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H A M P T O N I A the magazine of new hampton school / annual report

fall 2008, volume 124, number 2

celebrating service t. holmes moore receives the granite state award


excerpts from the 1914 summer announcement for new hampton literary institution and commercial college, the forerunner of today’s new hampton school.

Back in the day, you sewed your own team logo onto your uni-

The Annual Fund is one of New Hampton School’s most

form, in addition to supplying everything else but the game

important sources of unrestricted income. It directly supports

deld. Today, New Hampton School athletes can focus on the

the people and programs at New Hampton School, from faculty

game itself, thanks in part to the Annual Fund.

salaries to dnancial aid, athletic equipment to course materials.

While tuition represents a good portion of our annual budget,

The Annual Fund helps keep the school healthy and operating.

it does not cover the entire cost of a New Hampton School edu-

No matter what size, every gift to the Annual Fund makes a

cation. Additional funding, including contributions to the Annual

real difference to the school. Each contribution goes directly to

Fund, is used to supplement tuition so that we can meet our

funding the necessities. Thanks to your support and the support

annual commitments.

of other Hamptonians, no needle and thread are required.

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sdebenedictis@newhampton.org.

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H A M P T O N I A fall 2008

advisory board Jamie Arsenault Cindy Buck P’01, ’05 Sandy Colhoun Alan Crocker P’04, ’07 Andrew Menke Peter Miller P’09 contributors Jamie Arsenault Cindy Buck Lou Gnerre Andrew Menke Peter Miller Sara Karz Reid, PhD Martha Shepp C. J. Willingham designer Clay Dingman, Barking Cat Productions Communications Design

volume 124, number 2

welcome

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Letter from the Editor and Letters to the Editor

heads up

3

Service: at the Heart of NHS Andrew Menke

in brief

5

Campus Happenings

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School Calendar

1000 words

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International Day 2008 Jake Lee ’09

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Service Learning Connects Students with Communities Peter Miller

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Spotlight on Alumni: Eric Buer ’84; Annette Baker Doolin ’86; Richard Eisenberg ’71; Walter R. Peterson ’42 Martha Shepp and Peter Miller

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Ms. Joyce’s Opus Charlene Joyce Willingham

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Faculty Q & A: Steve Fay and Kristen Reimold

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Global Curriculum Coordinator: Dan Love

26

Excavating Petra Sara Karz Reid, PhD

strategic plan update

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New Hampton School’s Strategic Planning Process Hans Mundahl

commencement 2008

30

Pictorial

reunion 2008

32

Pictorial

husky sports

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Some Winter and Spring Sports Highlights Jamie Arsenault

lou’s corner

38

Column from Lou Gnerre

class notes

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Class Notes

52

In Memoriam

trustees

56

Board Transition

gift report

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Annual Report 2007–08

focus on service

photographers Dakema Besemer Sandy Colhoun Clay Dingman Mark Fox Richard Hartmier John Hession Library of Congress Peter Miller NEAT Photos RayAllyn Photography Sara Karz Reid J. Reiter Jennifer Rocco-Runnion P’08 J. D. Sloane Dennis Welsh Amy Wilson printer Penmor Lithographers © 2008 New Hampton School www.newhampton.org Hamptonia is printed on stock of which a minimum of 50 percent is made of recycled >bers and a minimum of 15 percent is made from postconsumer >ber. on the cover: T. Holmes Moore. Photograph by John Hession, courtesy of Plymouth State University.


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detail from map of belknap county, new hampshire, circa 1860, from the library of congress

editor Peter Miller, Director of Communications alumni office staff Sandy Colhoun, Director of Development Cindy Buck, Director of Alumni and Parent Relations Sarah DeBenedictis, Director of Annual Giving Louis Gnerre, Alumni Ambassador Jerrica Gray, Gifts Administrator and Planned Giving Assistant Ryann McCann, Administrative Assistant David Per>eld, Development O;cer

New Hampshire storyteller Willem Lange — who ostensibly makes his living as a contractor — typically concludes his yarns by sighing theatrically, “I’ve got to get back to work.” I >nd myself thinking of him when the action outside my window becomes just too distracting. Spending too much time in the o;ce isn’t usually an option in my job, because I need to know what’s going on. There’s action in the McEvoy Theater, the Smith Gymnasium, and in the classrooms that I have to see >rst-hand to really “get.” This isn’t the case, however, with what is by far this year’s biggest story. I keep daily tabs on the new Math-Science Center construction site while seated comfortably at my desk. Concrete, rebar, steel, welding — you name it, it’s all on display right outside my Meservey Hall window. Sometimes the minutes disappear as I discover the intricacies of modern construction methods, while my desk shakes and the air >lls with the sounds and occasional aroma of my fast-growing neighbor. The close proximity has made it easy to document the project, and I encourage you to visit www.newhampton.org/Math-Science for a selection of regularly updated photo galleries. You’ll be impressed at the progress that’s taking place outside my window. To be honest, sometimes I have to pull down the shade to concentrate on another project. Sigh… – Peter Miller, Editor, Hamptonia

Pamela Susi, Assistant Director of Annual Giving hamptonia is published twice

l e t t e r s t o t he e di t o r

a year by New Hampton School. The magazine reports news of the school, its students, teachers, and alumni. We welcome submissions for publication, news from and about alumni, and letters in response to articles.

t. h. was ahead of his time Thank you for printing my lengthy class note about Headmaster Moore’s enlightened handling of the student with epilepsy. This was an issue that wasn’t talked about in the late >fties, but T. H. had the wisdom to introduce the topic in a straightforward manner, and this education proved as valuable as any that I received. T. H. was de>nitely ahead of his time back then, and still is now.

Inquiries, comments, and letters may be directed to Hamptonia, New Hampton School,

George S. Robinson, Jr. ’61 Chester Springs, PA

70 Main Street, New Hampton, New Hampshire 03256. Or, call 603.677.3417 or e-mail pmiller@newhampton.org. New Hampton School does not discriminate on the basis of sex,

i know what it takes The magazine looks great! It’s very lively with lots of color, strong images, and short interesting pieces. Job very well done! I know what it takes to put a magazine together, and it’s a wonderful creative process but it sure takes a lot of energy!

race, color, creed, national or ethnic origin in administration of its admissions and educational

Kimberly Swick Slover P’08 Wilmot Flat, NH

policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school administered activities.

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(Editor’s Note: Ms. Slover is director of communications at ColbySawyer College and formerly served as editor of the award-winning UNH Magazine.)


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h eads up

andrew menke

habitat for humanity students nail down a roof.

service: at the heart of nhs For decades New Hampton School graduates have bene>ted from a student-centered, relationship-based, holistic, educational community, and service has been at the very heart of that experience. Here on campus we often re?ect upon the responsibility that accompanies the privilege of inclusion in our special learning community, working to build the ethos and the expectation that students will, as Emerson described in his oft quoted de>nition of success…leave the world a bit better…whether by a healthy child, a garden patch, or a redeemed social condition… It is a moral imperative that our students recognize the fundamental role of service in a healthy community and a functioning democracy. The world is now far more interconnected, interreliant, and interdependent than at any time in human history. We need to prepare graduates for a life of partnership and contribution, one in which students understand that bipartisan, cooperative engagement serves both the individual and collective. When a culture is driven by service to others a community can attain amazing continuity and cohesiveness. NHS students and alumni make service a central theme in their lives each and every day. To celebrate service, we dedicate this issue of Hamptonia to share a few stories of those who sel?essly “give back” in so many compelling ways. From Ryan Janvrin ’08, who traveled to Ethiopia in the summer of 2007 to support an orphanage in Addis Ababa, to Lt. Col Eric Buer ’84, who returned to campus this spring to share his experiences serving as a helicopter pilot during two tours of duty in Iraq, to Governor Walter Peterson ’42, who has served New Hampshire’s citizens and their educational community through a lifetime of dedi-

by Andrew Menke

cation, New Hampton School alumni are impacting the world in consequential ways. The Strategic Plan for 2008–13, enclosed with the spring Hamptonia, rea;rms our historic commitment to student growth through transformational experiences. As we begin to shape a more globally relevant curriculum, we are also focused on the local application of knowledge in ways that will improve the communities in which we live. In central New Hampshire, midtown Manhattan, New Delhi, or Shanghai, our communities need more caretakers — more hearts and hands as we transition to a healthier place for humanity. So it is here in the Lakes Region that we ask students to learn the commitment and value of service, a lesson that has been inculcated on campus for decades stretching back to the days of Fred Smith ’10 and Bud Moore ’38. Intellectual preparation is nothing if we fail to condition character to care about our fellow man. A National Commission of Service Learning report issued in 2002, Learning in Deed: The Power of Service Learning in American Schools, analyzed the results of proactively engaging students in meaningful service projects. “By providing opportunities for students to become active, positive contributors to society, service learning helps them to develop a sense of civic and social responsibility.” The report went on to con>rm what we already know about service: “At the same time, students are able to acquire an ethic of caring and community connectedness.” We acknowledge the individuality of our students through the Service Leaning Program as we do in so many other learning environments. The program’s faculty coordinators research, develop, and

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heads up oversee dozens of service experiences emphasizing both intellectual and physical engagement. Some o=er individual opportunities while others emphasize group contributions. Students work in a variety of settings, from our campus to the far corners of the state and country, to international locales. Whether it’s the urbanite wielding an axe and pry bar to build mountain trails, the soup kitchen volunteer who has never personally experienced hunger, or a Habitat for Humanity group nailing down roofs and framing for the very >rst time, students receive more than a well-rounded education in exchange for their open minds and helping hands. They receive the gift of humble altruism — a gift that they take with them wherever they go. Those with special interests are encouraged to suggest their own projects and faculty work closely with students to ensure that educational content guidelines are met. “At its best, a service-learning experience can be transformative,” noted Dr. Judith A. Ramaley of the National Science Foundation in the Learning in Deed report. “If we want our students to lead creative, productive and responsible lives, we must give them opportunities to learn in ways that have consequences for others, as well as for themselves. I know of no better way to invoke the many facets of cognitive development, moral reasoning, and social responsibility than to engage students in service learning opportunities.” This Hamptonia illustrates the spectrum of service activities that our students are actively engaged in on our campus and beyond. As you will see in the alumni pro>les and the faculty Q&A, service is more than just an obligation — it is a way of life that helps to de>ne the very best in our school culture. I hope these articles resonate and perhaps inspire you. We invite you to share your own story about how service impacted your life after New Hampton School. Yours in service,

Andrew Menke, Head of School

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t. h. “bud” moore: a model of service for nhs and the wider community New Hampton School’s Service Learning Program has long been blessed with an extraordinary example of public service and contribution. Headmaster Emeritus T. H. “Bud” Moore ’38, together with his wife, Norma Jean “Jinga” Moore, have demonstrated the tremendous good that can be accomplished in lives devoted to education and public service. In May, Bud received the Granite State Award from Plymouth State University as part of its commencement ceremony, in recognition of his outstanding academic, professional, and civic achievements on behalf of New Hampshire’s citizenry. True to form he also made a signi>cant contribution on the very same day, delivering a candid and inspirational address to the undergraduates. His long list of achievements encompasses a wide spectrum of community interests and needs: four decades of service to NHS (and continued service on the board of trustees); work on behalf of the New Hampshire Music Festival, the New Hampton Community Church, the GordonNash Library, the Mayhew Progam for at-risk boys; service as New Hampton’s town moderator and on important town committees; moderator for the Newfound Area School District; president of the New Hampshire Public Television’s (NHPTV) Public Broadcasting Council, and president of NHPTV’s board of governors. These are among the many positions of responsibility that he accepted and discharged with his characteristic gusto and competence. Plymouth State University President Sara Jayne Steen summed it up when she pointed out how Moore’s lifetime of dedication gave him a unique and valued perspective in addressing the PSU Class of 2008. “Bud Moore has devoted his life to transforming others’ lives and making New Hampshire a better place to live, learn, and work,” she said. “He is a distinguished leader and a man of major accomplishment.” Service to others has long been at the core of Bud Moore’s remarkable life, and has been a foundation for generations of NHS faculty, sta=, and students. All members of the NHS community have been bene>ciaries of his generosity. Q


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in brief

above: Howard Frank Mosher, awardwinning author of this summer’s reading text, Stranger in the Kingdom, provided the keynote address at Convocation on Sunday, September 7. at right: (L-R) Rene Metzler, Husky Green Council member and dance teacher; Carol Brooks, the teacher who inspired Dr. Grimm onto his career path (Brooks launched NHS’s environmental science program in the 1970s); Dr. Grimm; and Bekka Joslin, science teacher and school sustainability coordinator.

award-winning author howard frank mosher to keynote convocation A Stranger in the Kingdom by award-winning Howard Frank Mosher was this summer’s reading text. The novel is set in rural, northern Vermont during the 1950s, and the young narrator relates the history and pastoral beauty of >ctional Kingdom County (a thinly-disguised reference to the Green Mountain State’s “Northeast Kingdom” region) and his town’s decision to hire its >rst black minister. Mosher describes the characteristics of New England, the joys and struggles of the times, and the hopes of a better humanity. With this selection Head of School Andrew Menke announced the theme of “acceptance” as the central precept to be explored during the 2008–09 academic year. NHS will make use of community and dormitory meetings as well as academic class time to pursue discussions of acceptance to support the wider school curricula. To help celebrate the reading of A Stranger in the Kingdom, Howard Mosher was the keynote speaker at Convocation on September 7. You are invited to join the conversation about A Stranger in the Kingdom at www.nhssummerreading.blogspot.com. Q sustainability science authority (and nhs alum) leads campus conversation Dr. Kurt Grimm ’78 returned to NHS in August to lead a conversation with faculty and sta= on sustainability. Grimm, an interdisciplinary earth scientist from the University of British Columbia, is also

a self-described “grateful NHS alumnus” and a passionate advocate for authentic and practical sustainability. Grimm’s thought-provoking presentation united the reality of climatic surprises with food security, in an invitation to artful, skillful bioregional lifestyles. He and the faculty considered: What is sustainability? Is it simply a rebranding of environmentalism? (No). Is it a verb? (Yes). Is it an invitation to discover and implement authentic abundance in our individual and community lives? (YES!). Grimm was joined on campus by his former NHS teacher, Carol Brooks, who founded NHS’s environmental science program in the 1970s. Q chinese added to world language offerings Ni hao! (Hello!) Conversational Chinese for Beginners will be o=ered this year as a new foreign language option, in accordance with the Strategic Plan goal of connecting the NHS community to an increasingly global world. The course will teach real life and daily usage of the o;cial Chinese language spoken in the People’s Republic of China (PRC), basic Chinese writing techniques, and Chinese culture. Students will also learn the phonetic system and how to pronounce Chinese characters with correct tones. The course will be taught by Ying Xia Peterson, a native of the PRC and a trained translator and interpreter. Prior to immigrating to the United States in 1986, she worked as a general beat reporter for the Nan Fang Daily in Guangzhou. She received her MA degree in journal-

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clockwise, from top left: Photo includes several teams sponsored by Mark and Pam Troiano P’07 and includes alumni Mike Close ’96 (far left), Paul Altmeyer ’80 (front row, third from left), Jean Troiano ’07 (front row, second from right), and Matt Dodge ’07 (front row, far right); Britney Cullinan, Stacey Redman, Jen Berry ’83, and Jo Goodwin; John Buck, Shaun Carroll ’55, Suzanne Buck, and Jamie Arsenault; foursome includes Warner Nickerson ’02 (second from left) and Brian McLaughlin ’99 (far right).

ism from Northeastern University and her BA degree in English from He Bei University. She is ?uent in Mandarin and Cantonese. Mrs. Peterson will be assisted by English Teacher Beth Grosart. Q math-science center groundbreaking, web page On April 11, the school community gathered to o;cially break ground on the new Math-Science Center. Head of School Andrew Menke and Chairman of the Board Jason Pilalas ’58 shared re?ections of Randall Hall and ceremoniously acknowledged the start of a state-of-the-art facility, which will dramatically enhance these important curricular o=erings for our students and faculty. The building will be an outstanding learning environment that will support today’s classroom technologies and learning styles, and it will dramatically improve available resources for study and inquiry. While Randall Hall, or “The Brick” no longer stands on campus, the rich heritage and lifelong memories of the building endure. With hard hats on and shovels of soil to cast aside, the groundbreaking signaled the beginning of the next exciting chapter in the life of New Hampton School. Plans call for the building to be completed in time for fall 2009 classes. You can keep informed of the construction progress through

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a dedicated Web page, www.newhampton.org/Math-Science, which features regularly updated news and images. Q nhs runs the boston marathon Alumni and faculty alike from New Hampton School participated in the 2008 Boston Marathon on Monday, April 21. Faculty members James Duval, David Perfield, and Jennifer McMahon were among the athletes who competed. Alumni participants included Samantha Brann ’96 and Lisa Falconi ’01, who both participated as part of a Running Boston for a Cure team representing the Dana Farber Cancer Center. Tamara Milne ’98 also participated in this year’s marathon. If you ran in this year’s marathon and/or are planning to participate next year, please contact Director of Alumni Relations Cindy Buck at 603.677.3414; cbuck@newhampton.org, so you can be added to the roster of NHS friends who are participating in this impressive event. Q nhs golf classic This year’s NHS Golf Classic was held on June 1 at Lochmere Golf Club in Tilton, NH, with a full slate of players including alumni,


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in brief

top: Men’s alumni hockey game participants, February 2008. Former faculty Mark Tilton and Harrison Golden appear in the top row, third from right and far right, respectively. bottom: A Korean cultural landmark; Sandy Colhoun and Helen Clary (bottom row, center) with Korean host families.

current parents, parents of alumni, and friends of the school. A shotgun start at 8:45 am went o= without a hitch and the weather could not have been more perfect for a round of golf, with sunshine and a mild breeze to keep the black ?ies at bay. Third place overall was the team from NHS Golf Classic sponsor, Conneston Construction Co., Inc. (Je= and Jackie Downing, Ed Ambrose, and John Bownes). Second place was awarded to a reunion class team from 1968: Rusty Nordstrom, Lee Stevenson, Lansing Deane, and Larry Garland. First place went to Tim O’Brien, Mike Close ’96, James Sullivan, and Andrew Burns. Many thanks to all who supported this year’s golf classic. Q nhs and waterville valley academy to partner on alpine racing program New Hampton School and Waterville Valley Academy (WVA) are teaming up to provide a new joint alpine ski program run by the WVA alpine coaching sta=, with NHS Head J1/J2 Alpine Coach Jason Guilbert serving as NHS Joint Alpine Program director. In contrast with most other prep school o=erings, the partnership will enable NHS alpine athletes to take advantage of an intensive “academy school approach”

coupled with superior on-snow and dryland conditioning opportunities. They will also bene>t from fully-sta=ed competition schedules up to seven days a week during the winter months. The joint program will o=er o=-season opportunities for WVA’s summer and fall dryland and aquatic conditioning programs in Waterville Valley along with on snow programs in Hintertux, Austria; La Parva, Chile; and Copper Mountain, CO. NHS Athletic Director Jamie Arsenault noted, “WVA’s alpine program provides the depth to sta= ratio and the customized competition schedules demanded of elite FIS level J1/J2 athletes.” The two schools have already partnered to serve elite snowsports athletes in the freestyle arena. Former NHS and WVA freestyle aerialist Dylan Ferguson ’06 is now on the U.S. Freestyle Team on the World Cup tour, and current New Hampton School and WVA student-athlete Allie Lee ’08 is a current member of the U.S. Freestyle Team. Q boston gatherings: museum of science and bruins night Forty New Hampton School alumni, parents, and friends gathered in the Boston Museum of Science’s beautiful Skyline Room on April 3 for a festive reception and dinner. Head of School Andrew Menke updated the

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above: (L-R) Caitlin Andrews ’01 with friend, and Ti=any Killeen ’02, before attending the Boston Bruins game on January 24.

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nhs to host powderkeg competition in november Last November, a long-standing tradition was revived between New Hampton School and historic rival Tilton School. The Powderkeg competition took place at Tilton and a close contest throughout the day ended with the home team’s victory in football and the right to retain the Powderkeg trophy for the next year. It is New Hampton School’s turn now, as we host the competition on Saturday, November 8. Games and lunch begin at 11:30 am and all are welcome. Mark your calendar now and bring your Husky pride back to campus to help the school community cheer on its athletes in football, soccer, >eld hockey, and cross country. It is time to give up the Powderkeg, Tilton! Q

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audience on the groundbreaking for the school’s new Math-Science Center. “It is an exciting time to be a part of New Hampton School,” Andrew explained. The evening’s activities were rounded out with one of the latest IMAX >lms, The Grand Canyon: A River at Risk. Fifty alumni, parents, and friends attended the NHS Night at the Boston Bruins on January 24. A pre-game reception was held at The Harp, in close proximity to the TD BankNorth Garden. Guests enjoyed beverages and delicious hors d’oeuvres while visiting with the guest of the evening, former headmaster, teacher, and coach, Lou Gnerre, who traveled to Boston for a mini-reunion with many of his former students. The group then watched the home team defeat the New York Islanders, in a victory for the Bruins and for NHS camaraderie! Many thanks to Matthew Gulley ’01 for his assistance in procuring tickets for his alma mater. Q

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Design Your Own Husky Apparel Our new and improved online campus store lets you choose

the color and screen printing,

and you can even order embroidery

of the

school seal. Our shirt, caps, jackets, and other items

are brand-name quality, and the

store also features accessories, alums and grads,

gifts for

and much more.

Visit http://store.newenglandapparel.com/newhampton, or call 603.677.3464 to show your Husky pride — in style!


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scho o l cal endar new hampton school upcoming events 2008–09 September 7 Convocation

December 2 Classes Resume

March 14 Spring Break Begins at noon

September 8 First Semester Classes Begin

December 18 Holiday Dinner and Community Meeting

March 17 Florida Reception, Palm Beach

September 20 Homecoming/Hall of Fame Induction

December 19 Winter Break begins at noon

March 19 Florida Reception, Naples

September 26 Cape Cod Reception, hosted by Barbara and Earl Lewis ’62

January 6 Classes Resume

March 31 Classes Resume

January 22–24 Board of Trustees Meetings

April 7 Alumni/Parent Phonathon

January 29 NHS at the Boston Bruins

April 17 Music Concert

January 31 Winter Carnival

April 23–25 Board of Trustees Meetings

February 5 Mid Winter Weekend begins at noon

May 1 Dance Performance

February 10 Classes Resume

May 2 Prom

February 12 Alumni/Parent Phonathon

May 8 Arts Day

November 6–8 Fall Theatre Production

February 20–21 Family Weekend; Winter Theatre Production

May 8–10 Spring Theatre Production

November 8 Powderkeg at New Hampton School

February 21 Class of 2010 College Day

November 11 Fall Sports Awards

February 22 Third Annual Alumni Men’s Hockey Game

November 13 Washington, DC, Reception Old Ebbitt Grille

February 27–28 Student-Produced Theatre Production

October 3 Grandparents Day October 9–11 Parents Weekend October 11 Long Weekend/NHS Closed October 15 Classes Resume October 22–24 Board of Trustees Meetings October 28 Alumni/Parent Phonathon

November 18 Alumni/Parent Phonathon November 21 Thanksgiving Break begins at noon

March 6–7 Dance Performance March 10 Winter Sports Awards

May 12 Alumni/Parent Phonathon May 19 Spring Sports Awards May 21 Baccalaureate May 22 Commencement May 29–31 Reunion Weekend May 31 NHS Golf Classic

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korean students demonstrated a captivating fan dance.

international day 2008 In 2007–08, international students at New Hampton School represented four continents and nine nations, and made up 15 percent of the student body. While our numbers are relatively small, we work hard to share our culture with American students who may never have traveled abroad. When NHS students head out into the wider world, they will encounter even more cultural diversity than they experienced here. In order to share a deeper cultural appreciation for each of the countries we come from, NHS holds an International Day every spring. This year I planned the celebration with my good friend Terrance Kim ’09. We began organizing the food, dancing, and exhibitions in February and it was a lot of work, however, it was a great experience. All of the international students sweated over the details, but in the end everybody enjoyed watching each others’ performances and tasting food from all the di=erent nations. International Day means a great deal to both international and American students. In that sense, International Day is a service to the NHS community. This event shares how international students,

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by Jake Lee ’09

without giving up their own culture, adapt to the culture that they live in. Living in this school may be hard for some international students as they study thousands of miles away from home, but International Day is our opportunity to share our culture and identity. American students had new insights into the lives of international students and gained new respect for their life experiences. International students come from di=erent countries and cultures, but all came together with the same purpose for International Day. As both international and American students laughed, clapped, and ate food from other nations, there was a great sense of unity on this little campus, sharing things that we care about. ! New Hampton School infuses international experience throughout the intellectual and social life of the campus. International Day is among the guest presentations; celebrations of native culture; and mini-classes on language, history, and heritage that are sponsored during the year.


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ryan janvrin ’08 (at left) journeyed to ethiopia for his senior leadership project.

service learning connects students with communities Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q

by peter miller

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yan Janvrin ’08 wanted to do more than just visit Ethiopia, he wanted to make a diVerence. He traveled with his family halfway around the world last year to the impoverished, East African nation to adopt his baby sister, Zion. For some teenagers that would be enough, but Ryan wondered how he could make a bigger contribution. A thinker, Ryan was concerned about the other children in the orphanage. New Hampton School’s Service Learning Program gave him a framework for taking action and becoming a “doer” as well. The program has played this essential role for thousands of nhs students over the decades. Ryan’s service project was remarkable for its international focus, but not for the motivation to help others that prompted it. Service, whether near or far, has long been an important part of the New Hampton School experience. “New Hampton School’s Service Learning Program is strong and vital,” said Director of Service Learning Rosemary Brewster P’08. “I am

proud of the great work our students and faculty do, each serving at least twenty-four hours over the course of the school year. It’s a wonderful opportunity for us to work together in diVerent settings with the goal of helping others.” Faculty members Betsy Finer and Sue Winters are staV coordinators for the program. “Service Learning at nhs is solidly connected to our mission of preparing students to contribute both locally and globally,” said Finer. “Our team’s challenge is to provide students the most genuine service opportunities possible within given logistical parameters.” The Service Learning Program more typically connects students with nhs’s neighboring communities. Morgan Donovan ’09 teaches local elementary school students to conquer their fears by climbing high, one rung at a time up New Hampton School’s alpine tower. Her energetic cheerleading and coaching of youngsters beneWts both the school and regional communities, and her pride in the youngsters’ accomplishments is unmistakable.

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l-r: Service Learning Program sta= Sue Winters, Director Rosemary Brewster, and Betsy Finer.

