery studio

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in the Leverett Arts & Craft Center. Later, Peter and his wife settled in Ashfield, where he worked out of his home and studio. They founded Marsters Pottery Inc., wholesaling functional stoneware nationally and operating a retail craft store in Stockbridge.

1976 Charles “Chuck” William Jesson II, 54, of Laconia, New Hampshire, died suddenly on February 18, 2011 at his home. He grew up in Wayland, Massachusetts, and graduated from Wayland High School, class of 1975 before attending New Hampton School. He had been a resident of Laconia for many years. Chuck has worked in the restaurant business as a chef for most of his life. He had worked at such restaurants as the Hathaway House, the Galley, both in Laconia, and most recently at the O Steaks and Seafood Restaurant, in Lakeport. He loved the outdoors and enjoyed, mountain biking, hiking, skiing, and spending time with his dog, Shannon. Chuck is survived by his brother, two sisters, and several nieces and nephews.

1978 Robert E. Seydel passed away on January 27, 2011. He was 50 years old and a professor at Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts. He held a bachelor’s degree in English and photography from New York University and a master’s degree from the Rhode Island School of Design. Nearly 200 students, alumni, faculty, colleagues, friends and family gathered at a memorial service in February of 2011 at Hampshire College to remember Robert as a mentor,

friend, talented artist, brilliant man and family man.

1980 Phebe Gulick-Leonard, 49, died on July 5, 2011 with love, grace and dignity at her home in New Durham, New Hampshire with family and friends by her side. Born in Geneva, New York, in 1961 to Ruth (Phillips) and Peter Gulick, Phebe is survived by her loving husband Richard Leonard; parents Peter and Ruth Gulick of New Hampton, NH; sister Robin and her husband Tony Pino of Hopedale, Massachusetts; brother Peter Gulick Jr of Phoenix, Arizona, also niece and nephew Kate and Salvatore Pino. Phebe's extended family includes Stephen, Matthew, Daniel, and Elise Leonard and seven grandchildren and dearest friend Donald Bickford. She graduated from New Hampton School with the Class of 1980 and was proud of being nominated the best all-around female athlete of her class in soccer, basketball and tennis. She was also the first female volunteer firefighter/emt at the New Hampton Fire Department. Phebe was also a NH Hunter Jumper Equestrian competitor and enjoyed doing Hunter Paces. After attending Curry College, she earned her RN degree at Manchester Community College and obtained her First Assist Certification through Arizona State University. Phebe passionately loved nursing and assisting with multiple surgical specialties. The 15 years working at Franklin Regional Hospital, primarily with Dr. Murakami, her dear friend and mentor, provided her with a wealth of surgical experience. Moving to New Durham with Rich led to a 10 year nursing career at Wentworth Douglass Hospital in Dover, where Phebe was proud to be part of the skilled and dedicated OR service. So many close friendships endured to this day. She cared for all animals but had a special love for her horses and two Jack Russell terriers, Macy and Millie. She and Rich found their dream home at Miller Farm in New Durham and lived life to the fullest. Quickly a new horse barn was built, Maple Sugaring became an annual event, and an apple and peach orchard was plant-

ed on their 40-acre piece of heaven. Family, friends and neighbors all found Miller Farm a destination of peace, artistic expression, and fun. From hand painting gourds and rocks to sitting quietly on the hill, to picking apples, she shared her love of life with everyone. Phebe, the ultimate caregiver, friend, and teacher had keen insight and observation skills. She discovered that horses served as a conduit for connecting and communicating with youngsters and sharing their unconditional love. A kind word, a good deed, and some horse love are eternal. Heaven has horses of all colors, and one is surely waiting for Phebe. A celebration of Phebe's life was held at the New Hampton Community Church in New Hampton, New Hampshire in July of 2011. Q

former faculty Richard D. Crooks, age 78, died on March 8, 2011 after a brief illness at the Hildebrandt Hospice Care Center in Greece, New York. Dick was born in Saginaw, Michigan, on March 10, 1932. He graduated from Arthur Hill High School in Saginaw in 1950 and from Kalamazoo College in 1954 with a music major. He went on to receive a Master’s of Divinity from Colgate Rochester Divinity School in 1961 and was ordained to Christian ministry that same year. He married Marylou Howell Crooks in May of 1956 and amicably divorced in 1980. Rev. Crooks served as a pastor of churches in New Hampshire, Michigan and New York, in addition to teaching school. For the past 30 years, he lived in the Rochester, NY area. Jeremiah “Jerry” M. Splaine died at home on December 1, 2010 in Houston, Texas. He earned a B.S. and M.A. from Boston College in Massachusetts. He began his career as a teacher of Latin and French and a basketball coach at New Hampton School. He was also the founding headmaster of Charlotte Latin School in Charlotte, North Carolina and first lay headmaster of Duchesne Academy of the Sacred Heart in Houston, Texas. Jerry successfully moved into finance as an independent investment advisor and served on boards of Boston College

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david and annie rice

continued from page 61 States and, perhaps, sway a confirmed bachelor into marriage (this took time). As the wife of beloved English teacher, guidance counselor, and coach, David Rice, who worked at the School from 1954 until 1992, Annie relished her numerous informal roles at the school: hosting parties for victorious soccer teams, driving a van full of students headed to Belize for projects period to JFK airport in New

Alumni Senate, The Heritage Society of Houston and as financial advisor to staff of Catholic Charities. Richard I. Trenholm of Greenfield, Massachusetts, died on February 25, 2011 at Franklin Medical Center. He spent his childhood years in Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey. He left high school during his senior year to join the United States Navy and served as a Seabee in the Pacific Theater during World War II. After returning home, he graduated from high school in Trenton, NJ and

York City in a snow storm, and serving as the bookkeeper for the dining hall. After raising her children, Annie returned to teaching, joining the New Hampton School faculty from 1984 to 1990, teaching study skills and English as a second language. During summer vacations, Annie and David spent time at the cottage they built on “The Gut” in South Bristol, ME. In Maine, David pursued his love of fishing and Annie enjoyed time spent on the water.

was accepted at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. While at Bates, he was active in the Drama department and was elected senior class president. There he received his B.S. degree in English in June of 1952, subsequently earning Masters Degrees at both Boston University and the University of Connecticut, in History and in School Administration. Richard worked as a teacher and as an administrator at New Hampton School, Minnechaug Regional High School in Wilbraham, MA, East Hampton High School in East Hampton, CT, and

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Following her retirement from Southern New Hampshire University in 1995, Annie moved to Washington, DC where she took pleasure in urban life again and returned to traveling. For several months each year, she would set off to ride local buses from one end of South America to the other or explore remote areas of Laos, Vietnam, and Cambodia. She returned with stories that reflected her deep appreciation of both people and culture. These individual trips were balanced with long visits and shorter adventures with each of her children and their families who will greatly miss her friendship. It was always easy to be proud of someone who was grateful for all that life offered her and cheerful each day despite life’s inevitable challenges. Annie earned undergraduate degrees Canal Zone Junior College and The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a master’s degree from Teachers College, Columbia University. She was predeceased by her husband in 1993 and by her brother, James T. Nicolson. She is survived by her three children, William E. Rice, Charlotte A. Rice and husband Ezra Shales, and Sarah R. Cutler ’89 and husband David. She was blessed with five adoring grandchildren, Ian, Abram, and Evelyn Cutler and Agnes and Henry Shales, as well as four nieces and four nephews. Condolences can be mailed to the family at: PO Box 77, South Bristol, ME 04568. Until her death, Annie remained dedicated to her husband’s memory and to the important role of New Hampton School in her own life and in the lives of so many others. She was fortunate to count many former students and faculty members as lifelong friends. A local memorial service was held on Saturday, October 15, at 11 am at the St. Agnes Church in Ashland, NH. Q

Pioneer Regional High School in Northfield, MA. He spent the final 13 years of his professional career as a History and Social Studies teacher at the Whitingham School in Jacksonville, Vermont, retiring in 1990. Q

former trustee Henry J. Ellis, 90, died on February 26, 2011. A former trustee of New Hampton School, he graduated from Brown University in 1943 as an electrical engineer and an

ensign in the United States Naval Reserves. He then attended radar school at Bowdoin College in Maine. He married Binnie Johnson, before serving as radar and cic officer during World War II, ending his career as a full lieutenant. He worked for Public Service Co. of New Hampshire for 39 years, retiring as senior vice president. Henry managed the design and construction of the Seabrook power plant. Q

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Do You Know Your School?

This former New Hampton School leader left his mark on the School and his spirit endures in the daily lives of New Hampton School students. The first person to identify the man in this photo will win a free gift from the New Hampton School Campus Store. Answers can be sent to Director of Alumni and Parent Relations Cindy Buck; cbuck@newhampton.org.

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spring hamptonia winner: Congratulations to Mike Vollmin ’11, who was the first to correctly identify that John Corriveau ’74 and New Hampton Men’s Varsity Hockey Coach Matt Wright each won ncaa titles as players at Boston University.

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The campaign reporter

New Hampton School

GO BEYOND. the campaign for new hampton school

W W W. N E W H A M P T O N . O R G / G O B E YO N D

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a message

from the board chair remarkable. Dean has inspired me and so many others in the New Hampton community with his gift. I feel such a warmth of emotion to the School and I know we can “go beyond” and do so much more in the future. Thank you, Dean and Bo for your unwavering commitment to New Hampton School. There is a direct correlation between faith in the School’s direction and the financial support the institution enjoys. If Dean’s pledge is any indication, New Hampton School has never looked stronger. In the coming months, GO BEYOND will enter its final phase with a clear focus on the restoration of Meservey Hall. The $4.5M Meservey restoration project will require faith and support from the entire nhs community as we move forward and create a reshaped learning space for generations of students to come. I hope you will join me, Dean and

“Dean’s gift is at once

Dear Friends of New Hampton,

Bo, and thousands of nhs supporters to help us take GO BEYOND not just over

stunning and humbling.

Americans were euphoric in 1980. The

It is hard for most of us

Hockey team stunned the world, winning

to imagine making a gift

Hampton School’s Miracle On Ice became

of two million dollars.”

build a new hockey rink from trustee and

the $30.6M goal, but well BEYOND!

“Miracle On Ice” United States Olympic With great appreciation,

Gold in Lake Placid. In 2010, New a reality with a $2,000,000 pledge to GO BEYOND campaign chairman Dean Jacobson and his wife Bo.

Pete Galletly ’73, P ’09

Dean’s gift is at once stunning and

Chairman of the Board

humbling. It is hard for most of us to imagine making a gift of $2,000,000. The faith in and dedication to the School Dean has shown in making this gift serves as an inspiration for all of us, and what he has done to keep the momentum in the GO BEYOND campaign going is

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campaign briefs $30.6 million campaign goal $27.02 million to date

campaign reaches 88 percent New Hampton School alumni, parents, friends, faculty, and sta have rallied to support excellence in education. With a combination of capital gifts, annual fund participation, and support of the endowment, GO BEYOND has surpassed eightyeight percent of its goal of $30.6 million.

Campaign progress as of June 30, 2011

campaign goals r construction and renovation: r Meservey Hall: $4.5 million r Pilalas Center for Math

$15.4 million

and Science: $9.7 million

r Kennedy Turf Field: $1.2 million r endowment support: r Faculty Chairs: $3.0 million r Facilities Endowment: $3.0 million r Student Scholarships: $3.0 million r Creating Global Citizens: $1.0 million r annual fund:

$10.0 million

$5.2 million

GO BEYOND will restore Meservey Hall and provide a new home to the School’s Academic Support Program (ASP).

GO BEYOND Campaign Goal:

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$30.6 million

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donors making a difference dean jacobson ’68, makes a $2m pledge for a new hockey rink A three-sport athlete in soccer, ice hockey, and lacrosse at New Hampton before matriculating to Colgate University, Dean is the owner of BoDeans Baking, the country’s leading producer of specialty ice cream cones and chocolate ice cream sandwich wafers. A four-year student at New Hampton who came to NHS from Long Island, Jacobson had not returned to New Hampton until 2008, when he attended a celebration for Headmaster Emeritus T. Holmes Moore’s 70th reunion. Why are you committed to giving back to New Hampton School? First, I had four great years at nhs and that contributed to what I am today. Second, I became re-engaged with the school a few years ago and have been increasingly impressed with the leadership of Andrew and his team. And of course, as the chairman of the GO BEYOND campaign, I thought I should put my money where my mouth is. In the end, this seemed like an appropriate way to send a strong message to other donors that nhs is a great investment. We need to get Meservey and the rink done. On the need for a new Hockey Rink I won the Gall Hockey Award. At night, we sprayed the rink with water and shoveled off the snow. Even back then, I always felt we should cover the rink and that obviously happened. I saw the rink in the condition it is now, and it is clear we need to upgrade the whole facility to improve the image of the School. We’ve had a strong hockey program for 30 years, and now we need a world-class arena to support our great programs. On his experience at NHS I was a kid from Long Island from a tough neighborhood. I was a tough kid. My nhs experience went a long way to smooth out rough edges I had as a young kid of 14. It tamed me, made me more civilized in terms of interacting with people. Second, I was in three sports at nhs. That was mandatory. That really fostered the person I am today. Working with coaches and players, I learned to compete and win—that was a big step, a big fact, in my life. I live by those principles today, and they were brought out at nhs. On NHS Hockey Players and a new Rink I hope and trust that everybody who ever skated at nhs would share my dream to have a world-class hockey arena. By being a lead donor, this is my opportunity to help make that dream a reality, but we need everyone’s help. If you skated on nhs ice— on the rink, on the pond, we need your help. This is a breakthrough moment. This rink will be there for a long time. So to my fellow hockey players I say: it is time to step up, let’s make it happen! r

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donors making a difference

roger and georgeann ballou p’11, p’13 New Hampton School has become a special place for the

see how great the learning spaces are there. You want the

Ballou family.

whole school to look like that. It’s conducive to kids doing

Since 2009, Roger Ballou has served the School as a member of the Board of Trustees, guiding nhs through a time of change and the birth of new programs.

great work and it really affects the attitude of the students and their ability to learn.” Roger Ballou has extensive experience serving non-prof-

In the Spring of 2011, Roger and his wife Georgeann watched their son Grant graduate after four years of growth and transformation in and

its and recognizes the impact that

“The nhs experience took Grant from being a young

outside of the classroom at New Hampton School. While Grant begins a new educational chapter at Loyola University in New Orleans, the Ballou

the Meservey Restoration could have on the School. Ballou has seen firsthand how New Hampton has provided his son with a definitive

boy to an articulate young man with confidence”

family will watch their daughter

experience and wants to preserve that for future students. “The biggest thing was the maturity he developed,” Ballou says. “The nhs

Mariza, class of 2013, embark on her own New Hampton

experience took Grant from being a young boy to an articulate

journey.

young man who has confidence. In addition to maturing as a

The Ballou family showed their continued support of New Hampton in April when they made a generous pledge to the Meservey Hall restoration project.

person, I can see a different level of intellectual curiosity.” With the need for Annual Fund support, Ballou recognizes how donations to capital projects can be passed over.

“I saw the difference Pilalas has made on the appearance

“ You need to have funds to live on but you need funds for

of the School and the impression prospective families get,

tomorrow,” he explains. “The Annual Fund is the money the

and wanted to be helpful in getting the second stage of the

school needs to operate annually and the capital donations

Academic Row project going,” Ballou says. “ Visiting families

are the seed corn for the future for the school. You have to have both.” r

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focus on endowment the barbara guardenier master teaching chair in science The Barbara Guardenier Master Teaching Chair in Science was established in 2010. It is also the first of its kind at New Hampton School. This chair and associated professional development funds will be awarded every three years to a member of the New Hampton School Science faculty who represents the highest tradition of science teaching, as embodied by longtime faculty member Barbara Guardenier. Excellent teaching is at the heart of a New Hampton School education. Endowed chairs in support of faculty serve the school by underwriting the operations of the institution. Endowed chairs will underwrite a portion of the recipient’s salary and serve as an honor for the selected faculty member. Former Faculty Barbara Guardenier, Jessica Kang ’02, the first Guardenier Master Teaching chair recipient, and Andrew Menke

The award is given to the science faculty member, who demonstrates the best qualities of this spirited teacher through her or his

compassion, tenacity, and above all dedication to the teaching of science. This year’s recipient was Jessica Kang ’02. Her colleagues describe her as dedicated, unassuming, and multi-talented. She began studying science here at New Hampton School as a four-year student. Even then she stood out among her peers and received the Meservey Medal, nhs’s highest honor, before going on to receive her Zoology degree at the University of New Hampshire. Upon completing her undergraduate work and a Master’s degree in Education, she returned to teach at New Hampton School, where she was an early advocate for the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program and continues to help develop the curriculum as an IB Biology teacher. During her four-year tenure as a faculty member, she has taught a range of student abilities, interests, and courses as diverse as Physics. She can be seen after hockey or soccer practice dutifully at her classroom in the Pilalas Center for Math and Science, giving extra help sessions, preparing the next day’s labs, or developing new lessons to help her students better understand the subject she so openly cherishes. r

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state of the school report 2010–11 returns on investments

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from the advancement committee chair Dear Friends, My son, Grant ’11, just received his New Hampton School diploma in May. We could not be more proud of his many accomplishments and are extremely grateful for the tremendous support he received during his time on New Hampton School’s campus. Over the past four years, we have watched Grant evolve and mature in ways we never imagined when we first stepped foot on campus. We feel honored that our family has been a part of the School’s growth, and we know Grant’s experience was made better because of the generous support of the New Hampton School family of donors. It brings me great pride to share with you the figures of the 2010–11 State of the School Report. New Hampton School received $1,931,538 in gifts this fiscal year, allowing the school to surpass its fundraising goals. The New Hampton School Annual Fund sailed beyond the $950,000 unrestricted goal raising a grand total of $1,054,640. You will see on the following pages the hundreds of names it takes to accomplish all New Hampton School has achieved this past year. Propelled by the $100,000 “We’re All In Challenge,” the 2010–11 Annual Fund realized a record-number 1,237 donors, surpassing the necessary 1,000 donors to reach the Challenge. The entire New Hampton School community thanks those who made it a priority to participate in this exciting initiative. In its fourth year, GO BEYOND: The Campaign for New Hampton School—the largest capital campaign initiative in the School’s history—continued to move forward. With gifts totaling over $27,025,199 toward our $30.6 million goal, we remain focused on the next phase to raise $4.5 million for the restoration of Meservey Hall. For more in-depth information, please turn to the Campaign Reporter (page 67) to read about exciting GO BEYOND updates. Each year, the School relies heavily on the volunteers who give gifts of time and energy. Alumni serving as Class Agents have dou-

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bled, 24 current students participated in Annual Fund phonathons; over 30 people served as Reunion Committee members; current parents organized auctions and exam bakes, and provided winter carnival assistance; our Grandparent Fund Chairs helped to double the number of grandparent donors; and the list continues! We are deeply grateful for nhs community members who care to make a difference in the life of our school. New Hampton School is thriving because of the participation of so many individuals! Each year, the Annual Report highlights the fundraising success of New Hampton School; but more important, are the countless individuals who chose to participate this year with gifts of time and resources. Because of your donation, we are a healthy and vibrant school on the move. Thank you for participating this year!

