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LIFE ON THE SANDY SHORES, THE FRUITFUL FARMLANDS AND THE MAGNIFICENT VINEYARDS.

New Buffalo Times

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LONG BEACH • MICHIANA SHORES • GRAND BEACH • NEW BUFFALO • UNION PIER • THREE OAKS • LAKESIDE • HARBERT • SAWYER issue 41, volume 75

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Thursday, October 20, 2016

Three Oaks Village talks employee compensation at monthly meeting PAGE 4

New Buffalo Township receives “clean audit” at monthly meeting PAGE 6

NBHS students embrace 3-D printing PAGE 12 $4.5 million distributed to local governments by LRSB from the Four Winds Casino-New Buffalo PAGE 23 City Council approves recommendations from Planning Commission PAGE 24

Hey Nei g hbor Sustainable Vertical Farming New Buffalo, Michigan

BU Y LOCAL

I SWEAR...

MARK ROBERTSON APPOINTED TO NEW BUFFALO CITY COUNCIL — PAGE 4 —

PHOTO BY DEE DEE DUHN


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

Residential - Commercial - Marine

Professional Sales - Service - Installation

Furnace Tune-Up

9-466-0123 Bridgman Scott McGhee 9-469-6388 New Buffalo 11136 California Rd. 9-876-4505 cell Bridgman, MI 49106 mcgheeshvac@comcast.net

$45.00

For Semco or MI Gas Customers Exp.12/30/16

Bridgman • 269-466-0123 New Buffalo • 269-469-6388 11136 California Rd, Bridgman, MI 49106

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New Buffalo Times LOCAL INTELLIGENCE — SINCE 1942 —

ETHICS Society of Professional Journalism PROPRIETOR NEW BUFFALO TIMES, INC. PUBLISHER DEE DEE DUHN CONTENT/NEWS EDITOR KRISTIN E. FATOUROS NEW BUFFALO TIMES INTELLIGENCE ARTISTS JOE DURK REPORTERS AND CONTRIBUTING WRITERS DEE DEE DUHN THERESE DONNELLY LINDA HENDERSON FRANCESCA SAGALA LAWRENCE VON EBELER NATALIE CACIOPPO KURT MARGGRAF ALEXANDER FATOUROS SOPHIA ROSE FATOUROS NEW BUFFALO TIMES INTELLIGENCE NEW BUFFALO TIMES POLITICS GUEST WRITERS

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016 w

FROM THE PUBLISHER

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I cannot wait for the election season to be over–at the national, state and city levels. My brain is worn out (we should call it National Stress Month). And what about all this social media stuff– with so much we can get out there, it is impossible to know what we should believe. I still long for the days BEFORE COMPUTERS. When there was still mystery in the world, and our lives were slower and the earth was greener. When I visited remote villages on this planet that had never seen a blonde and very pale

LIBRARY TIDINGS

NEWS AND EVENTS FROM THE NEW BUFFALO TOWNSHIP LIBRARY

person before (hard to imagine now). When the most effective way to communicate was with FAX machines (although the lines were down more often than not in Indonesia, and it could take days or weeks to get a response in many cases). When newspapers had to be laid out by hand and every letter had to be put in the right place, and it would take many man hours to create just one page and get it ready to go to press. Never mind - I love computers : ) dee dee duhn

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The NEW BUFFALO TIMES is easy to find now, as we have the selected drop spots closer to you. Milda’s Corner Market Customs Imports Sawyer Garden Center The Whistle Stop David’s Delicatessen New Buffalo Pharmacy Barney’s Knoll Bros. Bud and Elsie’s Redamak’s Flip’s Big C Lumber Between Casey’s and Nancy’s For the most convenient location, you can subscribe to get the NEW BUFFALO TIMES in your mailbox or inbox. Please email us for E-TIMES, info@newbuffalotimes.com.

Dinges Fall Harvest open

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NATALIE CACIOPPO IN THREE OAKS

arbor Country’s favorite pumpkin farm is open for the fall season. Located in Three Oaks, Dinges Fall Harvest features fun activities for people of all ages, including fall crafts and decorations, tractor hayrides, corn mazes, a pumpkin bounce house and express train rides. Visitors can either walk through the fields and pick their own pumpkins or choose from several of the ones that are on display. Dinges Farm is available for field trips, Girl and Boy Scout troop visits, birthday parties and youth group farm tours. They are located at 15219 Mill Road in Three Oaks, Michigan.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

DESIGNS FOR DIGNITY KITCHEN WALK THIS WEEKEND

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he Designs for Dignity Kitchen Walk takes place this Saturday, Oct. 22, throughout Harbor Country. The tour features six state-ofthe-art kitchens and homes that are curated with tastings from local chefs and vendors. The tour culminates with a Wine Down Reception and Auction. This is a driving tour, with maps and directions being distributed at check-in. Comfortable shoes are advised. Tickets are available at the check-in at Susan Fredman at Home Gallery located at 15998 Red Arrow Highway in Union Pier. The tickets are $100 each. — STAFF REPORTS