The tower stands Wfty feet tall, and it must seem like much more to children. Despite the distance, bravery can conquer fear. “There was a girl who climbed one time and made it halfway up, then came back down,” Donovan related. “She was crying and afraid. But by the end of the day, she bucked up and just went for it. “She didn’t have to make it to the top; she just branched out,” Morgan said with a big smile and a slow nodding of her head. “She did what she wanted, which was great.” Morgan has helped with the “Community Connections–Adventure Clinic” program for the past two spring terms as part of the school’s yearly community service requirement. nhs views service as a learning opportunity, but for Donovan and her excited class of climbers it’s more like a gift to be shared. Rosemary Brewster commented, “Service is a win-win commitment—in the process we learn a great deal about others and ourselves as we leave our own needs behind and focus on giving. Many local organizations and families count on our assistance and value the interactions with our students and faculty; the connections made are important for everyone.” Service is woven into the school’s fabric, and the program is characterized by progressively increasing stages of responsibility. Service is introduced to Wrst-year students and followed in

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subsequent years with more ownership and closer interaction with served communities and individuals. Seniors conceive and implement signiWcant Service Learning Projects as capstone experiences, like the trip Ryan Janvrin took to Africa. Janvrin shared the discoveries that he made during his journey overseas with the school community as part of his Senior Leadership Project (SLP). The following narrative is taken from a Web site that he created (http://seniorleadershipproject.blogspot.com), which also includes a slide show about his trip. “In August of 2007 I began collecting items for an orphanage in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. I collected $500 in cash and approximately $2000 worth of diapers, wipes, diaper ointment, formula, and clothing. In December 2007 I packed twelve extra large army duZe bags to take to Ethiopia. During my stay I spent several hours playing with the orphans and learning about what life is like for children in Ethiopia who don’t have families.” Back on the nhs campus there is also a Daily Jobs Program, which charges students with contributing to the health and welfare of the campus through activities such as recycling. Activities and partnerships with local organizations enable students to contribute in a multitude of ways. The range of activities is broad and the school’s commitment is deep.

nhs students share their expertise with local peers in activities as diverse as theater, sports, and outdoor education programs. Other projects have included volunteering at animal shelters, soup kitchens, schools, hospitals, and day care and senior centers; assisting victims of family violence; outdoor work on nature trails and Habitat for Humanity projects; and eVorts that have aided orphanages, military service personnel and veterans, and the homeless. Students participated in over thirty diVerent types of service projects in 2007–08. Students in the New Hampton Fire Department’s Explorers Program received medical training and pulled night shifts at the Wrehouse; one student, Alex Thrower ’09, trained as an emt and went out on emergency calls. Students in the “Animal Saviors” program walked dogs and cleaned stalls at a local animal shelter. “Kids love playing with animals,” said Hans Mundahl, who helped direct the service program last year, “and they are indirectly helping the animals to Wnd homes.” Community service students annually spring clean at Camp Mayhew, a boys camp on Newfound Lake for disadvantaged children, and at Bolduc Park, a public facility on the Gilford-Laconia line. Students also helped to forge a nature trail for the Slim Baker Natural Area in Bristol. In the classroom, the nhs faculty integrates service learning into its curricula. Photography students document the various community service projects for later display, and health students partner with the American Red Cross to run the school’s on-campus blood drive. The most recent blood drive set a record for donations with a total of Wfty-six usable pints collected, thanks to the contributions of faculty, staV, students, and members of the local community who came to campus to “give the gift of life.” The drive has been running strong for eight consecutive years. Health Teacher Sara Tyson noted, “It is a great opportunity for the kids to experience a level of service that has such farreaching impact. The drive is also a great way to merge our New Hampton community with the larger world.” That’s the essence of the Service Learning Program. S


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left: Michael Topercer ’08 wields the caulking gun. above: This year’s Habitat trip helped build homes in Texas.

habitat for humanity: building homes and teamwork skills in florida and texas New Hampton School’s Community Service Program is a reXection of the school’s broad spectrum of interactions with diverse audiences. Students can contribute to worthwhile eVorts on campus or within walking distance, or in the case of Habitat for Humanity International (hfhi) they can join a worldwide cause whose number of beneWciaries tops one million. The stereotypical fun in the sun spring break trip might not conjure images of sacriWce and hard work, but that’s the reality of nhs’s Habitat program. Students forego sandy beaches for hot and tiring construction work, which more often than not changes the lives of both those who serve and those being aided. Habitat’s goals are as altruistic as they are ambitious. The organization works to eliminate poverty housing and homelessness from the world and to make decent shelter a matter of conscience and action. The organization has mobilized volunteers in more than 3,000 communities to improve the lives of strangers, brick by brick and roof by roof. Student crews are usually college-age, which is a testament to the maturity of New Hampton’s volunteers. “They work hard and get a lot out of it but they deWnitely have a lot of fun,” said nhs

Tutor and Women’s Hockey Coach Kerry Maher, who has participated in several trips. “What’s great is that it’s a random group of people who might not have been friends before who come together as a group.” Students are taught basic carpentry skills needed to put together modest homes, including rooWng, painting, and caulking, and they serve as laborers. These practical skills are combined with the pitching in that’s needed to perform as part of a team that includes nhs students and faculty, an onsite building foreman, and members of the family whose home is under construction. Maher has observed how getting to know the family can be a powerful aspect of the experience. “Students see Wrsthand how being a part of something like this can change a person’s life.” New Hampton School’s recent Habitat trips have included between Wfteen and twenty students and four faculty members. Students raise funds during the year to cover their travel expenses prior to spending four days during spring break at the Habitat building site. Daily reXection journals capture discoveries and epiphanies. The journals indicate the evolution of student perceptions. “I feel as though it’s necessary to give to those who

are less fortunate than me (even though they) are working just as hard,” explained Kayla DiBari ’08 in one of her Wrst entries. Later in the trip, she expressed a wish to contribute as much as possible. “I feel like when I do something productive like nailing the roof or helping with the windows it makes more of a diVerence than just picking up scraps. But being able to give a family less fortunate than I a home to live in and raise their kids in is a satisfying experience.” The Habitat program’s impact has been shared with the wider school community. The trip fulWlls community service obligations, or in the case of seniors like DiBari it can be the focus of their Senior Leadership Projects. (She recorded last year’s trip to Bryan, TX, in a PowerPoint presentation that was viewed by her peers and teachers.) During 2006–07, the students’ Habitat contributions were acknowledged in person when a Florida Habitat homeowner made a special trip to the nhs campus. The woman expressed her gratitude and explained how meaningful this help was to her life, thanking the students involved and singing their praises to the rest of the school community. Fun in the sun? It just doesn’t measure up. S

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left: Mike Fagan ’08 in the McEvoy Theater. right: (L-R) Danny Frias ’11, Katina Athanas ’08, and teacher Jen McMahon.

service takes center stage Some service activities take place quietly without much fanfare, while others are literally in the spotlight. James “Mike” Fagan ’08 combined his love of theater, his technical prowess, and many hours of hard work in his service contributions. Mike received the 2008 Blake Sampson Theatre Award in recognition of his mastery of the McEvoy Theater’s technologies while serving as the man behind the curtain for all manner of productions. He also earned the Silver Presidential Service Award for his many hours of contributions to the school. He served as designer, technician, light board and sound board operator, builder, running crew member, and a stage manager for both student-produced and mainstage productions. While the light and sound team never gets top billing, Fagan still knows the value of his work. “All the [school] meetings that we have, it’s taken for granted by a lot of people. You have to know the equipment and know how to make what’s going on look good on stage.” Fagan’s Senior Leadership Project took place in his native Ohio for the Cincinnati Young People’s Theater. He was one of a dozen technicians for Anything Goes, which featured 100 children.

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The Cincinnati technical director, Denny Reed, said, “Mike helped a lot with sound and he actually ran and teched the show, which had nine performances. He did well.” This fall Mike will begin a major in lighting design at Wright State University. His special interest is in intelligent lighting, the astonishing, computer-driven designs that inspire oohs and aahs at rock concerts and on cruise ships.

“food for all” program, ashland, nh Since 1992, the Booster Club on Ashland’s Main Street has hosted free community meals for anyone in need of a hot meal. nhs students regularly serve food, clean up, and put away chairs and tables for needy “guests” from area towns. Food for All is co-directed by two New Hampton residents, Linda Folsom and Elena Worrall, who have been “really impressed” with nhs students and their interactions with attendees. Folsom added, “The students are wonderful and polite and we are so thrilled to have them.” Service by nhs faculty is also acknowledged and appreciated. Worrall said, “The guests are just people in the community, and some really need that meal. We treat them all as valuable and worthy

people. It’s good for the kids to see that there are people in need, not only from a food perspective but also from a social perspective.” Betsy Finer, who helps coordinate the visits, identiWed one of the key reasons for the activity’s popularity: “It’s about food! There’s great satisfaction in the simple and direct act of serving food to those in need of it.” Service activities don’t always produce a high level of recognition; in some cases the providers never learn the outcome of their eVorts. Finer noted, “Food for All is an ideal activity because it fulWlls an identiWed need and the cause and eVect is immediate. We hope that all will eventually acquire an ability to give their time and eVorts towards needs where the results may be more delayed.” nhs has supported the Food for All Program in other ways, contributing over $1,000 a few years ago through a “Wheels for Meals” bicycle fundraiser. The program receives no government assistance and is operated entirely by contributions, which are gratefully accepted. For more information, please contact Linda Folsom or Elena Worrall at 603.279.0972. S


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Morgan Donovan ’09 and Gretchen Dancewicz-Helmers, a twelve-year-old alpine tower enthusiast from Hill, NH.

climbing high on burleigh mountain’s alpine tower One of the most distinctive features of the nhs landscape is the Wfty-foot alpine tower, which rises amid a clearing on the school’s 300-acre Burleigh Mountain property. The tower is a focal point for the school’s “Community Connections–Adventure Clinic,” one of several free oVerings that build athletic and outdoor skills in area youth in grades K-6. Director of Experiential Education Hans Mundahl runs the tower program with the help of students like Morgan Donovan ’09, who performed community service for the clinic as a sophomore and junior and will continue this year for her Senior Leadership Project. “It’s great to have a student who is involved for a longer period of time,” said Mundahl. “We consistently drew ten to Wfteen participants and a lot of it had to do with her.” He explained, “Morgan has an incredible amount of positive energy, and she encourages and mentors. Little kids ask, ‘Is Morgan going to be there?’ and Morgan asks about them as well.”

Relationships make all the diVerence when unforeseen situations pop up, such as this winter’s record-setting snowfall. “We couldn’t really start the program when we wanted to during the Wrst week of April,” recalled Mundahl, “but it didn’t stop the fun. Morgan was out sledding and playing tag with the eight-year-olds. Two weeks later there was still too much snow to climb, but the kids came back anyway to run and play with her.” Donovan knows that it takes lots of conWdence-building to get kids up that tall tower. “We play games Wrst so they are warmed up and excited. We train them to stand on the tower and to step oV, not jump, then Mr. Mundahl talks about the harness. After we get the harness on and they learn the commands about going up the tower, they can climb if they want.” Donovan will typically belay Wrst to encourage the youngsters. “I don’t pressure them,” she said. “I tell them if you’ve been up before, even partway, just try to get up to the next rung.” Satisfaction comes from seeing children conquer their fears while mastering climb-

ing procedures. “I get to watch kids grow before my eyes and accomplish something that not a lot of people can do at that age,” said Donovan. “I’m helping them climb by being their support and anchor.” “Service motivates me,” she continued. “I love seeing how the kids are enjoying the tower the way I enjoyed learning rock climbing when I was younger.” The Community Connections program lives up to its name according to Dawn Shimberg, who has driven her daughter, Rose, age ten, twenty miles down from Campton, NH, for the past four years. “I really love the fact that it’s reached out to so many area towns,” she said. “The program gives children a super, far-reaching sense beyond just their own little communities.” The Shimbergs didn’t know what to expect when they Wrst heard of the “adventure” program, but it appealed to them nonetheless. Rose took to the alpine tower immediately and has shared her excitement with many friends, including her Girl Scout troop that climbed en masse. Ms. Shimberg praised Mundahl for his leadership, and she singled out the high school students for their friendly and helpful ways. “Little kids are sometimes intimidated by older kids,” she said, “so it’s really nice that this is breaking down some of those misconceptions.” The younger and older students bond not only through triumphs, but also through shared adversity. Ms. Shimberg believes that the “rain or shine” program fosters a “we can do it!” attitude in children, since everyone gives it their all even if it’s pouring or the black Xies are raging. For her part, Rose oVered a Wfth-grader’s highest compliments: “It’s fun and it’s very cool.” S For information on this year’s Community Connections programs, please contact Betsy Finer at 603.677.3522;bWner@newhampton.org.

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lieutenant colonel eric buer ’84, usmc

Serving the Nation, in the Air and at the Pentagon Lieutenant Colonel Eric Buer’s ’84 Marine Corps service has taken him to Africa, the Middle East, Europe, and coast-to-coast stateside. He’s piloted attack helicopters, commanded, and earned three master’s degrees on a Xight path to high-echelon responsibility at the Pentagon. Along the way he’s accumulated more than 3,500 Xight hours and made 370 combat missions, risking his life many times. His contributions have been recognized with numerous medals, most notably the Distinguished Flying Cross for Valor. Eric credited New Hampton School for his sense of service, accountability, teamwork, and involvement—all critical to his success in one of the most demanding careers imaginable. “Flying attack helicopters, that’s what I do," he said simply. He was commissioned in 1988 and quickly deployed to Iraq in Desert Storm, to Somalia, and the former Yugoslavia. In 2003, he deployed with Task Force Tarawa, positioned in Kuwait in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. “The Wrst night of the war I was leading Xights across the border," Buer recounted. He ultimately went around Baghdad and to

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Tikrit, or in this marine’s cheerful parlance, “the lovely home of Saddam." Buer calmly described the tremendous stresses of his work. In 2004–05, he was based in Al Anbar province between the Xashpoint cities of Fallujah and Ramadi. His command of 400 included pilots and air crew, maintenance and healthcare workers, and administrative and logistics specialists. The ah-1w SuperCobras of Buer’s missions were supported by both uh-1n “Hueys" and Army Black Hawk helicopters, both well suited for casualty evacuation missions. “We brought casualties either to Baghdad or Balad, to big ‘casf’ hospitals." (“Contingency Aeromedical Staging Facility," formerly “m *a* s * h" units.) “These are very high tempo ops, working on fourteen-hour shifts. But one thing you never want to do is pretend that you’re working harder than anyone else. There are fundamental laws you have to follow, which is to serve the ground guys. That’s who our customers are, that’s why we exist." His war service was followed by another posting to war college. He’s modest about his outstanding academic record (bachelor’s in economics from Ohio Wesleyan; mba from La Salle, and master’s degrees in military studies and strategic studies from the Marine Corps Command and StaV College and the War College). It’s clear, however, that his intellect has been the ticket to his current, “great, great job." Buer reports to Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of StaV Admiral Michael Mullin as part of the J-7 Joint StaV, which oversees Operational Plans and Joint Force Development. (“J-7” refers to the Joint Chiefs of StaV’s seven directorates; J-1 is Personnel, J-2 is Intelligence, etc.) “In layman’s terms," Buer said easily, “J-7 writes war plans. We are the ‘integrators;’ we help the services get together for joint training. I run joint doctrine, which is the institutional wisdom of the military. “Doctrine," he continued, “isn’t really a ‘how to’ book; it’s a ‘what’ book." His work also involves nato policy, requiring travel to Athens and Brussels. He smiled playfully, “That part’s pretty good." New Hampshire has long been a family pivot point. Eric’s California family had a second

home locally, and now he also owns Lake Winnipesaukee property. Back at nhs for a recent visit, the years melt. “Buildings and faces change, but that same feeling is still here. It’s refreshing," he said, looking over the campus where he once played soccer, lacrosse, and hockey and ran cross country. Buer had a well-rounded nhs experience, serving in student government and receiving encouragement from Athletic Director Peter Gulick and History Teacher Larry Lougee, among others. It was in the realm of service, though, where the school’s impact was greatest. “Absolutely," he declared. “My sense of community and service, it all started here." As a student he visited the Golden View Health Care Center, an assisted-living facility in Meredith, NH, and participated in fall clean-ups and other activities that reinforced assisting others. Camaraderie was another part of those formative years. Buer observed, “When you come to New Hampton as a freshman you have to play sports, where teamwork is a requirement. Being in the military is the ultimate team sport." Stepping up and being held responsible are also rooted in nhs soil. “New Hampton School is such a close community, so you’re accountable for everything," he said. Buer’s family includes wife Jennifer and children Katherine (14), Cassandra (12), Eric (9), and Caroline (6). “I tell them, I learned the most incredible study habits at nhs. Because you went to school six days a week you had to manage your time, and from eight to ten o’clock at night you were studying no matter what." These habits impressed college roommates. “Eight to ten pm, I’d sit at my desk with books. It really held me in great stead." Great study habits, personal bravery and drive, and a deep commitment to serve have elevated Buer into the ranks of the nation’s military leadership. Just entering his prime, he will undoubtedly make even greater contributions to his country in the years to come. Q – Peter Miller


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Annette cannot say enough about the good of community service programs like New Hampton School's: “The more young people see of diVerent life experiences, the less likely they will be to judge others, and the more likely they will be able to feel true empathy."

annette baker doolin ’86 Empathy: Pass It On The deep honeyed voice of lawyer Annette Baker Doolin ’86 alternates between fervor and compassion as she describes her family, her career, and her belief in humanitarian service. Helping clients with adoption, divorce, child custody, visitation and support, guardianship of a minor, and all other aspects of family law are the breadth and depth of her Beverly, MA, solo law Wrm. nhs prepared Annette to be a learner and problem-solver. She describes her time here as “character building." She was deeply aVected by the pervasive sense of kindness, understanding, and empathy in the school community and believes that these traits made her a good judge of character, something she uses every day in her practice. She was not always so focused. Not until her mid-twenties did Annette consider furthering herself academically. She attended a two-year community college in Rochester, NY, and then went on to receive her bachelor's degree, magna cum laude, from the University of Rochester. From there it was on to SuVolk University Law School for her JD degree. It was through volunteer work while at the University of Rochester that Annette discovered her passion for domestic violence victim advocacy. As a result of seeing true victims of

domestic violence, “I harbor very strong feelings about people who lie and use the system to their own advantage." Annette entered the legal profession Wve years ago on her own terms; as a single mom, she knew she needed Xexibility, so she started her own Wrm. She has dedicated 10 to 20 percent of her work to pro bono domestic violence victim cases. The most gratifying aspect of the family law work is to reach out to men, especially those who may have been wrongly accused or are unfairly served with restraining orders. “The more I practice, the more my heart goes out. I let people know that it will get better beyond the crisis they are in. I tell them to leave it here with me at the oYce—the grief—and go take care of themselves…get a garden going, adopt a pet, spend time with friends, get out walking or exercising." In the long run, many have come back to see her, happy and transformed, and this is one of her rewards as well. Not too long ago, as she was speaking with a new client in her oYce, Annette mentioned the beautiful weather outside, sighing, “What a perfect day. Wouldn't this be a great day to have class outside? I attended a high school in New Hampshire where we would do that." “I know just what you mean," he replied. The conversation continued, and recounting the unexpected joy of realizing that her client was another

nhs alum makes her eVervesce with laughter. Annette cannot say enough about the good of community service programs like New Hampton School's. “Students need to get outside of their own bubble. To be put in situations you could never imagine will either cause you to be empathetic or to judge. The more young people see of diVerent life experiences, the less likely they will be to judge others, and the more likely they will be able to feel true empathy." Kindness and generosity oVer profound moments of shared humanity, she believes. And if you are not wired that way, she would most likely say: you must learn. “It's not a cookie cutter world out there." Annette's family includes seven children ranging in age from seven to Wfteen. She brought her daughter Rachel along when visiting nhs one summer day a few years back. She recalls a previous visit, for her twentieth reunion, when she wandered into Albee's (now known as the New Hampton Country Store). A longtime employee rushed at her from behind the counter. “Annette Baker, I have been worrying about you for twenty years!" “No need to worry, not at all! I am Wne, I've been just Wne!" Annette reassured her. Indeed, no worries at all. Q – Martha Shepp, – Assistant Director of Communications

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richard eisenberg ’71 Rich Eisenberg’s Floating Classroom The Bayfront Center for Marine Studies (www.bayfrontcenter.org) is not a traditional sailing school. Based on the shores of Lake Erie in Pennsylvania, the center is the brainchild of New Hampton School alumnus Rich Eisenberg ’71. Born from a passion for boats and boat-building, the organization is part school and part service organization. “Sailing itself is the least of what we teach," Eisenberg says. “We teach teamwork, having fun, self-reliance, problem solving, and eVective communication. Hopefully a beginner’s sail is tame and calm, but it can quickly turn into a bigeyed, white-knuckle kind of adventure. When that happens, the kids learn fast about problemsolving and thinking on their feet." Over 10,000 students have built eighty-two boats here in the ten years since bcms’s launch. Projects range from the Six-Hour Canoe to the indigenous Erie Boat, a twenty-nine-foot sailing and Wshing vessel. Groups include the National Honor Society, autistic children, scouts, adjudicated kids, and alternative education groups. Rich said unequivocally that the true product at bcms is not the boats, but the kids. “Can you imagine building a boat if you were blind?" Rich Eisenberg described one of the spe-

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cial groups that recently came to the center. His tone immediately quiets, adding, “One of these kids lost his eyesight in Iraq; he’s only twenty." Never dampened more than momentarily though, his voice rises again. The man’s enthusiasm for his work and the love he has for bringing life-changing opportunities to youth infuses all that he does and says. When Rich left nhs in 1971 for Allegheny College, he didn’t really know his focus. He took time oV midstream and worked in his hometown boatyard. Side by side with veteran boat builders in their very upper years, he gained skills, and most importantly, truly learned how to work. After graduating from Allegheny, he and his future wife Amy headed for the coast of northern California. Seven years later they moved to “the wet jungle side" of Maui, where he worked primarily in commercial construction, staying for eleven years until son Ivan was born. Parenthood brought a profound perspective shift for Rich. He became immersed with team sports, birthdays, and playgroups, and realized just how much he loved working with kids. The year 1994 found the young family back in his hometown, Erie, PA. Ivan wanted to play ice hockey. His dad puzzles over how that came about, “Must’ve been the Mighty Ducks movies. Go Wgure!" Rich was an enthusiastic sports dad, though, and happy to help out as assistant

coach. “I was collecting sticks and pucks, organizing things, and tying a lot of skates," he recollected. His enthusiasm spread to other sports that he had no experience with as well, like T-ball and soccer. It was during one of his school sport endeavors in 1995 that a locker room conversation birthed bcms. “This coach spoke passionately of the need for a connection to the bay here in Erie." It touched a nerve. The pair became partners and started the nonproWt in a temporary shack with no running water, but a great yard for building. Years of lobbying resulted in state funding for the beautiful, 14,000-sq ft. facility they are now housed in. All kinds of groups come, including adjudicated youth from all over the state. “Once they step on board, I love watching the transformation of swaggering juveniles full of attitude back into kids again. One hour ago they were sure there was no use for any of this, and then they’re using the gps, orienting a chart, making calculations in their heads; algebra! And they get the adventure aspect!" Rich is convinced that for kids, service gives perspective. “When you’re young you don’t have any way to see what you have and appreciate it." This hearkens back to his days at nhs and what he calls “full-circle mentoring." Mentoring from New Hampton School teachers gave Rich “enough freedom to do what we needed to do, and enough guidance to be safe." This encouragement led to nhs’s rock climbing program, initiated by Rich and friends. He also learned to adapt. A swimmer, Rich learned to play other sports at nhs. “We had no TVs (no reception anyway!), no music channels, no computers—and yet we were never bored. When kids today say the ‘bored’ word, I say to them, ‘The world is so rich! Find something you’re interested in and go for it!’" And he means what he says. Q – Martha Shepp


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I take the most pride in public service. I developed an ability and understanding of how people work together, of how they can set goals that bring everyone into a sense of community, making agreements in broad terms. The remaining diVerences then become manageable. F gov. walter r. peterson ’42

governor walter r. peterson ’42

Leader of Men During his time at Columbia University as a naval oYcer in training for World War II, Walter Peterson ’42 met with the commandant as part of a review process that every cadet had to undergo. “What do you have to say for yourself?” bellowed the commandant. Peterson found himself replying from the Wrm depths of his yet unproven self, “I understand the service of leadership and believe I know how to lead.” He later learned from a lieutenant that the commandant strongly believed in Peterson and declared, “He'll be a great oYcer one day.” Walter Peterson’s words would be prophetic. At 85, Peterson remains a chipper, one-time basketball-star, a dreamer, and a jazz fan who is reluctant to toot his own horn. Best known as one of New Hampshire’s strongest governors—believing in small government, a balanced budget, strong businesses, and strong personal rights—the four years of 1969–73 were only a small part of his remarkable life. Peterson also served the state as Speaker of the House, president of Franklin Pierce College, interim president of the University of New Hampshire, Peterborough town moderator, and Republican Party chairman for Hillsborough County. He spent twenty-two years in the family’s real estate business

in Peterborough, where he has lived most of his life with Dorothy, his wife and lifelong, wise advisor. Public service has so deWned Mr. Peterson that a complimentary moniker, “He’s a Walter Peterson Republican," is applied to politicians who exemplify the true nature of equanimity. “Of all the things I’ve done in life, I take the most pride in public service. I developed an ability and understanding of how people work together, of how they can set goals that bring everyone into a sense of community, making agreements in broad terms. The remaining differences then become manageable." Peterson was born in Nashua, NH, the eldest of two children in a service-minded entrepreneurial family. It was Walter’s mother who modeled a service ethic. She was a very determined person; a Red Cross volunteer, involved in local drama productions, a member of the Nashua Good Cheer Society, and with Walter’s dad, a big game hunter. And she believed in Walter. She was also intensely interested in justice and treating people fairly. He probably inherited her sense of drama as well, which “helped out quite a bit in politics." His dad was “an imaginative salesperson," masterful at putting unlikely things together—and displaying fair employer practices in his many successful business ventures—that weren’t lost on his sons. He was ranked near the bottom of his public high school class. Gov. Peterson said with no guise whatsoever, “It is good training to be underestimated. It’s something I was quite used to and actually, an asset." In his junior year, Headmaster Fred Smith came calling on the Peterson family, and Walter was soon enrolled. He was well-liked; classmates nominated him for class oYcer and he was a team sports player, but academics were still an issue. “I

was what you call a dreamer, or add, by today’s terms. I would listen in class, but then my attention would drift oV on this and that tangent." The governor’s bumpy New Hampton ride included an expulsion and re-admittance as a postgraduate, experiences that he calls invaluable. “I took a long time to grow up. Some teachers saw that I was worth the eVort…Lance Bicknell, and coaches John Shields and Bill White. I also got the feeling that Fred Smith liked me from the start. It makes a diVerence to know that you’ve got support, despite your screw-ups!" At six-foot-two, his dreams were of pro basketball. “I was a ‘tweener,’ half-decent but not big enough or quick enough to make the team." Coach White recommended him for football. “Our team was not the greatest…" Peterson chuckled, but he played guard and learned life lessons in psyching out opponents, catching them oV guard with the bait and switch, and thoroughly enjoying the joust. His political skills were certainly incubating on the playing Welds. The year and a half he spent at nhs oVered him the opportunity to mature and nurture his true talent: understanding human nature. Peterson’s eyes sparkle as he speaks of his twenty-one-year-old granddaughter, Anna, (he has two children and seven grandchildren) who, as a student trustee, serves with him on the board of the University System of New Hampshire. He may be describing his own salient qualities…she’s intellectual (summa cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa at UNH) and not necessarily a politician, yet she’s very interested in helping her fellow students resolve problems. She’s not at all full of herself, and was urged by others to run for the position. Another leader of men—and women—may be in the making. Q – Martha Shepp

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(l-r) charlene joyce willingham, hugh hare ’87, and mack willingham ’11 (with dive card).

ms. joyce’s opus Yeserday a child came out to wonder Caught a dragonly inside a jar Fearful when the sk was full of thunder And tearful at the falling of a sar `en the child moved ten times round the seasons Skated over ten clear frozen sreams Words like when you’re older mus appease him And promises of someday make his dreams

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by Charlene Joyce Willingham P’11

And the seasons they go round and round And the painted ponies go up and down We’re captive on the carousel of time We can’t return we can only look Behind from where we came And go round and round and round In the circle game `e Circle Game Joni Mitchell


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m s. jo y ce’s op us Despite the fact that I come from a long line of educators, never, in my wildest dreams did I expect to become a teacher. I probably wouldn’t have had it not been for an unexpected twist of fate when, in 1985, I decided to take a hiatus from my job as a television producer at ABC to return to my hometown of New Hampton to spend time with my mother, who had recently been diagnosed with ALS, a rapidly-moving illness also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease. After a few months of intense care giving, I realized that I needed to >nd a balance in my life if I was going to retain my sanity. At the suggestion of my friend and eventual husband Fred Willingham (Class of ’72 and computer systems manager at New Hampton School at the time), Headmaster Lou Gnerre o=ered me a job as director of theatre. I would start in two weeks. My >rst meeting with Dean of Studies Dave Rice was an interesting one to say the least. Little did I know what to expect when he told me that “theatre and >lm would attract a motley lot.” The usual suspects, I was told. Aldrich, Cordima, Cohen, Distler, Files 1, Files 2, Gertz, Jarvis, Mullen, Murphy, Sive, and Hare. Hugh Hare. I had been warned about him. The very >rst day I met Hugh, I had to throw him out of my class. “Oh, man…you just bought yourself a boatload of trouble,” said his classmate, Kim Cordima. I didn’t sleep all night. The following day, Hugh returned to my class. “I’m surprised and delighted you showed up,” I said. “Why wouldn’t I?” he retorted. “You didn’t mark me absent.” It was at that very moment a friendship was born. A friendship, I might add, that Hugh didn’t take lightly. Hugh was a strong ally: a good person to have on your side. He was there to help at every turn — whether it was building sets or recruiting the entire football team for auditions. Whatever my need, Hugh would >nd a way to accommodate it. My mother died in the early morning hours of January 19, 1987. It was snowy. Blizzard-like conditions. After a long, arduous day of making funeral arrangements, Fred and I returned home to >nd that our driveway (and roof) had mysteriously been shoveled, cordwood stacked, and dinner on the stove. It took several days and some pretty sharp detective work by Athletic Director Pete Gulick to >nd out that our “guardian angels” were the members of the hockey team, commandeered by none other than Hugh Hare. Hugh graduated in the spring of 1987. Though we went in very different directions — he o= to college and me back to the rat race of >lmmaking, we never lost touch. Throughout the years, Hugh has continued to acknowledge our milestones: our anniversaries, Fred’s second graduation from Plymouth State, and the birth of our son, Mackintosh Bennett Willingham (NHS ’11).