Respectfully,

Roger H. Ballou P ’11, ’13 Trustee and Chair, Advancement Committee nhs advancement committee Sarah R. Goos P’13, Trustee Dean P. Jacobson ’68, Trustee Robert D. Kennedy ’50, GP’10, Trustee Robinson C. Moore ’73, Trustee Rick Peyser ’68, Trustee Eugene E. Rainville ’57, Trustee Karen M. Saunders P’08, Trustee Peter Galletly ’73, P’09, Trustee Charles Hutchinson GP’12, Trustee Jun Yao, Trustee Karl Kimball ’74, Trustee Suzanne Walker Buck, Director of Admission, Staff Liaison Sandy Colhoun, Director of Development, Staff Liaison Will McCulloch, Director of Communications, Staff Liaison

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endowment funds

Academic Research Center Endowment Fund Mary E. Avery Fund Mary A. Bartlett Fund Jeffrey Pratt Beedy Scholarship Fund Ellen Brown and George Woolsey Bierlin Trust Fund Mr. and Mrs. William Edwin Bierlin Sr. Trust Fund Butler Book Endowment Butler Scholarship Fund Class of  Book Endowment Fund Eva Dodge Fund W. R. and S. C. Dow Fund Coach Preston Eames Fund David and Eleanor Eldredge Fund Farrelly-Gilmore Fund George and Sandra Fearons Endowed Scholarship Fund Ora Field Fund Edward E. Ford Fund Donald R. Galletly Scholarship Fund The General Endowment Fund Harrison Golden Endowed Fund for Professional Development The Barbara Guardenier Master Teaching Chair in Science Gurnett Trust Fund Ryan Haran Scholarship Fund Learning Center Endowment Fund Richard Lilly Scholarship Fund Agnes M. Lindsay Trust Fund A. Stanley Little Fund Loeb-Tomasko Fund Charles G. MacVane, Jr. Scholarship Fund Mildred McEvoy Fund Fred Merrow Fund Milne Fund T.H. Moore and Norma Jean Moore Endowed Scholarship Fund New Hampton School Community Scholarship Fund Nolet Project Fund Guy Alang Ntang Scholarship Fund Ralph S. O’Connor Prize for Excellence in Teaching Ordway Lecture Fund Ordway Student Aid Fund Robert A. Phillips Scholarship Fund Pilalas Center for Math and Science Endowment Pingree Family Theater Endowment Fund Provost Scholarship Fund David Rice Fund Donald Richardson Fund Fritz Robbins Fund Ralph Shackett ’ Fund Fredrick and Grace Smith Fund Richard Sterndale Fund William D. Stirrup Fund Tessier/Tyson Cross Country Scholarship Fund Mark Tilton Endowed Fund for Professional Development Dewitt Wallace: Reader’s Digest Endowed Fund Leslie J. Weed and Alice H. Weed Scholarship Fund Woodman Fund

total endowment:

market value june 30, 2010

$1,436,152 $401 $5,753 $416,024 $98,023 $55,009 $34,391 $10,147 $11,460 $35,193 $71,910 $1,935 $9,588 $25,351 $166,076 $9,588 $91,04 $531,850 $3,292,686 $76,453 — $246,527 $78,856 $22,035 $34,513 $49,858 $70,607 $21,961 $34,272 $9,588 $9,588 $319,475 $32,001 $52,334 $24,492 $9,178 $18,963 $3,170 $19,176 $29,251 $25,702 — $34,811 $106,210 $31,005 $38,352 $9,108 $64,968 $16,811 $169,594 $24,179 $80,095 $141,434 $538,534 $2,875

$8,714,049

total received this fiscal year

$200

$6,865

$28,125 $29,635 $26,400

$450 $24,500

$5,000

$200 $25,000 $10,116 $10,000 $7,450 $150

$2,000 $429,050 $6,000 $1,000

$612,141

market value june 30, 2011

$1,705,166 $476 $6,835 $493,952 $121,535 $67,027 $40,869 $12,581 $13,819 $41,810 $85,432 $2,399 $11,391 $36,391 $197,184 $11,391 $107,449 $631,474 $3,932,298 $90,774 $35,457 $292,884 $117,108 $26,163 $39,968 $59,233 $84,987 $26,074 $42,492 $11,391 $11,391 $379,548 $38,548 $91,226 $29,844 $11,379 $29,711 $3,931 $22,782 $34,973 $60,199 $12,542 $53,731 $129,202 $38,628 $45,563 $10,821 $83,031 $19,972 $742,236 $36,094 $96,287 $175,359 $639,411 $3,416

$11,146,538

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endowment report 2010–11: from the chairman of the endowment commitee The New Hampton School Endowment Fund (EF) continued to provide a meaningful measure of support to school operations. For the 2011 fiscal year, which ended on June 30, the Fund provided approximately $430,000 to the School to offset expenses representing approximately 3.4% of the operational budget. Of this amount, approximately $130,000 was designated for scholarship, a small percentage dedicated to specific, restrictive uses, and the bulk of the remainder for general school expenses. The Endowment’s value on June 30, had appreciated to $11.1 million from the prior fiscal year’s end value of approximately $8.7 million. The Fund’s growth can be attributed to excellent market performance—over 25%—and the receipt of very generous gifts from friends and alumni. The Board of Trustees’ guidelines for EF investments are diversified both globally and across the different, but traditional investment strategies, including equities and fixed income. All of the strategies are long-term in nature and none involve the use of leverage. The Endowment Committee periodically reviews the Fund’s performance and allocates assets among the different options available. With the exception of cash and cash alternatives, all of the Fund’s assets are invested in registered mutual funds managed by American Funds. Over the years, and during the 2011 fiscal year as noted, the School has been very fortunate to receive bequests and donations for the EF from alumni, parents, faculty, and friends. Specific accounts in the Fund have been and may be created to support all manners of school initiatives, or in tribute to faculty, alumni, and friends. The School has been diligent in adhering to the various conditions and restrictions imposed by the donors in order to fulfill their intention to benefit New Hampton School both in the present and the future. To preserve the assets, the Board’s guidelines limit annual distributions

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from the Endowment to the School to a small percentage of the Endowment average asset value, a parameter that is fairly standard among endowment funds. The New Hampton School Endowment continues to play a pivotal role in helping the School achieve its mission to educate students to become global citizens. During these continuing volatile markets and recognizing the limitations of tuition revenues, the Board of Trustees has strongly supported the absolute need to increase and strengthen our Endowment Fund. It is intended to exist in perpetuity for the benefit of the institution, its students, and faculty, and to support the work of the School today while growing to support its needs in the future. Your experience at New Hampton School was made possible by the generosity and commitment of alumni, parents, and friends. The School faces an ever-changing environment of global opportunities and challenges that would have been hard to imagine thirty or forty years ago. To succeed, it must be prepared. Your contributions to build a strong endowment are critical to this mission. Respectfully,

Steven G. Delaney ’65 Trustee and Chair, Endowment Committee nhs endowment committee Steven G. Delaney ’65, Trustee William F. Guardenier ’62, Trustee Jason M. Pilalas ’58, Trustee Sandy Colhoun, Director of Development, Sta= Liason Jill Duncan, Director of Finance, Sta= Liason For more information about New Hampton School’s endowment fund, capital gifts or estate planning, please contact Sandy Colhoun, Director of Development at 603-677-3413; scolhoun@newhampton.org.

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new hampton school five-year financial highlights Total assets Total liabilities Net assets

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

$ 52,507,779 18,665,453 $ 33,842,326

$ 49,207,882 17,534,452 $ 31,673,430

$ 48,072,464 18,669,198 $ 29,403,266

$ 51,179,487 21,048,018 $ 30,131,469

$ 43,262,960 15,609,701 $ 27,653,259

$ 10,356,984 2,035,339 2,263,053 284,370 434,146

$ 10,149,889 2,712,032 776,398 173,765 416,569

$ 15,373,892

$ 14,228,653

revenue Tuition, net of financial aid Gifts and pledges Investment Summer programs Auxiliary

total revenues

$ 9,845,560 2,877,302 (2,327,925) 213,986 393,220

$ 11,002,143

$ 9,294,270 4,203,207 (295,377) 216,473 487,797

$ 13,906,370

$ 9,095,519 2,588,492 1,723,706 139,033 492,122

$ 14,038,872

expenses Educational and supporting programs Summer programs School administration and general expenses Plant expenses Dining and food service Depreciation and amortization Provision (recovery) for doubtful pledges Fundraising expenses Interest expense Non-operating revenue/expense Interest rate swap

total expenses change in net assets

$ 3,320,058 198,998 3,579,361 2,060,365 864,817 1,606,990 210,000 881,051 299,549 180,594 3,213

$ 3,129,425 138,461 3,370,803 1,921,977 815,947 1,371,865 50,000 786,893 382,024 78 ($8,984)

$ 13,204,996

$ 11,958,489

$ 2,168,896

$ 2,270,164

$ 3,203,272 163,207 3,341,614 2,034,851 773,620 1,165,403 87,941 593,988 328,950 28,516 8,984

$ 11,730,346 ($728,203)

$ 3,290,363 82,326 3,250,906 1,973,613 835,381 1,015,689 — 637,762 346,752 (4,632) —

$ 3,470,126 65,709 3,269,971 1,937,940 801,302 993,190 — 556,571 364,027 (36,460) —

$ 11,428,160

$ 11,422,376

$ 2,478,210

$ 2,616,496

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the granite society Anonymous Mr. Robert C. Galletly † and Mrs. Pauline B. Galletly Mr. Robert D. Kennedy and Mrs. Sally Kennedy † Mr. and Mrs. Earl R. Lewis III Mr. and Mrs. Jason M. Pilalas Mr. Robert I. St. Clair † and Mrs. Regina B. St. Clair †

the meservey leadership circle The ayco Charitable Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Roger H. Ballou The Denver Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Evans The Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Mrs. Pauline B. Galletly Mr. and Mrs. Peter W. Galletly The Lola B. Grillo Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Peter J. Grillo Mr. and Mrs. Edgar V. Guardenier II Mr. and Mrs. William F. Guardenier The Paul and Cheryl Hamel Family Foundation The Samuel P. Hunt Foundation Mr. and Mrs. William S. Karol Mr. Robert D. Kennedy Mr. and Mrs. Earl R. Lewis III Mr. Yingjian Liu and Mrs. Dongquing Xu Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Maine Mr. Douglas A. McIninch The McIninch Foundation Mr. William C. Morton Mr. and Mrs. Jason M. Pilalas Mr. and Mrs. Eugene E. Rainville Mr. and Mrs. Dexter N. Smith † Mr. William A. Stirrup

the headmaster’s circle Ms. Susan K. Allen Mr. and Mrs. R. William Burgess Mr. Jianqiang Cai and Mrs. Lirong Tao Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Zhong Chen Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Dailey Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Drew, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. James L. Elcock Dr. and Mrs. Roger H. Emerson, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Samuel D. Goos Mr. and Mrs. Dean P. Jacobson Mr. Byeong Yong Jang and Mrs. Kyeong Hee Kim

Mr. and Mrs. Tsugio Kumagai Dr. Jeong Woo Lee and Mrs. Mi Jeong Lee Mr. and Mrs. Donn S. Lux Mr. and Mrs. Will L. Pingree Mr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Provost Dr. In Jong Seo and Mrs. Woo Soon Kim Mr. Pill Chong Shin and Ms. Seung Hae Han The Snave Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Il Ho Son Mr. and Mrs. Jon T. Tallarida Tiedemann-Bevs Industries Mr. George L. Winlock Mr. Shuhui Yang and Mrs. Yanjing Zhao

giving societies the meservey leadership circle $25,000 and above

the headmaster’s circle $10,000 to $24,999

the frederick smith society $5,000 to $9,999

the t. holmes ’38 and norma jean moore society $2,500 to $4,999

the louis gnerre, jr. society the frederick smith society Mr. and Mrs. Scott L. Adair Barking Cat Productions Communications Design Elena Barraquer, MD Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Berry BoDeans Cone Company BoDeans Wafer Company Ms. Corina Boulton Dr. and Mrs. Sudarshan Chatterjee Mr. Shixue Cheng and Mrs. Jianqin Zhu Mr. and Mrs. Steven G. Delaney Mr. and Mrs. Erik A. Dithmer Mr. Cody V. DuBuc Mr. and Mrs. James E. Dunivan, Jr. Mr. Paul R. Dupee Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Enxing Mr. William J. Fisher Mr. Joseph D. Gahtan Mr. Robert M. Greene Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Hutchinson Mr. and Mrs. Timothy R. Huyck Mr. Lin Lu and Mrs. Xu Xuemei Mr. Ralph S. O’Connor Dr. Se Kwang Park and Mrs. Ji Ae Seo Mr. Kyu Chong Seo and Mrs. Young Ja Oh Mr. Karl G. Smith II Dr. Hongsup Song and Mrs. Yoo Jin Chung Spectra Energy Mr. and Mrs. Thomas N. Tessier Mr. Qing Zhang and Mrs. Wei Yang

$1,000 to $2,499

the green and white society $500 to $999

the husky pride society $250 to $499

friends of new hampton $1 to $249

the granite society Members of the Granite Society provide a solid financial foundation for nhs donating $1,000,000 or more to nhs over their lifetime.

the belfry society The Belfry Society distinguishes donors who have made a contribution for five consecutive years or more. Belfry Society members are noted throughout the Gift Report with a bell adjacent to their name.

the 1821 society Members of the nhs community who have chosen to include the school in their estate plans.

the t. holmes ’38 and norma jean moore society The Arnold Baggins Foundation, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. James Broughton Mr. Shaun P. Carroll, Sr. Mr. Andrew M. Cohen Mr. David C. Comb and Ms. Coleen R. Fitzgibbon

Conneston Construction, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Culbert Mr. Gregory G. Friel Mr. Jeffrey D. Glidden Mr. and Mrs. George M. Haivanis Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Hall Mr. Benjamin R. Huntington Mr. Jeffrey R. Huntington

† deceased.