In January of this year, the phone rang. The voice on the other end uttered precisely ten words. “Look in your car. I’ll call back in >ve minutes.” I went to the car to >nd a fresh Florida avocado and a Scuba Schools International (SSI) Open Water Diver Manual. The phone rang again. It was Hugh. “The avocado is for you. I picked it out of the tree in my backyard with my lacrosse stick this morning. The scuba manual is for Mack. It’s about time for him to learn to dive. When can you come?” “How about this weekend?” Mack said. “How about spring break,” I replied. In March of this year, Fred, Mack, and I met with Hugh in Ft. Lauderdale for Mack’s scuba lessons. Five days and four dives later, the certi>cation was complete. So the years spin by and now the boy is twenty Though his dreams have lost some grandeur coming true There will be new dreams, maybe better dreams and plenty Before the last revolving year is through And the seasons they go round and round… In retrospect, it’s interesting that my relationship with Hugh has genuinely been a circle game. I taught Hugh, Hugh taught Mack…all of which got me to thinking of our unlikely friendship, and the foundation of that relationship. It’s all a series of concentric circles, with New Hampton School at the center. While we all have gone on to do di=erent things with our lives, there is a common denominator with each and every one of us. In my case, it doesn’t matter how many commercial or print jobs I’ve shot, how many movies I’ve produced or how many celebrities I’ve worked with. That’s not my opus. My masterpiece lies here at New Hampton — not only in the lives I may have touched, but just as importantly, in the lives that have touched mine. I’ve had the pleasure of having dinner at Katherine Distler Pugliese’s (’85) restaurant in St. Croix, the privilege of becoming friends with Gabrielle Cohen-Davidson’s (’86) parents, the honor of being called from the delivery room where Lenore Files-Gendron (’87) gave birth to her daughter Lily, the joy of drawing pictures with Scott Gertz’s (’88) daughter, Jordan. That’s my opus. In the immortal words of Gabrielle’s dad, Howard, “You can’t put a price on things like that.” Q [Editor’s Note: Charlene Joyce Willingham, known to all as “CJ,” taught at NHS from 1985 to 1987. She continues her career as a producer from her home o;ce in New Hampton, a short walk from the NHS campus.]

Sixteen springs and sixteen summers gone now Cartwheels turn to car wheels thru the town And they tell him, take your time, it won’t be long now Till you drag your feet to slow the circles down

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f oc u s o n se r vi c e : f a c u l t y q a n d a

steve fay and kristen reimold

Describe Your New Hampton Fire Department Volunteer Work. steve: I’ve done calls for auto accidents, and I’ve done a lot of Wre training, learning how to use the breathing apparatus, Jaws of Life, how to run a hose, etc. kristen: I’m on the medical, emt side. I’ve gone on ambulance calls. My husband is a WreWghter and he’s also an emt, so we try to split calls.

How does volunteering at the firehouse benefit our students? steve: Students develop a great deal of respect for people who work on behalf of the community. Some students are just amazed at the level of dedication and work that goes into it. kristen: It bridges two worlds. Students are impressed when they realize that WreWghters have to get up and leave their supper tables to help others in our community.

steve fay Algebra I and II, ASP Tutor, English II, Geometry hometown: Concord, MA education: BS, History, University of New Hampshire years at nhs: Fifteen years with nhfd: Five prior experience: Teacher, Landmark School co-curricular activities: Varsity Lacrosse Coach; JV Hockey Coach; NHS Fire and Safety O;cer

Your lives are busy. Why do you make time for this? steve: My initial motivation was serving as

nhs’s safety oYcer, and I wanted to develop the school’s relationship with the Wre department. Now I can be of help, for example if there’s a false alarm at the school I can advise the department so it can adjust its response mode appropriately. kristen: I’ve been an emt since 1991, but was never aYliated with a department before. The amount of knowledge transferred is incredible; I work with lots of qualiWed people.

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What do you tell your friends about New Hampton School? steve: There’s a lot of diversity in the student population—we’ve got a full, broad spectrum. nhs is a place where students can hang out with diVerent kinds of people. Other schools attempt to do this, but I don’t think most are as much of a community as we are. kristen: nhs students are down to earth and not pretentious. I love it that when WreWghters who might not have previously realized that are impressed by our students.

kristen reimold English II and IV hometown: Hingham, MA education: BA, English, Boston College; MEd, Risk and Prevention, Harvard Graduate School of Education years at nhs: Four years with nhfd: Three prior experience: AmeriCorps VISTA (domestic violence >eld); Teacher, Cushing and Tabor academies; EMT co-curricular activities: Varsity Lacrosse; Mentoring Program Coordinator


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mariana vinci germar ’10 visits the golden view health care center in meredith, nh.

want to get involved? hamptonia: Please send Class Notes news and photos to alum-

phonathons: Volunteers help fundraise for the Annual Fund,

ni@newhampton.org. Have you had an amazing experience you

which supports everything from student activities, to heat and

would like to share? How has your NHS experience shaped your

classroom supplies, to employee salaries. Phonathons are held on

life? Please contact Editor Peter Miller, 603.677.3417;

campus and are great ways to meet local alumni and parents, and

pmiller@newhampton.org.

connect with friends and classmates.

class agents: Class Agents are fundraisers who typically send

junior urban adventure (jua) program: Student groups

one to two letters annually to keep their peers up-to-date. Help us

ask essential questions as part of this experiential learning activity,

reach out to your classmates and keep them connected to New

then journey to Boston in December to >nd answers through inter-

Hampton School.

views and research with primary sources. Recent visits have included MIT, NPR, The Wilbur Theatre, New England Aquarium,

reunion committees: Volunteers are wanted — especially for

the Islamic Society, the School of Fashion Design, among others.

classes ending in 4s and 9s — to help the Alumni O;ce organize

Please let us know if your organization might be of interest to this

class Reunion activities. Recent committees have helped bring

year’s students.

record numbers back to campus.

arts day: Each spring, this school-wide event introduces students event hosts: NHS is seeking hosts who are willing to sponsor

to talented guest artists and diverse, new activities, such as hip hop

events in or near their homes across the country.

dance instruction, fencing, hand drumming, hand bells, and selfportraits. Please consider o=ering a workshop in your discipline.

community meetings/student workshops/faculty professional development: Please consider sharing your

For more information please contact Director of Alumni and Parent

expertise, wisdom, stories, and life journeys and lessons with the

Relations Cindy Buck, 603.677.3414; alumni@newhampton.org.

NHS community. Community Meetings feature a presentation followed by a formal dinner.


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gl o b a l c u r r i c u l u m c o o r d i n a t or

global curriculum coordinator: dan love It was at the Berlin Wall more than seven years ago that Dan Love realized the clear bene>ts of the International Baccalaureate program. Traveling with a group of IB Juniors from his previous school in Italy, he recalled, “My students and I were at the wall and I was amazed at their conversations. They were discussing the true start of the Cold War, the architecture on the former East and West sides, and how the buildings re?ected the social di=erences between the two former enemies.” As the students chatted easily in French, Spanish, and Korean with other visitors, Love said, “It was then that I realized that I was truly with an internationally-minded group of global citizens.” No one disagrees that we now live in an interconnected and interdependent world. New Hampton’s goal must be to fully prepare every student for the challenges and opportunities he or she will face in the new global society. It is with this in mind that as part of the new Strategic Plan, Head of School Andrew Menke has appointed Love as NHS’s global curriculum coordinator.

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In describing the goals of his new position, Love highlights several areas of focus. “I will be concentrating on three arenas that will bring our students into the global age. First, we will be establishing international exchange opportunities. Second, we will launch the International Baccalaureate diploma program at New Hampton. Third, we want to make sure our curriculum is infused with internationally-relevant subject matter. It is a way to bring the world to New Hampton, and to introduce our students to new levels of thinking. “In many ways, what I have been doing personally and professionally has prepared me for this new challenge,” Love explained. “Before coming to New Hampton, I was the History Department head at the American School Foundation in Mexico City. Incidentally, it’s the same school where Jinga Moore’s father was once the headmaster. Prior to Mexico, I taught social sciences at the American School in Milan, Italy, with my wife, Amy. My undergraduate degree is in political science from Colorado State University and I have a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from Chapman University.”


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glo bal cu rri cu lu m co o rdinator Love will begin by exploring programs in international learning. “I’m looking forward to starting some exchange opportunities for New Hampton students soon. I have taken students to Beijing, Athens, The Hague, and Berlin — as well as other places too obscure to mention. Already we are working with a school in China. I believe traveling — and if you have the opportunity, studying and even living — is a great way to learn about a culture while also learning about yourself.” Another element of Love’s new position is to implement the International Baccalaureate Diploma program at New Hampton School. “Currently, we are at the application phase,” he explained. “The Class of 2012 will be the >rst class that will have the opportunity to take part in the full diploma program. I’m proud to say that New Hampton will be the >rst boarding school in New England to o=er the program,” he added. Three department heads attended IB training this summer and more are scheduled. Love recognizes the value of the IB program in today’s learning environment. “The greatest bene>t that IB o=ers — and I say this after experiencing six senior classes matriculate through the program — is that it makes students more directly involved in their learning,” he said. Students in grades eleven and twelve will have the option of taking a series of rigorous, interconnected courses. “We are in a new age of participatory learning. Students need to be able to be not just engaged but challenged, and the material they are learning must be meaningful. IB courses are not a predetermined curriculum. Rather, it is a series of options that evaluates students in primarily essay fashion using authentic problems, scenarios, and events. Teachers and students have the freedom to explore di=erent themes and topics in a Socratic learning environment.” The third component of Love’s new role includes working with the dean of studies, department heads, and faculty to oversee curriculum development and the scope and sequence of courses. “Most of all I will be working with and for the present and future students of New Hampton. I want to make sure we are carrying through on our promise to prepare them for college and beyond. I believe we are at a major point in history” he observed. “The international dimensions of technology and information are changing the de>nitions of every part of our society. We need to make sure New Hampton students can think critically about the issues they will face.” Daniel Love has been teaching in the International Diploma Program for six years in Europe and Latin America. He is a former department head and Model United Nations Program director. When not working on curriculum he loves traveling with his wife, Amy, and their two children, who live on-campus in Rice House. He began his work as the global curriculum coordinator this summer in preparation for the 2008–09 school year. !

the international baccalaureate (ib) diploma program The IB Program is a challenging two-year curriculum, primarily aimed at students aged 16 to 19. It leads to a quali>cation that is widely recognized by the world’s leading universities. The program prepares students for college by encouraging them to ask challenging questions as they “learn how to learn,” while developing both a strong sense of their own identity and culture and the ability to communicate with and understand people from other lands. The curriculum contains six subject groups (Language, Second Language, Experimental Sciences, the Arts, Mathematics and Computer Science, and Individuals and Societies). There are also three core requirements (the Extended Essay, which o=ers students the opportunity to investigate a topic of individual interest and acquaints them with the independent research and writing skills expected at college level; Theory of Knowledge, an interdisciplinary course that encourages an appreciation of other cultural perspectives; and Creativity, Action, and Service, which encourages students to be involved in artistic pursuits, sports, and community service work). Please visit the IB Web site at www.ibo.org for more information. Global Curriculum Coordinator Daniel Love can be contacted with any speci>c questions at 603.677.3534; dlove@newhampton.org.

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excavating petra

aerial view of excavations at petra, showing the great temple (foreground) and small temple (upper right).

excavating petra [Editor’s Note: The author discussed her life as an archaeologist at an allschool Community Meeting earlier this year. She earned her doctorate in anthropology from Brown University in 2004. She lives on the NHS campus with her husband, Math Department Head Forest Reid, and their daughter, Natania.] At the end of the dig season in 2001 we were running short on time, as usual. Even ten, six-day weeks don’t give you enough time to do everything, so removing the large, white marble paver from the ?oor would have to wait until next year. A year later, one of the >rst things we did upon returning was to map, and then remove the intriguing piece of marble. It had been untouched for well over a thousand years. We picked it up, dusted it o=, and gasped when we saw the clearly inscribed Latin on the other side, honoring a long-dead Roman emperor.

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by Sara Karz Reid, PhD

To be the >rst person to touch a historical object, one that might some day be displayed in a museum, always fascinated me. Working as an archaeologist in Petra, Jordan, has given me that opportunity many times over. Archaeology is an interdisciplinary >eld, and anthropologists, classics scholars, geologists, and engineers work together to produce a complex and comprehensive history of a site. It’s a fascinating study of both past and present. Petra was founded as the capital of the Nabataean Empire in the late fourth century bc, and was annexed by the expanding Roman Empire in 106 ad. Today, it’s Jordan’s most popular tourist attraction. The best known monument at the site, the Treasury, is seen brie?y in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. There have been archaeological digs in Petra for almost a century, and yet less than 5 percent of the city has been thoroughly explored. I


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e x cav at i ng p etra

on the web Digs don’t all happen abroad! There are archaeological opportunities much closer to home. Below are some Web sites of interest for armchair archaeologists and for those interested in taking up the trowel. sara karz reid, next to the monastery at petra.

had the privilege of working there under the auspices of my doctoral advisor, Dr. Martha Sharp Joukowsky of Brown University, and the Jordanian Department of Antiquities. Dr. Joukowsky has directed ongoing excavations at the Great Temple for fourteen seasons. Built in the late >rst century bc, the structure was occupied and modi>ed until approximately the time of Roman annexation. Originally designed as a religious structure, one of its later phases included a 600-seat theater. The Small Temple is just west of the Great Temple and was almost entirely unexplored until summer 2000. Dr. Joukowsky suggested that I excavate there for my dissertation. Working with a small group of Americans and Bedouins we almost immediately began to discover marble, some with fragmentary inscriptions. Over the following two seasons, we excavated approximately one metric ton of marble (in over 6,000 pieces) from the small, 2,300square-foot building. This was attention-grabbing for a few reasons. Romans placed a high value on marble, considering it a luxury material. There is no marble native to Petra, and when it was sourced we discovered that it originated in several locations in Europe and western Asia. It would have been transported in at least two stages; over sea and then over land (a much more expensive proposition). The nearest port city at the time would have been Gaza, approximately 100 miles west. Examination of one of the larger inscriptions identi>ed it as a dedication to the Roman Emperor Trajan, dated between 106–114 ad. A second, fragmentary imperial inscription, reconstructed from fortyfour pieces, can be attributed to either Emperor Elagalabus (218–222 ad) or his successor, Alexander Severus (222–235 ad).

new england ➢ NH State Conservation and Rescue Archaeology Program (SCRAP), www.nhscrap.org ➢ New Hampshire Archeological Society, www.nhas.org ➢ Maine Archaeology Month, www.mainearchsociety.org/ mainearcmonth2007.pdf ➢ Massachusetts Archaeology Month, www.sec.state.ma.us/ mhc/mhcarch/ArchMonthintro.htm ➢ Vermont Archaeological Society, vtarchaeology.org/cms further away ➢ The Petra Great Temple, www.brown.edu/Departments/ Anthropology/Petra ➢ Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, CO, www.crowcanyon.org ➢ Archaeology Magazine, www.archaeology.org ➢ Archaeological Institute of America: Search for Fieldwork Opportunities, www.archaeological.org/webinfo.php? page=10016 ➢ Society for American Archaeology: Archaeology for the Public, www.saa.org/public/resources/Experience Archaeology.html ➢ Passport in Time, www.passportintime.com ➢ Anglo-American Project in Pompeii, www.brad.ac.uk/ acad/archsci/>eld_proj/anampomp

The marble, together with the proportions of the building and other >nds such as coins, pottery, and lamp fragments led me to date the building to the post-annexation era, no earlier than 106 ad, post-dating several other buildings in the city center.

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excavating petra

clockwise, from right: The author, daughter Natania, and husband Forest; a view of the Treasury; marble slab with dedication to the Roman Emperor Trajan (106–114 ad).

But what was the Small Temple? The dating of the structure and the presence of Roman imperial inscriptions led me to believe that the Small Temple was a Roman imperial cult building, dedicated to the worship of the Roman emperors as gods. After annexing the Nabataean kingdom, the Romans may have wanted to remind its people that they were no longer independent by building this temple in the heart of their capital. The Romans out>tted the building in tons of luxurious marble, imported at great cost, all the better to drive the point home. I hope that future excavation at the site will add more detail to the picture. Part of why I >nd archaeology so exciting is that it gives me the chance to be one of the >rst people to rediscover a speci>c time period, and interpret the thousands of pieces of history that literally come together like a gigantic (and heavy) jigsaw puzzle. No site digs itself. Archaeology requires the expertise of many, the physical labor of dozens more, and cooperation from all. Every season we hire local Badoul and Ammarin Bedouin workers. Many of the men have worked with us for several seasons and we got to know their families, especially at our annual July 4 baseball game (after clearing the “>eld” of rocks and goats) and cookout.

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Our dig foreman, Dakhilallah Qublan (also known as Abu Khalid), is responsible for hiring the workmen, organizing the dig teams, and distributing equipment such as picks, hoes, and wheelbarrows. On a large site such as the Great Temple >ve to ten trenches were open at a time, while at the Small Temple there were usually one or two. I have been friends with Abu Khalid’s youngest daughter, a now seventeen-year-old spit>re named Badria, since she was six. I have watched her grow up on site, accompanying her father every day, and absorbing the history of the Nabataeans in her own back yard. Her English has become impressive, while, despite her best e=orts my Arabic is merely mediocre. Working with the Bedouin reminds me that we are visitors in their home, and that Nabataean history (or anyone’s history, for that matter) is someone’s heritage, and one in which people take pride. As an archaeologist in a foreign country, I am also an ambassador for my own culture. Both Bedouin and American have many chances to discuss our cultures while talking in the trenches. Archaeologists, despite our fascination with the past, have no choice but to work and interact in the present. I wouldn’t have it any other way. !


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st rat e gi c plan n i n g up date

New Hampton School’s Strategic Plan is well underway, with some improvements already quite visible and others more deeply embedded. To date we have initiated or completed 224 action items (57 percent of the plan). Major construction projects include Kennedy Field, the synthetic turf, multi-sport facility that was completed last fall, and the Math-Science Center, now under construction. Please visit www.newhampton.org/ math-science for updates on this project, which is slated for completion in time for fall 2009 classes. Many other physical plant upgrades are anticipated, including improvements to dormitories and classroom spaces. Dr. Kurt Grimm ’78, a professor at the University of British Columbia, was recently on campus to lead a conversation on sustainability. In recent years, his established research expertise in earth system history, paleoecology, and paleoenvironmental reconstruction has ?ourished into theory and applied theory relating to the emerging sustainability sciences. Dr. Grimm’s presentation was in concert with several Strategic Plan goals, including greater global relevancy, more intentional involvement with local and regional communities, and further “greening” of the school’s curriculum and operations. Two new positions, the global curriculum coordinator and the technology coordinator, have been created in ful>llment of plan objectives. Dan Love and Hans Mundahl have assumed these key roles, respectively. Academic and curricular progress includes movement toward the International Baccalaureate diploma program and exploration of international exchange relationships. NHS’s Foundations of Learning: A Continuum of Skills for 21st Century Learners, was implemented at the start of the academic year. Students are assured of receiving a strong academic foundation that supports a skill-based, globally relevant curriculum. This year’s new curricular o=erings with global emphasis include the addition of Chinese for Beginners, Comparative World Cultures, Geology, Innovative Learning Technology, and Statistics. In addition, the yearly schedule has been modi>ed from trimesters to semesters

to allow for greater experiential opportunities, >eld study, and cultural exchange programs. The school’s athletic facilities are helping to achieve the goal of enhancing local and regional ties. The White Mountain Youth Lacrosse Program used Kennedy Field this spring for games and practices, and the Concord Cannons AAU baseball program played on the Gnerre Diamond, bringing teams from across New England to campus. New Hampton School has been working over the past year with Jan Krukowsky/Generation, a New York-based marketing communications >rm, on rebranding NHS in concert with the Strategic Plan goal of “Strengthened Identity and Visibility.” The three major projects have been identity (i.e. our logo and other graphic representations) a new Admission O;ce viewbook, and a revised Web site, all of which are slated for completion this fall. The Alumni and Development O;ce has added two new sta= members, who are facilitating closer ties between graduates, current students, and faculty, and positioning the school for enhanced overall >scal strength. There are numerous technology initiatives underway or recently completed, including wireless network installation, campus network security upgrades, and the provision of new laptops to all teaching faculty. NHS is a school on the move and we appreciate your support. If you have not already read it, we encourage you to review the Strategic Plan via the Hamptonia Web site, www.newhampton.org/ Hamptonia. You may also contact Director of Communications Peter Miller, 603.677.3417; pmiller@newhampton.org, to request a printed copy in the mail.

Hans Mundahl, Strategic Plan Liaison

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c o m m een ncement 2008

clockwise, from left: Looking good! Meservey Award Medal winner Arianna Puleo draws applause and smiles from Governor John Lynch (at left) and faculty; salutatorian Alex Slover; valedictorian Jess Nissenbaum; Kevin Moon and family.

governor john lynch emphasizes “service” “Service to your community and to others is something that has been instilled in you since you >rst set foot here on the New Hampton campus,” noted NH Governor John Lynch in his address, delivered on the occasion of New Hampton School’s 186th commencement. The governor made special mention of the school’s Service Learning Program during the ceremony, which featured the awarding of diplomas to 115 students. Governor Lynch said, “From your >rst community service projects, all the way up through your senior leadership project here at the New Hampton School, you have seen >rst-hand the power of service to the community.

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“Service for others, not for self, has been a pillar upon which your education here at New Hampton was built. “A commitment to your community should be an ethic we all learn well and carry with us throughout our lives.” The Class of 2008 included students from eighteen states and international graduates from Bermuda, Canada, Cape Verde, China, Guatemala, Korea, and Taiwan. The following awards were presented to outstanding members of the class. r Jarrod Gobbi (Atkinson, NH) received the Ben Cecil Jury of His Peers Award, given to the student elected by classmates as the Commencement welcome speaker. (He is attending Bryant University this fall.)


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co m m e n ce m ent 2 0 0 8

clockwise, from above: Youngjun Kim, the class marshal; Matt Hamel, who received Baccalaureate awards in classical language, English, and history, ?anked by his proud parents Cheryl and Paul Hamel (Paul is also an NHS trustee); Nicole Cullinane; and Governor John Lynch addresses the crowd.

r Jessica Nissenbaum (Westborough, MA) was the class valedictorian, an award presented to awarded to the student with the highest overall GPA during his or her New Hampton School experience. (Syracuse University) r Alexander Slover (Wilmot Flat, NH) received the Intellectual Curiosity Medal and was the salutatorian. The Intellectual Curiosity Medal is awarded to the student whose academic interests carry him or her the furthest beyond the regularly assigned classroom tasks and whose performance is marked by a true search for knowledge. (Cornell University) r Youngjun Kim (Seoul, Korea) received the Multicultural Diversity Medal. (George Washington University)

r Kayla DiBari (Holderness, NH) received the Citizenship Medal. The Citizenship Medal is awarded to the student who has unsel>shly contributed to making New Hampton School a more vibrant and productive community. (College of the Holy Cross) r Matthew Hamel (Walpole, MA) received the Academic and Personal Growth Medal. (Colorado School of Mines) r Arianna Puleo (Mamaroneck, NY) received the Meservey Medal, New Hampton’s most prestigious award. The Meservey Medal is given for outstanding contributions to the academic, co-curricular, and community life of the school. (Connecticut College) A complete transcript of Governor Lynch’s remarks is available at www.newhampton.org/pressreleases.

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reunion 2008

clockwise from top left: The Moore grandchildren gathered to honor Bud ’38 and Jinga Moore; Elena Carboni ’83 and Francesco Theodoli ’83; (L-R) VIP presenters included former Gov. Walter Peterson ’42, Executive Councilor Ray Burton, Head of School Andrew Menke, NH Commissioner of the Department of Cultural Resources Van McLeod ’65, and NH Commissioner of Labor George Copadis ’71; Bud leads a reunion of Glee Club members as a grand >nale to a wonderful evening.

reunion 2008 It was a blast! It was a smash hit! New Hampton School made reunion history with the largest crowd seen in decades. Even the rain couldn’t dampen spirits as alumni and former faculty began rolling into town a day early, on May 29. The crowd grew by Friday evening with four di=erent events happening simultaneously: a dinner honoring the 50th Reunion Class of 1958 at the home of Head of School Andrew Menke; a cookout overlooking Lake Winnipesaukee at the home of Keith Noe ’83 celebrating the 25th Reunion; a dinner gathering in Meredith for the Class of 1998 celebrating its 10th NHS Reunion; and a pizza party on campus for all others. A huge thank you to the reunion chairs and reunion volunteers. Without your energy, perseverance, and enthusiasm, Reunion 2008 would not have been so incredibly successful. The reunion pictures on the following pages tell the story, but we decided that the letter of one alumnus so eloquently and so powerfully conveyed the range of emotions and excitement permeating the weekend’s festivities, and we felt compelled to share an excerpt with you. Robert-Grant Wealleans ’68 expresses clearly what reunions are all about:

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I decided to step o= of the roller coaster ride of life just long enough to attend the New Hampton School Reunion of 2008. This reunion was the fortieth for my Class of 1968 but it marked my actual >rst attendance at an o;cial reunion (homecoming and a few visits in the ’70s don’t count!). Amazingly, although I live in southern California, I’ve been to New Hampshire three times this year and visited the school in April with my new bride Lori. Lori could not attend Reunion ’08 but insisted I attend and promised me it would be a wonderful experience. She was more than right about that! Funny, Phil Sawyer, Je= Glidden, and other “reunion whips” from the Class of 1968 have said the same thing through the years but I either didn’t listen, or I had the usual bag of excuses handy to fend them o=. It was a wonderful experience indeed! I count this past weekend as some of the most ful>lling days in my life. What I failed to realize all these years is the enormous bond between members of my class and the sheer joy and memories we share. To convey to you the emotions and happiness I experienced would be both di;cult and lengthy because this experience is all personal and only you can experience and appreciate reunion by actually participating. I urge you to come back to NHS and


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clockwise from above: Trustee Bob Kennedy ’50 provided a poignant and witty tribute to Bud and Jinga; members of the Class of 1958 gathered, including (standing) Jim Shattuck, Leighton Symonds, T. J. Fitzgerald, Gard Thompson, Tom Moss, Carl Anderson, Ed Rose, Jon Frank, Jason Pilalas, Henry Peterson, John Muldoon, (sitting) Dick Whitmen, Tom Slayton, Hooper Cutler, Jonathan Granger, Jim Salvucci, Jim Morrison, Bob McLeod; Bud and Jinga receive commemorative gifts from Head of School Andrew Menke as the Moore children look on.

re-light the lamps in the tunnels of your memory and see for yourself, in our case, how great the Class of ’68 turned out. You will simultaneously see, recognize, and feel proud of, why our Class of 1968 has the highest reunion attendance — a number which we plan to exceed for the 45th Reunion in 2013 and beyond!! Around campus, what was heard often and very loud was the sound of laughter, not only from my classmates and others but also from the former and current faculty members as we all traded war stories, anecdotes and (wow!) “Secrets of New Hampton.” The latter prompting one alumnus to repeatedly say, “Put it in the book!” I had a wonderful time. No, make that a fantastic time! I’m looking forward to the coming reunions in 2013 and 2018. I would love to see you there and then — so save the date(s) and plan on being at NHS for our 45th and 50th reunions. The rest of you please attend your important milestone reunion years and remember NHS generously by contributing to this great institution — 200 years old in 2021! My very best to you all and your families. – robert-grant wealleans ’68

2008 reunion awards lifetime achievement award Jason M. Pilalas ’58 headmaster’s award This award, presented to T. J. Fitzgerald ’58, recognizes an alumnus for service to the school in a particular year. marco polo award Presented annually to the alumnus who has traveled the greatest distance, the award was given to Guenter Stricker ’73, who traveled from Hagen, Germany. most distinguised alumnus award Given each year to the alumnus who has returned to celebrate Reunion from the earliest and most distinguished class, the award was presented to George Stanton ’38 and Dick Cates ’43.