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Mr. and Mrs. David R. Kaiser Mr. Jonathan A. Karalekas Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Kennedy Mr. Hwan Kyoon Kim and Mrs. Tae Ae Lee Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Koenig, Jr. The Koenig Family Charitable Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Bradley Leighton Mr. James G. Lifshutz The Lifshutz Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Rich M. Lovering Mr. Mark G. McLaughlin Mr. and Mrs. Eugene B. McLean Mr. and Mrs. Mark S. Miller Mr. and Mrs. T. Holmes Moore Pleasant View Gardens The Rathmell Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. Roth Mr. Matthew M. Rutter Mr. M. Whitson Sadler Mr. and Mrs. Howard C. Saturley Mr. William C. Saturley The Schwab Charitable Fund Dr. and Mrs. Michael L. Seigle Mr. and Mrs. Vincent F. Tulley II Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Vrana The Vrana Family Foundation Mr. Yao Huang Wang and Mrs. Hong Yan Mr. and Mrs. David C. Wason Dr. and Mrs. Rudolph L. Wise

the louis gnerre, jr. society Mr. and Mrs. Stephan Akin Mr. Gopal D. Amin Mr. Stephen J. Bandoian Mr. and Mrs. Andrew H. Banoff Mr. Raymond J. Barnes and Mr. John M. Reilly Mr. Robert Borzillo Mr. Robert A. Borzillo Mr. and Mrs. Mark Bouzianis Mr. Gerald I. Brecher Mr. and Mrs. D. Ari Buchler Mr. David L. Chambers and Dr. Michele LeComte-Chambers Dr. Lawrence A. Churchville III Mr. Steven E. Clancy Mr. and Mrs. Alvin H. Clemens Mr. Gordon E. Clement Mr. Sandy Colhoun and Ms. Selina Rossiter Ms. Marilyn J. Comb Mr. Juan Cora Guerreiro and Mrs. Maria J. Gil Caballero

Mr. A. Haigh Cundey The A. Haigh Cundey Foundation Mr. and Mrs. John P. Delea Honorable Alford J. Dempsey, Jr. Mr. Frank Dennen Ms. Jill A. Duncan Mr. and Mrs. Philip R. Eisenmann Mr. George T. Fearons Mr. Thomas J. Fitzgerald Mr. W. West Frazier and Ms. Christine Collins Frazier Mr. Robert C. Galletly, Jr. Mr. William H. Goldberg Mrs. Hilda M. Greene Mrs. Bryna G. Haber Mr. and Mrs. Luke J. Haran, Jr. Mr. Julian C. Harrison Mr. and Mrs. Alan Hart Mr. David E. Harvey Mr. David L. Heald Mr. Christian A. Hendricks and Ms. Lori A. Nichols Samantha M. Jewett, Esq. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Sumner N. Katz Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Kesten Mr. Karl V. Kimball Mr. John D. Knapton Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Leary, Jr. Dr. Jang Keun Lee and Mrs. Ji Hwan Choi Mr. and Mrs. Ben S. Levitan Mr. and Mrs. Carl C. Liebert III Mr. Philip W. Lobo Mr. and Mrs. David LoPresti Mr. Nicholas M. Maggio Mr. and Mrs. Wayne D. Maggio Mr. ZhiHua Mai and Mrs. Xuezhen Zhu Mr. Jeremy C. McCamic Mr. and Mrs. David T. McGrath Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Menke Ms. Kathryn W. Miller Mr. and Mrs. Robinson C. Moore Thomas J. Motley, Esq. Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. Mumma Mr. James B. Nicholson Mr. and Mrs. J. Philip O’Hara Mr. and Mrs. Keith A. O’Hara Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey W. Organ Mr. Stephen H. Paneyko Governor Walter R. Peterson † and Mrs. Dorothy D. Peterson Mr. Henry H. Peterson Mr. Robert A. Pollard Mr. George S. Robinson, Jr.

Mr. John A. Romagna Mr. R. Edward Rose, Jr. Mr. Leo-Pierre Roy Mr. Frederick Smith, Jr. Mr. Robinson V. Smith Mr. and Mrs. Scott N. Solman Mr. Peter A. Stirrup Mr. Scott D. Tkachuk Mr. Robert H. Traylor The Traylor Charitable Fund Mr. Allan R. Turner Tyler, Simms & St. Sauveur, P.C. The Vanguard Group Mr. Arthur W. Vietze, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Gregory W. Wagner Mr. R. Christopher Wallace Mr. Whitney O. Ward Mr. Richard G. Weinberg The Weinberg Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Richard Weinstein Mr. Jun Yao

the green and white society Mr. David Abraham Anonymous () Bank of America Matching Gifts Program Dr. John W. Barlow and Ms. Elizabeth Poulsen Dr. Martin I. Baskin Mr. and Mrs. Gary J. Beban Mr. Robert T. Bennett, Jr. Ms. Victoria A. Blodgett and Ms. Susan Overton Mrs. Karen Bressler and Mr. Scott Epstein Mr. Arthur M. Brink, Jr. Ms. Alicia M. Burrows Mr. and Mrs. Gary Caruso Mr. Lucas Caruso Mr. Nicholas E. Caruso Mr. Michael P. Conforti Mr. John M. Crafts Mr. Albert O. Dyson Mr. Steven R. Eichenbaum Mr. Robert A. Feldman Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Fox Mr. Dougall C. Fraser, Jr. Ms. Grae Garl Mr. Gregory C. Golembe Granite United Way Mr. Charles W. Howard II Mr. Xiaobo Hu and Mrs. Rongyan Sun The Invest In Others Charitable Foundation Mr. Ronald J. Logdahl

Mr. Cesar A. Maso Mr. Paul G. McIntire Mr. Matthew S. McKenna Mr. Frank J. McMackin IV Mr. Robert G. Merrick Mr. Ronald F. Milardo Dr. Thomas H. Moore, Jr. Mr. F. Myles Moran and Mrs. Mary Jo Levitsky Mr. William C. Moyes Mr. Stephen F. Murphy Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Murray, Jr. Mr. John P. Naparlo Mr. and Mrs. Terry A. O’Toole Mr. Stephen H. Perry Mr. Scott D. Peters Mr. Frederick M. Peyser III Mr. Eric T. Philippi Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Piscitelli Mr. and Mrs. Hugh B. Richardson Mr. James P. Richey Mr. Luis A. Rivera Mr. James G. Salvucci Mr. Robert E. Sanson Mr. Thomas W. Saturley Mr. Peter J. Schiot Mr. George B. Schofield The Irving and Bernice Singer Family Foundation Mr. Joshua S. Sydney Mr. John F. Teague Mr. and Mrs. Peter D. Thomson Mr. Walter W. Ungermann Mrs. Lynn H. Van Cleave Mr. Robert W. Warburgh Mr. Owen M. Ward Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Wolcott

the husky pride society Mrs. Susan R. Agger Dr. and Mrs. Ronald F. Altman Mr. Richard A. Aube Mr. Steven D. Bailer Mr. Randall A. Bandoian Mr. and Mrs. Arthur N. Barron Mr. and Mrs. Edward N. Barry Mr. Ralph A. Brown Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Buck Ms. Jane L. Campbell Mr. John P. Carter Mr. John B. Clark Mr. Robert B. Coan Mr. Edwin M. Corns III Mr. Craig B. Corson Ms. Cathy Creany and Mr. Cary Gordon

† deceased.

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Mr. Frank A. De Lisi, Jr. Mr. William C. Descary Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Stuart A. Disbury Ms. Barbara K. Doud Dr. and Mrs. Sylvio L. Dupuis Mrs. Ellen L. Elcock Mr. Leonard M. Feinstein Colonel Normand V. Ferdinando (ret.) Mr. Christopher P. Frost Mr. Laurence D. Gale Mr. C. Eric Garber Mr. Lawrence B. Garland GE Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Jay P. George Mr. John J. Gilbert, Jr. Henry F. Goode, Jr. PhD Mr. Jeff C. Graham Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Haas Mrs. Phyllis S. Hamblet Mr. R. Christopher Henry Mr. Mark C. Iber Mr. and Mrs. Peter A. Jacobi Mrs. Ann S. Kent Mr. William C. Kerchof Mr. Keith D. Kidder Mr. Jay F. Kimball Dr. James F. Klein Mr. Richard P. Kleinknecht Mr. Robert R. LaPointe Mr. William B. Logie Mr. and Mrs. Joseph T. MacAndrew Mr. Duncan C. MacInnes Mr. Richard S. Mackay Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Magee, Jr. Gary F. Margolis, PhD Mr. John J. Marrapese Mr. and Mrs. John B. Mattes, Sr. Mr. Henry H. McIntosh Mr. and Mrs. M. John McMahon Mr. Michael J. McNamara Mr. James K. Moore Mr. and Mrs. James A. Morison Mr. John M. Muldoon Ms. Deborah Myers Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Nathanson National Philanthropic Trust Mr. Robert L. Pascucci Ms. Amy Patenaude-Gunn Mr. Jeffrey C. Pattee Mr. and Mrs. David Perfield Mr. George R. Pesek Mr. Peter N. Phillips Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Pollock, Jr. Mr. George P. Ponte Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Rainville

Mr. and Mrs. Donald W. Rockel Mr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Rosenblatt Mr. and Mrs. Rex V. Rubin Mr. Neil Samuels Mr. Edward J. Sanson Mr. Philip W. Sawyer Mr. and Mrs. Alan Scalingi Mr. William J. Schneiderman Mr. Ralph Schwan and Ms. Lori R. Hartglass Mr. R. Jon Shackett Mr. Michael S. Sherwood Mr. Frederick J. Slamin Mr. William E. Smeaton Mr. Carl D. Smith Mr. and Mrs. H. William Smith, Jr. Mr. H. William Smith III Mr. John P. Smith The Patricia M. and H. William Smith, Jr. Foundation Mr. Stanton T. Smith Reverend David B. Sterling Mr. and Mrs. Donald W. Stevens Mr. George K. Thorlin Mr. and Mrs. Mark Troiano Mr. Harold A. Uttley, Jr. Mrs. Denise Van Dyke Burgess Mr. John H. Vohr Ms. Whitney L. Walsh-Cardozo Mr. A. Arnold Waterman Mr. Robert-Grant Wealleans Mr. Paul A. Weinman Mr. Robert S. Wolff Mr. Robert L. Zirinsky

friends of new hampton Abbott Fund Matching Grant Plan David J. Ackerknecht, cpa Mr. Neale T. Adams Mr. William A. Adams Mr. and Mrs. Howard L. Agid Mr. Alexander C. Albert Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Alexander Mr. Brian J. Alexander Mr. Byron A. Allen, Jr. Mr. Charles W. Allen, rn, acrn Mr. John H. Allen Mr. Clayborn W. R. Allen Ms. Mercedes R. Amador Mr. Kevin A. Ambrose Mr. Zachary M. Amero Mr. and Mrs. Rodney W. Ames Mr. Timothy M. Ames Mr. and Mrs. Dennis R. Ames Mr. Rodney W. Ames, Jr. Mr. Carl G. Anderson

Mr. Gerald F. Anderson Mr. Justin Anderson Mr. and Mrs. Roy E. Andrews Ms. Alexandra D. Andrews Anonymous () Mr. and Mrs. Donald L. Arsenault Mr. and Mrs. Dana G. Arsenault Mr. and Mrs. James L. Arsenault Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Ashing III Mr. Marc E. Atkinson Mr. Louis F. Auger Mr. Samuel J. August Mr. Alexander P. Ayer Dr. Burton Baker Ms. Christina M. Baker Mr. William E. Balcom Mr. and Mrs. Rolf L. Ball Mr. and Mrs. Daniel A. Ball Mr. Grant M. Ballou Ms. Rebecca M. Banoff Mr. Edward H. Bardes Mr. Robert S. Barlow Mr. Marcus Barnes-Reilly Mr. and Mrs. Michael Barnett Mr. Mark L. Baron Ms. Jeanne C. Baron Mr. William E. Barrett Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Barry Mr. Donald F. Barry Hugh E. Barry, Esq. Mr. Nathan G. Barry Mr. and Mrs. Constantine P. Bart Mr. Rodney J. Bascom Mr. Prescott W. Baston, Jr. Mr. Dana Bates Mr. Bruce S. Batting Mrs. Carolyn J. Baumel Mr. S. Noel Baxter Mr. Harvey A. Bazarian Mr. J. Bradley Bealle Mr. Copley R. Bean Ms. Cierra J. Bean Mr. Thomas T. Beeler Mr. William D. Benisch Mr. Bradley Bennett Ms. Holly L. Bennett Ms. Alexandra Berkowitz Mr. Elliott Berkowitz and Ms. Nancy Phillips Mr. Roger L. Berman Mr. and Mrs. Todd R. Bernasconi Ms. Emma L. Berry Ms. Kelsey B. Berry Mr. Steven W. Berry, Jr. Mr. Kirk Beswick Mr. Robert G. Bianchi

Mr. Anthony A. F. Bicchieri Mr. R. Stuart Bicknell Kent L. Bicknell, EdD Mr. George W. Bierlin Mrs. Elizabeth Bingham-Johns Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey S. Black Ms. M. Brady Black Mr. J. Thompson Black Ms. Kimme Black Mr. and Mrs. Martin Z. Black Mr. Robert F. Blakeley Mr. John P. Blizzard Mr. Bruce S. Bogart Mr. Brian D. Boire Dr. Aliou B. Boly and Ms. Nanette E. Alvey Mr. Thomas J. Bond Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Bond Mr. Clifford S. Bonney Ms. Stella K. Bonnie Mr. George B. Boone Mr. Brandon Borghi Ms. Maureen Borghi Mr. and Mrs. Arthur J. Borry Mr. Richard A. Boulter Mr. William J. Box, Jr. Mr. Todd B. Boyle Mr. and Mrs. Morgan J. Brady III Mr. Oliver B. Bragg Mr. Collin D. Bray Mr. Benjamin D. Brenner Mr. and Mrs. Douglas J. Brenner Ms. Joan B. Brewer Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Brewster Ms. Leia M. Bridgham Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation Mr. Emanuel Brito Mr. Edgar M. Bronfman Mr. Jacob R. Broughton Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Brown Mr. William M. Brown Ms. Meredith Brown Mr. Milton K. Brown, Jr. Mr. Russell Brummer and Ms. Amy Wilson Ms. Jourdan Buchler Mr. John S. Buck and Mrs. Suzanne Walker Buck Mr. Conrad F. Buck Mr. Eric R. Buck Mr. Matthew K. Buck Lt. Col. Eric F. Buer Mr. Scott Bugbee Ms. Ha Thanh Bui Mr. Charles J. Burch III Mr. Robert W. Burgess

† deceased.

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student phonathon program dials up Twenty-four volunteer student callers, five phonathons,  pledges,  first-time donations, and , raised—to say the Student Phonathon Program was dialed up this year is an understatement! A dedicated group of the student body made it a priority this year to help raise money for their school by calling and asking nhs alumni to support the School’s Annual Fund and the , Participation Challenge. Also, a “student-only” phonathon was held in December at which time a new training video was filmed and edited by nhs sophomores Jeremy Seigle ’ and Owen White ’. Wanting to provide a more visual way of training to make Annual Fund calls, the humorous and informative video created by students adds another level of sophistication to the student calling program. The creativity, enthusiasm, and eagerness displayed by our student callers raised the level of productivity at the phonathons this year. Not only are phonathons imperative to helping reach nhs Annual Fund goals each year, but the opportunity it provides current students to speak with alumni all over the country is a terrific way to enhance the nhs network. The next time your phone rings, please take the time to speak with our enthusiastic student callers and share with them stories from your own nhs experience! 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald T. Burke Mr. F. Thomas Burke III Mr. Christopher D. Burns Mr. Bruce W. Burns Mr. Kenneth G. Burr, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Jere G. Burrows Mr. Thomas W. Butcher Mr. James E. Butler, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Kevin G. Calley Mr. Charles M. Calley Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Callif Ms. Deirdre A. and Ms. Elizabeth A. CampbellTompkins Ms. Katherine T.J. Campbell-Tompkins Ms. Allyson Campion Mr. Robert L. Cantine, Jr. Mr. Clark R. Caplan Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Caracino Mr. Dane M. Caracino Ms. Briana Cardwell Mr. Alan R. Carlsen Mr. M. Geoffrey Carlton II Ms. Jessica P. Carpenter

Mr. and Mrs. Jacques O. Cartier Ms. Nora Cascadden Ms. Cynthia F. Casner Mr. Anthony M. Ceazan Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Cetron Mr. John R. Chagnon Ms. Mariele Chambers Mr. Michael R. Chambers Mr. Gabriel R. Chami Mr. William A. Champney Mrs. Irene A. Chandler Mr. John W. Chang Mr. and Mrs. George W. Chase III Mr. and Mrs. Jon M. Chase Miss Wenhui Chen Mr. David Chesley Dale R. Childs, MD Mr. Joung Yun Choi Mr. and Mrs. Craig E. Churchill Ciao Pasta Restaurant Mr. Matthew J. Cicchetti Mr. Gregory R. Clancy Mr. Stuart F. Clark Mr. Reginald H. Clark

Mr. Peter A. Clayton Mrs. Martha B. Clement Mr. Richard W. Cleveland Mr. Richard R. Cleverly Ms. Vickie D. Clifford Mr. David C. Coen Hal D. Cohan, MD Mr. Lawrence G. Colby Ms. Patricia R. Colhoun Ms. Megan E. Collins Mr. and Mrs. David C. Collins Mrs. Erika M. Collins Mr. Nathaniel S. Colp Mr. Nicholas S. Comosa Mr. and Mrs. John C. Conkling Mrs. Carolyn S. Cook Mr. Frank T. Copenhaver Mr. Anton Cora Gil Mr. Daniel Corey Mr. and Mrs. William E. Cormier Mr. Max V. Cormier Reverend and Mrs. William G. Corr Dr. Paul M. Costello Mr. Richard A. Cote

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Cote Ms. Ann Marie Cote Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Coursey Mr. Eben G. Crawford Mr. Roger L. Creighton Mr. Kenneth D. Cressy Mr. Alan B. Crocker Mr. Lawrence R. Crosby, Jr. Mr. Robert H. Cross Mr. Jeffrey K. Crothers Ms. Jerrica M. Crowder Colonel W. Bruce Crowell Mr. John G. Crowley Ms. Sara Lin Crowley Mr. John P. Cullinan and Mrs. Britney Cullinan Mr. and Mrs. Kevin A. Cummings Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Cummings Mr. and Mrs. Barry G. Curran Mr. Irving B. Cushing Mrs. Sarah R. Cutler Mr. Hooper W. Cutler Mr. and Mrs. Brian T. Dacey Mr. and Mrs. Jack R. Dailey, Jr.

† deceased.

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Mr. Joseph L. Dalferes III Mr. David Dath Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Davis Mrs. Theresa M. Davis Mr. William S. Davis II Mr. Calvin J. Dawson Mr. Christopher D. Day Mr. William Deacon Lansing K. Deane, Esq. Mr. and Mrs. Patrick DeBenedictis Ms. Cheryl DeFosses Mr. and Mrs. George Dekeon Mr. and Mrs. Christopher E. Delaney Ms. Emily E. Del Grego Mr. and Mrs. William P. DeLuca Mr. G. Paul Denecke Mr. Daniel P. Dennehy Mr. Mark P. DesMeules Mr. and Mrs. David A. Devine Mr. James H. Dewhirst Mr. William R. Dexter Mr. James A. DiCarlo Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. Diehl Ms. Donna M. Dionne Mr. and Mrs. Earl C. Dodge Mr. Robert N. Dodge Mr. Alex W. Dodge ltc William F. Doherty, usa (ret.) Mr. Kendall M. Dolbeare Mr. Thomas A. Donovan, Jr. Mr. Sean E. Donovan Ms. Ashley K. Dorian Mr. and Mrs. Daniel K. Dorian IV Mr. and Mrs. Dan Dostie Ms. Kristina L. Doucette Ms. Rachelle Doucette Mr. Robert M. Drew Mr. Brian M. Driscoll Mr. and Mrs. Francis L. Driscoll III Mr. and Mrs. Terence J. Driscoll Mr. Thomas Q. Driscoll Mr. David P. Driscoll Mr. Michael R. Driscoll Mr. Josiah H. Drummond, Jr. Mr. John R. Duffett Mr. James E. Dunivan Mr. Douglas Dunn and Ms. Donna Vance Mr. Roger A. Durant Mr. and Mrs. Steven P. Durelli Mr. Michael S. Durelli Mr. Ralph A. Edson, Jr. Ms. Elizabeth B. Edwards Mr. John W. Ehrlich Mr. Richard C. Ekholm Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Elkins

Mr. James M. Ellis Ms. India C. Ellis Ms. Lucinda T. Embersits Mrs. Elizabeth T. Emerson Mr. Alexander N. Enescu Mr. Nicholas B. Enxing Mr. Charles A. Ernst III Mr. Stephen H. Erwin Mr. and Mrs. Claude H. Estes IV Mr. Carlton F. Evans Mr. Vincent J. Every Ms. Mackenzie L. Ewing ExxonMobil Foundation, Inc. Mr. Richard M. Ezequelle Mr. William D. Fabrocini Mr. Steven Fariole Mr. Timothy A. Farnham Mrs. Katerina Farr-Williams Mr. and Mrs. Norman D. Farwell Honorable Roland D. Fasano Mr. and Mrs. Stephen T. Fay Ms. Nan T. Fay Mr. and Mrs. Gregor E. Fellers Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Fendler Ms. Jo E. Fendley Mr. Henry B. Ferris Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Fields Mr. Cameron S. Fields Mr. David I. Fineblit Ms. Hannah M. Fiore Mrs. Amanda Desrochers Firmino Mr. Raymond E. Fisher Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Fisk Mr. Charles W. Fitch II Ms. Victoria Fitzgerald Mr. E. Scott Forbes Mr. Gregg E. Fowler Dr. Marc Frader and Ms. Janis Hersh Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Frame, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Kirk J. Franklin Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Freeborn Mr. and Mrs. Justin Freeman Mr. Thomas H. Freese Mr. Jeffrey S. Frost Mr. Jason Fruithandler Ms. Carey L. Fusick Mr. Peter E. Gall Ms. Brittany M. Gallagher Ms. Leanne F. Galletly Ms. Sandy Gates Mr. George R. Geehan, Jr. Mr. Andrew George Mr. Mark S. Germano Mr. William E. Gifford Ms. Alisha Gilbert Ms. Christina M. Gill

Mr. and Mrs. Russell E. Gilpatric Mr. Barry S. Gilvar Mr. and Mrs. Louis Gnerre, Jr. Mr. Christopher Golembe Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey P. Goley Ms. Cheryl P. Gonzales Mr. Alan P. Goode Mr. Bruce A. Goody Mr. Daniel A. Gordin Ms. Cynthia Gordon Ms. H. Gail Gordon, R.E. Mr. Mark Gordon Ms. Shoshanah B. Gordon Mr. Jason P. Gorgone Mr. Connor J. Gorman Mr. and Mrs. Daniel P. Gorman Mr. Peter Gorman Mr. and Mrs. Mark Gould Mr. Bartolo R. Governanti Ms. Gina Graciano Mr. Jonathan G. Granger Ms. Felicia Grant Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Gray Green Monster Sports Mr. Thomas L. Greenbaum Mr. Benjamin M. Greene Mr. David B. Greer Mr. Rentoul C. Grevatt Mr. Robert H. Griffin Mr. Frederick J. Griffin, Jr. Mr. James E. Grillo Ms. Elizabeth Grosart Mr. Thomas S. Grossman Mr. Matthew S. Gulley Mr. R. Jack Gulliver Mr. and Mrs. David T. Gunn Mr. William H. Gunther Mr. Roger Guthrie, Jr. Mr. Alan Haas Mr. Joseph S. Haas, Jr. Mr. Alan J. Hackel Mr. Carter G. Haff Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Hage Mrs. Ann Hall Ms. Marnie E. Hall Mr. Richard L. Ham Mr. Henry Hanlan and Mrs. Daniele Malo Dr. David S. Hanswirth Mr. Devin Haran Mr. Wesley J. Hardman Mr. William H. Haring Dr. Eugene L. Harley Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Harlow Ms. Amanda Harrington Ms. Patricia E. Harris Merrill

Mr. Webster L. Harrison Ms. Dale T. Hart Ms. Kaitlynn E. Hart Mr. Christopher M. Hart Elizabeth Hassinger, dvm Mr. Allan W. Haynes Mr. Bradford P. Hazeltine Ms. Tina Hazelton Mr. Jacob M. Heal Mr. Timothy H. Heald Mr. and Mrs. Christopher M. Healey Dr. and Mrs. Michael J. Hechtkopf Mr. Evan E. Heckel Mr. and Mrs. Michael Heffernan Mr. Aaron M. Hendricks Mr. and Mrs. Adrian C. Hendricks dtcm Karl W. Henry, usn David C. Henshaw, PhD Ms. Ng Thi Thanh Hien Mr. Donald C. Higgins, Jr. Mr. John J. Hill III Mr. John H. Hinchcliffe III Mr. Matthew E. Hinzpeter Mrs. Loraine K. Hobausz Mr. Jefferson H. Hodges, Jr. Mr. Allan F. Hodgkins Mr. Craig W. Hoffman Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Hoffman Mr. Roland B. Hogan Mr. Francis J. Holleran, Jr. † Peter B. Hollis, DMD Captain Rockwell Holman, usn (ret.) Mr. and Mrs. Philip J. Holton IV Mr. Philip J. Holton Dr. and Mrs. Scott L. Horton Mrs. Kathleen Howe Mr. Keith A. Hrasky Ms. Xinyi Hu Ms. Maureen A. Huber Ms. Hayden Huff Mr. and Mrs. Scott Huff Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan T. Huntington Mr. Rufus B. Hurst Mr. Theodore P. Hurwitz Mr. Peter F. Hutchins, Jr. Mr. Michael F. Hutchinson Dr. and Mrs. Gary B. Irish Mrs. Adama Jalloh Mr. Frederick W. Jean Mr. Charles H. Jenkins Mr. George D. Jenkins Mr. Min Gu Jeong Mr. Ning Yuan Jiang Mr. Dean Johnson Mr. Allan R. Johnston Mr. and Mrs. William J. Jordan

† deceased.

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Mr. Timothy P. Jordan Mr. and Mrs. Justin Joslin Mr. T. Scott Jube Ms. Sarah Kaiser Ms. Jessica A. Kang Ms. Katelyn T. Karkos Dr. and Mrs. Paul J. Karr Mr. James T. Kaufman Mr. and Mrs. Edward W. Kazar Ms. Reiva J. Keith Ms. Caroline M. Kelly Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence P. Kelly, Jr. Mr. John M. Kelsey and Ms. Sally Wilson Kempner Family Foundation Mr. G. Duncan Kendall Mr. Robert M. Kennedy Mr. Alexander B.E. Kent Mr. and Mrs. Myron Kibbee Mr. and Mrs. George Kidd, Jr. Mrs. Ellen D. Kidd and Mr. Steve Brown Mr. and Ms. William D. Kietzman Mr. and Mrs. Richard E. Killmer Mrs. Gabrielle A. Killmer Popp Mr. Nam Soo Kim Mr. Soo Wan Kim Mr. Junhyung Kim Mr. Jin Hong Kim and Mrs. Young Hee Lee Ms. Shelli Kimmel Mr. Micah R. Kinsler Mr. and Mrs. David Kirkwood Mr. Maclean R. Kirkwood Mr. George D. Kittredge III Mr. and Mrs. Andrew P. Klein The Honorable Christopher M. Klein Mrs. Ruthann M. Kline Smith Ms. Julia Knobloch Ms. Kayla E. Kommit Mr. and Mrs. Ken-ichi Kondo Mr. Edward M. Koplow Ms. Jill R. Korst Mr. Charles M. Koutsogiane Mr. Kenneth J. Kozens Mr. G. Howard Krauss, Jr. Mr. Benjamin A. Kudary Mr. Robert J. Kurtz Mr. and Mrs. Eric W. LaCroix Mrs. Beverley E. Lafferrandre Chess Mr. Gerald T. LaMarque Mr. Matthew S. Lambert Ms. Maura Lane Mr. Matthew C. Langadas Mr. Steven L. Larkin Mr. Maurice J. Laroche

Mr. and Mrs. Roger B. LaRochelle Mr. Daniel G. Larson Mr. and Mrs. Christopher LaSpina Mr. Paul A. Lazdowski Mr. and Mrs. William C. Leach Mr. and Mrs. Ernest A. LeBlanc Mr. Alex S. Lederman Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. Lederman Mr. Chan Lee Mr. Byong Jik Lee Mr. and Mrs. John G. Legg, Jr. Mr. Brent A. Leighton Mr. Nicholas C. Leighton Mr. H. Lester Leland Ms. Chelsea D. Lemke Mr. Garrett D. Lemke Mr. Alan J. Levenson Mr. Samuel J. Levine Mr. Michael J. Levine Ms. Dara E. Levitan Mr. Daniel A. Lewis, Jr. Mr. Jackson E. Lewis Ms. Yangjiayi Li Ms. Quimin Liang Mr. Micah Liben Mr. Jacob A. Liebert Mr. Seth N. Liebert Mrs. Veronica Lima-DeAngelis and Mr. Michael DeAngelis Mr. Kenneth L. Lincoln Mr. Stephen A. Lindquist Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Link Mr. Christopher Little Mr. and Mrs. David H. Little Mr. and Mrs. Warren M. Little Mr. Stephen W. Litvin Mr. Qiutong Liu Mr. Zhengyi Liu Mr. Frank W. LiVolsi, Jr. Mr. Martin D. Lodge Dr. and Mrs. Edward E. Loftspring Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Long Ms. Sarah M. Long Mr. Edward A. Loring, Jr. Mr. Roger E. Lotz, Jr. Mr. Daniel Love and Ms. Amy Sedestrom Mr. James C. Lowell Mr. Xiao Lu Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Luse Ms. Sarah E. Lutkevich Mr. Philip D. Lux Ms. Alexandra C. Lynch Mr. Jacob R. Lynch Mr. Kevin K. Lynch Mr. Michael M. Lynch

Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Lynch Mr. Rodger V. Lyons Mr. Robert W. Lyons Mr. David A. MacAlpine Mr. Robert W. MacArthur Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. MacConnell Mr. Joseph J. MacConnell II Ms. Margaret MacDonald Mr. Earle P. MacGillivray, Jr. Mr. Rafael A. Machado Mr. James C. Mackay Mr. John D. MacLeod, Jr. Mr. Daryl G. MacLeod Mr. and Mrs. Ryan H. Mahady Mrs. May M. Maisonneuve Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Maker Mr. Samuel D. Maker Mr. Timothy Maki Mr. Gregory T. Mamos Mr. Stefano R. Mancini Ms. Euginnia C. Manseau Mr. Albert B. Mark Mr. Daniel G. Markham Mr. D. Bruce Marshall Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Marshall Ms. Melody Martel Miss Claudia Marti Llado Ms. Florence E. Martin Mr. Andrew M. Martone Mr. Andrew F. Martz Mr. and Mrs. Jeremy Mathison Mr. J. Baxter Mattes, Jr. Ms. Maeve Matthews Dr. John F. Maxfield III Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Mazur Mr. and Mrs. Stephen A. Mazur Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Mazza Mr. Michael W. McBournie Ms. Jenna McCabe Mr. and Mrs. Scott McCann Mr. Frank K. McClelland Mr. and Mrs. Cory McClure Mr. and Mrs. Joseph McClure Mr. Eric McCollom and Ms. Kristie Gonzalez Mr. Gordon J. McCown, Jr. Mr. William L. McCulloch and Mrs. Carolina Ansaldo Mr. Hubert B. McDonough Mr. George H. McEvoy Mr. and Mrs. James P. McFadden, Jr. Ms. Melissa McGee Mr. David S. McGrath Colonel Robert W. McKeen, usa (ret.) Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. McLean Mr. D. Van McLeod

Mr. and Mrs. James P. McMahon Mr. Philip W. McMaster Mr. and Mrs. Joseph L. McMenaman Mr. Gerald E. McNally, Jr. Ms. Jacqueline T. McNally Mr. Cory W. McPhee Mr. Roger C. McPherson, PE Mr. and Mrs. William A. McWilliams, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. John J. Meany Medtronic Foundation Dr. H. Jay Melosh IV Mr. Edgar Mendelsohn Mr. and Mrs. Scott J. Mendelson Mr. Peter A. Meneghin III Mrs. Abigail S. Mercer Ms. Sharon F. Merrill Marino Mr. and Mrs. Herbert B. Mershon Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Meservey Mr. James T. Messier and Ms. Denise K. Noble Mr. John T. Metzger Ms. Rene Metzler Mr. James Miller Mr. Scott F. Miller Mr. and Mrs. Michael Milofsky Mrs. Ann M. Minahan Mr. and Mrs. B. Frederick Minard Mrs. Reid P. Mizell The Mobile Giving Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan D. Mohr Mr. Winslow B. Mohr Mr. Thomas C. Monahan Ms. Annette MontBlanc Mr. David W. Moody Mr. and Mrs. Andrew S. Moore Mr. and Mrs. Dayce P. Moore Ms. Ellyn C. Moore Mr. John C. Moore Ms. Victoria A. Moore Mrs. Elizabeth M. Moores Ms. Erin K. Moran Ms. Molly S. Moran Morgan Stanley Matching Gifts Program Mr. John P. Morin Mr. Charles D. Morrill, Jr. Mr. Dennis Morrisey Richard D. Morrison, MD Mrs. Sally S. Morse Mr. and Mrs. Ellsworth R. Morton Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Moseley, Jr. Mr. Thomas B. Moss Frank Motley, Esq. Mr. and Mrs. Rory L. Moulton Mr. Charles Mouquin

† deceased.

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Mr. Frederick W. Moynihan Mr. and Mrs. William T. Mullen Mr. and Mrs. Hans Mundahl Mr. and Mrs. Samuel C. Murdough Mrs. Maura A. Murphy Mr. Melvin J. Myers Mr. and Mrs. Richard S. Myers Ms. Lauren J. Myers Mr. Andrew Nagy Donald R. Nary II, Esq. Ms. Kyra Nathanson Mr. and Mrs. Seth Natter Mr. Peter M. Neisel Mr. Charles Newell and Mrs. Kathleen Collins Mr. and Mrs. Nestor M. Nicholas Mr. Chester E. Nichols II Mr. Warner C. Nickerson Mr. and Mrs. Keith F. Noe Mr. and Mrs. Scott Nolan Mr. James M. Noonan Mr. Donald S. Noot Mr. John A. Nordhouse Mr. and Mrs. Everett R. Nordstrom Ms. P. Alice Norris Mr. Robert E. O’Brien, Jr. Mr. Daniel P. O’Donnell Mr. Matthew B. O’Donnell Ms. Kate F. O’Hara Mrs. Cynthia L. O’Leary Mr. W. James O’Neill Ms. Wanda D. O’Rear Mr. and Mrs. John J. O’Toole III Mr. William P. Oberndorfer III Mr. Paul N. Olenik Mr. Charles F. Oliver III Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. Olson Dr. and Mrs. Oluwole O. Olusola Mr. Barry H. Orenstein Mr. Christopher M. Organ Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. Orosz Mr. Robert T. Osborne Mrs. Barbara T. Ossege Mr. Shawn Ouellette Mr. and Mrs. Robert Page III Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert F. Palmer Mr. William C. Pankey Mr. and Mrs. Anthony E. Paquet Mr. Trevor A. Paquet Ms. Brianna D. Pare Mr. Hyun Jae Park Mr. Robert L. Parrish Ms. E. Nicole Pasceau Mr. Nicholas P. Paulos Mr. Eric K. Pearson

The Honorable and Mrs. Carleton P. Penn Mr. and Mrs. Peter F. Penniman Ms. Heidi Penziner Mr. Frederick S. Pepek, Sr. Dr. W. Reid Pepin Mr. Peter L. Pequignot Mr. Justin T. Perino Ms. Claire D. Perrier Mr. William H. Perry III Mrs. Kirstie A. Perry Mr. Alfredas Petkus Mr. Whang Phang Mr. Donald A. Phillips Mrs. Donna Phillips Mr. John D. Phillips Mr. William H. Philpot Mr. R. Scott Piehler and Mrs. Tamar A. Colegrove-Piehler Ms. Lindsay J. Pierce Mr. and Mrs. Joseph G. Piscitelli Mr. Paul A. T. Piscitelli Mr. Norman A. Plaisted Ms. Susana Planas Lopez Mr. and Mrs. Vincent J. Plansky Mr. Aaron Platt Mr. Robert J. Pludo Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Pluhar Gordon B. Plumb, PhD Ms. Kristyn E. Polucha Ms. Catherine N. Poole Mr. Donald E. Porter Mr. John P. Powell Mr. Joseph E. Powers, Jr. Mr. David C. Preston Mr. Robert A. Price, Jr. Mr. Herman G. Protze Mr. Edward A. Provencal Mrs. Charlotte Provost Mr. Joseph J. Ptasinski Mr. Marko Punda Mr. Thomas R. Pynchon Mrs. Kristen G. Quackenbush Ms. Donna Quinn Mr. James Quinn Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Randall Mrs. Monique T. Randolph Mr. William W. Rankin Mr. Dana Raucher Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth C. Raynor Mr. Kyle C. Raynor Miss Emily C. Reardon Mr. Michael P. Reardon Mr. and Mrs. Darren Redman Mr. Robert G. Reed, Jr. Ms. Jennifer R. Reed