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above left: (front) Liz Hassinger, Matt Sparks, Anita Pederson Galletti; (back) Harrison Golden, Joe Saturley, Pam Harbach Harley, Dave Burns, Dean Straw. above right: Jason Pilalas ’58 proudly receives his long overdue but well deserved New Hampton School diploma from Andrew Menke. below: (front) Dean Johnson, Tony Torres, Rick Peyser, Rob-Grant Wealleans, Larry Garland, Je= Glidden, Dick Humphreville, John Romagnya; (second row) Bill Ness, Bill Brown, Rusty Nordstrom, Matt Hinzpeter, Tito (Birdman) Meyer, Gordon Rose, Bob Wharton, PM Costello, Jim Heald, Je= Tulis, Dean Jacobson; (third row) Alan Johnston, Bob Samuels, Tom Saturley, Craig Corson, Hugh Barry, Hank Goode ’69, Lansing Deane, and Phil Sawyer.

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right: (front) Jack Metcalf, Edie Metcalf, Tom Beeler,

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Louise Borke, Jerry Brecher, Frank Dennen ’62; (back) Lawson Ramsay, Jim Noonan, Dougall Fraser, Kevin Kavanagh, Stuart Bicknell, Tom Moore. below left: Attendees gathered to remember and honor class members who have passed on. below right: (front) Melanie Dirig-Grasso, Tamara Milne, Molly Rogers; (back) Ryan Mahady, Megan Collins, Jamie Glidden, Jill Mahady.

below left: (front) Robin MacEwen, Loraine Hobausz, Sandy Cantin and daughter; (back) Keith Noe, Dan Kinney, Francesco Theodoli, Elena Carboni, Adam Smith, Jennifer Berry below right: (front) Elibet Moore Chase ’75, Polly Worthen Hutchins ’74, Vicki Makris and daughter, Bill Goldberg, Ken Reever, Mark Salsbury; (back) Rob Moore, Bill Saturley, Pete Galletly, John Morin, Guenter Stricker, Mike Tamposi ’72, Dean Taylor, Peter Soule.

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top left: The Huskies were very competitive this year under >rst-year coach Peter Hutchins ’01. at left: Women’s hockey goalie Ally Derthick ’10 makes the save. She was outstanding in net this year and should provide the foundation for future success. above: Nicole Cullinane ’08 sparks her team.

winter/spring sports wrap-up by Director of Athletics and Co-Curricular Activities Jamie Arsenault The Men’s Varsity A Basketball Team had another quality season led by Patrick Saunders (Princeton University), Kendall Durant (Virginia Tech), Twany Beckham (Mississippi State University), and Mike Howlett (University of Pennsylvania). The Women’s Hockey Team >nished with a 4-14-3 record, but had many outstanding games and a lot of its losses were close. The team played tough and worked hard even though hampered by injuries. Seniors Whitney Brown, Sam Hersey, and Arianna Puleo led the Lady Huskies. The USSA skiers had one of their best seasons in twenty years, led by PG Matt Dodge and Senior Nate MacClellan. NHS >nished the Macomber Cup series seventh overall and fourth for the boys.

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Dodge lowered his points and rankings to become one of the top juniors (under 19) in the country. He’ll be skiing NCAA Division 1 at St. Lawrence next year. Freshmen Lyndsay Tamposi and Molly Tulley both quali>ed for Junior 3 Regionals and after a few clutch wins, Molly went on to the Junior 3 Olympics at Waterville Valley, NH. Allie Lee, a member of the New Hampton’s Class of 2008, was named to the United States Freestyle Ski Team in the aerials category. Allie is ranked among the top female aerial skiers in the country. Making its >rst playo= appearance in a decade, the Men’s Varsity Hockey Team lost the Division 2 New England Prep School Ice Hockey Association (NEPSIHA) >nals. The team was led by goaltender Pat Dunn ’09, Casey Shaughnessy ’08, and Kyle Zobler ’09. Shaughnessy was honored as a >rst-team All-New England selection. For the season, the one-two punch of Zobler and Shaughnessy combined for eighty-one points. As noted in the Manitou student


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top left: Ten student-athletes earned Division I or Division II college scholarships last year. These achievements represent substantial accomplishments in the classroom and on the playing >elds. (Front row, L-R) Tori Childers, University of South Carolina; Patrick Saunders, Princeton University; Orion Outerbridge, University of Rhode Island; Ben Brewster, University of Richmond. (Back row, L-R) Kendall Durant, Virginia Tech University; Matt McFadden, Merrimack College; Kayla DiBari, College of the Holy Cross; Anthony Smalls, Merrimack College. (Missing) Twany Beckham, Mississippi State University; Michael Howlett, University of Pennsylvania. middle left: Justin Deluca >nished an impressive four-year run, undefeated in tennis. at left: Women’s Varsity Lacrosse. above: Lacrosse on the new, synthetic turf Kennedy Field.

newspaper after we almost took the title, “Husky pride has never been more prevalent…we know the hockey players have given it their all, and we are proud to call them Huskies.” The Women’s Varsity Basketball team had a successful, 12-8 season, and earned its >fth consecutive invitation to the NEPSAC Tournament. Standout players included seniors Amanda Bacher, Nicole Cullinane, Kayla DiBari, Olivia Norris, and Katie Seraikas, among others. The Men’s Varsity Boys Lacrosse Team >nished 7-7, its most successful season in over ten years. Led by seniors Christian Cook, George Jenkins, and PG Nick Maggio, the season highlight was when the Huskies battled back from a 7-3 halftime de>cit to defeat a very tough Gould Academy team 12-11. Jenkins scored the game-winning goal with less than a second to go in regulation time. The Men’s Varsity Tennis Team was co-champion of the Lakes Region League. Justin Deluca >nished his remarkable four-year

career undefeated and with a league championship of the No. 1 singles division, and Sam Cieplicki won the No. 2 championship. The Huskies were one of the strongest teams in New England this year. The Women’s Varsity Softball Team was 2008 Lakes Region runner-up. With a record of 9-4, the scrappy Lady Huskies were in every game, led by the outstanding pitching of Hillary Burrows ’09 and play of Olivia Norris, Lindsey Bass, and Vanessa Campbell. The Men’s Varsity Baseball Team was the 2008 Lakes Region runner-up, with a record of 9-6. The Huskies were led by the outstanding play of Pat Saunders, Anthony Malik, Justin Marcotte, Jarrod Gobbi, and Andy Pryor, all of whom were selected as Lakes Region All-Stars. The Women’s Varsity Lacrosse Team >nished tied for third place in the Lakes Region with a record of 5-5. The Lady Huskies were led by seniors Kayla DiBari, Leah Heal, and junior Katelyn Bernasconi.

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Hello friends, If you missed Reunion 2008 you missed a very good time. We had fun renewing old friendships and telling old stories, which got better with each telling! At the reunion dinner for the Class of 1958, a number of mysteries were solved. Did you know that multi >lm theaters were born in the projection booth in Madan Auditorium at NHS, all demerits assigned to Jon Bartel ’59 were the result of mistaken identity, Bob Smart had a girlfriend seen with him on the beach of Cape Cod, and that mattress moving was a varsity sport which took place after Commencement? Unsolved mysteries: How did the sailboat get into the pond? How did Bob Smart’s VW get into so may extraordinary places? On record, we have Gnerre’s garage, the auditorium, the dining room, the dumpster — anyone want to confess? Reunion 2008 was the largest in New Hampton’s history. Twentyseven former faculty returned. Everyone had a great opportunity to visit with each of the teachers and complain about their grades. Peter Sterling and Tom Elmer sent regrets. Maybe next year. Peter and Tom are retired, Peter living in North Carolina and Tom living in Colorado. Blake Babcock notes a news gap from 1965–74 — Judy and Blake’s years at NHS. Help me remedy that problem. Let me hear from you! A big reason for the large reunion turnout was the celebration for Bud and Jinga Moore. A tribute well deserved came in the form of speeches from past and present board chairs Phil O’Hara ’51, Bob Kennedy ’50, and Jason Pilalas ’58. During Jason’s speech he named the new math and science building that will stand in Randall’s place. Sorry — title unable to be printed! Former Glee Club members under the direction of Norm Farwell and T. H. Moore provided outstanding entertainment — a great job on very short notice.

Well, Randall Hall is gone. The old girl did not give up any of her secrets. I half expected to discover secret passages and see truckloads of empty beer cans, but it didn’t happen and “the Brick” passed quietly into history. (Please note that the Randall bricks are for sale; see page 8 for details.) I’ve heard from a number of you—too numerous to mention all, but here are a few: Ken Holbert ’69 writes, referring to the Class of 1969 as the “younger generation” and continues to give me aggravation in the form of mocking my computer skills. Class of 1969, I’ll be calling you soon about your 40th Reunion, May 29–31, 2009. Did you know Randy Johnson is in Los Angeles working in the production sound end of the >lm industry? Ricardo Vargas ’58 was sorry to miss his 50th NHS Reunion but we are pleased to be back in touch with him. The next time you hear from me, I will have had a knee replacement to go along with my hip replacement. I’m half of a bionic man. The “Golden Years” are brass at best. Someone said the Golden Years are golden because those are the years during which you give the doctors all your gold! Keep those cards and letters coming folks, and get back often to visit your school. Best regards,

Lou Gnerre Alumni Ambassador

tips for submitting images to hamptonia for class notes Hamptonia prefers good-quality prints or digital images. If the print is output from a digital Wle, our preference is to receive the original digital Wle. For digital photographs, please create them using the highest-quality setting on your camera. If you need additional information, please contact Cindy Buck at cbuck@newhampton.org.

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clockwise from left: Vonnie and Carter Ha= ’57 in Antarctica; Isabella Herman, daughter of Amanda ’04; Dick North ’46 (photograph courtesy Richard Hartmier).

class of 1941 Bill Gunther continues to work

designing computer systems, and spends a lot of time with his eight children, sixteen grandchildren, and Wve great grandchildren. He adds, “After the project I am working on is completed, I might take some time to smell the roses." class of 1945 Harold Callis sent in a photo

from 1944–45 (see page 51) and asks that anyone in the picture who is “still moving" to get in touch with him at haroldcallis@comcast.net. Hal posed some interesting questions back to the Alumni OYce, such as “Do the students still jump oV the bridge into the river all summer" and “Is the Post OYce still part of a candy/soda shop?"

Bill Kerchof writes, “Just returned from a month-long cruise to the Persian Gulf, Jordan’s Petra, Egypt’s Luxor on the Nile, Sicily, Spain and Portugal, with my wife Jean. We are still in good health, and living the good life in Pinehurst, NC. Even the golf is improving. Glad to know that the ‘Greatest Generation Matching Challenge’ is so successful. There are still a few of us left who remember the World War II days at New Hampton.

class of 1946

It has been another year of welldeserved recognition for Yukon writer, Dick North, who resides in Dawson City, Yukon Territory, Canada. Not only was he presented with an honorary Wre chief’s badge for his seventy-ninth birthday, he was featured in Canada’s Up Here

magazine (April/May 2008), and has been appointed to the Order of Canada. His many recent honors include a Commissioner’s Award for Public Service, awards from the Dawson City Museum, and having a street in the Dome subdivision named after him. His most recent book was a memoir, Sailor on Snowshoes: Tracking Jack London’s Northern Trail. class of 1954 Jim Wright visits annually with classmates Tom Grady and Tony Torti on the Cape. Tom volunteers with prison ministry and Tony is an important developer in that area. He adds, “It is great to commiserate with these old (yes, old) friends; I am still teaching school after fortyseven years."

class of 1956 Dick Pratt recently connected with

Lou Gnerre and shared, “The best way to reXect about me is for me to gift the school library a copy of Cool Cars-Square Roll Bars, which is about hot rods in the 1950s. I Wgured out in one semester that traditional college was not for me, then worked in the automotive aftermarket as an ‘outside salesman’ for a parts store in Salem, MA. After a couple of years, with marriage to the mother of my two children in the midst, I became the division sales manager for a specialty chemical company that I helped develop, then national sales manager after that—all the while involved with racing cars. We were way ahead of our time! I ran a speed shop in 1968–79, and began a real estate business in 1970 with a fulltime partner. I did real estate

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full-time in 1979, closed the shop and focused on the market on Martha’s Vineyard. We’re still racing and still doing real estate on the Vineyard, in St. Croix, and in New Mexico. Health has had its ups and downs but day to day is good enough!" Jim Van Vranken writes, “Me and

my ‘girlfriend’ (wife Gail) are coming up on our 50th anniversary; she’s never seen the New England foliage season!" Jim has been busy selling processing equipment for almost forty years with The Ross Group of Companies, an exciting challenge which he dearly loves even more than Wshing! He promises to visit New Hampton School very soon. class of 1957 Carter Haff shares that he and

his wife Vonnie had a wonderful trip to Antarctica with Lindblad Expeditions/National Geographic in November 2007. More recently, their seventh grandchild arrived in May; Vonnie and Carter attended and thoroughly enjoyed the gala celebration honoring T. Holmes ’38 and Jinga Moore. class of 1958 Ed Rose adds his own accolades for Reunion Weekend 2008: “My wife Lorraine and I recently attended my 50th Class Reunion at New Hampton and we both had a blast! Attended T. H. and Jinga’s 70th and it was more than expected. Outstanding! The mood and energy of everyone there, the terriWc food and service, and especially the friendship Xowed like the wine at each end of the tent. I can’t compliment the entire administrative and kitchen staV enough (the food was incredible). I can’t say enough positive things. It was terriWc meeting

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the new head of school and seeing all the wonderful things happening. I was particularly impressed with the level of funding in the new T. Holmes and Norma Jean Moore Scholarship Fund and the new construction underway. Thank you all again for a special, never-to-be-forgotten weekend." In recounting the wonderful time he had celebrating his 50th reunion, Jim Salvucci returned home to learn that his wife, Janice, was promoted to professor of Wne and applied arts at Curry College. Jim also works at Curry and threatens to never retire because he is having too much fun! Ricardo Vargas recently contacted Lou Gnerre and shared the following: “I have worked primarily as managers of banks both public and private in Costa Rica. I am retired although I keep myself busy as president of the board of a private school and as an advisor on Wnancial matters to companies. I married in 1963, proud father of Wve children (three boys and two girls) and eleven grandchildren. The oldest lives in California. Give my best regards to T. J. Fitzgerald, Ed Ross, Hooper Cutler, Jim Shattuck, Jason Pilalas, and tell them I am very sorry I missed them at Reunion."

recouperating from prostate surgery and Dave from rotator cuV surgery. Both claim that hard battles from years ago on New Hampton’s athletic Welds are beginning to take their toll. class of 1962 Alden Johnson shares the follow-

ing update: “While on a recent trip to babysit for our grandchildren in France we made a visit to Germany to meet Karl Alt, who had found my father’s dog tags. My father was a B17 pilot and was shot down and killed during the second raid on Schwienfurt, Germany, also known as Black Thursday. He found the tags and some pieces of the plane after the war. Karl’s brother was also killed in the war. We toured the crash site and temporary burial site where six crew members were buried, and other crash sites in the region." class of 1963

National Public Radio’s “The Story” program interviewed Gary Margolis, PhD last spring. Margolis read “The Interview," a poem he wrote to Specialist Monica Brown, a medic and the Wrst woman to be awarded the Silver Star for service and bravery in Iraq. Gary is beginning his thirty-seventh year as director of Middlebury College’s Mental Health Services.

class of 1959 Sandy Levine happily reports that

class of 1964

he will be a grandfather in September. He practices immigration law in Arlington, VA, and has branch oYces in India and in Pakistan, where he regularly travels.

Tom Adams sends greetings to his classmates, adding, “It was neat recalling memories of Bud and Jinga. I have a computer job that requires me to be available immediately when needed. It’s nice to be a necessity career-wise during my sixty-second year. Nevertheless, I kept recalling nhs during 1963–64, and wondered where everyone is now? I live in a converted barn in Chatsworth, CA,

Fred Slamin and David Lucey ’60

forged a lasting friendship as student athletes. They held a minireunion recently at Cape Coral Hospital in Florida. Fred was

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but my mailing address is P.O. Box 5817, Ventura, CA 93005-0817. If any of you happen through the area, please contact me. My kids are in Cambridge and New Haven. One eloped last November, the other plans a wedding in June. Alas, my job requires that I skip the latter. I prefer elopement. Cheers to all!" class of 1965 Gordon Miller, Jr., recently shared

the following update: “My family and I continue to reside in Lebanon, NJ, on a small horse farm where we have been for twenty-eight years. I am the director of risk for a family oYce where I analyze and recommend hedge fund investments for the group. We have two children both in their twenties now, neither married, so alas no grand children. I continue to have very fond memories of my time at New Hampton and hope in the near future to visit. My best wishes to all. I have recently changed my e-mail address to gimtwo@comcast.net. I spend my summer months following my passion of deep sea Wshing oV the New Jersey coast, chasing tuna and marlin. My wife of thirty-Wve years, Christine, is heavily involved in the sport of dressage, going to horse shows throughout the mid-Atlantic states and a few trips to New England. Charles M. Koutsogiane writes, “On the family front I am employed as division counsel for Textron Financial Corp at its world headquarters in Providence, doing resort and hotel Wnancing transactions with developers in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and other countries. Unfortunately, I don’t get to do site visits. My wife continues to teach French at Franklin High School in Massachusetts. My son Charlie graduated from Providence Country Day


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clockwise, from top left: James Gelatt ’85; Dan Rawson ’01; Hayden Ansland ’68; Elizabeth Joan Hayes, daughter of Kelly Dyer Hayes ’85; Fred Slamin ’59 and Dave Lucy ’60.

(where I am asst. hockey coach) and will be doing a PG year in September. He was accepted to nhs, but he felt that Vermont Academy might be better suited for him. It should make for some interesting and competing loyalties in our household when nhs meets VA in soccer and hockey, two of Charlie’s sports. I still bleed nhs green. I also want to say hi to all my ’65 classmates and wish them well."

look back on my PG year at New Hampton as a turning point in my educational life and have nothing but great memories of those days. Best regards to Mr. and Mrs. Moore." Frank Motley had a hip replacement this past month, adding, “That was the only reason I would have missed the salute to the Moores… Other than expecting my 19th grandchild in the fall, I am doing just Wne."

class of 1966 Bill Hecker is still in New Canaan,

Hershell Norwood has been busy

CT and writes, “My wife Leslie and I have two children, Meg ’10 at Pomfret School and Thomas ’13 at St. Lukes School. Life is great, we spend a lot of vacation time at our house in Costa Rica and in the summer we’re most of the time in Watch Hill, RI. I

teaching, acting, directing, and producing plays. He recently shared news of his latest theatrical adventure, “My historical play about jazz singer Billie Holiday, Billie’s Blues, has achieved some success. It won a competition recently with the

Downtown Urban Theatre Festival (dutf) in New York. Out of 2,000 or so play scripts mine won a semiWnalist position, and will receive a reading performance at the Cherry Lane Theatre, the longest continuously running OV-Broadway theatre in the Village. The producers have scheduled a full OV-Broadway production of the play that will open in July at The Cell Theatre (NYC) and plan to run it for six weeks. (Imagine, me...). Mr. and Mrs. Moore I could not attend your celebration of our closely loved thm. I wish you all well." class of 1968 Hayden Ausland is a professor of

classics at the University of Montana in Missoula. He said, “Recently, I

have been active in establishing a partnership between the University of Montana and the University of Tromsø (Norway). I am back in Tromsø now, and will be visiting in the Philosophy Department through June 2009." The College of Charleston recently announced that Professor of Hospitality and Tourism Steve Litvin has been awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to study sustainable tourism development at Ontario’s University of Guelph, which has one of the world’s premier hospitality and tourism programs. As research chair in sustainable commerce, Steve will focus on the tension between tourism growth and livability in a tourism community.

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clockwise from left: Jackson Mizell ’04 and sister Callie; Carson Fowler, son of Gregg ’83; Gordon Miller ’65 and family.

John Romagna was the 2008 All

Daily Record Boys Swim Coach of the Year, leading the Delbarton School Boys Swim Team in Morristown, NJ, to its sixth straight conference championship as well as the Wrst Morris County crown since 1999 and second place in the Prep States A division. John lives in nearby Clinton, NY, with his wife Karen and their two sons, Matthew and Tim. He is a senior vice president with amg National Bank. Chuck Slayton sends his regrets

for not being able to join the Class of 1968 at Reunion. He adds, “I trust I won’t have to wait another ten years to hook up with those guys again. I have been working in a variety of counseling environments for the past twenty years in both alternative and public education with mostly at-risk kinds of kids. I hope to do similar

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work as I’m relocating to Pittsburgh while looking for a doctoral program to keep me occupied. I’m a proud dad to two beautiful ladies, a nurse and a teacher, and a proud new grandfather as of January." class of 1969

ful career with great experiences and locations. I only have six years left until my second daughter graduates from college. I think I will hang it up at that point, but it has been great fun. I am very happy to see the improvements to campus. All the best to my classmates!"

Randall Johnson recently con-

nected with Lou Gnerre, after seeing “Lou’s Corner" in the last issue of Hamptonia. He writes, “I only attended nhs for one year, but I have fond memories of the school and Mr. Gnerre’s guidance. My story after graduation is: four years at Texas Christian University, majoring in mass communications; moving to Los Angeles in 1978, and thirty-two years in the Wlm business in production sound. Nominated for an Academy Award for sound this year for No Country for Old Men, which won Best Picture. It’s been a wonder-

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Steve Cumming is station manager of North Texas Radio for the Blind and continues anchoring news at 570 klif in Dallas. Because he has loads of leftover free time (not really), he also does an overnight oldies show for ABC Radio on Friday and Saturday nights (1–6 am est) heard on nearly 100 aYliates. (He notes that Laconia, NH, is on the list.) He is also working on a startup Internet radio station, greenradio.net, which plans to begin broadcasts in September. The format is talk on all things “green."

Scott Carr passed along a photo of him visiting Dave Hinman and wife Jan on a dive trip to Cozumel a few summers ago. Scott adds, “Please note that Dave still refuses to obey the rules even when they are in Spanish. Tell all our classmates that they need to sign up for one of Dave’s many exotic dive trips even if they are not currently certiWed— Dave will take care of that little detail. A great time is guaranteed!"

class of 1970 Louis E. Letsky recently received a

call from Andy Chelini from Venezuela. He writes that his “last son," one of a set of identical triplets, just graduated as a doctor of pharmacy and he will be beginning a fellowship at the University of New Mexico. The other triplets are both engineers, as is their older brother. Now that all are out on their own


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Louis plans on retiring. He lives in Illinois, just across the river from St. Louis, MO. Jim St. Onge is a corporate credit

analyst for Freudenberg-nok in Bristol, NH. He recently participated in the nhs Golf Classic at Lochmere Golf Club on June 1. Jim married Denise Bolduc, of Concord, NH, on October 13, 2007. The St. Onges reside in Moultonboro, NH. class of 1972 Glenn Baldwin recently contacted the Alumni OYce: “Sorry I missed the big bash Reunion weekend, but I was entered in a motorcycle endurance rally, the Maine 400, which by some Xuke of fate I won. I’ve stopped by a couple times recently to gander at the construction of the new math-science building. Have a great summer!"

class of 1973 Sweed Dalton is leaving ibm after

thirty years to begin a new career as a middle school math teacher. Craig Hammer works at a real estate

brokerage company he created a few years ago, Hammer Residential, llc, in Newton, MA. Visit www.Hammer Residential.com to learn more. Tom Kalvin writes, “I wanted to

make it to the reunion but as the ‘Sgt. of Arms’ of my Masonic Motorcycle Club, Chapter 38, I had to attend a beneWt ride and party for a local fallen Iraq soldier. We’ve sponsored the ride for the last three years and as it grows, so do donations to help his three-year-old daughter. As an eleven-year usmc veteran it is very close to my heart. I am still employed by the Federal Bureau of Prisons and can retire any

day I want, which may be any day. My wife and I are big into XyWshing and last year were on a horseback/ Wshing trip into the Montana wilderness. I hope to pack up my ’03 screamin’ eagle roadking for a roadtrip to NH and Maine in August. See if you can Wnd me at www.chapter38.net." Denis McGonagle sends his best regards to all of his classmates: “Sorry I was unable to attend Reunion. I unfortunately have become disabled due to chronic pain syndrome, but am doing fairly well dealing with all of the medications and physical therapy. I have a sixteen-year-old son who attends B.C. High in Boston. He will be a junior next year and has maintained a 3.9 gpa as well as being an excellent athlete, playing soccer and track. I live in Rutland, VT, and volunteer my time helping people with addiction issues. I have a cadc certiWcate and was recognized by my peers and the Vermont governor for outstanding contributions assisting people in the area of substance abuse and recovery. Hope all are doing well and hope to get back to New Hampton soon." Robinson C. Moore is one of Wve athletes who will be inducted into Bowdoin College’s Athletic Hall of Honor in October. The hall perpetuates the memory of individuals who have brought distinction, honor, and excellence to Bowdoin through their accomplishments in athletics. Rob is being recognized for his incredible soccer prowess as a student athlete. He is currently the assistant head for external relations at Lawrence Academy in Groton, MA, and is an nhs trustee. His daughter, Grace, graduated from Bowdoin this year.

class of 1974 Doug Friedman contacted the

Alumni OYce recently, stating that he had recently been in touch with classmate Rob Nussbaum. Doug is traveling quite a bit these days producing events with nascar and will try to swing by for a brief visit when nascar hits New Hampshire. Kevin Ward recently sent the following update: he has been married since 1985 and has a ten-year-old daughter who ski races. “She made the Rocky Mountain Division of USSA J4 team," he proudly shares, adding he is also a board member of the division and of the Rocky Mountain Masters, through which he avidly ski races. The Wards live in Silverthorne, CO, where he is president and ceo of PC Conferencing, Inc. (www.pcconf.com).

therapy through the Harvard Medical School/meei, coach jazz students through the Fred Haas Studio at Dartmouth and at Interplay Jazz Camp, and have fun touring as a member of the “Pure Nonsense Duo," a Lily Tomlin-style production of silly songs from Opera to Rock and Roll. My daughter, Abby, recently graduated from Landmark College and will continue her studies in early childhood education at Mount Ida College. She is my joy!" class of 1977 Peter Vairo writes that his eldest

daughter, Logan, graduated with honors and the top tennis award from Archbishop Molloy High School in Queens, NY. She will attend Hobart and William Smith Colleges as a biology major. Logan and dad visited Paris and London during Logan’s spring break.

class of 1976 Neil Samuels shares, “My wife

class of 1978

Brooke and I celebrated our 25th anniversary this May. Our older son Ben graduates from Tufts next spring and our younger son Oliver is oV to the University of Vermont in the fall. I’ve been working hard for the Obama eVort in Pennsylvania and was recently elected a delegate to the Democratic National Convention. I am looking forward to having a front row seat as our party and our nation make history in Denver this August."

Christopher Snare is currently living on Lake Sammamish in Redmond, WA, where he enjoys year-round waterskiing. He has a second home in Cebu, Philippines, where he spends winters scuba diving and traveling through Asia. His business is real estate investment and development and notes that times are slow for projects now but it’s a great time to do some strategic buying. He is currently single and enjoys international travel adventures!

Ellen Nordstrom Baer shares, “I am enjoying living in Concord, NH, having recently moved from neighboring Vermont to take over as head of the Voice Department at the Concord Community Music School, one of the ten largest community music schools in the U.S. In addition, I continue to study speech

Tim Hollingsworth runs a land surveying company in Seattle. He is married and has two children and was not able to attend this year’s reunion as he was chaperoning a trip for his son. Next time, Tim!

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clockwise from left: The Nordstrom family gathered at the May 31 gala honoring the Moores; John Pollock ’97; Dan Hinman ’69 and his wife Jan, with Scott Carr ’69.