Mr. Kenneth P. Reever Mr. Michael E. Reingold Mrs. April M. Rey Ms. Kathy J. Rhoades-Wright Mr. R. Steven Rhodes Mr. Scott D. Richards Mr. Allen S. Richardson Mr. James M. Richardson Mr. Peter N. Richmond Ms. Lynda A. Rideout and Mr. John A. Wellman Mr. and Mrs. Richard Risteen Mr. Paul J. Ritzman Mrs. Sara Rizkalla-Tyson Ms. Lesley A. Robbins Mr. Erling R. Roberts Mr. Donald F. Robinson Mrs. Shirley H. Robinson Mr. Cephas B. Rogers III Mrs. Eleanor E. Rogers † Ms. Molly W. Rogers Mr. Anthony J. Romano III Mr. and Mrs. Kelvin Rose Mr. Bryan A. Ross Mr. and Mrs. Douglas M. Ross Ms. Shelley Rothman Mr. Michael T. Rouleau and Ms. Kimberly L. Brock Mr. Jarod M. Rouleau Mr. Thomas C. Roundy Mr. David L. Ruell Mrs. Ellen Ruell Mr. Joseph Sampson Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Santamaria Mr. and Mrs. Pat F. Santaniello Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Saunders Mr. Evan C. Schafer Ms. Maxine H. Schick Mr. Scott E. Schneider Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Schreiber Ms. Peyton E. Schreiber Mr. Stephen W. Schultz Mr. Howard G. Seaver Mr. Richard L. Seavey Mr. William P. Seldon Mr. and Mrs. Philip S. Seydel Mr. Jeffrey S. Shackett Dr. Robert B. Shapiro Mr. Neal Shartar and Ms. Sheryl Anderson Ms. Martha Shepp Mr. Mark D. Sherburne Mr. and Mrs. Gary F. Sherman Mr. Jeffrey B. Sherman Mr. Edwin L. Sherrill, Jr. Mr. Ethan C. Shinn

Ms. Holli Hamel Siff Mr. Peter K. Silbert Mrs. Sarah Silverstein Mrs. Patricia A. Simeone Mr. Michael F. Simpson Mr. Michael J. Simpson Mr. Gourdin E. Sirles Mr. and Mrs. Shane D. Sirles Ms. Taylor M. Sirles Mr. Alexander I. Slover Mr. Connor S. Slover Mr. and Mrs. Todd K. Slover Mr. Charles G. Smerlas Mr. Allen E. Smith Mr. Boyd P. Smith Mr. Carey T. Smith Mr. David E. Smith Mr. David L. Smith Mrs. Jane B. Smith Mrs. Kathleen Smith and Mr. Dana L. Pruitt Mr. M. Daniel Smith Mr. Peter T. Smith Dr. and Mrs. Richard R. Smith Mr. Travis O. Souza Mr. Kenneth W. Spalding, Jr. Mr. Samuel L. Spalding Mr. Joseph A. Spitzer Mr. Stephen Stafford Mr. R. Neil Stalker Starbucks Coffee Company Mr. Charles R. Stauffer, Jr. Ms. Carol A. Stazinski Mr. Thomas C. Steinmetz Mrs. Barbara Stepanek Mr. Hugh Spitzer † and Mrs. Dinah Stevens Mr. Fred G. Stevens Mr. Theodore Stiles Ms. Elizabeth Lynn Stirling Mr. Ju Hwan Suh Mr. Brian J. Sullivan and Ms. Erika Hoddinott Mrs. Shea Sullivan Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Susi Mr. Chris R. Swanson Mr. William A. Swarts, Jr. Mr. Peter C. Swett Ms. Allison M. Swift Mr. F. Christopher Tahk Mr. Allen S. Tailby Ms. Julie Tallman and Mr. Michael Avery Ms. Si Yun Tang Tanger Outlet Center target

† deceased.

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Mr. Robert S. Tatigian Mr. Franklin J. Taylor Mr. and Mrs. James M. Taylor Mr. Richard M. Taylor Dr. Steven H. Taylor Mr. and Mrs. Sean M. Teague Mr. Thomas N. Tessier Mr. Richard C. Thall Mr. William Thayer and Ms. Betsy C. Crocker Daryl J. Thomas, PhD Mr. Gard R. Thompson Mr. Rodney D. Thorn Ms. Meiqi Tian Dr. Lance M. Tibbetts Mr. Mark E. Tilson Tilt’n Diner Mr. Jon S. Tilton Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth L. Tomaro, Sr. Mr. M. Peter Tonissi II Mr. Michael R. Topercer Ensign Terry J. Topercer II Mr. Anthony C. Torti Mr. Carter A. Trent Mrs. Rosanna G. Trestman Ms. Joyce Trevor Mr. Fred R. Tripp Ms. Jean M. Troiano Mr. and Mrs. Chester A. Truskowski Mr. and Mrs. Ernest J. Tsouros Mr. Jason Tucker Mr. Kyle Tufts Mr. Jeffrey K. Tulis Ms. Molly A. Tulley Mr. William S. Turville Mr. and Mrs. Adam R. Tyson Ms. Lea S. Tzimoulis Mr. Craig Untiet Mr. Kamron B. Vachiraprasith Mr. and Mrs. W. Donald Vance Mr. and Mrs. Daniel J. Vautour Ms. Camille Vecchione Ms. Chieko Vilas Mr. Daniel F. Viles, Jr. Mr. Douglas T. Viles Mrs. Jaime P. Viteri Mr. Thomas D. Vohr Mr. Carlos Birt Vollenweider Mr. Michael C. Vollmin Dr. and Mrs. Ernest Votolato Ms. Lynn H. Wadhams Mr. Darrin L. Wahlberg Mr. Frederick J. Walker Mr. C. Barry Walker Mr. James G. Walker Mr. James H. Walker, Jr.

Ms. Sheighla E. Wall Mr. David W. Wallwork Mr. James Walsh Mr. and Mrs. Sven Walsh Ms. Claire M. Walter Mr. Wyman B. Ward Mr. Richard J. Wargo Mr. Henry S. Warren Ms. Harriet Warshaw Mr. Fletcher R. Wason Mr. Tyler R. Wason Mr. Brandt A. Wax Mr. and Mrs. David D. Webster Mr. Samuel D. Webster Mr. Ian A. Weinberg Mr. Steven W. Weinberg Mr. Ralph B. Welsh, Jr. Ms. Kathleen Whitcher Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Q. White Mr. Bertwell K. Whitten Mr. Jonathan A. Wiederecht and Mrs. Nur Kilic Mr. and Mrs. Allen Williams Mr. J. Mills Williams Mrs. Erica Willingham Cecile Windels, MD Mr. David W. Winking Ms. Maureen F. Winking Mr. and Mrs. Stephen M. Wishoski Mr. and Mrs. Rob Womack Mr. Samuel B. Wood, Jr. Mr. Stephen M. Woodaman Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Woodland, Jr. Mr. Samuel H. Worthen Mr. Christian J. Wright Mr. and Mrs. James A. Wright Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Wright Mr. Shihao Xie Mr. John S. Yancey Mr. Xiaohan Yang Mr. Tyler York Ray S. Youmans, dvm Mr. Baker M. Young II Mr. and Mrs. John B. Young Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Young Mr. and Mrs. Zachary Zimmerman Mr. Allen P. Zornow Mr. Mark W. Zurwell

alumni donors

Dr. John F. Maxfield III  Dexter N. Smith †

William C. Kerchof  Robert W. MacArthur  Frederick Smith, Jr. 

class of 1938

class of 1946

Class Agent: T. Holmes Moore G. Howard Krauss, Jr. T. Holmes Moore 

George B. Boone  Rentoul C. Grevatt Roland B. Hogan

Gerald F. Anderson  Bruce W. Burns Irving B. Cushing James H. Dewhirst Thomas P. Fendler  Robert J. Kurtz  Jeremy C. McCamic  James P. Richey 

class of 1940

class of 1947

Ralph Budd Welsh, Jr. 

Roger L. Creighton  John J. Gilbert, Jr.  William H. Gunther Samuel L. Spalding 

Constantine P. Bart  Gordon E. Clement  Robert B. Coan  William F. Doherty, usa (ret.) Robert C. Luse Allan R. Turner  A. Arnold Waterman

class of 1942

class of 1948

Stuart F. Clark Kendall M. Dolbeare Roger C. McPherson, P.E.  Walter R. Peterson †  Howard G. Seaver Edwin L. Sherrill, Jr.  M. Daniel Smith  Robinson V. Smith Samuel B. Wood, Jr.

Class Agent: Charles M. Hines Robert S. Barlow  John R. Duffett Ralph A. Edson, Jr.  Eugene L. Harley  Charles M. Hines William B. Logie  D. Bruce Marshall  Thomas C. Monahan William E. Smeaton Richard Y. Sutton William A. Swarts, Jr.

class of 1937

class of 1939

class of 1941

class of 1943 Kenneth D. Cressy Carlton F. Evans Rodger V. Lyons  Edward J. Sanson Owen M. Ward

class of 1944 Louis F. Auger David E. Harvey  Francis J. Holleran  Capt. Rockwell Holman usn (ret.)  Robert W. Lyons  Ralph S. O’Connor  William W. Rankin  Robert E. Sanson  Stanton T. Smith 

class of 1936 Allen S. Richardson Robert I. St. Clair †

class of 1945 Oliver B. Bragg  F. Thomas Burke III  G. Paul Denecke 

class of 1949 Byron A. Allen, Jr.  Conrad F. Buck  Colonel W. Bruce Crowell Erik A. Dithmer  Robert N. Dodge Jackson E. Lewis  Kenneth L. Lincoln William H. Perry III

class of 1950 Alan R. Carlsen Stephen H. Erwin Peter E. Gall Jefferson H. Hodges, Jr. Robert D. Kennedy  John D. Knapton James C. Mackay

† deceased;  belfry society membership.

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manitou circle: new hampton school classes 1929–61 The Manitou Circle was created in June  as a way to honor New Hampton School’s most distinguished alumni. The Manitou Circle honors members of the alumni community who have surpassed their th Reunion milestone. This group is celebrated during Reunion Weekend at a breakfast hosted by Head of School Andrew Menke. The legendary T. Holmes Moore ’ presented New Hampton School with a check in the amount of ,, reflecting the collective donations of the Manitou Circle to the School’s Annual Fund. We are deeply grateful for the help of Phil O’Hara ’, GP’, and Bob Pollard ’, who lead the Manitou Circle gift effort. If you are a member of the Manitou Circle, we hope you will join us for the annual breakfast that takes place each year during Reunion Weekend! 

W. Reid Pepin, dds  George B. Schofield  Carey T. Smith  Arthur W. Vietze, Jr.

class of 1951 Class Agent: J. Philip O’Hara Albert H. Cundey Allan F. Hodgkins  Robert G. Kesten Gerald T. LaMarque  Earle P. MacGillivray, Jr.  J. Philip O’Hara  John P. Smith Wyman B. Ward

class of 1952 Lawrence R. Crosby, Jr. Alan J. Levenson  Donald S. Noot Robert G. Reed, Jr. Kenneth W. Spalding, Jr.  John H. Vohr  John B. Young

class of 1953 William E. Barrett  Dr. Richard D. Morrison, MD John A. Nordhouse  Charles F. Oliver III 

Robert T. Osborne Frederick S. Pepek, Sr. George P. Ponte  Gourdin E. Sirles Carl D. Smith  Harold A. Uttley, Jr. 

class of 1954 Robert F. Blakeley  Richard M. Ezequelle  Col. Normand V. Ferdinando, (ret.)  Robert H. Griffin William H. Haring Theodore P. Hurwitz Charles Mouquin Chester E. Nichols II  Peter N. Phillips  Hugh L. Spitzer †  Anthony C. Torti  David W. Wallwork James A. Wright

class of 1955 Alexander P. Ayer Bruce S. Batting Ralph A. Brown  Shaun P. Carroll, Sr.  John W. Chang Richard A. Cote  Raymond E. Fisher

Allan W. Haynes H. Lester Leland Martin D. Lodge John T. Metzger  Kenneth R. Olson Robert L. Pascucci Donald A. Phillips Michael P. Reardon  Cephas B. Rogers III Richard L. Seavey  Joseph A. Spitzer  Richard C. Thall

class of 1956 Class Agent: Robert A. Pollard John H. Allen Anonymous Burton Baker  William E. Balcom James E. Butler, Jr.  John B. Clark Reginald H. Clark Richard W. Cleveland  Eben G. Crawford R. J. Gulliver Richard L. Ham John J. Hill III Charles H. Jenkins Richard P. Kleinknecht Gregory T. Mamos

Robert A. Pollard  Thomas D. Vohr Henry S. Warren

class of 1957 Class Agents: Eugene E. Rainville, Hugh B. Richardson David Abraham  J. Bradley Bealle Lawrence G. Colby Robert H. Cross  Jeffrey K. Crothers Roger A. Durant  Charles W. Fitch II William E. Gifford Barry S. Gilvar Alan J. Hackel Carter G. Haff  Edward M. Koplow  Daniel G. Larson Frank W. LiVolsi, Jr. George H. McEvoy  Peter Neisel  Robert J. Pludo  Eugene E. Rainville  Hugh B. Richardson  Robert B. Shapiro Reverend David B. Sterling F. Christopher Tahk

† deceased;  belfry society membership.

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supporting the international baccalaureate program: new hampton school class of 1961 The Class of  th Reunion Committee—comprised of Chair, Karl Smith ’, Bill Fisher ’, Bob Greene ’, Geoff Hickin ’, George Robinson ’, and Fred Tripp ’—set out to establish a gift in perpetuity to New Hampton School in honor of their milestone th Reunion. Understanding the critical role the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program (ibp) will play in setting New Hampton School apart from its peer schools and wanting to make the ibp accessible to all students, the class established an endowment fund to directly support the students in this program. The committee led an extraordinary campaign to raise , to name an endowed fund in support of the IB Program. Receiving gifts and pledges from  classmates, the class achieved their , goal, raising a total of ,. Additionally, their class participation grew from  to  in one year! On behalf of a grateful school, we all extend our thanks to the Class of  for creating this lasting gift for the students and faculty of New Hampton School. 

Brandt A. Wax Ray S. Youmans, dvm

class of 1958 Class Agents: Thomas J. Fitzgerald, Jonathan G. Granger, R. Edward Rose, Jr., James Salvucci, James D. Shattuck Carl G. Anderson William A. Champney Dale R. Childs, MD Hooper W. Cutler Thomas J. Fitzgerald  Jonathan G. Granger Colonel Robert W. McKeen  James A. Morison Thomas B. Moss John M. Muldoon Henry H. Peterson  Jason M. Pilalas  Edward A. Provencal R. Edward Rose, Jr.  James G. Salvucci  Gard R. Thompson 

class of 1959

class of 1960

Class Agents: Edgar V. Guardenier, Eric T. Philippi William R. Dexter Thomas S. Grossman Edgar V. Guardenier II  Webster L. Harrison  Peter B. Hollis, dmd  Samuel J. Levine Barry H. Orenstein  Eric T. Philippi  Herman G. Protze James M. Richardson  Erling R. Roberts M. Whitson Sadler  Frederick J. Slamin  Allen E. Smith Peter A. Stirrup  James H. Walker, Jr. Bertwell K. Whitten

Class Agents: Richard W. Maine, James B. Nicholson, Philip W. Lobo S. Noel Baxter Richard A. Boulter John P. Carter  William C. Descary Josiah H. Drummond, Jr.  Charles A. Ernst III  Robert A. Feldman  Christopher Frost Thomas L. Greenbaum Evan E. Heckel  John H. Hinchcliffe III  G. Duncan Kendall Philip W. Lobo  Richard W. Maine  Henry H. McIntosh  James B. Nicholson Gordon B. Plumb, Ph.D. Michael F. Simpson David L. Smith  David E. Smith

Walter W. Ungermann  Fletcher R. Wason

class of 1961: reunion

Reunion Committee: William J. Fisher, Robert M. Greene, Geoffrey H. Hickin, George S. Robinson, Jr., Karl G. Smith, Fred R. Tripp George W. Bierlin  Kenneth G. Burr, Jr.  Frank A. De Lisi, Jr. Paul R. Dupee Albert O. Dyson Richard C. Ekholm William J. Fisher Joseph D. Gahtan Bruce A. Goody Robert M. Greene  Julian C. Harrison  Keith D. Kidder  Cesar A. Maso Peter L. Pequignot George S. Robinson, Jr. Karl G. Smith II

† deceased;  belfry society membership.

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Fred R. Tripp  J. Mills Williams George L. Winlock 

class of 1962 Class Agents: Frank Dennen, William F. Guardenier William A. Adams Richard A. Aube  Harvey A. Bazarian Robert T. Bennett, Jr.  Arthur M. Brink, Jr.  Richard R. Cleverly Joseph L. Dalferes III Frank Dennen  C. Eric Garber William F. Guardenier  David L. Heald  Earl R. Lewis III  Edward A. Loring, Jr. James C. Lowell  Norman A. Plaisted  Thomas C. Steinmetz  Robert W. Warburgh 

class of 1963 Class Agent: open Thomas T. Beeler William D. Benisch  R. Stuart Bicknell Gerald I. Brecher Charles M. Calley Frank T. Copenhaver  Thomas A. Donovan, Jr. Timothy A. Farnham Dougall C. Fraser, Jr. George D. Kittredge III  Roger E. Lotz, Jr. Gary F. Margolis, PhD  Douglas A. McIninch Thomas H. Moore, Jr.  James M. Noonan W. James O’Neill David C. Preston Charles R. Stauffer, Jr. William S. Turville

class of 1964 Class Agent: open Prescott W. Baston, Jr. Clifford S. Bonney  Robert L. Cantine, Jr. Michael P. Conforti  Edwin M. Corns III John W. Ehrlich  R. Christopher Henry 

David C. Henshaw, PhD Frederick W. Jean  Christopher M. Klein  Richard S. Mackay  Albert B. Mark Peter A. Meneghin III  Charles D. Morrill, Jr. Dennis Morrisey Jeffrey C. Pattee  Peter K. Silbert Peter C. Swett John F. Teague Robert L. Zirinsky 

class of 1965 Class Agents: Rodney W. Ames, Steven G. Delaney, Alan P. Goode, D. Van McLeod Rodney W. Ames Kent L. Bicknell, EdD  Steven G. Delaney  Alford J. Dempsey, Jr. James A. DiCarlo Alan P. Goode  Frederick J. Griffin, Jr.  Karl W. Henry, usn  Charles M. Koutsogiane Kevin K. Lynch  D. Van McLeod  H. Jay Melosh IV Andrew S. Moore Joseph E. Powers, Jr. Stephen W. Schultz  Steven H. Taylor  Daniel F. Viles, Jr. Frederick J. Walker 

class of 1966: reunion

Reunion Committee: Lawrence A. Churchville III, Frank Motley III Neale T. Adams  Marc E. Atkinson  Milton K. Brown, Jr. Lawrence A. Churchville III David C. Coen  John M. Crafts Roland D. Fasano  Gregory C. Golembe James F. Klein  Duncan C. MacInnes  Philip W. McMaster Frank Motley III William C. Moyes  Eric K. Pearson Donald E. Porter  John P. Powell

Paul J. Ritzman Rodney D. Thorn  Lance M. Tibbetts  M. Peter Tonissi II Paul A. Weinman

class of 1967 Class Agent: open Charles W. Allen, rn, acrn Andrew M. Cohen Leonard M. Feinstein Donald C. Higgins, Jr. Rufus B. Hurst James T. Kaufman John S. Yancey 

class of 1968 Class Agent: Frederick M. Peyser, Alumni Fund Chair Hugh E. Barry, Esq. Copley R. Bean Roger L. Berman William M. Brown Peter A. Clayton Craig B. Corson Paul M. Costello  Mr. Lansing K. Deane  Thomas H. Freese Lawrence B. Garland  Jeffrey D. Glidden  Matthew E. Hinzpeter Dean P. Jacobson Dean Johnson Allan R. Johnston Stephen W. Litvin Robert L. Parrish  Frederick M. Peyser III  John A. Romagna  David L. Ruell Thomas W. Saturley  Philip W. Sawyer R. Neil Stalker Jeffrey K. Tulis Robert-Grant Wealleans

class of 1969 Class Agent: Henry F. Goode, Jr., PhD Donald F. Barry John G. Crowley David I. Fineblit Henry F. Goode, Jr., PhD Paul A. Lazdowski  Paul G. McIntire William C. Morton William C. Pankey Richard M. Taylor 

class of 1970 Class Agent: open Rodney J. Bascom  Gordon J. McCown, Jr. David W. Moody Fred G. Stevens Robert S. Tatigian

class of 1971: reunion

Reunion Committee: Joe Del Grosso, Robert R. LaPointe, Patricia Harris Merrill, Matthew M. Rutter, Robert M. Kennedy, Stephen A. Lindquist, Holli Hamel Siff ’ Mark P. DesMeules Robert C. Galletly, Jr.  George R. Geehan, Jr. Patricia E. Harris Merrill Robert M. Kennedy Robert R. LaPointe Stephen A. Lindquist John D. MacLeod, Jr. Robert G. Merrick William P. Oberndorfer III Ellen Ruell Matthew M. Rutter H. William Smith III  George K. Thorlin Douglas T. Viles Whitney O. Ward  Samuel H. Worthen

class of 1972 Class Agent: Holli Hamel Siff William J. Box, Jr. Joseph S. Haas, Jr. Jay F. Kimball  Benjamin A. Kudary  Ronald J. Logdahl  Thomas J. Motley, Esq.  P. Alice Norris Whang Phang Michael S. Sherwood  Holli Hamel Siff  Allen S. Tailby C. Barry Walker

class of 1973 Class Agents: Peter W. Galletly, Thomas H. Haas, Robinson C. Moore Kevin A. Ambrose Charles J. Burch III Barbara K. Doud Peter W. Galletly 

† deceased;  belfry society membership.

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new hampton school’s class agent program doubles in size Over the past year the New Hampton School Class Agent Program has nearly doubled in size! Class Agents are members of the alumni community who possess strong loyalty to the School and passion to help New Hampton achieve greater fundraising success. Class Agents are eager to give back to their alma mater by supporting the School’s Annual Fund and encouraging their classmates to do the same. With only  Class Agents last year, New Hampton School is fortunate to now have over ! Ranging from the Class of  to the Class of , Class Agents serve the School by writing letters, making phone calls, sending emails and posting reminders on Facebook. Class Agent outreach is helping to increase alumni participation. This year, in particular, it was an important factor in successfully reaching the , “We’re All In Challenge.” We are extremely grateful for the terrific work our Class Agents are doing by sharing their enthusiasm for New Hampton School and by supporting today’s students! If you are interested in serving as a Class Agent, we’d love your help. Please contact Sarah DeBenedictis, Director of Annual Giving at --; sdebenedictis@newhampton.org. 

William H. Goldberg Jeff C. Graham Thomas H. Haas  T. Scott Jube Robinson C. Moore  John P. Morin Kenneth P. Reever William C. Saturley 

class of 1974 Class Agent: Karl V. Kimball Jeffrey S. Frost Terri Hamel Haas  Karl V. Kimball Daniel A. Lewis, Jr. Stephen H. Perry  John D. Phillips Peter N. Richmond Donald F. Robinson Elizabeth Lynn Stirling Rosanna Liebman Trestman Baker M. Young II

class of 1975

class of 1977

Class Agent: Elibet Moore Chase Mark L. Baron Clark R. Caplan John R. Chagnon  Elibet Moore Chase  James M. Ellis Mark C. Iber Mark G. McLaughlin Leo-Pierre Roy 

Class Agent: William J. Schneiderman Bruce S. Bogart  Steven E. Clancy  Daniel P. Dennehy David P. Driscoll Samantha M. Jewett, Esq. Daryl G. MacLeod Donald R. Nary II Thomas R. Pynchon  Monique Osborne Randolph William J. Schneiderman  Mark E. Tilson James G. Walker  R. Christopher Wallace

class of 1976: reunion

Reunion Committee: Richard D. Frame, Jr., Jay P. George Elizabeth Bingham-Johns Richard D. Frame, Jr. Jay P. George Christopher Golembe Frank K. McClelland Catherine N. Poole Neil Samuels  Boyd P. Smith Mark W. Zurwell

class of 1978 Class Agent: open Edward H. Bardes John W. Barlow Amanda Miller Harrington  Elizabeth Hassinger, dvm Matthew S. Lambert  Michael J. McNamara

Ronald F. Milardo Frederick W. Moynihan  Thomas C. Roundy William P. Seldon 

class of 1979 Class Agent: Charles G. Smerlas Susan Lyons Agger Gregory R. Clancy Amy Patenaude-Gunn  Michael E. Reingold  Charles G. Smerlas 

class of 1980 Class Agents: Paul C. Altmeyer, Victoria A. Blodgett, Jonathan A. Karalekas, Scott D. Peters Victoria A. Blodgett Matthew J. Cicchetti Hal D. Cohan, MD Brian M. Driscoll Jonathan A. Karalekas  Cynthia Gibb O’Leary Scott D. Peters

† deceased;  belfry society membership.

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R. Steven Rhodes Anthony J. Romano III Allen P. Zornow 

class of 1981: reunion

Reunion Committee: Carolyn Baumel, Laurence D. Gale Carolyn Porter Baumel  Robert G. Bianchi Christopher D. Burns Laurence D. Gale John J. Marrapese John C. Moore Robert E. O’Brien, Jr. George R. Pesek Robert A. Price, Jr.  Scott D. Richards Michael J. Simpson Chris R. Swanson

class of 1982 Class Agent: open Thomas W. Butcher Tamar A. Colegrove-Piehler Andrew M. Martone Hubert B. McDonough Barbara Tuxbury Ossege R. Scott Piehler Carlos B. Vollenweider

class of 1985 Class Agent: William C. Brooks Anonymous Scott J. Mendelson Lynn Hetherington Van Cleave

class of 1986: reunion

Reunion Committee: Christopher B. Collins, Kimberly J. Cordima, Greg Dulchinos, Vincent J. Every, Robert J. Hill Vincent J. Every  David S. Hanswirth Bradford P. Hazeltine  Daniel G. Markham Daryl J. Thomas, PhD

class of 1987 Class Agent: open Bartolo R. Governanti Lorna Cobham Mendelson Stephen F. Murphy Matthew B. O’Donnell 

class of 1988 Class Agent: open Scott E. Schneider Peter T. Smith Christian J. Wright

class of 1983

class of 1989

Class Agent: Keith F. Noe Gopal D. Amin Jennifer Shackett Berry  Steven R. Eichenbaum Henry B. Ferris E. Scott Forbes Gregg E. Fowler  Loraine Greenwood Hobausz Jill Radding Korst Matthew S. McKenna  Keith F. Noe  Jeffrey S. Shackett Mark D. Sherburne Jon S. Tilton  Whitney L. Walsh-Cardozo

Class Agent: Sarah Rice Cutler Samuel J. August Todd B. Boyle Sarah Rice Cutler  Marnie E. Hall Andrew F. Martz Kristen Guardenier Quackenbush

class of 1984 Class Agent: Eric F. Buer Lt. Col. Eric F. Buer  Christopher D. Day Sean E. Donovan William D. Fabrocini Maura Clarke Murphy

class of 1990 Class Agent: Cory W. McPhee Cory W. McPhee Paul N. Olenik Luis A. Rivera

class of 1991: reunion

Reunion Committee: M. Geoffrey Carlton II, Elizabeth Pickel Doda Timothy M. Ames M. Geoffrey Carlton II Anthony M. Ceazan

class of 1992 Class Agent: George T. Fearons George T. Fearons  Alexandra Schenck Lynch

Shea Hast Sullivan Darrin L. Wahlberg

class of 1994 Class Agent: Katharine S. Tkach Timothy P. Jordan Daniel P. O’Donnell Kirstie Scobo Perry

class of 1995 Class Agent: Samuel D. Webster Brian D. Boire Emily Ewell Del Grego Carey L. Fusick April Corneau Rey Samuel D. Webster 

class of 1996: reunion

Reunion Committee: David J. Ackerknecht, Hope MatthiesRayner David J. Ackerknecht, cpa David Chesley Erika Holmes Collins David B. Greer Timothy H. Heald Lindsay Jordan Pierce Scott D. Tkachuck Jason Tucker Jaime Cetron Viteri

class of 1997 Class Agent: open Frank J. McMackin IV Marko Punda Scott D. Tkachuk

class of 2000 Class Agent: Alicia M. Burrows Anonymous Randall A. Bandoian Alicia M. Burrows Michael J. Levine Michael M. Lynch David A. MacAlpine Warner C. Nickerson Joshua S. Sydney

class of 2001: reunion

Reunion Committee: Eric R. Buck, Lisa Falconi Perfield Eric R. Buck  Sara Lin Crowley Ashley K. Dorian Matthew S. Gulley Jacob M. Heal Craig W. Hoffman Benjamin R. Huntington Peter F. Hutchins, Jr. Euginnia C. Manseau Lisa Falconi Perfield  Alfredas Petkus Lesley A. Robbins  Erin O’Toole Walsh

class of 2002 Class Agent: Collin D. Bray Rodney W. Ames Collin D. Bray Mark S. Germano Jessica A. Kang John P. Naparlo

class of 2003 class of 1998 Class Agent: Megan E. Collins Megan E. Collins  Jill M. Falconi Mahady Gregory G. Friel Ryan H. Mahady Molly W. Rogers

class of 1999 Class Agent: open Benjamin D. Brenner Gabrielle A. Killmer Popp Micah R. Kinsler Jacob R. Lynch Evan C. Schafer

Class Agent: open John P. Blizzard Nicholas C. Leighton

class of 2004 Class Agents: Megan E. Frame, Christopher M. Hart, Steven L. Larkin M. Brady Black Gabriel R. Chami Thomas Q. Driscoll  Mackenzie L. Ewing Jason P. Gorgone Christopher M. Hart Steven L. Larkin Chelsea D. Lemke E. Nicole Beal

† deceased;  belfry society membership.

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leaving their mark in stone: the class of 2011

The Class of  will always be remembered not just for their strong cohesiveness, but also for the beautiful granite bench they donated to the School. Led by a dedicated group of classmates, the Class of  set a goal to raise  to purchase the bench as their Senior Class Legacy Gift. With great enthusiasm and determination, they raised an impressive  in cash donations, surpassing their goal by  percent. Receiving donations from  members of their class, they achieved  percent participation. The granite bench is a fitting reminder of the strength found in numbers and the true power of participation! 

class of 2005 Class Agents: Stella K. Bonnie, Michael R. Chambers Alexander C. Albert  Stella K. Bonnie Matthew K. Buck  Michael R. Chambers Cody V. DuBuc Peyton E. Schreiber

class of 2006: reunion

Reunion Committee: Kate F. O’Hara, Allison M. Swift, Tommy N. Tessier Jeffrey Thompson Black Allyson Campion Jessica P. Carpenter Cheryl P. Gonzales Katelyn T. Karkos Garrett D. Lemke Sarah E. Lutkevich Rafael A. Machado Kate F. O’Hara Kristyn E. Polucha Allison M. Swift Thomas N. Tessier

Terry J. Topercer Stephen M. Woodaman

class of 2007 Class Agents: Kelsey B. Berry, Matthew E. Dodge, Jean M. Troiano Kelsey B. Berry Amanda Desrochers Firmino Kaitlynn E. Hart Jean M. Troiano

class of 2008 Class Agents: Nicholas M. Maggio, Arianna N. Puleo Robert A. Borzillo Nicholas E. Caruso George D. Jenkins Nicholas M. Maggio James K. Moore Kyle C. Raynor Alexander I. Slover

class of 2009 Class Agent: open Alex W. Dodge Leanne F. Galletly

James E. Grillo Ellyn C. Moore Molly S. Moran Michael R. Topercer

class of 2010 Class Agent: Merrill Clerkin Emma L. Berry Lucas Caruso Merrill Clerkin Nicholas S. Comosa Andrew George Alexander B. E. Kent Jacob A. Liebert Victoria A. Moore Bryan A. Ross Franklin J. Taylor Carter A. Trent Camille Vecchione

class of 2011 Brian J. Alexander Clayborn W. R. Allen Zachary M. Amero Alexandra D. Andrews Christina M. Baker Grant M. Ballou

Rebecca M. Banoff Marcus Barnes-Reilly Nathan G. Barry Cierra J. Bean Steven W. Berry, Jr. Anthony A. F. Bicchieri Thomas J. Bond Jacob R. Broughton Dane M. Caracino Joung Yun Choi Nathaniel S. Colp Anton Cora Gil Max V. Cormier William S. Davis II Calvin J. Dawson Robert M. Drew Michael R. Driscoll James E. Dunivan Michael S. Durelli India C. Ellis Nicholas B. Enxing Cameron S. Fields Brittany M. Gallagher Daniel A. Gordin Connor J. Gorman Wesley J. Hardman Aaron M. Hendricks

† deceased;  belfry society membership.