Dr. Peter Gizzi has published several books and is a professor in the University of Massachusetts system. He hopes to visit nhs sometime soon to oVer a workshop in writing or reading poetry. Steve Hoyt is married with a daughter, eight, and a son, four. A trip to London on business prevented him from returning for Reunion 2008. His company makes electricity from waste heat and business is booming! Bill Seldon writes that his oldest

daughter, Melissa, just Wnished her Wrst year at Rhode Island School of Design and his other daughter, Elizabeth, was on a high school tennis team that was in the Massachusetts state Wnals. He would love to hear from fellow postgraduates and asks, “Steve Trush, where are you?"

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Liz Hassinger returned for her

30th nhs Reunion, and oVered the following update, “I’m still living in Rhode Island, living life as a busy, holistic veterinarian and single mom of Grasa, thirteen, and Marina, Wfteen. I went to the recent reunion, and had a great time and late night at the Margate in Laconia, with Pam Harbach, Anita Pederson, Matt Sparks, Dave Burns, and Cliff Jones ’79. Good friends are still

good friends! It was nice to remember all the good times and hardships of life thirty years ago, and we all enjoyed seeing some of our nhs teachers, like ‘Gook,’ Mr. Diehl, Lou Gnerre, Mr. Golden, Mr. Paradis, Bud Moore, and more... I was very moved by the experience, and grateful to those teachers, they and all the nhs folks made a great eVort and had a big impact on our lives. Always

new hampton school

happy to hear from old pals, my email is wolf42f@verizon.net.”

was that more of my classmates were not there. Thanks!"

Dean Straw added his own com-

class of 1980

ments about Reunion Weekend: “My children and I had a great time at the functions we attended. The formal dinner was done as well if not better than any I have attended. My children were overwhelmed by the size of the campus and the friendliness of all. I had not planned to attend the formal dinner but was invited to attend by a couple of very nice event staVers. I got a chance to chat with the new head of school and was very impressed with him. I believe the community that chose him did a great job. In my humble opinion New Hampton is now the pride of New Hampshire private schools and is blossoming like a beautiful rose. My only regret

Pam Lewis recently called the Alumni OYce to update her information. She would love to hear from her classmates at pamlewis@aol.com. She is currently living in Dubai where her boyfriend is a diplomat. She is learning Arabic and teaching English in a Berlitz School. She especially wants Harrison Golden to know that she is teaching English, after being such a challenging student in his class a few decades ago! Marty Lanigan reports that he is

still alive and well in Basking Ridge, NJ…married, wife Karen, and two children, Mary Kate (thirteen) and Matthew (eleven). He is also still


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happily working at Mezz Cap, which he founded in 2001.

dous turn out with Gregg Fowler, Jen Berry, Jon Tilton, Loraine Hobausz, Adam Smith, Deborah

class of 1981

Finleon ’84, Robin MacEwen,

Betsy Webb reports that she is living in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada, with her partner Carm and their Wveyear-old son DD; “Life is good," she writes, “doing lots of massage therapy, biking with our boy, and occasional sailing."

Lisa Davy, Dan Kinney, Jim

Robert E. O’Brien, Jr. lives in

Duxbury, MA, with his wife Cathy and three sons, Bobby (thirteen), Shayne, and Trevor (twelve). Bob is a wealth management advisor with Merrill Lynch and has been with the Wrm for Wfteen years. John Marrapese is the advertising and marketing director for the Uniform Textile Sevice Association in Washington. He lives in McLean, VA, with his wife of fourteen years, Martha, and their two sons, Cameron (eleven) and Colin (seven). He adds, “a quick shout out to Hal, Skip, Billy, George, and the rest of the crew from the Lewis CC! Coming up on thirty years, boys, let’s get together at nhs in 2011!" Richard Fahy is now a Navy captain working in Tampa as the director of the Joint Operations Center for the U.S. Special Operations Command. He is looking forward to moving back to New Hampshire in the fall to hike and XC ski. He says hi to Kurt, Todd, Eric, Chris, Matt, Kevin, and all the younger classes from Preston Hall where he proctored his senior year.

Gallagher, Elena Carboni, Francesco Theodoli, and Sandy

class of 1987

Cantin joining the festivities. We

Nik Atsalis writes, “After living in the Boston area for approximately Wfteen years my family, which includes soon to be four-year-old George and two-year-old SoWa, are now living full-time in Centerville, MA, on Cape Cod, a few miles from Hyannis where I grew up. It’s great being within walking distance or a short drive of my family, which includes four of my Wve brothers, my parents, and multiple nieces and nephews. Just shy of a year ago I started an information technology recruiting company named Geosof, Inc., based in Hyannis with an oYce in Boston. Best wishes to my classmates who I haven’t seen or spoken with in many years."

had a great time reconnecting. My family and I made the big move to New Hampshire in July. My son Jacob will be attending New Hampton this fall as a junior. His brother Zachary will have to wait one year and will be attending Memorial Middle School in Laconia. My wife Lisa and I look forward to being more involved with the New Hampton community.” class of 1985 Kelly Dyer Hayes and her husband

Chris are doing well and happily announce the arrival of Elizabeth Joan Hayes, born May 27, 2008. Jim Gelatt reports that he was the 2007 national champion of the Platinum Division (ages 40–44) at Steamboat Ski Resort during the Nastar Nationals. He also qualiWed in 2008 at Steamboat in March. More details can be found at Nastar.com.

class of 1986 Tina Mongerson Smith and her

family are moving back to New Hampshire from the Chicago area and she can’t wait. Her daughters, Taylor and Carter are fourteen and eleven respectively and she can’t believe she’ll have a daughter in high school so soon! She sends her best wishes to her nhs classmates.

class of 1983

25th Reunion Chair Keith Noe writes, “Our class recently celebrated our 25th reunion. We had a tremen-

and works for Zuellig Pharma as the executive director of business development and sales force eVectiveness. Tom is single and enjoys triathlons, golf, and traveling around the region.

Tom Birsinger has lived in Asia for eight years (Thailand, Vietnam and Korea). He is currently living in Korea

class of 1989 Robyn (Pelon) Piper and her hus-

band Mike are still happily living on the lake in Moultonborough, NH. Anyone who remembers Robyn’s feelings about sports and Wtness in high school will be surprised to hear that she is in her seventh year managing a Curves Wtness club in Meredith, NH, and to hear that she considers it the most rewarding job she’s ever had! She and her husband participated in a yearlong, online art project called the “TwinGeekz Artz Project," in which participants created one work of art a week to prove their theory that “all creativity needs is a deadline." Robyn’s submissions to TwinGeekz were poems; the project must have gotten the creative juices Xowing as she is now designing and selling a line of greeting cards called “The Picture’s Worth," soon to be featured at thepicturesworth.com. Marnie Hall shares that after her

class of 1988 Jeff Davis sends his regrets for not

being able to attend his 20th nhs Reunion in May. He adds, “I know at some point I will have to sit down and update my crazy life since leaving nhs. Outside of some military experience in Germany for Desert Storm and a professional soccer career in Portugal and Germany, it’s been all hotel industry for me. Graduating from Echols International Hotels and Travel Schools, I have been all over the world. Most importantly, I married Danielle in July 2001 and our son was born in 2002. I still live in Homewood, IL, south of Chicago. I hope the Class of 1988 is doing well and enjoying life to the fullest. I wish all the best and hope that we all meet up soon."

Wance, Edward, returned from Iraq in 2005, they moved from New York to North Carolina and were married in March 2008. Congratulations to Marnie and Edward! class of 1991 Rex Dickson is living in Los Angeles and was married to Glenda Novotny in May 2007. He is lead game designer on Medal of Honor Franchise for Electronic Arts and stays in touch with Lexi Lynch ’92, and more recently reconnected with classmate Brad Ingermann. Joe Plaia continues to enjoy living in Portsmouth, NH, and the many challenges of working as an attorney for the Rockingham County Public Defender’s OYce in nearby Stratham. Joe and his daughter

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clockwise from bottom left: Christopher Snare ’78; self-portrait of Ashley Clark ’04; Kayla Joan Nabors, daughter of Michelle Hoyt Nabors ’03; Rob Mumma ’98 and Marissa Ites married by the sea in Maui and are making their home in Iowa; Rex ’91 and Glenda Dickson.

Catherine were among the hundreds of alumni, friends, and former faculty who toasted the Moores in May. class of 1992

currently revamping her career and leaving the world of social work to pursue more creative options. Melanie and Adam wish everyone from their class all the best!

class of 1994 Melanie Kirkman wants everyone to

know she is doing very well. She lives with classmate Adam Millstein outside of Pittsburgh where he is a full-time emt and Wreman. They have two cats, Sunny and Lulu. Melanie is

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April Corneau Rey is a claims con-

an electronic products wholesale Wrm, which specializes in phones, psp, display TV, notebook, video, computers, mp4, gps, Xbox 360, and digital cameras. She encourages friends to visit www.welecp.com.

sultant at William Gallagher Associates in Boston and shares the happy news that she and her husband, Wilson, are expecting their Wrst child in July. She sends her best wishes to everyone at New Hampton and stopped by the recent young alumni event at Tia’s in June.

class of 1995

class of 1997

Carey Fusick stopped by to visit

In March, John Pollock graduated in the 176th class of the Massacusetts Fire Academy. He is a member of the Agawam, MA, Fire Department.

George Fearons has ventured into

the entrepreneurial world with his own small company, New England Multi Line, representing other company sales eVorts throughout New England. One of the lines he carries, for example, is a company that produces snowshoes for LL. Bean and rei. Check out www.nemultiline.com or e-mail George at george@nemultiline.com for more information.

a ski patroller in the winter while growing her ski equipment business, Jagged Edge Sports.

Nicole Turcotte is working with

New Hampton School recently and discovered the softball award plaque that bears her name (unbeknownst to her until now, it was a gift from Carey’s family in honor of her softball talents at nhs). Carey lives in Denver with fellow nhs alumna, Andrea Milotte ’96 and works as

new hampton school

Jill Wagner Raftery writes, “I

have been living in sunny south Florida for about eight years, work-

ing as a police oYcer. I have been married for Wve years to a fellow oYcer and we are expecting our Wrst child, a girl, in September. I have been serving in the usaf Reserves for eleven years and have recently been promoted to the rank of technical sargeant (E-6). My husband is also in the Reserves. We have two cats and a Jack Russell named Fenway. I will be celebrating our new addition with a baby shower in New Hampshire hosted by Abby Manchester.” class of 1998 Mandy Cronin is running her own hockey school called M-Power Hockey, www.M-PowerHockey.com. After leaving nhs, Mandy played hockey at the University of Maine. She has been living in Toronto for the past six years, playing professional hockey in the Canadian


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clockwise from left: Liz Hassinger ’78, Matt Sparks ’78, Cli= Jones ’79, and Dave Burns ’78; Alan Hackel ’57 and Tom Moss ’58 in Bermuda; (L-R) Stan Bucklin ’71, Steve Lindquist ’71, George Copadis ’71, Sam Worthen ’71, Matt Rutter ’71, Phyllis Nordstrom, Robert Kennedy ’71.

Women’s Hockey League. Mandy will be inducted into nhs’s Athletic Hall of Fame on September 20, 2008. Tamara Milne was among the nhs

alumni running this year’s Boston Marathon in April. She graduated from Boston University with a master’s degree in Wnancial economics and multinational commerce. She purchased a condo in Boston and began a new job at Brothers, Harriman as a project manager for European tax implementation. Rob Mumma married Marissa Ites

in March in Maui, HI, in a small, intimate wedding by the ocean. Rob and Marissa are now residing in Ankeny, IA. Faith Norris is now Faith Anne

McMahon. She attended Radford University; her husband, Christopher

attended St. Lawrence University and received his graduate degree from Boston University. She continues, adding, “Come July 30 there will be a new member of the family! It will be either Owen Christopher McMahon or Brody Christopher McMahon. So far it has been a picture perfect pregnancy. We have lived in Burlington, MA, now for a year and we love it here! We’re planning on moving to Winchester, MA, (borders Burlington) in about a year if renovations to our house go well.” Jarrad Savinelli recently updated his activities since leaving nhs. “I went to college for two years and then got involved in our family business (Fantasy Fireworks, Inc.) for the last three years. I have managed our Hinsdale store and in August I am being appointed general manager of all the stores. I own a home in

Townsend, VT, live with my dog ‘Pyro’ and two cats and still love the outdoors! Thank you New Hampton!" class of 1999 Namsoo “Mark” Im shares that he

is in his third year working for SK Telecom, the largest mobile-telecommunication company in Korea. He works for Global Alliance and Investment and is on business to many countries. He sends his best to all of his nhs friends!

of the Cubs, at a game the other day I ran into Katie Fezekas ’98. I have also had the good fortune of regularly spending time with Collier ‘Squirt’ Drayton ’98 and hope to catch up with our new Chicagoland arrival (another former Husky Hoopster) Brent Klassen ’98. I have no wife, no girlfriend, no kids…just a great job and a lot of free time. Two quick book recommendations for Mr. Redman and Mrs. Berry: The Lovely Bones and The Pillars of Earth. Be well. I hope to see you all at my ten-year reunion next year.”

Jordan Kaufman enthusiastically

writes, “To all my friends at New Hampton, past and present: Everything in my world has been fantastic. My friends and family are all healthy, the commercial real estate business is great, the Cubs are dominating, and there’s no better place to be than Chicago. Speaking

Ryan Miller Peirce writes, “It has been a long time and so much has happened. I am still teaching physics and chemistry at St. Christopher’s School in Richmond, VA. I also coach soccer and rock climbing and help with the yearbook. Also, I have graduated from Virginia

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clockwise from left: Morgan Woodru= ’89 visits Paris; Richard Fahy ’81 with niece Anna and friend; Jim Van Vranken ’56 and his wife Gail.

Commonwealth University with my master’s in education while working full-time. My thesis was on ‘Problem-based Learning in Physics Education.’ In September 2008 I married Gregory Peirce, from Highland, UT. He is a medical student at the Medical College of Virginia. We were married at the lds Temple in Washington, DC. I hope to make it to the ten year reunion!" Alexandra Poh is attending gradu-

ate school at unh preparing to receive her master’s in nursing in December 2008! This summer she will begin working as a new graduate nurse in the Intensive Care Unit at Concord Hospital. She is also planning her wedding for January at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Laconia, NH. Alexandra recently became engaged to Lawrence Fraley of Warren, MI. Lawrence is a chief petty

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oYcer in the Navy and is an instructor at Recruit Training Command in Great Lakes, IL.

musical, Zombie Prom! I think I have Wnally found my calling. Have a great summer!"

Brian and Kristin Stell happily

class of 2000

welcomed their Wrst child, Jameson Joseph, born December 15, 2007. Congratulations to the growing Stell family!

Chris Palmer writes that he has

Marcie Weinstein sends her greetings, “I have a new job this year! After teaching English for three years, I was given the entire Drama Department at Piper High School in Sunrise, FL. We’re a public school of about 3,000 students in the Fort Lauderdale area. This year, we competed at the district and state level with three students earning Superior and Excellent ratings for their performances. We also performed The Mousetrap in the fall, and we had a great experience with our spring

new hampton school

“Taken my graphic design/Web site development company full-time and it is going well. It’s Kenmont Design Group; www.kenmontdesigngroup.com. I get to meet a lot of people, learn about all diVerent types of businesses, etc. I have been in contact with Sean Holt and Kellan Dall (former roommate), and they both are business owners themselves and doing quite well! Sounds like our class graduated a fair amount of entrepreneurs!”

former nhs trustee and father of John Pollock ’97 and Terry Pollock ’94. Created in 2006, Pollock Land Planning oVers landscape architecture, planning, environmental design, and consulting services. Based in central New Hampshire, it is a rapidly growing business; visit www.pollocklandplanning.com. Andrew “Boulder” CameronWalter received his Professional Ski

Instructors of America children’s accreditation. He passed his psia Level I and Level II, and achieved this certiWcation in a shorter period than any other ski instructor at Colorado’s Purgatory/Durango Mountain Resort.

class of 2001 Eric Buck has joined the ranks of the self-employed with business partner and mentor, Robert Pollock,

Lisa Falconi and David PerWeld have announced their engagement. Lisa taught and coached at nhs


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from 2006–08. She will attend graduate school at Boston University beginning in September to pursue a master’s degree in school counseling and will also begin her internship in counseling at the Fay School. David has been a member of the nhs community for the past seven years as a science teacher, head football coach, and admission associate. He joined the Alumni and Development OYce in July. An August 1, 2009, wedding date has been set. Congratulations to Lisa and David! Topher Harlow recently updated the Alumni OYce on his endeavors. He is heading to Mt. Hood, OR, to work with former nhs Ski Coach David Edry in one of his camps. He will return to New Hampshire this fall to student-teach and Wnish his undergraduate degree. Topher was recently named head coach of Plymouth State University’s Men’s and Women’s Ski Team and is excited to begin this next chapter of his life. Euginnia Manseau is still living in

Vail, CO, working for Ski and Snowboard Club Vail. She was able to travel to China last spring, visiting friends in Hong Kong, Shanghai, and Beijing. She hopes to visit New Hampshire and her East Coast friends during the summer. Ian Moses stopped by to visit cam-

pus recently. He is living in Manchester, NH, and working as a residential adviser in a home for boys with special needs, a challenging position that he Wnds to be very rewarding. He continues to maintain his interest in the arts, especially the theater. Halary Patch is engaged to be

married next summer. Hallie is com-

pleting her graduate studies in nursing at Boston College. Daniel Rawson is working and liv-

ing in Lakeland, FL, and attending graduate school at night. He is teaching middle school in Bartow. Nora Trochim writes, “I recently

received a masters in arts management degree from George Mason University. I currently work for the Wise Giving Alliance of the Better Business Bureau, where I evaluate national charities. I recently got engaged and will be getting married May 30, 2009." class of 2002 Tarren Bailey recently exhibited her photography alongside that of Amy Wilson, director of the Galletly Gallery and the nhs Visual and Performing Arts Department. Both were part of a photography exhibit at Terra Perma in Laconia, NH. Mark Baldwin earned a spot on the Korean pga Tour when he Wnished the Wnal round of the 2008 Korean Tour Q-School tournament with a score of seventy-one, one under par. Follow Mark on the tour on his blog, markbaldwinsgolf.blog spot.com.

class of 2003 Dr. Allan Haddad Jr. writes, “I

graduated from Duquesne University in 2005 with a doctorate in pharmacy. I met my wife Katie in pharmacy school. We married in September 2006 and have been living in Sherbrooke, Quebec. We have recently bought a home, and we love it. We have a border collie puppy named Marlo and a cat named Mila. We enjoy golWng a lot, and I still play hockey (ice in the winter and roller in the summer). We are opening a pharmacy in Sherbrooke under the banner name of Familiprix. It will be a dream come true as I try my best to follow in my father’s footsteps. It will be hard work, but hard work never killed anyone. Take care, miss you all!" Michelle Hoyt Nabors writes, “I

got married May 16, 2007, to a southern gentleman named Derrik Nabors. I graduated from usc upstate in May and live in Williamston, SC, in a beautiful house that we had built. We had daughter, Kayla Joan Nabors, in December 2007. I miss home but think the south is going to be my home now. I hope everyone up there is doing well." George Kan recently shared news

Tristan Poh recently connected

with the Alumni OYce, sharing that he and his wife Marsha moved to San Antonio where Tristan did some joint Xight training with the Air Force. This past March, Lieutenant Junior Grade (ltjg) Poh earned his wings as a naval Xight oYcer and is currently stationed in Jacksonville, FL, where he will begin training as a navigator on the P-3 Orion. He and Marsha are enjoying sunny Florida with Moose, their new boxer.

of his activities, “I am currently working in a Honda dealership in Huntersville, NC, as a certiWed express technician. We do maintenance on mostly recent Honda production vehicles or some earlier models. I left the Savannah College of Art & Design to attend University Technical Institute at North Carolina, nascar Technical Institute. I completed the general automotive repair and nascar Technology, plus advance training courses with Nissan natt, and I

also gave the class graduation speech. I have received many certiWcations and awards but seems like it is not enough to get on the professional teams in nascar or any higher professional series in motor sports. I guess I will set my goal up to Formula teams and see how far I can go. I am applying to the University of North Carolina Charlotte for motor sports engineering. I am proud to live here as part of the motor sports industry; believe it or not Dale Earnhardt, Jr. lives right down the road from my house!" Nathan Spencer is living in

Ketchikan, AK, where he works as a manager/buyer for Tongass Trading Company. He sends a big hello to his classmates from the “Land of the Midnight Sun!" class of 2004 A. Jordan Akerley writes, “I gradu-

ated from Wellesley College with a BA in sociology, then moved to Boston where I will work as a paralegal in the OYce of the Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley’s Health Care Division." Ashley Clark was a “Best of

College Photography" Wnalist in a contest sponsored by Photographs Forum and Nikon. Over 4,000 college students from around the world sent in photographs and only 200 were chosen. Clark will be published in the Best of College Photography Annual 2008, and was also published in the Centripetal Literary Journal. Both photographs being published were from a black and white series titled “women in the Struggle," which highlighted the various roles of women. The series gained much recognition and was featured in various newspapers.

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clockwise from left: Alexandra Poh ’99 and >ancée Lawrence Fraley; Tom Birsinger ’86 and friends; Herschell Norwood’s ’66 playbill.

Later Clark was accepted as the only student out of Wfteen professional artists in the photography exhibition “Minotaur in the Mirror: Artists Focusing the Lens on the Self." Clark is currently creating large scale black and white photographs for the show. She graduated from Plymouth State University majoring in graphic design with minors in art history and imaginative writing. She was on the Dean’s List and captained the nationally ranked DII Women’s Rugby Team. Kristen Eisner recently completed

an internship in the nhs Admission OYce. She graduated from Elmira College with a degree in psychology and is beginning to explore graduate school. In the meantime, she is working as a lifeguard closer to home in Meredith, NH.

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Ian Franklin shared, “Following graduation I am adrift in the sea of opportunity, currently without anchor or sails (base or direction). I hope to get a job where my anthropology degree may be of use, such as working as an archaeology contractor (cultural resource management) or in a museum. Grad school is in the long-term plan. I hope the changes at nhs over the past four years have been constructive and I wish my classmates good health and luck." Chelsea Graham, a senior at Simmons College in Boston, received the prestigious Fulbright Scholarship for her study of diabetes in Mexico. She is one of the 151 Fulbright award recipients for 2008–09 in the Western Hemisphere. Christopher Hart graduated magna cum laude from Wheaton College in May with an undergradu-

new hampton school

ate degree in economics. He recently joined Atlantic Trust in Boston and is enjoying work and life in the big city! Amanda Herman shares, “My little girl, Izzy (Isabella) is doing great. She’s about twenty-one months now and getting bigger and more beautiful everyday. My Wancée, Nathan, and I have high hopes for her future and we talk about her attending New Hampton one day. Nathan and I are still trying to Wnd the time to plan a wedding while chasing our daughter around. When it does happen we will let you know and send pictures! I’m Wnishing up my bachelor’s degree with a focus in religion. I’m just a couple of classes away and I can’t wait. I know my love for history came from my favorite classes taught by Ms. McShane. I hope everyone at nhs is doing well. The changes on campus look wonderful and I can’t wait to see the Wnished project."

Craig Leaman sends his best wish-

es to all his classmates, former teachers, and coaches at nhs! He is doing well at the University of Vermont and will graduate next year. Jackson Mizell has joined the 2nd

Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment “Golden Dragons," 10th Mountain Division out of Fort Drum, NY. class of 2005 Matthew Buck continues to live, work, and attend school near Bangor, ME. He is pursuing dual degrees in Wre sciences and emergency medical services through Southern Maine Community College where he recently made the dean’s list. He works part-time for the Milford, ME, Fire Department and is in the midst of WreWghter training at Milford as well as preparing to complete his emt certiWcations. He sends his best to all his nhs classmates and teachers!


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at left: Lisa Falconi ’01 and David Per>eld. top: 1944–45 class photo, sent in by Harold Callis ’45. Harold has asked that anyone in the picture who is “still moving” please get in touch with him at haroldcallis@comcast.net. A larger version of this photograph is available for review online at www.newhampton.org/alumni.

Krystin Hickey became the ninth Wheaton College women’s basketball player, and the Wrst junior, to reach the 1,000-point plateau. One of the team’s captains, Krystin earned New England Women’s Basketball Association all region honors during the 2006 season. Congratulations Krystin, keep up the terriWc work! Soh Hee Hwang visited campus in April. Soh Hee is a junior at the University of Wisconsin majoring in sociology. She was able to reconnect with favorite faculty members Helen Clary, Doug MacKinnon, Katka FarrWilliams and her all-time favorite staV member, Bonnie Martin. Colin Lynch was recently selected

by the San Diego Padres in the second day of Major League Baseball’s 2008 amateur draft. This would mean forgoing his senior season at St. John’s University and he is in the

process of making the diYcult decision to join the Padres or complete his senior year. Lynch Wnished the 2008 campaign 4-1 with a 3.58 era and thirteen saves. His twenty-three career saves places him three away from matching the school’s all-time record. If he does not sign, Colin will be eligible for next year’s draft. He throws a fastball, curve, slider and changeup, with his fastball clocked in the 91–94 mph range and his changeup between 77–78. St. John’s University recorded a school-record forty-two wins this year. Brendan Poh is a religious studies major and Naval rotc midshipman at The College of the Holy Cross, and will start his senior year this fall. This past spring at the annual Naval rotc President’s Review he was the recipient of the Vernon Hill Post No. 435 American Legion Award for outstanding campus involvement. This

fall Brendan will assume a leadership position in the rotc battalion. class of 2006 Tommy Tessier returned to his alma mater in January through a sixweek, Colby College internship. He enjoyed looking at nhs through the eyes of an alumnus.

class of 2007 Kaitlyn Hart writes that she will travel to London this summer for a six-week study abroad program with the University of Tampa. She sends her best to all her nhs friends and family! John Westland recently learned from Sen. John Sununu (NH) that he has received an appointment to the U.S. Air Force Academy beginning this fall. After graduating from nhs, John attended Valley Forge Military Academy and Junior

College in Pennsylvania, working hard toward this impressive accomplishment. Congrats to our very own Whitey! John Pietkiewicz is enjoying col-

lege and playing basketball for the Flagler College Saints. Pietkiewicz led the team to a 20-7 season, with 15.1 points per game and drained 81 “threes" at a 38 percent clip. He also hit 86 percent of his free throws, and was good for 3.6 assists per game from his shooting guard spot. The icaa Conference recognized him on the All-Freshmen Team and third team All-Conference. Please send your news and photos that you want to share with the NHS community to alumni@newhampton.org.

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correction Kenneth Dustin Cressy ’43 is alive (spring 2008 issue listed a Kenneth Daniel Cressy ’43 as deceased). This should have been listed as Daniel W. Cressey ’48. Our apologies to the Cressy and Cressey families for this error. F class of 1936 Joseph Edmund Powers, Sr. passed away June 14, 2008, and was buried in the New Hampton Cemetery. Joseph Edmund Powers, Jr. ’65 was among the family members who spoke at the service. F class of 1941 Donald B. Graham, 85, died on May 10, 2008. Mr. Graham was born in Watertown, MA, a son of George C. Graham Sr. and Helen French Graham. He graduated from Ridgewood High School (NJ) in 1940. After that he went to New Hampton School, where he graduated in 1941. Mr. Graham was very active in sports as a varsity member of the soccer, hockey, and baseball teams, but his real love was the game of golf. In the summer of 1940 he met the love of his life while working at a resort in New Hampshire. In 1941 he enlisted in the U.S. Air Force and was called to active duty in late 1942, was commissioned as a second lieutenant and assigned as a pilot of B-24s in Fogia, Italy, in 1944. Mr. Graham was on a mission June 13, 1944 on a German run when his plane met disaster. Fortunately he had a seat pack parachute that saved his life. He was captured and placed in Stalag 3 until liberated by Patton’s Army in 1945. Mr. Graham was awarded the

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Purple Heart. On his return home he married Eleanor Timmie Tyrer on June 30, 1945 in Tilton, NH. Mr. Graham graduated from the University of New Hampshire in 1949. He was the merchandiser administer of Hu=man and Koos Furniture Company until 1979, then went into the real estate business and became owner and broker of Atlantic Realty Company of Pawleys Island, SC. Mr. Graham was a charter member and past president of the Pawleys Island Lion’s Club. He also was a charter member of the Sea Gull Men’s Golf organization, charter member of Hagley Estates Home Owners Association, a member of the Pee Dee Golf Association and the Tri-County Golf Association, and life member of Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1086, Midland Park, N.J. Mr. Graham was predeceased by two brothers, Captain Lindal Graham and George C. Graham Jr. Surviving are his wife, Eleanor, three children, a sister, and a great-granddaughter. F class of 1943 Melvin S. McLeod, Jr. of Bedford, MA, and a sixty-year summer resident of Wolfeboro, NH, died Monday, July 9, 2007. He was 82. Mel was born in 1924 and attended Melrose High School (MA) and graduated from NHS. He went on to Cornell University where he graduated in 1949. He worked for Payne Elevator Company in Cambridge from 1950 until 1970 retiring as an executive assistant to the president. Mel shared >ftysix years of marriage with his late wife Elizabeth (Eaton) McLeod. He is survived by son Scott E. McLeod and his wife Joan; Catherine A. McLeod, and Elizabeth M.