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Philip J. Holton Min Gu Jeong Ning Yuan Jiang Reiva J. Keith Junhyung Kim Nam Soo Kim Soo Wan Kim Maclean R. Kirkwood Matthew C. Langadas Alex S. Lederman Byong Jik Lee Chan Lee Brent A. Leighton Dara E. Levitan Seth N. Liebert Qiutong Liu Zhengyi Liu Sarah M. Long Xiao Lu Philip D. Lux Joseph J. MacConnell II Samuel D. Maker Stefano R. Mancini J. Baxter Mattes, Jr. Michael W. McBournie Kevin J. Messier Winslow B. Mohr Lauren J. Myers Christopher M. Organ Trevor A. Paquet Brianna D. Pare Hyun Jae Park Nicholas P. Paulos Justin T. Perino Paul A. T. Piscitelli Susana Planas Lopez Joseph J. Ptasinski Jarod M. Rouleau Taylor M. Sirles Connor S. Slover Travis O. Souza Franklin J. Taylor Meiqi Tian Carter A. Trent Molly A. Tulley Kamron B. Vachiraprasith Michael C. Vollmin Tyler R. Wason Ian A. Weinberg David W. Winking Shihao Xie Xiaohan Yang

class of 2012 Brandon Borghi Mariele Chambers

Alexander N. Enescu Peter Gorman Michael F. Hutchinson Sarah Kaiser Yangjiayi Li Claudia Marti Llado David S. McGrath Scott F. Miller Erin K. Moran Kyra Nathanson Jeffrey B. Sherman Ethan C. Shinn Ju Hwan Suh

class of 2013 Alexandra Berkowitz Jourdan S. Buchler Ha Thanh Bui Katherine T. J. Campbell-Tompkins Briana Cardwell Wenhui Chen Hannah M. Fiore Shoshanah B. Gordon Hayden Huff Caroline M. Kelly Julia Knobloch Kayla E. Kommit Qiumin Liang Emily C. Reardon

class of 2014 Kristina L. Doucette Victoria Fitzgerald Alisha Gilbert Xinyi Hu Si Yun Tang Sheighla E. Wall

current parents Scott and Josephine Adair Stephan Akin and Lyda Akin Robert and Laura Alexander Mercedes R. Amador Jamie and Lara Arsenault  Steven D. Bailer Daniel and Martha Ball Roger and Georgeann Ballou Andrew and Karen Banoff Raymond J. Barnes and John M. Reilly Jeanne C. Baron Elena Barraquer, MD Michael and Jane Barry Elliott Berkowitz and Nancy Phillips Todd and Samantha Bernasconi Aliou B. Boly and Nanette E. Alvey Thomas and Monica Bond

Corina Boulton Mark and Kerri Bouzianis Morgan and Eileen Brady Douglas and Margaret Brenner Karen Bressler and Scott Epstein Benjamin and Rosemary Brewster James and Ilya Broughton D. Ari and Helene Buchler George Buehler Bill and Barbara Burgess Jianqiang Cai and Lirong Tao Kevin and Kerry Calley Jane L. Campbell Deirdre A. Campbell-Tompkins and Elizabeth A. Campbell-Tompkins Anthony and Susan Caracino David Chambers and Michele LeComte-Chambers  Jon and Louisa Chase Sudarshan and Jodi Chatterjee Zhong and Xiuqin Chen Shixue Cheng and Jianqin Zhu Alvin and Valerie Clemens David and Maura Collins David C. Comb and Coleen R. Fitzgibbon Juan Cora Guerreiro and Maria J. Gil Caballero William and Leslie Cormier Robert and Jennifer Culbert Kevin and Susan Cummings Theresa M. Davis David and Nancy Devine Stuart and Diana Disbury Robert and Lisa Drew Terence and Mary Driscoll James and Margaret Dunivan Douglas Dunn and Donna Vance Steven and Patricia Durelli Philip and Heather Eisenmann James and Kathleen Elcock Roger and Patricia Emerson George Enescu Daniel and Denise Enxing Claude and Eleanor Estes Stephen and Priscilla Fay Curtis and Cathy Fields Kirk and Dawn Franklin W. West Frazier and Christine Collins Jeffrey and Jeanne Goley Samuel and Sarah Goos H. Gail Gordon, R.E. Daniel and Beth Gorman Henry Hanlan and Daniele Malo Alan and Donna Hart 

Christian A. Hendricks and Lori A. Nichols Ng Thi Thanh Hien Philip and Jill Holton Xiaobo Hu and Rongyan Sun Scott Huff and Kim Khazei Huff Timothy and Louise Huyck Adama Jalloh Byeong Yong Jang and Kyeong Hee Kim David and Jennifer Kaiser Sumner and Georgia Katz Lawrence and Carolyn Kelly Rebecca and Myron Kibbee Ellen D. Kidd Jin Hong Kim and Young Hee Lee David and Lisa Kirkwood Joseph and Deborah Koenig Tsugio and Motoko Kumagai Chris and Lisa LaSpina Joseph and Susan Leary Andrew and Elizabeth Lederman Jang Keun Lee and Ji Hwan Choi Jeong Woo Lee and Mi Jeong Lee John and Cheryl Legg Bradley and Lynn Leighton Ben and Sharon Levitan Carl and Amy Liebert James G. Lifshutz Christopher T. Little David and Heidi Little Yingjian Liu and Dongquing Xu Timothy and Sheila Long Rich and Linda Lovering Lin Lu and Xu Xuemei Donn and Michele Lux Joseph and Ann MacAndrew Joseph and Heather MacConnell Paul and Joanne Magee ZhiHua Mai and Xuezhen Zhu May M. Maisonneuve Douglas and Tara Maker John and Sarah Mattes Robert and Juliet Mazur David and Bonnie McGrath James and Jennifer McMahon Joseph and Jayne McMenaman Andrew and Jennifer Menke  Sharon F. Merrill Marino James T. Messier and Denise K. Noble James Miller Kathryn W. Miller Mark and Mary Ann Miller Michael and Donna Milofsky Jonathan Mohr and Jan Haskell-Mohr 

† deceased;  belfry society membership.

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F. Myles Moran and Mary Jo Levitsky  Rory and Martha Moulton Deborah Myers Richard and Ellyne Myers Michael and Barbara Nathanson Charles Newell and Kathleen Collins Keith ’ and Lisa Noe  Scott and Colleen Nolan Wanda D. O’Rear Oluwole and Curline Olusola Jeffrey and Melodee Organ Anthony and Linda Paquet Se Kwang Park and Ji Ae Seo Peter and Sandra Penniman Heidi Penziner Will and Lucy Pingree Paul and Deirdre Piscitelli Donna Quinn James Quinn Robert and Robin Rainville Darren and Stacey Redman  Jennifer R. Reed Kathy J. Rhoades-Wright Lynda A. Rideout and John A. Wellman Cynthia and Andrew Roth Michael T. Rouleau and Kimberly L. Brock Rex and Darci Rubin Ralph Schwan and Lori R. Hartglass Michael and Janet Seigle In Jong Seo and Woo Soon Kim Jeffrey S. Shackett ’ Gary and Dianne Sherman Pill Chong Shin and Seung Hae Han Shane and Michele Sirles  Todd and Kimberly Slover Kathleen Smith and Dana Pruitt Scott and Kristi Solman Il Ho and Young Hae Son Hongsup Song and Yoo Jin Chung Barbara Stepanek Jon and Annette Tallarida James and Patricia Taylor  Vincent and Cheryl Tulley Lea S. Tzimoulis Denise Van Dyke Burgess Daniel and Nancy Vautour Ernest and Ann Votolato Charles and Jan Vrana Yao Huang Wang and Hong Yan David and Bonnie Wason Steven W. Weinberg Richard and Dina Weinstein Andrew and Tracy White

Cecile Windels Maureen F. Winking Shuhui Yang and Yanjing Zhao Qing Zhang and Wei Yang

parents of alumni Anonymous Howard and Jean Agid Ronald and Barbara Altman Dennis and Jean Ames Rodney ’ and Nancy Ames Anonymous () Dana and Corinne Arsenault Charles and Deanna Ashing Stephen J. Bandoian Michael and Margaret Barnett  Martin I. Baskin Gary and Kathleen Beban Todd and Samantha Bernasconi Thomas and Jennifer ’ Berry  Jeffrey and Cynthia Black  Kimme Black Robert Borzillo Benjamin and Rosemary Brewster Michael and Mari Brown Paul and Cindy Buck  Gerald and Alice Burke Jere and Sue Burrows Gary and Patricia Caruso  Theodore and Betsy Cetron David Chambers and Michele LeComte-Chambers  George and Elibet ’ Chase  Martha B. Clement Vickie D. Clifford John and Nancy Conkling Carolyn S. Cook William and Deborah Corr Robert and Shelly Coursey Alan B. Crocker Betsy C. Crocker Barry and Maureen Curran Brian and Cindy Dacey Jack and Karen Dailey Thomas and Joyce Dailey Harry and Suzanne Davis Christopher and Pamela Delaney John and Kathryn Delea Earl C. and Beth A. Dodge  Daniel and Lisa Dorian David P. Driscoll ’ Francis and Kelly Driscoll Jill A. Duncan  Elizabeth B. Edwards Lucinda T. Embersits Peter and Ellen Evans 

Norman and Margaret Farwell Nan T. Fay  Gregor and Carol Fellers  Robert and Linda Fox Marc Frader and Janis Hersh Richard and Margaret Frame Richard ’ and Margaret Frame Pauline B. Galletly Peter ’ and Karen Galletly  Robert ’ and Joni Galletly  Grae Garl Jay ’ and Gretchen George Christina M. Gill Russell and Gretchen Gilpatric  Louis and Patricia Gnerre  Jeffrey and Jeanne Goley Cynthia Gordon Mark Gordon Mark and Cynthia Gould Hilda M. Greene Peter and Marion Grillo  Edgar ’ and Barbara Guardenier  David and Jane Gunn Bryna G. Haber Richard and Patricia Hage George M. and Ruth E. Haivanis  Christopher and Kaisa Hall Paul J. Hamel and Cheryl Hamel  Luke and Lynda Haran  Paul and Victoria Harlow Alan and Donna Hart  Dale T. Hart Michael and Judith Hechtkopf Michael and Joan Heffernan Richard ’ and Ann Herring Richard and Helen Hoffman Scott and Donna Horton  Jeffrey R. Huntington  Gary and Sun Ok Irish Peter and Mary Jacobi  William and Mary Beth Jordan William and Sinesia Karol Paul and Nancy Karr Edward and Carolyn Kazar John M. Kelsey and Sally Wilson Thomas and Anastasia Kennedy William and Mary Kietzman Richard and Sidney Killmer Hwan Kyoon Kim and Tae Ae Lee  Andrew and Jayne Klein  Ruthann M. Kline Smith Ken-ichi and Shirley Kondo

Beverley E. Lafferrandre Chess Roger and Jennifer LaRochelle  William and Elaine Leach John and Cheryl Legg Bradley and Lynn Leighton Alan ’ and Elizabeth Levenson  Veronica Lima-DeAngelis  Edward and Ina Loftspring  Rich and Linda Lovering Nicholas and Laura Lynch Wayne and Maria Maggio Robert and Jan Marshall Richard and Melody Martel Frank and Mary Mazza Frank McClelland ’ James and Glenda McFadden Eugene and Deborah McLean  William and Ann McWilliams John and Catherine Meany Edgar Mendelsohn Abigail and Phil Mercer Herbert and Irma Mershon  James Miller Kathryn W. Miller Ann M. Minahan B. Frederick and Rosemary S. Minard Reid P. Mizell Jonathan Mohr and Jan Haskell-Mohr  Annette MontBlanc Andrew ’ and Susannah Moore Dayce and Maura Moore  T. Holmes ’ and Norma Jean Moore  F. Myles Moran and Mary Jo Levitsky James ’ and Gay Morison William C. Morton ’ Daniel and Margaret Moseley  Michael and Margaret Mumma  Seth and Marian Natter  Nestor and Anne Nicholas  Keith ’ and Lisa Noe  Everett and Mary Elizabeth Keith and Dena O’Hara  John and Suzanne O’Toole Terry and Kathryn O’Toole Robert and Marsha Page  Gilbert and Patricia Palmer William ’ and Jeanne Perry Vincent and Patricia Plansky Robert and Christina Pollock  John ’ and Christine Powell Stephen and Virginia Provost Christopher and Gwendolyn Randall Kenneth and Anne Raynor Darren and Stacey Redman 

† deceased;  belfry society membership.

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grandparent fund chairs: george and diane kidd, grandparents of will ’12 and charlie ’14 callif George and Diane Kidd (Will ’ and Charlie Callif ’) stepped into the Grandparent Fund Chair role this year eager to make an impact. And they have done just that. Their outreach to New Hampton School grandparents has made a significant difference. In just one year, total grandparent donors have increased by  percent. “nhs offers an experience that our grandchildren will benefit from for the rest of their lives,” explains George Kidd. “Over the past three years, we have watched our grandson, Will, mature into a selfmotivated young man. And, our younger grandson, Charlie ’, has shown tremendous growth in just one year both academically and athletically. “We have been so happy with our grandsons’ experiences at nhs that we jumped at the chance to once again serve as the Grandparent Fund Chairs. The confidence we have in Head of School Andrew Menke, his talented team, and the opportunities offered to our grandsons, are some of the many reasons we make giving to the nhs Annual Fund a priority.” New Hampton School is deeply grateful for the commitment George and Diane have made to raising awareness about the School and encouraging grandparents to play a role in their grandchild’s experience by participating in the Annual Fund. 

Donald and Dorothy Rockel  Eleanor E. Rogers † Douglas and Alison Ross Joseph and Roberta Santamaria Howard and Geraldine Saturley Timothy and Karen M. Saunders  Alan and Kathy Scalingi Peter J. Schiot Robert and Elizabeth Schreiber Kyu Chong Seo and Young Ja Oh Philip and Iris Seydel Shane and Michele Sirles  Todd and Kimberly Slover Bill and Patsy Smith Frederick and Jane B. Smith  Richard and Lynne Smith  William A. Stirrup  James and Patricia Taylor  Sean and Nancy Teague Thomas and Diane Tessier  Peter and Jessica Thomson  Robert H. Traylor Mark and Pamela Troiano  Chester and Mary Truskowski Ernest and Katherine Tsouros

Lynn H. Wadhams  Gregory and Gina Wagner  Claire M. Walter Whitney ’ and Vicki Ward  Richard J. Wargo David and Debora Webster Richard G. Weinberg Jonathan A. Wiederecht and Nur Kilic Allen and Janet Williams Maureen F. Winking Rudolph and Corliss Wise Stephen and Carol Wishoski Robert and C. Wolcott  Robert S. Wolff Robert and Diane Young

grandparents Susan K. Allen Roy and Maxine Andrews Donald and Jean Arsenault Edward and Philomena Barry Maureen Borghi Joan B. Brewer Robert W. Burgess Marvin and Sera Callif Jacques and Joanne Cartier

Cynthia F. Casner Marilyn J. Comb Robert and Nan Cote Arthur and Barbara Cummings George and Drucilla Dekeon William and Kathleen DeLuca Edward and Lois Mary Diehl  Sylvio and Cecile Dupuis Ellen L. Elcock Elizabeth T. Emerson Pauline B. Galletly Felicia Grant Paul and Priscilla Gray Roger Guthrie, Jr. Gail and Christopher Healey Adrian and Phyllis Hendricks Jonathan and Eleanor Huntington Charles and Elva Hutchinson Robert Kennedy ’  Ann S. Kent George and Diane Kidd Ernest and Marie LeBlanc Warren and Jean Little Stephen A. Mazur Arthur and Alberta McLean John and Jeanne McMahon

Gerald E. McNally, Jr. Jacqueline T. McNally Robert and Evelyn Meservey T. Holmes ’ and Norma Jean Moore  Elizabeth M. Moores Ellsworth and Joyce Morton William and Leigh Mullen Samuel and Gail Murdough Thomas and Florence Murray Melvin J. Myers J. Philip ’ and Patricia O’Hara  Joseph and Nancy Orosz Carleton and Joan Penn Claire D. Perrier Joseph and Marie Piscitelli Anthony and Barbara Pluhar Joseph and Sheila Rosenblatt Pat and Irene Santaniello Maxine H. Schick Patricia A. Simeone Frederick Smith Jr. ’ Frederick and Jane B. Smith Kenneth and Barbara Tomaro Joyce Trevor W. Donald and Dannie Vance

† deceased;  belfry society membership.

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100% faculty and staff participation in 2010–11 annual fund For the first time in New Hampton School history,  percent of faculty and staff supported the School with a donation. There is no stronger endorsement of the School than the collective voices of our dedicated faculty and staff. This year’s success stems directly from the hard work of our tremendous Faculty and Staff Fund volunteers: Johnny Buck, Kathleen Howe P’, Maureen Huber, Mel Martel P’, Cory McClure, and Matt Wright. Their enthusiasm was contagious campus-wide, and led to the results they have been working to achieve for several years. New Hampton School faculty and staff, the heart and soul of our community, have raised the bar for participation and should be a model for all to follow. We salute our faculty and staff for their unwavering support of all areas of school life. Faculty and staff support sends a strong message of confidence and enthusiasm for the future of our school and its students. 