LeBoeuf; brother of the late Norman L. McLeod; and >ve grandchildren. F class of 1945 Edward H. Locke, 80, of Lake Oswego, OR, died March 11, 2008. He was born in 1927, attended NHS and then Waltham Watch Making School followed by the University of New Hampshire. In 1951 he met Grace L. Maunsell and the two were married. Mr. Locke took a job with the St. Paul Insurance Company and was transferred to Lake Oswego in 1970. He then worked for Fred S. James and Co. Mr. Locke taught skiing until age 78. Survivors include his wife of >ftyseven years, Grace, his son Robin H. Locke, his daughter Heidi Locke-Talbot, his sister Marjory Locke, and >ve grandchildren. His son Ted H. Locke died in 2003. F class of 1946 Dr. Marvin C. Adams, 79, of Cape Elizabeth, ME, passed away peacefully on Jan. 4, 2008. Born in Bangor, ME, in 1928, he graduated from NHS, completed his undergraduate studies at the University of Maine, and professional studies at the University of Vermont Medical School. He completed his internship at Maine Medical Center before serving his country as >rst lieutenant in the U.S. Navy at Brunswick Naval Air Station as a base physician. Marvin maintained a practice in Ear, Nose, and Throat medicine in Portland, ME, for thirty years, retiring in 1990. Marvin is survived by the love of his life, Glenna (Billings) Adams. They celebrated their sixtieth anniversary last summer. He is also survived by four children, April V. Adams and


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i n m emoriam

l-r: Dan McLeod ’65; Ryan Haran ’97; “Papy” á Nyam ’06.

her partner Dana McEacharn, Victoria A. Lindquist and her husband Eric, Susan E. Adams of Brooklyn, NY, and Stephen A. Adams and his wife Caitlin. Marvin leaves four grandchildren and one great-grandchild, a brother, as well as numerous cousins, nieces, and nephews. F class of 1952 Douglas G. Grandin, Sr., 73, longtime Simsbury, CT, resident, died December 24, 2007. He leaves his wife of >fty years, Deborah (Lecraw) Grandin. Born in Tena?y, NJ, in 1934, he graduated from NHS and Lehigh University. He served in the U.S. Army Signal Corps as a part of the Allied occupation forces in Berlin, Germany. A mechanical engineer who earned his MBA from the University of Hartford, Doug worked for several area machine tool companies and was an o;cer of the Society of Mechanical Engineers. In addition to his wife, he will be missed by his daughter

Nancy and her husband Joe Campolieta, and his son Doug and his wife Lisa. He leaves four beloved grandchildren, a sister, a brother, and three nephews. F class of 1956 Howard G. Forbes of Dallas, TX, died in 2007. F class of 1965 Daniel B. McLeod, 61 of Sunapee, NH, died April 2, 2008. He was born in Concord, the son of Ambassador R. Scott McLeod and Edna (van Pappelendam) McLeod. McLeod served as president of the New Hampshire Automobile Dealers Association (NHADA) from 1988 until this past December. Dan was designated a National Automobile Dealers Charitable Foundation Ambassador at his retirement in December. Mr. McLeod served as administrative assistant to the New Hampshire House Majority Leader from 1978–80. Prior to that,

he was an associate professor of social sciences at the New Hampshire Vocational Technical College in Berlin. Mr. McLeod did his graduate studies in education administration at the University System of New Hampshire, the University of Maine, and the University of Virginia. He attended the University of Denver and obtained his BA in history from Nasson College in Maine. He served as vice chairman on the board of trustees of the New Hampshire Community Technical College System. Last June, McLeod was the recipient of the 2007 Daniel Webster Council of the Boy Scouts of America Distinguished Citizen award. He served on the Concord Board of Directors of Child and Family Services. He coached soccer for many years, at several levels; from youth soccer to the college level. He was one of the founding coaches of Concord’s Youth Soccer program and was its >rst all-star team coach. McLeod was an accomplished

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athlete, with a great love for skiing and kayaking. He played the guitar, composed songs and had a deep appreciation of music. Dan was also a gifted >ne furniture maker. Dan leaves his beloved wife of thirty-eight years, Debbie, his son Ben McLeod and his wife Nikki, his daughter Molly McDonald and her husband David, and four muchloved grandchildren. He leaves a sister, Anne Ryan; his brother, Van McLeod ’65, and his wife, Joan Goshgarian; his brother-in-law, J. Barry Coughlin, and his wife, Jo Ann; his sister-in-law Roberta Tenney and her husband Rodney; and nieces and nephews. F class of 1969 Charles F. “Tony” Weisner II, 56, of Upton, MA, died on March 13, 2008. He was the beloved husband of Elizabeth L. (Fiekers) Weisner, to whom he was married for seventeen years. Mr. Weisner was born in Manchester, CT. He attended NHS and the University of Denver, and worked as a construction site supervisor for Nash Development and then for Co Energy America until becoming disabled by a spinal cord stroke in 2003. In addition to his wife, he leaves two sisters. He was also a loving uncle to >fteen nieces and nephews and eight greatnieces and great-nephews, and a beloved brother-in-law to ten. F class of 1997 Ryan Haran, of Basking Ridge, NJ, passed away on Friday, July 18 after a long battle with cancer. He was 29. Born in New York City, he later resided in Basking Ridge and attended the William Annin School, and NHS. He graduated

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dean’s list from Fairleigh Dickinson University, Madison, NJ, with a BS degree. He attended the Chubb Institute in New Brunswick, NJ, completing an advanced program in computer science with honors. He was employed by Xerox in Santa Monica, CA, prior to his illness. He is survived by his parents, Lynda Montoya Haran and NHS Trustee Luke John Haran, Jr. of Basking Ridge; and his brother, Devin Patrick Haran of New York City. He is a grandson of the late U.S. Senator Joseph M. Montoya of New Mexico and Della R. Montoya and of the late Luke and Katherine Haran of South Dartmouth. The Ryan Haran Scholarship has been established at New Hampton School. The family would appreciate donations to this scholarship in his memory. For more information, please contact Cindy Buck, 603.677.3414; cbuck@newhampton.org. F class of 2006 Frack Audrey Menghe á Nyam ’06, known to all as “Papy,” passed away suddenly on Sunday evening, June 29. He had been playing in a pick-up basketball game at Adelphi University on Long Island when he collapsed and lost consciousness. Papy had recently transferred to Adelphi from Canisius College, where he also played basketball. Entering New Hampton School in the fall of his junior year, he was an honor student and member of the Varsity A Men’s Basketball Team and the Varsity Lacrosse Team. He received the Multicultural Diversity Award at Commencement 2006. Papy was born in 1987 in Cameroon, Africa, the youngest of ten children.

Associate Director of Admission Cathy Creany was among the many members of our community who knew him well. She said, “He had a smile that lit up a room. Papy was so radiant, loving, and positive. He was quite spiritual, very kind and self-reliant, and worked hard at school and athletics.” On Thursday, July 3, a memorial service was held at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Laconia. Plans are underway for an all-school memorial service during the next academic year. At the memorial service on July 3, fellow Cameroonian and NHS classmate Radar Onguetou ’06 spoke about his dear friend, observing, “Papy would not want any of us to stop smiling and spreading hope even when everything seems dark. He always had hope and went after it, and he would want us to be as committed as he was.” F former staff Dorothy G. Noakes died on January 12, 2008. Dorothy was born in 1918 in New London, NH. She graduated from Colby Hill School, Sunapee High School, and Concord College of Business. After moving to New Hampton, she was the bookkeeper for New Hampton School for thirty-eight years before retiring in 1983. Dorothy resided in New Hampton since 1945. Her husband, Frederick L. Noakes, died in 1984. She was also predeceased by two brothers, William and Norman Green and one sister, Lillian Wilson. She is survived by a daughter Shirley; a stepson, William; a stepdaughter, Mary; ten stepgrandchildren; thirty-three step-great grandchildren; twenty step-great great grandchildren; three sisters, Marie, Bertha, and Ruth; and nieces and nephews. F


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athletic hall of fame to recognize athletic achievement Two years ago, New Hampton School established an Athletic Hall of Fame to recognize and honor outstanding individuals who share the school’s rich athletic history. The Hall of Fame Committee consists of the head of school, assistant head of school, director of athletics, director of alumni relations, as well as former and current faculty members and an alumni representative. Nominations are accepted throughout the year and reviewed on an annual basis in early June, at which time the next year’s slate of inductees is selected for one of the following categories: Coach, Male Athlete, Female Athlete, and Team. The list of nominees continues to grow and your help is needed to ensure that we have as representative a slate as possible. Please review the quali0cations and take a few moments to complete and return the nomination form below for those nhs alumni or coaches whom you feel are deserving of this special honor. Many thanks for your interest and assistance! eligibility Eligibility shall not begin for student-athletes until ten (10) years after the class of which the person was a member has graduated from New Hampton School for Male Athlete Nominees and seven (7) years after the class of which the person was a member has graduated from New Hampton School for Female Athlete Nominees. Coaches eligible for induction must have coached a minimum of seven (7) years at New Hampton School. For teams, eligibility shall not begin for student-athletes until ten (10) years after that team’s 0nal date of completion. qualifications Any New Hampton alumna/us who has attained outstanding recognition or superior accomplishments in any sport is eligible for nomination. The nominee shall be chosen on the basis of playing ability, integrity, sportsmanship, character, and his or her contribution to the team or teams on which she/she played, and to New Hampton School. nominee

years at nhs

sport (s) your name

your e-mail address

your telephone

Please include a paragraph about why you feel this individual or team is deserving of induction into the New Hampton School Athletic Hall of Fame. You can return this form to Director of Athletics Jamie Arsenault, New Hampton School, 70 Main Street, New Hampton, NH 03256 or visit our Web site at www.newhampton.org/athletics.


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trustees officers Jason M. Pilalas ’58, Chairman, San Marino, California Peter W. Galletly ’73, P’09, Vice Chairman, Mahwah, New Jersey William F. Guardenier ’62, Finance Chairman, Mt. Kisco, New York Michael F. Mumma P’98, Secretary, Je=erson, Iowa members Dr. Sanders Abrahams P’07, Raleigh, North Carolina Steven G. Delaney ’65, Harrison, New York Erik A. Dithmer ’49, New York, New York M. David Giardino ’49, Trustee Emeritus, Princeton, New Jersey Ruth J. Haivanis P’04, West Newton, Massachusetts Paul Hamel P’07, P’08, Vice Chairman Peter Galletly ’73, Head of School Andrew Menke, and Chairman Jason Pilalas ’58 dig in at the groundbreaking ceremony for the new Math-Science Center.

Walpole, Massachusetts Luke J. Haran, Jr. P’97, Basking Ridge, New Jersey Herman A. Hassinger P’77, P’78, Trustee Emeritus, Block Island, Rhode Island

In October, Chairman of the New Hampton School Board of Trustees Jason Pilalas ’58 will be succeeded by Chairman-elect Peter W. Galletly ’73. This transition re?ects a healthy school and two men who share a love for their alma mater, an appreciation of service, and a deep mutual respect. Each remains steadfastly committed to the New Hampton School culture and community which sheltered, challenged, and uniquely transformed them. It was entirely >tting then that they shared this spring’s groundbreaking ceremony for the new Math-Science Center, as joyously depicted above. The conceptualization of the center and its initial construction are among the many signi>cant achievements of Pilalas’s soon-to-be-completed tenure, just as surely as next year’s completion and dedication of the facility will represent highpoints of Galletly’s turn at the helm.

Jason and Peter are both talented professionals who lead passionately by example, though each defers personal credit. Their service to New Hampton School is unsel>sh and unwavering, yet this represents just one facet of their lives, for both are also successful businessmen, devoted family members, and earnest contributors to their communities. Their hard work and dedication is leavened with warmth and humor. People naturally feel at ease and accepted in their encouraging presence. New Hampton School is very fortunate indeed. When the board chair’s baton is passed in October, the school’s highest level of leadership and stewardship will continue without missing a beat. Please visit www.newhampton.org/ Hamptonia to access In Service to New Hampton School, an appreciation of these two remarkable men by Director of Alumni and Parent Relations Cindy Buck.

Samantha Jewett ’77 Gilford, NH William S. Karol P’08 Westwood, Massachusetts Robert D. Kennedy ’50, GP’10, Chairman Emeritus, New Canaan, Connecticut Deborah Woodward Leach P’96, Attleboro, Massachusetts Earl R. Lewis ’62, Sudbury, Massachusetts Richard W. Maine ’60, Avon, Connecticut Robinson Moore ’73, Groton, Massachusetts T. Holmes Moore ’38, Headmaster Emeritus, New Hampton, New Hampshire Hugh B. Richardson ’57, Bristol, Rhode Island Karen M. Saunders P’08, Gilford, New Hampshire Geo=rey Winters ’62, Greenwich, Connecticut

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from the development committee chair If New Hampton School is measured by numbers alone, it has been the most successful year in the school’s fundraising history. New Hampton School closed its >scal year on June 30, 2008, having received $4,936,918 in gifts to the school. Led by two gifts of over $1,000,000 each, NHS has proven itself a worthy partner in philanthropic investments at the highest level. With all of our support in mind, it is my pleasure, as chair of New Hampton School’s Development Committee, to share the following Report of Gifts for the 2007–08 year. And what a year it has been! With a powerful new Strategic Plan as our roadmap, New Hampton School is surging ahead in every area, led by the growing support of our alumni, parents, friends, and trustees of the school. With your support, New Hampton School faculty and students have the tools and resources they need to provide a world-class education, grounded in the principles that have de>ned the school for over a century: excellence in education and a commitment to social service in our community. If you have not been back to New Hampton recently, I encourage you to return. The campus is vibrant and full of machinery! The new Math-Science Center is growing steadily from the ground up and it looks spectacular. Internally, new programs like Chinese(to begin in September) and the addition of a new global curriculum coordinator are signs that NHS is on the move. Come back to school — you will be amazed. A few highlights of the year include the following: r An anonymous pledge of $4,000,000 was completed this year, leading the way in the construction of the new Math-Science Center to be dedicated in September 2009. r A gift of $1,200,00 from Robert D. Kennedy ’50 and his wife, Sally, provided the capital for a new synthetic turf >eld, invaluable in the challenging New England climate. r Alumni pledged $1,100,000 for the T. Holmes ’38 and Norma Jean Moore Scholarship Fund (toward an ultimate goal of $2,500,000). r Faculty and Sta= reached 92 percent participation in the Annual Fund. r Over 430 alumni, parents, and friends of the school returned for Reunion Weekend and the Bud and Jinga Moore Gala. These are just a few of the wonderful successes the school has enjoyed this year. In the past three years New Hampton School has

realized 37 percent growth in the Annual Fund to a record total of $824,618 this year. The school raced past the unrestricted goal, hitting $744,457. Support for NHS came from all corners of the campus and the globe. Led by our trustees with 100 percent support, our faculty and sta= set an all-time record with 92 percent participation —a wonderful achievement. Parent participation was an impressive 58 percent and alumni participation grew to 13 percent. Thank you to everyone who participated in the Annual Fund e=ort! My deepest gratitude to Alumni Fund Chair J. Philip O’Hara ’51; Parents Fund Chairs Karen and Timothy Saunders P’08; Parents of Alumni Fund Chairs Sanders and Jeanne Abrahams P’07; Grandparent Fund Chair Sheila Weeks P’81, GP’08, ’09; and Faculty and Sta= Fund Chairs and Representatives David Per>eld, Stacey Redman, Maureen Huber, Beth Grosart, and Cory McClure. Reunion giving played a big role in the total dollars raised for the school this year. Support from Reunion year alumni was over $236,521. The school enjoyed the help of many volunteers, parents, alumni, and student callers, who collectively raised over $60,000 through successful phonathon e=orts. Thank you to all of our volunteers. From the Boston Museum of Science Skyline Room to the NHS Golf Classic, school events drew ever-increasing crowds. Reunion Weekend 2008 was capped with a gala celebration honoring Bud and Jinga Moore. Over 430 alumni, former and current faculty, trustees, family, and friends gathered under a festive white tent on May 31 to honor and celebrate the Moores. On behalf of the board of trustees, thank you for your ongoing generosity and support. We do not take your gifts for granted — every gift, of every size, represents an investment in the future of our school community of over 8,000 students, alumni, parents, trustees, faculty, sta=, and friends. For the tangible and intangible support you provide, I o=er my personal thanks. Respectfully,

Deborah Woodward Leach, Trustee and Chair, New Hampton School Development Committee Parent of Jed Leach ’96

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above: Lou Gnerre, our Alumni Ambassador, looks forward to hearing from you. Look for his latest thoughts in “Lou’s Corner” p. 38. at left: The New Hampton School Alumni and Development O;ce is here to serve you. From left: Cindy Buck, Sarah DeBenedictis, Ryann McCann, David Per>eld, Sandy Colhoun, Pam Susi, and Jerrica Gray.

from the director of development Bud Moore. Lou Gnerre. Sam Worthen. Sumner Hawley. Harrison Golden. Mark Tilton. After three years at New Hampton School these NHS legends are >rmly planted in my mind. Traveling across the country, meeting alumni and parents, I have had the chance to hear hundreds of stories about the celebrated >gures who helped create the history of our school; but faculty are only one part of the equation — without students, without alumni, there would be no school. To all New Hampton School alumni I say: “welcome home.” Again and again, throughout the course of our Reunion Weekend, when we celebrated Bud and Jinga Moore’s decades of contributions, I heard alumni say they felt like they were coming home. We have ?ung the doors wide open and I hope all of you will return to campus to see what’s happening. You will be amazed. We are incredibly proud of the direction NHS is headed. This year your school secured multimillion dollar support usually reserved for colleges and universities. With $4,000,000 from an anonymous donor the new Math-Science Center is growing from the ground, and a million dollars from Robert D. Kennedy ’50 and his wife, Sally, built our new turf >eld. And this was just the beginning. Alumni and parents made hundreds of gifts that herald a new era of investment in New Hampton School— and for this support we say thank you! We hope you will agree that NHS is worthy of your support and we’ll work hard to gain it.

To accomplish the goals the school has laid out, the Alumni and Development O;ce has added new sta=. New Hampton School welcomed Pam Susi as assistant director of annual giving last fall and Jerrica Gray as gifts administrator and planned giving assistant in the spring. On July 1 two new sta= formally came on board: Ryann McCann, administrative assistant, and David Per>eld, development o;cer. We are thrilled to welcome these key new additions to the team. These new sta= join a well-honed crew that includes Cindy Buck, director of alumni and parent relations; Sarah DeBenedictis, director of annual giving; and Lou Gnerre, alumni ambassador. We are here to serve you. In the coming months and years you will be hearing more from us as we add new publications to our outreach (both in print and electronically) and host events both near and far. Those of you whom I have met, I look forward to seeing you again soon, and for those we have not been in touch with, welcome back — we can’t wait to see you here on campus. Best wishes,

Sandy Colhoun, Director of Development

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thank you! New Hampton School is fortunate to have many loyal alumni, parents, faculty and sta=, grandparents, friends, and countless others who are committed to the school’s development. We present the proof of that commitment in these pages — full of the names of families, individuals, and organizations that have given so much to New Hampton School this year. Although we cannot possibly list the names of everyone who volunteered, we want to acknowledge and thank all of our valued supporters equally for their meaningful gifts of time and attention. The 2007–08 Annual Report acknowledges all gifts received by New Hampton School during the >scal year July 1, 2007–June 30, 2008. In an e=ort to recognize each donor and provide a comprehensive account of every gift, credit is given to all supporters of New Hampton School’s fundraising e=orts. Corrections or questions should be addressed to:

above: Sandy Colhoun, director of development. below: Kennedy Field, our new synthetic turf athletic >eld (left) and the new Math-Science Center (right) are just two of

Sandy Colhoun Director of Development New Hampton School 70 Main Street New Hampton, NH 03256 603.677.3413 scolhoun@newhampton.org

the many gift highlights made possible by donors this year.

The >nancial totals reported herein represent unaudited >gures and may di=er slightly from the >nal audited reports of the school. Every e=ort has been made to ensure their accuracy for publication in this report prior to the o;cial audit. From all of us at New Hampton, thank you once again for your support.

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5

fy08 annual fund sources of giving

4 3

1 2

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Alumni: 47% Parents: 29% Parents of Alumni: 8% Matching Gift Companies and Foundations: 11% Faculty, StaV, Grandparents, Friends, Former Faculty: 5%

total from all types of giving fy08: $4,936,918

annual fund growth

FY05: FY06: FY07: FY08:

$595,941 $631,038 $794,630 $824,618

Amounts include both restricted and unrestricted funding. FY05

revenue

3

FY06

45

FY07

FY08

6

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

2 1

Tuition (84%):† Endowment income (6%): Annual Fund (5%):‡ Summer Programs (2%): Auxiliary Services (2%): Other (1%): total:

expenses

$11,665,415 $837,720 $744,457 $219,202 $304,646 $74,744 $13,846,184 *

5

4

1

3 2

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Salaries and BeneWts (52%): Operating Expenses (15%): Facilities (includes utilities) (15%): Financial Aid (16%): Tuition Remission (2%): total:

$6,643,768 $1,969,976 $1,868,574 $2,075,000 $306,000 $12,864,018 *

†Annual per-student boarding tuition is $38,500; day tuition is $22,500. ‡Amount includes unrestricted funding only. *Revenue and expense amounts are unaudited as of publication date. 60

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endowment funds

The Anonymous Endowment Fund The Academic Research Center Endowment Fund The Mary E. Avery Fund The Mary A. Bartlett Fund The JeVrey Pratt Beedy Scholarship Fund The Ellen Brown and George Woolsey Bierlin Trust Fund The Mr. and Mrs. William Edwin Bierlin Sr. Trust Fund The Butler Book Endowment The Butler Scholarship Fund The Class of 1948 Book Endowment Fund The Eva Dodge Fund The W. R. and S. C. Dow Fund The David and Eleanor Eldredge Fund The Farrelly-Gilmore Fund George and Sandra Fearons Endowed Scholarship Fund The Ora Field Fund The Edward E. Ford Fund The Donald R. Galletly Scholarship Fund The Harrison Golden Endowed Fund for Professional Development The Gurnett Trust Fund The Learning Center Endowment Fund The Richard Lilly Scholarship Fund The Agnes M. Lindsay Trust Fund The A. Stanley Little Fund The Loeb-Tomasko Fund The Charles G. MacVane, Jr. Scholarship Fund The Mildred McEvoy Fund The Fred Merrow Fund Milne Fund The T. H. Moore and Norma Jean Moore Endowed Scholarship Fund The Nolet Project Fund The Guy Alang Ntang Scholarship Fund The Ordway Lecture Fund The Ordway Student Aid Fund The Robert A. Phillips Scholarship Fund The Provost Scholarship Fund The Restricted Endowment Fund The David Rice Fund The Donald S. Richardson Tennis Scholarship Fund The Fritz Robbins Fund The Fredrick and Grace Smith Fund The Richard Sterndale Fund The William D. Stirrup Fund The Tessier/Tyson Cross Country Scholarship Fund The Mark Tilton Endowed Fund for Professional Development The Unrestricted Endowment Fund The Dewitt Wallace: Reader’s Digest Endowed Fund The Leslie J. Weed and Alice H. Weed Scholarship Fund The Woodman Fund

total endowment:

market value june 30, 2007

total gifts received this year

market value june 30, 2008

$452,352 $2,063,885 $592 $8,500 $574,505 $120,875 $78,561 $49,363 $12,559 $16,345 $52,001 $106,255 $14,167 $22,626 $0 $14,167 $131,345 $643,923 $0 $224,015 $25,122 $54,933 $73,670 $96,553 $27,180 $42,261 $14,167 $14,167 $472,059 $0 $37,810 $11,217 $4,248 $28,334 $32,345 $10,000 $768,084 $110,894 $37,859 $56,668 $72,720 $24,840 $172,259 $31,173 $5,000 $2,857,188 $174,407 $378,000 $4,248

$89,025

$474,661 $1,880,539 $519 $7,453 $544,754 $115,724 $69,007 $44,975 $11,978 $14,987 $45,593 $93,161 $12,422 $23,529 $217,502 $12,422 $119,220 $686,420 $47,685 $319,381 $26,010 $45,859 $64,592 $89,644 $25,922 $40,461 $12,422 $12,422 $413,885 $16,443 $30,434 $10,835 $3,725 $24,843 $38,302 $19,551 $695,826 $97,456 $36,390 $49,685 $74,087 $21,779 $175,449 $29,315 $52,454 $2,437,922 $166,974 $705,171 $3,725

$10,172,857

$48,164

$100

$1,950 $227,184 $109,000 $50,000 $140,256

*$1,077,241

$10,500 $150 $4,664 $11,000 $1,000 $50,000 $393,366

$2,213,600

$10,163,512

*includes planned gifts

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giving societies T the meservey leadership circle T $10,000 or more

T the manitou society T $5,000 to $9,999

T the frederick smith society T $2,500 to $4,999

T the headmaster’s circle T $1,000 to $2,499

T league of benefactors T $500 to $999

T friends of new hampton T $250 to $499

T the belfry society T Honoring donors with >ve consective years of contributions

leadership donors New Hampton School recognizes and deeply thanks individuals who make giving to the school a priority and who make that commitment at the highest levels. Leadership donor contributions are an indispensable element of the school’s life and the cornerstone of New Hampton School’s future. This year, 246 leadership donors contributed an incredible $4,164,477 in restricted, unrestricted, and capital donations. the meservey leadership circle Anonymous The Argyros Foundation Mr. and Mrs. George Argyros Mrs. Stephanie Argyros Gehl Arnold Baggins Foundation, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Roger Ballou Mrs. Rose Bethe

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Mr. Yuli K. Bethe Mr. and Mrs. Thomas K. Churbuck Conneston Construction, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Dailey Mr. Frank Dennen Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Mr. J. Christopher Flowers and Mrs. Mary White Mr. H. Jonathan Frank Mr. Yanbin Fu and Mrs. Weijuan Zhang Mr. Robert C. Galletly (deceased) and Mrs. Pauline B. Galletly Mr. and Mrs. Peter W. Galletly Dr. and Mrs. Peter J. Grillo The Lola B. Grillo Foundation Mr. and Mrs. William F. Guardenier Mr. Paul Hamel and Mrs. Cheryl Hamel Mr. and Mrs. William S. Karol Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Kennedy Mr. and Mrs. Hwan Kyoon Kim Mr. Akira Kurosaki and Ms. Monica Bethe Mr. and Mrs. Sang Hun Lee Mr. and Mrs. Earl R. Lewis III Mr. Lawrence C. Lyon

new hampton school

Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Maine Mr. Melvin S. McLeod Jr. (deceased) Mr. and Mrs. T. Holmes Moore Mr. and Mrs. Michael F. Mumma Mr. Hyung Jin Oh and Mrs. Kyung Soo Han The Paul and Cheryl Hamel Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Jason M. Pilalas Mr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Provost Mr. Kyu Chong Seo and Mrs. Young Ja Oh Mr. and Mrs. Jin Ho Shim Mr. William A. Stirrup Mr. Leslie and Mrs. Alice H. Weed (deceased) White Flowers Foundation Mr. and Mrs. William L. Yeager the manitou society Mr. and Mrs. Steven G. Delaney Mr. and Mrs. Erik A. Dithmer Ms. Carole Griner Mr. and Mrs. Sung Joo Kim Mr. and Mrs. Edwin F. Leach Mr. George H. McEvoy The Mildred H. McEvoy Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Eugene B. McLean Premier Laser Cutting LTD Mr. and Mrs. Eugene E. Rainville Mr. Choung-Shik Shim and Mrs. Hee Ja Byun Mr. Dong Won Shin and Ms. Eun Kyung Choi Mr. and Mrs. Greg Wagner the frederick smith society Dr. and Mrs. Sanders L. Abrahams Mr. and Mrs. Gary J. Beban Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Berry Mr. and Mrs. Kirk Buttermore Mr. Shaun P. Carroll Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Gary Caruso Mr. and Mrs. John Delea Mr. Preston N. Eames Mr. and Mrs. Peter Evans Mr. Thomas J. Fitzgerald Mr. Dougall C. Fraser Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Galletly

Mr. JeVrey D. Glidden Mr. and Mrs. Edgar V. Guardenier II Mr. and Mrs. George Haivanis Mr. and Mrs. Hong Gil Han Mr. David L. Heald Mr. and Mrs. Kent Holce Mr. and Mrs. Dean P. Jacobson Mr. and Mrs. Wayne D. Maggio Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Menke Mr. and Mrs. Keith A. O’Hara Mr. Thomas Rollins Mr. M. Whitson Sadler Mr. Hong Sup Song and Mrs. Yoo Jin Chung Mr. Yong Gu Yoon and Mrs. In Ja Lee the headmaster’s circle Mr. Myles J. Ambrose Anonymous Dr. Martin Baskin Mr. Brian Bassett Mr. Peter J. Bergen Mr. and Mrs. JeVrey S. Black Ms. Caroline Boeckman The Boeckman Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Chornyei Mr. Gordon E. Clement Mrs. Erika Holmes Collins Mr. and Mrs. James C. Comosa Mr. Craig B. Corson Mr. Alan B. Crocker Ms. Jill A. Duncan Mr. Charles A. Ernst III Mrs. Antoinette Fallon Mr. Joseph D. Gahtan Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Galletly Jr. Ms. Grae Garl Mr. William H. Goldberg Mr. and Mrs. Luke J. Haran Jr. Mr. David E. Harvey Mr. and Mrs. Herman Hassinger FAIA Mr. Richard A. HilWker Mr. Jeremy Hiltz Mr. David N. Hinman Mr. and Mrs. James Horner Mr. Charles W. Howard II Dr. Ki Hung Hwang and Mrs. Hye Kyung Lee Ms. Samantha Jewett, Esq.


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Mr. David H. Jones Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Karger Mr. and Mrs. Graeme G. Keeping Mr. Jin Won Kim and Mrs. Hyang Ja Park Dr. and Mrs. Wonsuk Kim Mr. and Mrs. Morton J. Macks Ms. Holly E. Maine Mr. and Mrs. John B. Mattes Sr. Mr. Jeremy C. McCamic Mr. and Mrs. Jeong Hyun Moon Mr. and Mrs. Robinson C. Moore Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Morse Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Moss Mr. Thomas J. Motley Esq. Mr. William C. Moyes Mr. John M. Muldoon Mr. J. Philip O’Hara Mr. Henry H. Peterson Governor Walter R. Peterson Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Pollock Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Reich Mr. George S. Robinson Jr. Mr. Robert A. Ross Mr. Leo-Pierre Roy Mr. William C. Saturley Mr. and Mrs. James Shaughnessy Mr. Frederick Smith Jr. Mr. Robinson V. Smith Mr. Peter A. Stirrup Mr. and Mrs. Sung Yong Tak Mr. and Mrs. Jon Tallarida Mr. and Mrs. Michael A. Tamposi Mr. and Mrs. Laszlo Tanos Mr. John F. Teague Mr. and Mrs. Thomas N. Tessier Mr. Robert H. Traylor Mr. and Mrs. Vince Tulley Mr. Arthur W. Vietze Jr. Mr. Robert W. Warburgh Mr. R. Bruce Weeks Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Rudolph L. Wise Ms. Valerie Wiseman Mr. Kyung Hoon Yoo and Mrs. Insoo Lee Mr. Robert L. Zirinsky league of benefactors A. Haigh Cundey Foundation

Mr. David Abraham Mr. Byron A. Allen Jr. Andrews Construction Co., Inc. Mr. Charles L. Bardelis Mr. William E. Barrott III Mr. Robert T. Bennett Jr. Mr. John Buck and Mrs. Suzanne Walker Buck Mr. James E. Buckley Jr. Esq. Mr. Bedford W. Chandler Dr. Lawrence A. Churchville III Mr. Sandy Colhoun and Ms. Selina Rossiter Mr. Christopher B. Collins Mr. and Mrs. Michael P. Conforti Ms. Lois Cornell Dr. Cecelia Cox Mr. A. Haigh Cundey Mr. George Evans Mr. and Mrs. William Fallon Mr. Robert A. Feldman Mr. David Finder Dr. Marc Frader and Ms. Janis Hersh Mr. Richard B. Gadd Dr. Edwin B. Goodall III Mr. Cary Gordon and Ms. Cathy Creany Mr. Jonathan G. Granger Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Haas Mrs. Bryna Haber Mr. and Mrs. William A. Harloe Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Alan Hart Mr. John B. Hess Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Peter Jacobi Mr. and Mrs. William J. Jordan Mr. Jonathan A. Karalekas Mrs. Ann Kent Mr. Keith Kidder Dr. James F. Klein K-Mac Professional Home Builders Captain and Mrs. Daniel A. Lewis USN (Ret.) Mr. Ronald J. Logdahl Mr. and Mrs. William Marcotte Mr. James S. McEntegart Mr. Henry H. McIntosh Mr. Robert H. McLeod Metro Lacrosse, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. James Miller

Mr. and Mrs. Randall Minton Dr. Thomas H. Moore Jr. Mr. James A. Morison Mr. and Mrs. Joseph J. Naparlo Mr. and Mrs. John O’Neal Ms. Amy Patenaude-Gunn Mr. Stephen H. Perry Mr. and Mrs. James Pines Mr. Daniel P. Rawson Mr. Michael P. Reardon Mr. and Mrs. Hugh B. Richardson Mr. R. Edward Rose Jr. Mr. James G. Salvucci Mr. George B. SchoWeld Ms. Peyton E. Schreiber Mr. James D. Shattuck Dr. and Mrs. Richard Smith Southern Craft Manufacturing, Inc. Dr. Joel B. Stern Mr. and Mrs. James M. Taylor Mr. and Mrs. Peter D. Thomson Mr. and Mrs. Terry Topercer Mr. Henry D. Towers Mr. James L. Tuite Mr. Allan R. Turner Mrs. C. Wesley Tyson, Jr. Mr. Robert L. Underhill Mr. Walter W. Ungermann Mr. Owen M. Ward Mr. Whitney O. Ward Mr. Robert-Grant Wealleans Mr. Robert N. Weeks Mr. Paul A. Weinman White Mountain Lacrosse Club Mr. George L. Winlock Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Wolcott friends of new hampton Dr. and Mrs. Ronald F. Altman Anonymous (3) Astral Mr. Richard A. Aube Mr. Raymond J. Barnes and Mr. John Reilly Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Barry Ms. Victoria A. Blodgett Mr. Arthur M. Brink Jr. Mr. Ralph A. Brown Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Buck

Mr. Allan T. Buros Jr. Mrs. Thelma Burrows Mr. James M. CariWo Mr. John P. Carter Mr. Richard A. Cascio Mr. John R. Chagnon Mr. David L. Chambers and Dr. Michele LeComte-Chambers Dr. Dale R. Childs Mr. Steven E. Clancy Mr. Robert B. Coan Mr. and Mrs. George W. Cook IV Mr. JeVrey Corbett Mr. Edwin M. Corns III Dr. Paul M. Costello Mr. J. Barry Crawford Mr. Thomas E. Crocker Mr. and Mrs. Patrick DeBenedictis Dayton Foundation Depository, Inc. Ms. Barbara K. Doud Mr. Roger A. Durant Mr. and Mrs. John F. Embersits Fargo Fund of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation – Monadnock Region Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Fendler Mr. George R. Geehan Jr. Mrs. Marilyn Geller Mr. W. Lawrence George Mr. John J. Gilbert Jr. Mr. Gregory C. Golembe Mr. Robert P. Goodman Ms. Marie Green Mr. Robert M. Greene Mr. Lloyd S. Grunvald Mr. and Mrs. Richard Hage Mr. Robert H. Hardin Mr. Julian C. Harrison Mr. and Mrs. Gregory P. Helms Mr. R. Christopher Henry Dr. and Mrs. Scott Horton Mr. Mark C. Iber Irving and Bernice Singer Family Foundation Mr. CliVord Jones III Mr. and Mrs. Soon-Jin Kang Mr. GeoVrey D. Kapp Mr. William C. Kerchof Mr. Jay F. Kimball

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Ms. Kirsten E. King Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. King Mr. John D. Knapton Mr. Benjamin A. Kudary Mr. and Mrs. Eric W. LaCroix Mr. Matthew S. Lambert Mr. Philip W. Lobo Mr. William B. Logie Mr. Duncan C. MacInnes Mr. Richard S. Mackay Mr. and Mrs. Richard Masland Ms. Maureen McDermott Mr. and Mrs. John J. Meany Mr. and Mrs. Douglas A. Mirk Mr. Albert F. Mogerley Mr. John P. Morin Mr. Frank Motley III Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Murdough Mr. John P. Naparlo Mr. and Mrs. Leo Nocera Mr. David F. Noyes The Patricia M. and H. William Smith, Jr. Foundation Mr. Frederick M. Peyser III Mr. Robert J. Pludo Mr. George P. Ponte Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Raynor Mr. James P. Richey Mr. Paul J. Ritzman Mr. and Mrs. Donald W. Rockel Major R. S. Rodriguez Mr. Matthew M. Rutter Mr. and Mrs. Charles Sabolis Mr. Joseph Sampson Mr. Edward J. Sanson Mr. Robert E. Sanson Mr. Thomas W. Saturley Mr. Jarrad B. Savinelli Mr. Philip W. Sawyer Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Schreiber Ms. Marion Seltzer Mr. John L. Senning Mr. and Mrs. Brian Serville Mr. Mark D. Sherburne Mr. Michael S. Sherwood Mr. Carl D. Smith Mr. H. William Smith III Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Smith Jr.

Mr. Stanton T. Smith Mrs. Tina C. Smith Mr. Matthew A. Sparks Mr. Charles R. StauVer Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Donald Stevens Stobezki, Zelitsky & Co., LLC Mr. and Mrs. Michael H. Sydney Mr. and Mrs. Charles Thrower Mr. and Mrs. Mark Troiano Mr. Harold A. Uttley Jr. Mrs. Lynn H. Van Cleave Mr. Douglas T. Viles Mr. A. Arnold Waterman Ms. Sheila Weeks Mr. and Mrs. Allen Williams reunion giving Reunion class gifts are a critical component of New Hampton School’s Annual Fund. This year, Reunion classes contributed a total of $236,521. The classes had a record breaking turnout for Reunion Weekend—May 30 to June 1, 2008. More than 430 alumni, spouses, children, and current and former faculty enjoyed sharing stories from days past while learning about New Hampton School today. The school extends its gratitude to all Reunion volunteer leaders, committee members, and donors. gifts from alumni New Hampton is grateful for the unmatched >nancial support from its alumni, as well as the commitment and strong leadership of alumni volunteers. Great things are happening at New Hampton and pride among our alumni continues to grow. Alumni are the foundation of all support for New Hampton School. Alumni value and appreciate their New Hampton experi-

alumni fund Alumni donations comprised 55 percent of the goal of the Annual Fund, contributing $390,000. Without philanthropic support from alumni, New Hampton School would not be thriving in its 187th year of educating young people. New Hampton truly needs your continued support. Our gifts are an essential and integral part of the overall operation of the school. Those of you who donated this year should be pleased to have been a part of this tremendous eVort and I thank you for joining me. We look forward to welcoming new alumni to our donor lists in the coming years. Wonderful memories and connections abound from my years as a student, alumnus, and trustee, and in observing my granddaughter Kate’s ’06 own experience at New Hampton. I feel fortunate to be a member of the New Hampton School family and am pleased to have served as alumni fund chair this year. J. Philip O’Hara ’51 Alumni Fund Chair Grandfather of Kate O’Hara ’06

ence, giving back in order to provide today’s students with the same opportunities.

class of 1938 T. Holmes Moore 

class of 1922 Leslie Weed (deceased)

class of 1939 George B. Boone Richard L. Swift 

class of 1932 Robert C. Plumb Edward E. Seaver

class of 1940 Henry D. Towers  Ralph B. Welsh Jr. 

class of 1936 George N. Bartemus Jr.

class of 1941 George C. Congdon Roger L. Creighton John J. Gilbert Jr.  Donald B. Graham (deceased) William H. Gunther John M. Robinson 

class of 1937 Craig Barker  John F. MaxWeld III  Frederick V. Newman

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Samuel L. Spalding  Frank R. Vose class of 1942 Kendall M. Dolbeare  Robert C. Galletly (deceased)  Roger C. McPherson  Walter R. Peterson  Howard G. Seaver  Edwin L. Sherrill Jr.  M. Daniel Smith  Robinson V. Smith William L. Yeager  class of 1943 Carlton F. Evans Rodger V. Lyons Melvin S. McLeod Jr. (deceased) Edward J. Sanson Owen M. Ward class of 1944 Myles J. Ambrose  Louis F. Auger Ira C. Foss Jr. David E. Harvey  Francis J. Holleran  Rockwell Holman  Robert W. Lyons Ralph S. O’Connor  Robert N. Patchett William W. Rankin  Robert E. Sanson  Stanton T. Smith  class of 1945 Oliver B. Bragg  F. Thomas Burke III Howard E. Butler Harold B. Callis G. Paul Denecke  W. Lawrence George William C. Kerchof  Robert W. MacArthur  Frederick Smith Jr.  class of 1946 Gerald F. Anderson 

Irving B. Cushing  Thomas P. Fendler  Robert J. Kurtz Jeremy C. McCamic  Richard P. North James P. Richey  class of 1947 Constantine P. Bart  Gordon E. Clement  Robert B. Coan  William H. Cummings Jr. Collier Holmes Robert C. Luse John L. Threshie Allan R. Turner  John A. Veazey  A. Arnold Waterman class of 1948 Robert S. Barlow  John R. DuVett  Ralph A. Edson Jr.  Eugene L. Harley  Charles M. Hines  Joseph W. Hoos Allan H. Jodrey  William B. Logie  D. Bruce Marshall  William A. Swarts Jr.  class of 1949 Byron A. Allen Jr.  Edward B. Balmer  Conrad F. Buck  Erik A. Dithmer  Robert N. Dodge Richard K. Herring  Theodore A. Jones Jackson E. Lewis  Kenneth L. Lincoln Thomas C. Morganstern  William H. Perry III  Robert L. Underhill class of 1950 Peter J. Bergen Richard A. Cascio

James L. Conrad Jr.  Stephen H. Erwin Peter E. Gall Robert D. Kennedy  John D. Knapton Charles R. Leader Jr.  James G. Paine  W. Reid Pepin George B. SchoWeld  Carey T. Smith  Arthur W. Vietze Jr.  class of 1951 Albert W. Bailey A. Haigh Cundey Allan F. Hodgkins  Gerald T. LaMarque  Earle P. MacGillivray Jr. J. Philip O’Hara  Dean C. Schambach class of 1952 Thomas E. Crocker  Douglas G. Grandin (deceased) Alan J. Levenson  Donald S. Noot Robert G. Reed Jr. Kenneth W. Spalding Jr.  John H. Vohr  John B. Young class of 1953 Anonymous William E. Barrett  William J. Blemings Thomas GaVey John A. Nordhouse  Charles F. Oliver III  Frederick S. Pepek Sr. George P. Ponte Carl D. Smith  Harold A. Uttley Jr. Robert N. Weeks class of 1954 Robert F. Blakeley  Richard M. Ezequelle  Normand V. Ferdinando

Chester E. Nichols II  Peter N. Phillips  Hugh L. Spitzer Anthony C. Torti  class of 1955 Ralph A. Brown  Shaun P. Carroll Sr.  Bedford W. Chandler Richard A. Cote  Raymond E. Fisher Allan W. Haynes H. Lester Leland John T. Metzger  Kenneth R. Olson Michael P. Reardon Cephas B. Rogers III Richard L. Seavey  Joseph A. Spitzer  William H. Sullivan Jr. class of 1956 Anonymous John H. Allen Burton Baker John R. Bostwick Thomas M. Browne James E. Butler Jr.  Reginald H. Clark Richard W. Cleveland Richard B. Gadd  Raymond C. Houlden Richard P. Kleinknecht Donald L. Oppenheim Robert A. Pollard Richard L. Trombly Thomas D. Vohr Henry S. Warren class of 1957 David Abraham  Robert H. Cross  Roger A. Durant  Barry S. Gilvar Carter G. HaV  Edward M. Koplow  Daniel G. Larson Jonathan J. Li

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Frank W. LiVolsi Jr. George H. McEvoy  Peter Neisel  Robert J. Pludo  Eugene E. Rainville  Hugh B. Richardson  David B. Sterling John E. Tannar Ray S. Youmans Jr. class of 1958 Anonymous William A. Champney Dale R. Childs Hooper W. Cutler J. Peter Donovan Thomas J. Fitzgerald  H. Jonathan Frank  John W. Frankel Matthew J. Garston Jonathan G. Granger W. Grant McIntosh III Robert W. McKeen  Robert H. McLeod James A. Morison  Thomas B. Moss  John M. Muldoon James W. Muldowney Henry H. Peterson  Jason M. Pilalas  R. Edward Rose Jr.  Robert A. Ross James G. Salvucci James D. Shattuck Thomas H. Slayton  Gard R. Thompson class of 1959 J. Barry Crawford  Edgar V. Guardenier II  Webster L. Harrison  Peter L. Hinkeldey Peter B. Hollis  Walter J. Olson Jr. Barry H. Orenstein Eric T. Philippi  James M. Richardson  M. Whitson Sadler 

Frederick J. Slamin Allen E. Smith Peter A. Stirrup  James H. Walker Jr. John F. Younger Jr.  class of 1960 John P. Carter  William C. Descary Josiah H. Drummond Jr.  Charles A. Ernst III  Robert A. Feldman  Evan E. Heckel  G. Duncan Kendall Charles W. KirchhoV Philip W. Lobo  Richard W. Maine  Henry H. McIntosh  John C. Mead Ronald W. Meckfessel David L. Smith  Walter W. Ungermann  class of 1961 George W. Bierlin Kenneth G. Burr Jr.  James M. CariWo William J. Fisher II Joseph D. Gahtan Robert M. Greene  Julian C. Harrison  Keith Kidder Cesar A. Maso George S. Robinson Jr. Richard B. Sizer Fred R. Tripp  George L. Winlock  class of 1962 Richard A. Aube  Robert T. Bennett Jr.  Arthur M. Brink Jr.  James E. Buckley Jr. Richard R. Cleverly Frank Dennen  William F. Guardenier  David L. Heald  Alden C. Johnson 

Earl R. Lewis III  James C. Lowell  Norman A. Plaisted  Richard W. Sears  John L. Senning  Thomas C. Steinmetz  Robert W. Warburgh  class of 1963 Thomas T. Beeler William D. Benisch R. Stuart Bicknell Gerald I. Brecher Allan T. Buros Jr. Frank T. Copenhaver  Thomas A. Donovan Jr. Dougall C. Fraser Jr.  George D. Kittredge III Alexander Lincoln III Gary F. Margolis  Walter McKay Jr. Jack A. Metcalf Thomas H. Moore Jr. James M. Noonan Charles R. StauVer Jr. class of 1964 CliVord S. Bonney  Michael P. Conforti  Edwin M. Corns III John W. Ehrlich  R. Christopher Henry  Frederick W. Jean Christopher M. Klein  Richard S. Mackay  Albert B. Mark Peter A. Meneghin Eric L. Neu JeVrey C. Pattee Richard A. Shmishkiss John F. Teague Robert L. Zirinsky  class of 1965 Kent L. Bicknell Steven G. Delaney  Michael V. Elliott Alan P. Goode 

Frederick J. GriYn Jr.  Robert H. Hardin Karl W. Henry John B. Hess Jr. Charles M. Koutsogiane  Kevin K. Lynch D. Van McLeod  Gordon I. Miller Jr.  Stephen W. Schultz  Donald M. Stalker Steven H. Taylor Frederick J. Walker  class of 1966 Neale T. Adams  Marc E. Atkinson Milton K. Brown Jr. Lawrence A. Churchville III David C. Coen  Roland D. Fasano Gregory C. Golembe Edwin B. Goodall III Hilary D. Jean Robert S. King  James F. Klein  Duncan C. MacInnes  Frank Motley III William C. Moyes  David F. Noyes Eric K. Pearson Donald E. Porter Paul J. Ritzman Rodney D. Thorn  Lance M. Tibbetts  Paul A. Weinman class of 1967 David W. Brainard Rufus B. Hurst David H. Jones  John S. Yancey  class of 1968 Craig B. Corson Paul M. Costello Lansing K. Deane  Thomas H. Freese Lawrence B. Garland 

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JeVrey D. Glidden  Matthew E. Hinzpeter Dean P. Jacobson Dean Johnson Allan R. Johnston Stephen W. Litvin Robert L. Parrish Frederick M. Peyser III John A. Romagna  Gordon R. Rose Robert E. Samuel Thomas W. Saturley  Philip W. Sawyer R. Neil Stalker JeVrey K. Tulis Robert-Grant Wealleans class of 1969 Donald F. Barry R. Scott Carr Henry F. Goode Jr.  Thomas R. Haufe Peter C. Hendrick David N. Hinman Paul A. Lazdowski  Richard M. Taylor  class of 1970 Rodney J. Bascom  Eddie C. Cobb Jr.  John B. Horton Willie M. Jones Thomas F. Monahan Robert S. Tatigian class of 1971 Peter H. Baker Charles S. Bucklin Charles E. Eastman Robert C. Galletly Jr.  George R. Geehan Jr. Robert M. Kennedy Stephen A. Lindquist Peter S. Lyon Sean M. Maguire William P. Oberndorfer III  Matthew M. Rutter H. William Smith III

Douglas T. Viles  Whitney O. Ward  class of 1972 William J. Box Jr.  Raymond A. Buskey Jay D. Haber Jay F. Kimball  Benjamin A. Kudary Ronald J. Logdahl  Thomas J. Motley  Whang Phang Michael S. Sherwood  Holli Hamel SiV  Allen S. Tailby Michael A. Tamposi Frederick C. Willingham class of 1973 Anonymous Charles J. Burch  Stuart E. Chandler  Barbara K. Doud Peter W. Galletly  William H. Goldberg  Thomas H. Haas Brandon J. Little Robinson C. Moore  John P. Morin  William C. Saturley  class of 1974 Kenneth W. Blood Robert P. Goodman Terri Hamel Haas Robert W. Heyer Jr. Stephen H. Perry  Peter N. Richmond Donald F. Robinson John B. Warters class of 1975 Clark R. Caplan John R. Chagnon Elibet Moore Chase Lois Dehls Cornell Catherine Storms Fischer Mark C. Iber

Leo-Pierre Roy  T.J. Scammon Judith Abbott Tamposi Elizabeth Munro von Keller class of 1976 Elizabeth Bingham-Johns Richard D. Frame Jr. Jay P. George R. Scott Rodriguez Neil Samuels  Robert J. Webster Mark W. Zurwell class of 1977 Bruce S. Bogart  Steven E. Clancy  Samantha Jewett Paul T. King Thomas R. Pynchon  William J. Schneiderman  James L. Tuite James G. Walker  class of 1978 Anita Pederson Galletti Cheryl A. Geerhold-Quilty Amanda Miller Harrington Matthew S. Lambert  Frederick W. Moynihan Peter F. Quilty Joseph H. Saturley William P. Seldon  Gayle L. Sharpe Matthew A. Sparks class of 1979 Thomas K. Churbuck Lloyd S. Grunvald CliVord Jones III Robert D. McGuire Lyford A. Merrow Amy Patenaude-Gunn  Michael E. Reingold  Charles G. Smerlas 

class of 1980 Victoria A. Blodgett Hal D. Cohan Phebe T. Gulick H. R. Hawkes Jr. Jonathan A. Karalekas  Steven E. Leinbach Scott D. Peters Allen P. Zornow  class of 1981 Carolyn Porter Baumel Patrick F. Bigg Matthew B. Driscoll Laurence D. Gale  Robert A. Price Jr. R. Bruce Weeks Jr. class of 1982 Hubert B. McDonough Joel B. Stern class of 1983 Jennifer Shackett Berry  Henry Ferris Gregg E. Fowler  Richard A. HilWker  Loraine Greenwood Hobausz Matthew S. McKenna Keith F. Noe JeVrey S. Shackett Mark D. Sherburne Adam M. Smith Jon S. Tilton  Robert W. Vetromile Jr.  class of 1984 Eric F. Buer Susan Healey Gavitt  Arthur Mezzullo III  class of 1985 Lynn Hetherington Van Cleave class of 1986 Christopher B. Collins Vincent J. Every Bradford P. Hazeltine

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parents’ fund We are deeply grateful for the tremendous education our son, Patrick ’08, received at New Hampton School. We know that he will do well thanks to the solid foundation New Hampton School has provided him and are very grateful to the incredible community members who have played such an integral part in preparing him for the world beyond NHS. To show our appreciation we support the school’s Annual Fund and are pleased to have served as the parents fund chairs for the past two years. Thanks to the remarkable generosity of so many of our parents, the New Hampton School Parents Fund achieved an outstanding 58 percent participation rate this year. Karen and Tim Saunders Parents’ Fund Chairs Parents of Patrick Saunders ’08

GeoVrey D. Kapp Tina Mongerson Smith Daryl J. Thomas class of 1987 Gara B. Field Faith Mershon Goldberg Matthew B. O’Donnell Pavel Perlov class of 1988 Cary M. Allen Stephanie A. Argyros Gehl Cathy Whitman Barber Peter T. Smith class of 1989 Sarah Rice Cutler  Anne Landry Hile Andrew F. Martz

class of 1990 Paul N. Olenik  class of 1991 Brian Bassett M. GeoVrey Carlton II Christopher A. Kennedy class of 1992 JeVrey Corbett George T. Fearons Alexandra Schenck Lynch  class of 1995 Samuel D. Webster  class of 1996 William AuWero Samantha M. Brann Erika Holmes Collins Peter D. Tourigny

class of 1997 J. Ryan Haran (deceased) Jarrad B. Savinelli class of 1998 Megan E. Collins  Melanie A. Dirig-Grasso Gregory G. Friel class of 1999 Gabrielle A. Killmer Mark K. Raab class of 2000 Michael J. Levine Warner Nickerson Christopher J. Palmer class of 2001 Eric R. Buck  Ashley K. Dorian Lisa A. Falconi Matthew S. Gulley Craig W. HoVman Peter F. Hutchins Jr. Erin J. O’Toole Daniel P. Rawson Lesley A. Robbins  class of 2002 Tarren M. Bailey Matthew G. Burroughs Jessica A. Kang John P. Naparlo class of 2003 Jillian D. Nugent Nathan L. Spencer class of 2004 A. Jordan Akerley Yuli K. Bethe Bradford M. Crocker Thomas Q. Driscoll class of 2005 Alexander C. Albert Matthew K. Buck

Kirsten E. King Peyton E. Schreiber James F. Watkins III Kevin M. Williams class of 2006 Ida Dyment Brady Morningstar Kate F. O’Hara Thomas N. Tessier class of 2007 Thomas A. Crocker Victor Gennaro Kaitleen M. Gillis Kaitlynn E. Hart Trevor C. J. Hogan Brian A. Norville Jean M. Troiano Laura H. Weigle class of 2008 Eric M. Barlow Nicoya M. Borella Whitney Brown Dana B. Buckley Nicholas E. Caruso Yen-Shuo Chen Annie G. Couvillion Brianna V. D’Ambrosio Paul Evans James M. Fagan Matthew Hamel Leah E. Heal Michael S. Helms Caitlyn Homer Young Jun Kim Peter A. Kovacs Allison Lee Matthew C. Marini Sayde P. Mohr Jae Hyon Moon Samantha A. Morse Jessica H. Nissenbaum Arianna N. Puleo Julie Randall Kyle C. Raynor