Rob and Coranell Womack Charles and June Woodland

faculty and staff Justin Anderson Sheryl Anderson  Jamie Arsenault  Lara Arsenault  Margaret Barnett  Arthur Barron Charlotte Barron Dana Bates Bradley Bennett Holly Bennett  Jennifer Shackett Berry ’  Kirk Beswick Rebecca L. Borry Rosemary Brewster Leia Bridgham Emanuel Brito Meredith Brown Russell Brummer Cindy Buck  Johnny Buck Paul Buck  Suzanne Buck Scott Bugbee Jessica P. Carpenter ’ Nora Cascadden Craig E. Churchill

Sandy Colhoun  Daniel Corey  Robert Coursey Cathy Creany  Jerrica Crowder Sara Lin Crowley Britney Cullinan John Cullinan David Dath William Deacon Patrick DeBenedictis  Sarah DeBenedictis  Cheryl DeFosses Donna Dionne Beth Dodge  Jennifer Dostie Rachelle Doucette Jill Duncan  Marty Elkins Paul Elkins Steven Fariole Katerina Farr-Williams  Priscilla Fay Stephen T. Fay Jo E. Fendley Matthew Fisk Peg Frame Morganne Freeborn Stephen Freeborn Justin Freeman 

Sandy Gates Gretchen Gilpatric  Louis Gnerre  Bartolo Governanti ’ Gina Graciano Elizabeth Grosart  Ann Hall Tina Hazelton Kathleen Howe Keith A. Hrasky Maureen Huber  Peter F. Hutchins, Jr. ’ Justin Joslin Rebekka Joslin Jessica Kang ’ Kenneth J. Kozens Eric LaCroix  Maura Lane Maurice Laroche Veronica Lima-DeAngelis  Christopher Little David LoPresti Daniel Love Margaret MacDonald Timothy Maki Melody Martel Florence Martin  Amy Mathison  Jeremy Mathison  Jenna McCabe

Ryann McCann Cory McClure Destiny McClure Joseph McClure Kristin McClure Eric McCollom William McCulloch Melissa McGee Jennifer McMahon Andrew Menke  Rene Metzler  Hans Mundahl  Sarah Mundahl  Andrew Nagy Shawn Ouellette David Perfield  Alfredas Petkus ’ William H. Philpot Christina M. Pollock Gwen Randall  Darren Redman  Stacey Redman  Donna Risteen Kelvin Rose Rita Rose Joseph Sampson  Jon Shackett Neal Shartar  Martha Shepp Stephen Stafford 

† deceased;  belfry society membership.

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thank you! The many successes we celebrate would not be possible without our generous family of donors. In the past year, with your support, we topped $1 million in the Annual Fund, we secured the $100,000 “We’re All In Challenge,” faculty and staff participation hit 100 percent, and we moved ever closer to our $30.6 million GO BEYOND Campaign goal. We are deeply appreciative for the countless alumni, parents, faculty and staff, grandparents, friends and many others who support New Hampton School each year through gifts of time, treasure, and talent. These pages demonstrate the commitment of the entire community to securing the New Hampton School experience for future generations. Because you gave, New Hampton School has never been stronger. Your donation to nhs helped us surpass our fundraissandy colhoun and daughter eloise ing goals and we are extremely proud to share the State of School Report with you this year. The 2010–11 State of the School Report recognizes gifts received by New Hampton School during the fiscal year July 1, 2010–June 30, 2011. In an effort to recognize each contributor and provide a comprehensive account of every gift, credit is given to all supporters of New Hampton School’s fundraising efforts. Corrections or questions should be addressed to Sandy Colhoun, Director of Development, New Hampton School, 70 Main Street, New Hampton, NH 03256; 603-677-3413; scolhoun@newhampton.org. On behalf of the entire nhs community, thank you for your generosity! The financial totals reported herein represent unaudited figures and may differ slightly from the final audited reports of the school. Every effort has been made to ensure their accuracy for publication in this report prior to the official audit.

Carol Stazinski  Donald Stevens  Theodore Stiles  Brian J. Sullivan Joseph Susi Pamela Susi Julie Tallman William Thayer  Kyle Tufts Adam Tyson  Sara Tyson  Craig Untiet Chieko Vilas Gina Wagner  Erin J. O’Toole ’ James Walsh Kathleen Whitcher

Erica Willingham Amy Wilson Matthew Wright Tyler York Zachary Zimmerman

friends Anonymous Rolf and Carla Ball Martin and Ellie Black Edgar M. Bronfman Irene A. Chandler Patricia R. Colhoun Ann M. Cote Jason Fruithandler Benjamin M. Greene Alan Haas

Phyllis S. Hamblet Devin Haran Charles W. Howard II  Shelli Kimmel Micah Liben Alfred and Ellen Link Sally S. Morse  Stephen H. Paneyko Donna Phillips Aaron Platt Charlotte Provost Dana Raucher Shirley H. Robinson Shelley Rothman and Family Jack, Sarah, David & Lev Silverstein Regina B. St. Clair † Harriet Warshaw

corporations and foundations Anonymous The Arnold Baggins Foundation, Inc. ayco Charitable Foundation Barking Cat Productions Communications Design  BoDeans Cone Company BoDeans Wafer Company Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation  Ciao Pasta Restaurant Conneston Construction, Inc.  The A. Haigh Cundey Foundation The Denver Foundation Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund  Granite United Way

† deceased;  belfry society membership.

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Green Monster Sports The Lola B. Grillo Foundation  The Paul and Cheryl Hamel Family Foundation The Samuel P. Hunt Foundation The Kempner Family Foundation The Lifshutz Foundation The Koenig Family Charitable Foundation The McIninch Foundation Mobile Giving Foundation National Philanthropic Trust Pollock Land Planning, llc The Rathmell Family Foundation The Schwab Charitable Fund The Irving and Bernice Singer Family Foundation The Patricia M. and H. William Smith, Jr. Foundation  The Snave Foundation Starbucks Coffee Company Tanger Outlet Center target  Tiedemann-Bevs Industries Tilt’n Diner The Traylor Charitable Fund Tyler, Simms & St. Sauveur, P.C.  The Vrana Family Foundation The Weinberg Family Foundation

matching gift companies Abbott Fund Matching Grant Plan Bank of America Matching Gifts Program The Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation ExxonMobil Foundation, Inc. Follett Corporation Matching Gifts Program  The GE Foundation  Invest In Others Charitable Foundation John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Medtronic Foundation Morgan Stanley Matching Gifts Program Spectra Energy Turner Investment Partners Vanguard Group

gifts-in-kind David Abraham Stephan Akin and Lyda Akin Clay Dingman, Barking Cat Productions Communications Design Thomas and Jennifer ’ Berry Brandon Borghi Arthur and Rebecca Borry Mark and Kerri Bouzianis Benjamin and Rosemary Brewster Meredith Brown Jane L. Campbell Deirdre A. Campbell-Tompkins and Elizabeth A. Campbell-Tompkins Nora Cascadden Ciao Pasta Restaurant Robert and Shelly Coursey Cathy Creany and Cary Gordon Patrick and Sarah DeBenedictis Cheryl DeFosses Donna M. Dionne Paul and Marty Elkins Roger and Patricia Emerson Stephen and Priscilla Fay Gina Graciano Green Monster Sports Paul J. Hamel and Cheryl Hamel Benjamin R. Huntington Jeffrey R. Huntington Jin Hong Kim and Young Hee Lee Robert R. LaPointe Andrew and Elizabeth Lederman Bradley and Lynn Leighton Carl and Amy Liebert Veronica Lima-DeAngelis and Michael DeAngelis David and Alison LoPresti Rich and Linda Lovering Frank McClelland ’ Joseph and Kristin McClure Eric McCollom and Kristie Gonzalez Andrew and Jennifer Menke David and Lisa ’ Perfield Paul and Deirdre Piscitelli Pleasant View Gardens Joseph and Roberta Santamaria R. Jon Shackett Kathleen Smith and Dana Pruitt Scott and Kristi Solman Starbucks Coffee Company Julie Tallman and Mike Avery Tanger Outlet Center Tilt’n Diner Scott D. Tkachuk Lea S. Tzimoulis

memorial gift: 1961 deceased class members r r r r r r

Robert D. Allard ’ James O. Bovaird ’ Daniel F. Dullea ’ Gary S. Ebbels ’ Richard N. Foster ’ David M. Golin ’

Gregory and Gina Wagner West Shore Marine Matthew and Erin Wright Tyler York

memorial gifts Guy Alang-Ntang ’ Thomas S. Doyle ’ Donald Ellis Richard Wright “Buck” Ellison, Teacher and Soldier Clarice Althea Gnerre Donald Greene ’ William P. Hamblet ’ Ryan Haran ’ S.L. Kirloskar Dennis Merrill ’ Denise Natter ’ Pierre Provost ’ Hugh Spitzer ’ William P. Straw ’ George Walker ’ Jim Ward ’

honorary gifts Andrew Altman ’ Sarojini Amin Justin Anderson Christina Baker ’ John Bamman ’ Dana Bates Jennifer Shackett Berry ’ Ray Boly ’ Manny Brito Russ Brummer Johnny Buck Craig Churchill Alitia Cross’s ’ marriage to Jerry Pleasant Veronica Lima DeAngelis Patrick DeBenedictis Sarah DeBenedictis Marty Elkins Steve Fay

r r r r r r

Jonathan D. Harger ’ Jacob R. Henderson ’ Jeffrey P. King ’ John G. Morrow, Jr. ’ Donald A. Stine ’ William D. Stirrup ’

Jonathan Frader ’ Peg Frame Justin Freeman Lou Gnerre Beth Grosart Barbara Guardenier Luke and Lynda Haran Pete Hutchins ’ KJ Kozens Chan Lee ’ Dan Love Ryann McCann T. Holmes ’ and Norma Jean Moore New Hampton School NHS Girls’ Varsity Soccer J. Philip O’Hara ’ Kate F. O’Hara ’ for her Reunion Freddy Petkus ’ Joe Sampson Jon Shackett Kathleen Smith Max Smith ’ Michael Tamposi ’ Molly Tulley ’ Adam Tyson Gina Wagner Mack Willingham ’ Amy Wilson Sue Winters Matt Wright

1821 society Irving T. Bartlett Jr. ’ † Peter J. Bergen ’ † Thomas H. Berry and Jennifer S. Berry ’, P’,’,’ George W. Bierlin ’ and Ellen B. Bierlin William D. Blake ’ † Mildred S. Braley † Arthur M. Brink, Jr. ’ Wallace C. Butterfield ’ † and Eleanor L. Butterfield † Richard A. Cascio ’ †

† deceased;  belfry society membership.

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1821 society The strength of New Hampton School’s future endowment depends in large part upon the foresight and support of those alumni, parents, and friends who have chosen to include the school in their estate plans. The 1821 Society serves to acknowledge their confidence and vision. Members of the New Hampton community who have established bequests, life income gifts and charitable trusts for the ultimate benefit of the school recognize the value of a New Hampton School education and their responsibility to help preserve the opportunity for future generations. New Hampton School is most appreciative of the generous commitment made to preserving the School’s future by the Society’s current members. We encourage others to join those honored here who recognize the value of sharing their legacy. By indicating your intentions to remember New Hampton School in your estate plans, you earn membership in the 1821 Society. If you have New Hampton School in your estate plans and have not notified the School or would like more information in doing so, please contact Sandy Colhoun, Director of Development at 603-677-3413; scolhoun@newhampton.org.

Helen J. Chandler Cornelius † and Mary Dekker P’ † Preston N. Eames Alice M. Ebbels P’ † Charles Fields  † and Ora M. Fields  † Richard D. and Marilyn † Frame P’, GP’, GP’ Peter W. Galletly ’ and Karen Galletly P’ M. David Giardino ’ William H. Gunther ’ Charles H. Gurnett ’ † Robert R. Gurnett ’ † William A. Hazard ’ † and Genevieve Hazard

David Heald ’ † and Jane Heald P’, ’ Charles M. Hines ’ Rockwell Holman ’ and Irene T. Holman Martin H. Howell, Jr. ’ † Robert E. Irish ’ † Samantha M. Jewett, Esq. Theodore A. Jones ’ Donald C. Jordan ’ Robert A. Jungst ’ George M. Kendall P’ † Robert D. Kennedy ’ and Sally † Kennedy GP’ D. Bruce Marshall ’

the ellen brown and george woolsey bierlin trust and the mr. and mrs. william edwin bierlin, sr. trust Once again this year, the income from the Mr. and Mrs. William Edwin, Sr. Trust and the Ellen Brown and George Woolsey Bierlin Trust was designated for professional development for New Hampton School faculty teaching courses within the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program (IB) in accordance with IB requirements. The School remains deeply grateful to the Ellen Brown and George Woolsey Bierlin and the Mr. and Mrs. William Edwin Bierlin, Sr. Trusts for their support of the School’s commitment to provide a globally relevant curriculum.

Helena M. Milne ’ † and Douglas M. Milne † Rodman S. Moeller ’ and Dorothy B. Moeller F. Maurice Morrill † Kenneth R. Norris ’ † Leonore Lane Paneyko P’ † Robert L. Pascucci ’ Preston Perlman ’ † Robert A. Phillips ’ † and Donna Phillips Jason M. Pilalas ’ and Rena Pilalas Rodney F. Poland, Jr. ’ † George P. Ponte ’ Frances A. Richardson † George S. Robinson, Jr. ’ James Rogers † and Eleanor E. Rogers P’ † in memory of their son, John F. Rogers ’ Howard and Geraldine Saturley P’,’,’

Stephen W. Schultz ’ and Romey Stuckart Alfred B. Small ’ † Dexter N. Smith ’ † Kenneth L. Snow ’ Robert I. St. Clair ’ † and Regina B. St. Clair † Thomas and Diane Tessier P’ John L. Threshie ’ and Elizabeth Threshie Anthony K. Van Riper ’ † Martha Bartlett Walker P’ Albert L. Watson ’ † Robert-Grant Wealleans ’ and Lori Wealleans Leslie Weed ’ † and Alice H. Weed †

† deceased.

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The 1821 Society

Introducing the NHS Family of Funds at New Hampton School

Unveil the power of your participation!

When you participate in the Annual Fund, you may

designate your donation to underwrite the area of New Hampton School that is most important to you. Annual Fund donations support financial aid, faculty and staff salaries, the upkeep of our beautiful buildings and grounds, athletic teams that wear the Husky green with pride, talented artists, and our signature academic programs that help to distinguish the New Hampton School experience.

International Baccalaureate Program (IB)/Global Initiatives: encourages international mindedness and emphasizes development of the whole student—physically, intellectually, emotionally, and ethically.

Experiential Learning: creates meaningful environments in which authentic learning occurs beyond the classroom setting.

Athletics: strives for excellence by providing opportunities for physical, emotional, and intellectual growth in each of our student-athletes at all levels of competition.

Faculty and Staff Professional Development: allows faculty members to develop and collaborate professionally within their field of expertise.

Visual and Performing Arts: offers students opportunities for selfawareness, self-expression, and artistic growth in a safe environment that promotes both skill development and personal character.

Residential Life: supports a healthy and rich living experience for boarding students, making them feel at home and part of a family.

Financial Aid: provides access to a New Hampton School education for the most talented and deserving youth.

Technology: offers cutting-edge tools and necessary skills critical to learning in the 21st century and beyond.

Academic Support Program (ASP): helps students build confidence in learning through skill development, providing greater awareness of themselves as learners.

General Annual Fund: choosing to not designate your donation allows New Hampton School to use your gift where the need is greatest.

Robert D. Kennedy ’50 A New Hampton School Education Is Priceless hen Robert D. Kennedy arrived at New Hampton School in

dence in our Head of School Andrew Menke and in the strategic planning

1947, the country was just emerging from World War II. New

process that is pointing toward a curriculum that meets the challenges

Hampton had a small cadre of veterans on campus who had

of the twenty-first century. New Hampton School is entering a very excit-

returned to finish high school, and their presence on campus was intim-

ing period, and I hope my estate gift might inspire other alumni, parents,

idating. “NHS had some lingering WWII veterans in the School,” Kennedy

and friends.”

explains. “The football team played college freshmen. The JV played

“Bob Kennedy is one of New Hampton’s most steadfast friends and

Holderness and Proctor. The big thing was to try out for football, and that

supporters,” says Head of School Andrew Menke. “His superior business

took a certain amount of courage. My goal was to make the starting team.

acumen, great love for his alma mater, remarkable generosity, and ener-

I weighed only 160 pounds.”

gy have already helped the School in so many ways. We are very grateful

Not only did Kennedy make the starting team, he played four years

for his extraordinary gift.” 

of football before matriculating to Cornell. Kennedy, of New Canaan, Connecticut, went on to become the CEO of the Union Carbide Corporation. He played football, basketball, and baseball for New Hampton and served as vice president of the senior class. And, he has made a major commitment to benefit New Hampton School is his estate plan. Bob’s devotion to the School has never waned during more than twenty years as a school trustee. “It’s been my privilege to see the School improve in so many areas over the years,” he says. “I have great confi-

 The New Hampton School 1821 Society

Give Today. Impact Tomorrow. Scan this QR code or go to www.newhampton.org/giving

recognizes alumni, parents, and friends of the School who choose to include New Hampton School in their estate plans. If you are interested in being a part of the 1821 Society, please contact Sandy Colhoun, Director of Development; scolhoun@newhampton.org; 603-677-3413.

For more information, please contact: Sarah DeBenedictis, Director of Annual Giving 603-677-3415; sdebenedictis@newhampton.org

New Hampton School Fall 2011 Hamptonia magazine. Flat size is 11.0 inches tall by 17.31 inches wide (includes 0.31 inches for perfect-bound spine); folded size is 11.0 inches tall by 8.50 inches wide. Artwork prints in four-color process and bleeds all four sides. Cover artwork; Cover II and Cover III.


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new hampton school

nonprofit us postage

new hampton, nh 03256-4243 www.newhampton.org

New Hampton School has launched its new web site. Please visit www.newhampton.org and learn more about your school.

hamptonia the magazine of new hampton school fall 2011

PAID lewiston, me permit no. 82

Hamptonia

the magazine of new hampton school fall 2011

fred smith ’45, usn

Honoring Our Veterans page 28 inside

Scan this QR code to go there now:

Lou Gnerre Celebration Commencement 2011 Reunion 2011

New Hampton School Fall 2011 Hamptonia magazine. Flat size is 11.0 inches tall by 17.31 inches wide (includes 0.31 inches for perfect-bound spine); folded size is 11.0 inches tall by 8.50 inches wide. Artwork prints in four-color process and bleeds all four sides. Cover artwork; Cover IV and Cover I.


Hamptonia Fall 2011