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Zachary E. Redman Kyle Reich Jessica L. Repko Rachel Rollins Katherine L. Seraikas Casey J. Shaughnessy Ji Hoon Shim Alexander I. Slover Hyun Seo Tak Melanie E. Tamposi Andrea L. Winking memorial gifts gifts made in memory of: Guy Alang Ntang ’07 (2) Edwin H. C. Angell ’31 Kurt Bolstad ’98 Kimberly Craft ’02 Richard Wright “Buck" Ellison Robert C. Galletly ’42 (52) Dr. Sanford (Sandy) E. Geller ’68 Col. Donald F. Perkins USAF (ret.) ’39 Robert Phillips ’42 Denise Natter ’93 Andrew Sloan ’97 Arthur L. Sullivan Jr. ’37 Robert Van Buren ’40 (2) James T. Ward ’66 gifts made in honor of: Brady Black ’04 Tommy Black ’06 Norman Brown Jarred Everette Cowart ’98 Alan Crocker Alitia Cross ’88 Erin Marshall Cyr ’00 Louis Gnerre Bert Lamb Richard Maine ’60 Jeremy and Amy Mathison T. Holmes Moore ’38 (4) T. Holmes and Norma Jean Moore (3) New Hampton School Faculty and StaV Justin Norris ’10 Olivia Norris ’08 J. Philip O’Hara ’51 Ryan Porcelli ’01

Austin Stern Mark Tilton gifts from current parents The tremendous success of the Parents’ Fund was a result of the generosity of so many New Hampton parents, as well as the dedicated work of all Parents’ Fund volunteers. With over 58 percent participation our parents contributed $222,690 in unrestricted and restricted support to this year’s Annual Fund. The willingness of parents to commit >nancial resources to the school in addition to tuition makes a meaningful di=erence to our faculty and students. For that, ew Hampton School extends a very heartfelt thank you. Anonymous (6) Robert and Laura Alexander Norma Jean Andrews-Gore Elizabeth Armstrong Frank and Barbara Attardo Michael and Michelle Aube Marie Baker Roger and Georgeann Ballou Raymond J. Barnes and John Reilly Michael and Jane Barry Martin Baskin Robert and Lynn Beach Ronald and Lise Bellaud Thomas and Jennifer ’83 Berry  Caroline Boeckman Arthur and Rebecca Borry Neal and Pam Boyce Benjamin and Rosemary Brewster Jay S. Buckley William and Holly Burrows Mark and Michelle Cameron Gary and Patricia Caruso Ernest and Donna Chornyei Thomas ’79 and Katherine Churbuck Suzanne Clerkin and Raymond Pape

S. Tristram and Cynthia CoYn James and Teresa Comosa Michael and Shirley Condon Robert and Shelly Coursey Christopher and Pamela Dargin John and Kathryn Delea Earl and Beth Dodge James and Tamara Donovan Carl and Linda Erickson Chip and Sandy Evans Peter and Ellen Evans William and Susan Fallon David Finder Terry Finder J. Christopher Flowers and Mary White Richard and Margaret Frame Yanbin Fu and Weijuan Zhang David and Christine Gagne Peter ’73 and Karen Galletly  Grae Garl Christina Gill Thomas Gill Marie Green Peter and Marion Grillo Meta and William Grogan Susan and John Haas Bruce and Marcia Hamel Paul and Cheryl Hamel Hong Gil Han and Soon Young Choi Joan A. Hartel Deborah Hatch Raymond and Marlene Heal Gregory and Frances Helms  Jeremy Hiltz Leigh Hogan Kent and Karen Holce James and Ruthann Horner Scott and Donna Horton Will and Mare JeVries Douglas and Georgia Jenkins Dan and Pam Kaiser Stewart and Lori Karger William and Sinesia Karol James Keegan and Roxanne Tufts-Keegan Graeme and Kimberly Keeping Rebecca Kibbee

Hwan Kyoon Kim and Tae Ae Lee Jin Won Kim and Hyang Ja Park Sung Joo and Yong Ran Kim Wonsuk and Sunghee Kim Roger and Jennifer LaRochelle George and Kathleen Lee Sang Hun and Mee Kyeong Lee Yungjian Liu and Dongquing Xu Timothy and Sheila Long Lawrence C. Lyon Danielle MacDonald C. Peter and Elizabeth MacLellan Wayne and Maria Maggio William and Mary Ellen Marcotte Richard and Kay Marini  Richard and Eugenia Masland John and Sarah Mattes Paul McAdam and Melissa Sentman Thomas and Maxine McBey James McDonough and Emily Wrubel James and Glenda McFadden Francis and Peggy McGrane Kathryn and James Miller  Peter Miller and Meredith Bird Miller Scott and Lori Miller Randall and Tamara Minton Jonathan and Jan Mohr Jeong Hyun Moon and Sun Sook You Dayce and Maura Moore Myles Moran and Mary Jo Levitsky Stephen and Janet Morse John and Susan Natoli Marc and Marsha Nissenbaum Leo and Gail Nocera Greg and Anne Norris Hyung Jin Oh and Kyung Soo Han Lorna Outerbridge Clevil and Beverly-Ann Parris Esther Pemberton Robert and Pamela Piper Paul and Deirdre Piscitelli Michael J. Puleo Christopher and Gwendolyn Randall Harry and Trish Raphael Kenneth and Anne Raynor Darren and Stacey Redman  Robert and Vicki Reich Katherine Repko

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parents of alumni fund As Parents of Alumni Fund Chairs for the New Hampton School 2007-08 Annual Fund, we would like to thank you for your generous support of a very successful campaign. The Parents of Alumni Fund raised an amazing $128,962, an amount that is more than twice that of last year! Just as important is the nearly 50 percent increase in the number of alumni parents who participated. As proud parents of four-year student, Steven ’07, we were glad to be able to assume a leadership role in the Annual Fund. It was our pleasure to give something back to the school that provided an excellent education for our son and helped him to grow into a responsible and caring young adult. Sanders and Jeanne Abrahams Parents of Alumni Fund Chairs Parents of Steven Abrahams ’07

Thomas Rollins Charles and Suzanne Sabolis Susan Sanborn Mercier Alan and Judy Sanders Timothy and Karen Saunders Marion Seltzer Kyu Chong Seo and Young Ja Oh JeVrey S. Shackett ’83 James and Joan Shaughnessy Choung-Shik Shim and Hee Ja Byun Jin Ho Shim and Hye Shin Cho Dong Won Shin and Eun Kyung Choi John and Terry Simkunas Kirsten A. Singer Shane and Michele Sirles Richard and Lynne Smith Sally Smith Hong Sup Song and Yoo Jin Chung Donald and Michelle Stewardson Kim Storms Ufer Sung Yong Tak and Chun Ok Moon Jon and Annette Tallarida

Michael ’72 and Judith ’75 Tamposi Laszlo and Zsuzsa Tanos James and Trish Taylor  Charles and Kathy Thrower Terry and Erin Topercer Michael and Karen Torrey Vince and Cheryl Tulley Edward and Catherine Vinci Germar Greg and Gina Wagner Julie E. Weissman Robert and Kerry Williams Frederick ’72 and Charlene Joyce Willingham Cheryllann Wilson Maureen Winking Valerie Wiseman Kyung Hoon Yoo and Insoo Lee Yong Gu Yoon and In Ja Lee Alan and Heather Young

gifts from parents of alumni Parents of alumni are among some of the school’s most loyal donors. This unique group has witnessed the long-term impact of their son’s or daughter’s New Hampton School experience and has remained committed to providing the same opportunities for future generations of New Hampton students. Anonymous (4) Sanders and Jeanne Abrahams  Ronald and Barbara Altman Myles ’44 and Lorraine Ambrose Dennis and Jean Ames George and Julia Argyros Charles Bardelis Michael and Margaret Barnett  Gary and Kathy Beban  Thomas and Jennifer ’83 Berry  JeVrey and Cynthia Black  Laurence and Patricia Blood Gerald and Angie Bologna Karl and Mary Bolstad Michael and Mari Brown Harry and Nancy Bryant Paul and Cindy Buck  Jay Buckley Gerald and Alice Burke Allan and Nadine Buros Chester and Mary Butcher Kirk and Cathy Buttermore Theodore and Betsy Cetron David Chambers and Michele LeComte-Chambers Suzanne Clerkin and Raymond Pape Vickie CliVord John and Nancy Conkling George and Ann Cook  Eric Courtney James and Anne Cram Alan B. Crocker  Barry and Maureen Curran John and Marion Cushing Brian and Cindy Dacey

Thomas and Joyce Dailey  JeVrey and Janice Dansicker Harry and Suzanne Davis Christopher and Pamela Delaney Edward and LoisMary Diehl Earl and Beth Dodge Daniel and Lisa Dorian Francis and Kelly Driscoll Jill A. Duncan  Richard Eisenberg John and Lucinda Embersits Carl and Linda Erickson Nan Fay  Gregor and Carol Fellers  Marc Frader and Janis Hersh Richard ’76 and Margaret Frame David and Christine Gagne Robert C. Galletly ’42 (deceased) and Pauline B. Galletly  Robert ’71 and Joni Galletly John and Natalie GarWeld Russell and Gretchen Gilpatric  Louis and Patricia Gnerre Mark and Cynthia Gould Peter Green and Triscia Hennessy Joseph and Margaret Gulley Bryna Haber Richard and Patricia Hage George and Ruth Haivanis  Paul and Cheryl Hamel M. Wayne and Audrey Hamel Luke and Lynda Haran  William and Diana Harloe  Paul and Vicki Harlow  Alan and Donna Hart Dale Hart Herman and Doris Hassinger Raymond and Marlene Heal Michael and Judith Hechtkopf Michael and Joan HeVernan Gregory and Frances Helms Richard and Ann Herring Calvin and Leslie Hill Richard and Helen HoVman Donald and Barbara Hogan Raymond and Geryl Hueter Ki Hung Hwang and Hye Kyung Lee Gale Jackson

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Peter and Mary Jacobi Dorcas Jones  Theodore Jones ’49 William and Mary Beth Jordan Michael and Nancy Joyce Soon-Jin and Dianna Kang John Kelsey and Sally Wilson  Robert ’66 and Jamie King Andrew and Jayne Klein  Ken-ichi and Shirley Kondo  Akira Kurosaki and Monica Bethe Beverley E. LaVerrandre Chess Steven and Stephanie Larkin Edwin and Deborah Leach  Richard Leclerc  Jill Leinbach  Alan and Elizabeth Levenson Donald Levine Captain and Mrs. Daniel Lewis USN (ret.)  Veronica Lima-DeAngelis and Michael DeAngelis Edward and Ina Loftspring  Nicholas and Laura Lynch Lawrence Lyon  Sean and Gail Maguire Robert and Gwen Mann Richard and Kay Marini Patricia Marshall Robert and Jan Marshall Richard and Melody Martel Maureen McDermott Daniel and Ellinor McElroy James McLaren Eugene and Deborah McLean  John and Catherine Meany Herbert and Irma Mershon  James and Kathryn Miller  Ann Minahan B. F. and Rosemary Minard William Mitchell and Debra Bray Mitchell  Reid P. Mizell  T. Holmes ’38 and Norma Jean Moore  Stephen and Janet Morse Daniel and Margaret Moseley Michael and Margaret Mumma 

Charles and Connie Murcott Joseph and Catherine Naparlo Seth and Marian Natter  Nestor and Anne Nicholas  Jane Nold Greg and Anne Norris Elvis Norville and Andrea Herbert-Norville Keith and Dena O’Hara Robert and Marsha Page Gilbert and Patricia Palmer James and Marjorie Pines Robert and Pamela Piper Armelde Pitre and Richard Bloom Vincent Plansky Robert and Christina Pollock  Frank and Carol Porcelli Herbert and Ronnie Price Stephen and Virginia Provost Annie Rice Donald and Dorothy Rockel  Barry Rosen and Nancy Van Vranken Steven and Deborah Ross  Robert and Elizabeth Schreiber Brian and Ellen Serville Philip Seydel Arthur and Donna Singer H. William and Patsy Smith  Ruthann Kline Smith Frederick ’45 and Jane Smith  William Stirrup  Michael and Mary Sullivan Michael and Joy Sydney Laszlo and Zsuzsa Tanos Michael and Halcyone Tasha James and Trish Taylor  Thomas and Diane Tessier  Peter and Jessica Thomson  Terry and Erin Topercer Michael and Karen Torrey Robert Traylor  Mark and Pamela Troiano  Chester and Mary Truskowski Ernest and Katherine Tsouros Susan Tyson Lynn Wadhams  Whitney ’71 and Vicki Ward Luther and Cynthia Weigle

grandparent fund Tradition is very important to my family. When my grandson, Connor Burrows ’08, graduated in May 2008 he was following in the footsteps of his uncle, R. Bruce Weeks, Jr. ’81, and his great, great grandfather, Samuel Smith, who graduated from the New Hampton Literary Institute in 1896. My granddaughter, Hillary Burrows ’09, will graduate in 2009 on the 110th Anniversary of her great, great grandmother Winnifred Page’s graduation in 1899. New Hampton School has been preparing young people for a successful future over its long history and that is why I am pleased to support this outstanding school and its tradition of excellence. Sheila Weeks Grandparent Fund Chair Grandparent of Connor Burrows ’08 and Hillary Burrows ’09 Parent of Bruce Weeks ’81

Robert and Kerry Williams  Allen and Janet Williams  Maureen Winking Rudolph and Corliss Wise Joel and Rachel Wohlfeil Robert and C. Sharon Wolcott  John and Leolyn Wood gifts from grandparents New Hampton School is grateful for the leadership of Sheila Weeks, who has served as the Grandparent Fund chair the past two years. Sheila is the grandparent of Conner ’08 and Hillary Burrows ’09 and parent of Bruce Weeks ’81. Each year, New Hampton grandparents participate in many areas of school life. For all that they contribute for the betterment of New Hampton School, we o=er a

warm thank you for making their grandchild’s school a priority. This year we are pleased to report our grandparents’ generous contributions of $41,450 to the Annual Fund—a 44 percent increase in total dollars raised from last year. Anonymous (4) Roy and MaxineAndrews Edward and Philomena Barry Libby Baskin Rose Bethe John and Robin Brennand Harry and Nancy Bryant Thelma Burrows James and Helen Comosa George and Dru Dekeon Richard and Norma Dunn Antoinette Fallon John and Jean Fitzpatrick

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faculty and staff fund We’re very excited to surpass last year’s mark of 70 percent participation with an incredible 92 percent from our faculty and staV this year. Our success stems from the addition of Maureen Huber, Beth Grosart, and Cory McClure. With their persistence and positive spirit, we were able to connect with more faculty and staV, and our results show strong support for New Hampton School. With each passing year, we Wnd the faculty and staV understand the value of participating because it sends a strong message of conWdence and enthusiasm for the future of our school and its students. Stacey Redman and David Perfield Faculty and Staff Fund Chairs Maureen Huber Staff Representative Cory McClure and Beth Grosart Faculty Representatives

James and Marilyn Fletcher Robert C. Galletly ’42 (deceased) and Pauline B. Galletly  Helga Garger Theresa Hansen Robert ’50 and Sally Kennedy  Ann Kent T. K. and Pearl Lau Ernest and Marie LeBlanc Alice A. Lederman Morton and Louise Macks  Michael and Jeane Matteo Valerie McAleenan Samuel and Gail Murdough Patricia Norris-Anderson J. Philip ’51 and Patricia O’Hara  Mr. and Mrs. John O’Neal Joseph and Nancy Orosz Joseph and Marie Piscitelli Michael and Betty Puleo Theodore Raphael Vic and Margaret Rosa

Claudette Saunders Marie I. Sirois Frederick ’45 and Jane Smith  Ferne Tilton Robert and Joan VanDerpoel Frank R. Vose ’41 Sheila Weeks gifts from faculty and staff There is no stronger endorsement of the school than the united voices of our dedicated faculty and sta=. In addition to their tireless service to New Hampton School, an overwhelming 92% of all faculty and sta= made a gift to the Faculty and Sta= Fund this year. We salute these individuals, the heart and soul of New Hampton School, for their unwavering support of all areas of school life.

Sheryl Anderson James L. Arsenault  Lara Arsenault  Margaret Barnett  Charlotte Barron Dana Bates Holly Bennett Jennifer Berry ’83  Kirk Beswick Rebecca Borry Emanuel Brito Russell Brummer Cindy Buck  John Buck Suzanne Buck Helen Clary Sandy Colhoun Daniel Corey Robert Coursey Cecelia Cox Cathy Creany  Alan B. Crocker  Britney Cullinan John P. Cullinan Patrick DeBenedictis Sarah DeBenedictis Beth Dodge David Doyle Katherine L. Drennan Jill A. Duncan  James Duval Jacob Falconer Lisa A. Falconi ’01 Steven Fariole Stephen Fay Jo E. Fendley Betsy Finer Shirley Forbush Margaret Frame Morganne Freeborn Steven Freeborn Justin Freeman David A. Gagne Gretchen Gilpatric  Louis Gnerre Gina Graciano Jerrica Gray Elizabeth Grosart

Barbara Guardenier Jason Guilbert Annie Hall Tina Hazelton Kathleen Howe Maureen Huber Peter F. Hutchins ’01 Erik Johnson Justin Joslin Rebekka Joslin Jessica A. Kang ’02 Eric W. LaCroix Matthew Lamotte Maurice Laroche Michael J. Levine ’00 Veronica Lima-DeAngelis Christopher Little Daniel Love Doug MacKinnon Kerry Maher  Timothy Maki Melody Martel Bonnie Martin Florence Martin Jeremy Mathison Paul McAdam Meghan McCarron Cory McClure Melissa McGee Jennifer McMahon Andrew Menke Rene Metzler Steven Michalek Peter Miller Hans Mundahl Jillian D. Nugent ’03 Erin J. O’Toole ’01 Shawn Ouellette Brooke Pearsall  David G. PerWeld Lawrence Pimental Tony Quintero Christopher Randall Gwen Randall Darren Redman  Stacey Redman  Forest Reid Kristen Reimold

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Kristin Richardson Donna Risteen Peter D. Rowan Joseph Sampson Ilana Saxe J. K. Scott Jon Shackett Neal Shartar Martha Shepp Teresa Simkunas Kathleen Smith Sally Smith Stephen StaVord Carol Stazinski Donald Stevens Theodore Stiles  Pamela Susi William Thayer Jesse Truman Adam R. Tyson  Sara Tyson  Gina Wagner Katerina F. Williams Amy Wilson gifts from friends New Hampton School enjoys many wonderful relationships with members of the outside community, and the school once again thanks all those who chose to acknowledge these ties with a gift to the 2007–08 Annual Fund. Thanks to their generosity, donations from New Hampton friends totaled $26,283 this year — over $10,000 more than the previous year. New Hampton School and its students are fortunate to be the bene>ciaries of the loyalty and commitment of the many friends of the school. Anonymous Andrews Construction Co., Inc. Ted and Elisabeth Angell Astral

Blakely B. Babcock William E. Barrott III James and Catherine Bell Dean and Cheryl Benner Suzanne F. Briguglio Mr. and Mrs. G. Bill Bullock Cynthia Cheesman Cherokee Casket Co., Inc. Conneston Construction, Inc.  Kevin Conquy Copland Industries, Inc. Clay Dingman, Barking Cat Communications Design Katherine B. Doub E. C. Manger & Son Co. Preston N. Eames Edgecombe Casket Company Inc. R. Hugh and Nancy Elliott Robert D. Feitlowitz Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd G. Freed Freeman Metal Products, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Furlong Donald and Catherine Galletly Marilyn Geller Philip and Joann Godwin Mervin and Barbara Goldman Carole Griner Hard as Nails Ministries Inc. Charles M. Howard II  J. M. Hutton & Co., Inc. Mr. and Mrs. R. Frank Jerd Mr. and Mrs. Richard Keating Beverley E. LaVerrandre Chess Hal and Mary Jane Macartney Holly E. Maine Deborah M. Marchant Matthews International Corporation Katy McClanahan James S. McEntegart Barbara F. McKernin Al Melanson Metro Lacrosse, Inc. John and Cherri Mitsinikos Albert F. Mogerley Sally S. Morse Robert and Nancy Munczinski Richard M. Palmer Sr. Paul Casket Company, Inc.

Jean M. Perkins Josepha P. Peterson Randy and Lori Ramundo Sandra K. Reid Barbara A. Rheinhardt Charlotte A. Rice Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Sarkisian Mr. and Mrs. Fred Scheele Jr. Schuylkill Haven Casket Company, Inc. Ann Seidel Sidney L. Shepherd Southern Craft Manufacturing, Inc. Southern Heritage Casket Co., Inc. Austin C. Stern Stobezki, Zelitsky & Co., LLC David R. Sullivan John and Darcy Taylor The Inn on Golden Pond Theo. Tiedemann & Sons, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Richard F. Tice Charles and Judy Trapp Elizabeth S. Tyler Tyler, Simms & St. Sauveur, CPAs, PC  Vandor Corporation Verplank Enterprises, Inc. Victoriaville W. M. Manufacturing, Inc. Alice H. Weed (deceased) White Mountain Lacrosse Club William W. Winans Ai-Chu Wu gifts from corporations and foundations Each year, a diverse list of corporations and foundations support New Hampton through gifts of cash, gifts-in-kind, matching gifts, and sponsorship of school events. The generosity of these institutions, businesses, and foundations help provide an additional level of support for all our ongoing programs. The A. Haigh Cundey Foundation The Argyros Foundation The Arnold Baggins Foundation, Inc.

The Boeckman Family Foundation The Citizens Bank Charitable Foundation The Dayton Foundation Depository, Inc. The Fargo Fund of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation—Monadnock Region The Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund The Irving and Bernice Singer Family Foundation The Jewish Community Foundation The Lola B. Grillo Foundation The Mildred H. McEvoy Foundation The Morningstar Family Foundation, Inc. The Patricia M. and H. William Smith, Jr. Foundation The Paul and Cheryl Hamel Family Foundation The Wellpoint Foundation The White Flowers Foundation matching gift companies The Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation The Capital Group Companies Charitable Foundation The Follett Corporation Matching Gifts Program GE Foundation General Re Corporation The GlaxoSmithKline Foundation The J. P. Morgan Chase Foundation Mass Mutual Financial Group The Merrill Lynch & Co. Foundation, Inc. Microsoft Matching Gifts Program Morgan Stanley Matching Gifts Program PWzer, Inc. The UBS Foundation USA The Verizon Foundation The Wachovia Foundation gifts-in-kind Tyler, Simms & St. Sauveur, CPAs, PC Benjamin and Rosemary Brewster M. GeoVrey Carlton II ’91

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Alan B. Crocker Clay Dingman, Barking Cat Communications Design James and Tamara Donovan H. Jonathan Frank ’58 Jay D. Haber ’52 JeVrey and Carol Huntington Sung Joo and Yong Ran Kim Veronica Lima-DeAngelis Yungjian Liu and Dongquing Xu Doug MacKinnon and Helen Clary Bonnie Martin Hubert B. McDonough ’82 Eugene and Deborah McLean Scott D. Peters ’80 Jason M. Pilalas ’58 Richard A. Shmishkiss ’64 Sally Smith Hong Sup Song and Yoo Jin Chung Hugh L. Spitzer ’54 golf tournament sponsors and donors All Ways Green Landscaping American Refrigeration, Inc. Andrews Construction Co., Inc. Thomas and Jennifer ’83 Berry Borislow Insurance Agency Paul D. Buckley, David Johnston Development, LLC Cape Arundel Golf Club Carroll Concrete Company Shaun P. Carroll, Sr., ’55 Central Paper Products Conneston Construction, Inc. Control Technologies Dunkin’ Donuts E & R Laundry and Dry Cleaners Steve Erickson, Jostens Finishing Touches by Mark Paul Fluet Engineering The Galletly Family Giguere Electric Golf and Ski Warehouse Cary Gordon Granite State Glass Hallsmith-Sysco Foods Hart’s Turkey Farm Restaurant

Dale Hart Russell Hart ’70 Jeremy Hiltz Excavation, Inc. Bradley Ingermann ’91 William Karol KODA Enterprises Lovering Volvo Rich and Linda Lovering M. Saunders Fruit and Wholesale Products MTM Insurance Associates The Marcotte Family The Mayhew Program Jim Morison, Kelly Sports Warner Nickerson ’02 Northeast Delta Dental OYce of Michael Rosenfeld, Architects Owl’s Nest Golf Club John Parent, Future Supply Corp. Patsy’s Leasing Corporation Scott Peters ’80 R. P. Williams & Sons Robert Williams Ken and Anne Raynor StoweXake Inn and Spa Resort, Stowe, VT Chris Swanson ’81 The Troiano Family Tyler, Simms, & St. Sauveur, CPAs, PC Gina and Greg Wagner Waukewan Golf Club West Shore Marine Charlie Wheeler 1821 society The strength of New Hampton School’s future endowment depends in large part upon the foresight and support of those alumni, parents, and friends who have chosen to include the school in their estate plans. The 1821 Society serves to acknowledge their con>dence and vision. Members of the New Hampton community who have included the school in their estate plans through a bequest

or life income plan recognize the value of a New Hampton School education and their responsibility to help preserve the opportunity for future generations. New Hampton School is most appreciative of the commitment made by the society’s current members. We encourage others to join those honored here who recognize the value of sharing their legacy. Anonymous Peter J. Bergen ’50 George Bierlin ’61 and Ellen Brown Bierlin William D. Blake ’49 (deceased) Arthur M. Brink Jr. ’62 Wallace ButterWeld ’33 and Eleanor ButterWeld (deceased) Cornelius and Mary Dekker (deceased) Alice M. Ebbels (deceased) Richard D. Frame M. David Giardino ’49 William H. Gunther ’41 Charles Gurnett ’32 and Elizabeth Gurnett (deceased) Robert R. Gurnett ’32 (deceased) William A. Hazard ’48 (deceased) David Heald ’38 (deceased) and Jane Heald Charles Hines ’48 Rockwell Holman ’44 and Irene Holman Martin H. Howell Jr. ’35 (deceased) Robert Irish ’50 and Mary Louise Irish Theodore A. Jones '49 Donald C. Jordan '41 Robert A. Jungst ’48 George M. Kendall (deceased) Robert D. Kennedy '50 and Sally Kennedy William ’45 and Jean Kerchof D. Bruce Marshall ’48 Helena Milne ’19 (deceased) Rodman Moeller ’39 and Dorothy Moeller

Kenneth R. Norris ’33 (deceased) and Ruth Norris Leonore L. Paneyko (deceased) Preston Perlman ’58 (deceased) and Stella Perlman Rodney F. Poland Jr. ’37 (deceased) George S. Robinson Jr. ’61 James Rogers (deceased) and Eleanor E. Rogers, in memory of their son, John F. Rogers ’63 Howard Saturley and Geraldine Saturley Stephen W. Schultz ’65 Alfred B. Small ’30 (deceased) Kenneth L. Snow ’53 (deceased) Robert I. St. Clair ’36 and Regina B. St. Clair (deceased) John L. Threshie ’47 Martha B. Walker Albert L. Watson ’45 (deceased) Leslie Weed ’22 and Alice H. Weed (deceased) the ellen brown and george woolsey bierlin trust and the mr. and mrs. william edwin bierlin, sr. trust This year the income from these trusts supported professional development of New Hampton School’s faculty as the school furthers its commitment to a global vision while strategically investing in its teaching faculty. We are grateful to the Ellen Brown and George Woolsey Bierlin and the Mr. and Mrs. William Edwin Bierlin, Sr. trusts for making these projects possible. ommissions Our sincere apologies for the following omissions from the 2006–07 Report of Gifts: Gift Listing Omissions Richard L. Swift  ’39 Susan Healey Gavitt  ’84

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How a vacation home became a scholarship fund.

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George and Sandra Fearons always had the highest regard for New Hampton School. Their son, George Fearons ’92, got his start at nhs and inspired a successful career in sales. George and Sandra wanted to help New Hampton School and did so by making a gift of real estate—a vacation home in Lovell, Maine. With help from George and Sandra, New Hampton School sold this home and used the proceeds to establish The George and Sandra Fearons Endowed Scholarship Fund. “New Hampton School had a wonderful impact on our son’s life,” said Fearons. “Sandra would be delighted to know that our home in Maine was transformed into a scholarship fund at nhs. We are grateful for the experience that nhs gave our son and we are thrilled to give back in this way.” You, too, can help make the New Hampton School experience a reality for a needy student by donating property, including homes and land, or by gifting stock to the school. For more information or gift ideas, please contact Sandy Colhoun at scolhoun@newhampton.org or call directly at 603.677.3413.

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Hamptonia Fall 2008  

The alumni magazine of the New Hampton School.