TOAST THE COAST, HALLOWEEN STYLE

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he seventh annual Weko Beach Brewers Festival will take place Saturday, Oct. 29, from 1 p.m. until 7 p.m. under a “big top” tent overlooking the beach in Bridgman, Michigan. The festival is a showcase event to sample craft beers by the tastes or by the mug. The event features the award-winning, locallyproduced beers from 22 Michigan breweries offering 88 beer choices from around Michigan, including Round Barn and Greenbush Brewery. The day is filled with sun and sand, tasty cuisine from local restaurants, live music and, at the end of the festival, enjoy a dazzling sunset. Feel free to come in costume - just keep your face visible and unobstructed. The following bands will entertain: Janet Hines-Norris, Jared Knox and the Hagar Bombs and Top Secret Band. Food is for sale on a cash-only basis at the festival. Tasting tickets are used for beer only. Pair your Michigan craft brews with some tasty food from these fine local establishments: Bridgman Premier Meat Market and Classic Catering. Parking and shuttle buses will be available at designated nearby lots in Bridgman. No backpacks, outside coolers or dogs allowed. This is a rain or shine event. General admission is $25 in advance or $35 at the door and includes 15 tasting tickets. Designated Driver/Under 21 is $15. The event is sponsored by the Greater Bridgman Area Chamber and Growth Alliance (CGA). Visit www. wekobeachbrewersfest.com for more information. — COMPILED BY

LINDA HENDERSON

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DDA talks TIF funds at meeting

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BY FRANCESCA SAGALA

t their monthly meeting Thursday, Oct. 13, New Buffalo Downtown Development Authority Board of Directors members heard a resolution that will hopefully clear up questions with regards to tax increment financing (TIF) funds. Chair Robert Kemper distributed the resolution to Board members, which states that the City shall “annually allocate” $40,000 “sourced from available tax increment financing tax captured funds” to the DDA’s budget for its general administration activities. The resolution goes on to state that, should there be tax increment financing funds in excess of $40,000, then 90 percent of those funds would go to relieve costs of doing downtown capital improvement projects, while 10 percent would stay within the DDA’s reserve account for expenditures consistent with its “approved activities.” Kemper added that they drafted the resolution because it was a “good idea” to “establish framework for how that money is used.” He said that they addressed the attorney with regards to helping them draft the resolution, as well as someone who works with DDAs from Wightman and Associates. Board members approved asking the City Council for approval of the resolution. Also at the meeting, Kemper discussed the success of the first City picnic, which was held Sunday, Oct. 9, at Lions Park in New Buffalo. He thanked all those who provided food, such as David’s Deli, which provided an assortment of homemade side salads and desserts; Local, which provided the hamburgers and The Marina Grand, which provided the hot dogs. In addition, City staff and the fire and police departments showed up with their gear on display. Overall, Kemper said he thought they were successful in their mission to let people know they are open to discussion. “We’re interested in talking not just at 8 in the mornings but from 1-5 on Sundays too,” he said. Joe Lindsay, who chairs the Communications subcommittee, announced that they’ve made brochures that were trifolds detailing the City’s infrastructure needs and what they believe can be done about them. He said that they have 1,000 of them printed. In addition, Lindsay added that he and Kemper, along with New Buffalo Business Association Executive Director Cathi Rogers, had been working on the DDA’s Facebook page and answering people’s comments that were posted to it. Another way that they would be answering people’s questions, Lindsay said, would be by printing postcards, which would also be including a before and after picture of what the downtown would look like after the project is completed. Also with regards to communication, Kemper added that he did a short presentation at last Monday night’s New Buffalo Area Schools School Board meeting. He encouraged other Board members to “get in front of a board” whenever they got the chance to also spread the word about the DDA and the North Whittaker Street project. Board members approved an invoice from Quercus Garden Design for the fall planters on North Whittaker Street of $4,250. Rogers reminded Board members of the holiday festivities taking place the Saturday after Thanksgiving in New Buffalo, such as the Santa parade and the tree lighting. She said they planned on possibly making the parade bigger this year, and reaching out to surrounding communities for participation. She also hinted at a possible revival of the City’s past Winterfest celebration, which was held in early February, and said she was considering having a bonfire or s’mores and sledding at Oselka Park.

Three Oaks Village talks employee compensation at monthly meeting

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NATALIE CACIOPPO IN THREE OAKS

he Village of Three Oaks discussed the memorial tree and bench program as well as employee compensation at their Wednesday, Oct 12 meeting. Starting Dec. 1, the federal law was changed to say that any salaried employee needs to have at least two employees working under them and the minimum wage must be $47,450. While the Village has some current salaried employees, they don’t fit under the new category. Employees not being salaried because they don’t fit the criteria would be eligible for overtime; however, the salaried employees wouldn’t be eligible. Currently, the Village Manager and the police chief are the only ones that fit under this new category. Councilmembers voted 4-3 to have the wage adjustments on the next payroll, effective immediately. The salary increase will be discussed again at next month’s meeting. Darlene Heemstra talked about the memorial tree and bench program, which is when the Village decides on a type of tree and where it should be placed throughout the Village. A memorial plaque will accompany the tree. She also informed the Council that benches are needed in Dewey Canon Park, and that there might be enough money in the budget to replace the current ones. Village Manager Adam Umbrasas shared that the State of Michigan signed off on a new medical marijuana law. The opt-in law allows dispensaries and grow operations, and gives a town or city the choice if they want to allow them to be a part of their communities. If Board members choose no, then it will not be allowed in that town or city; however, if they choose yes, a $5,000 yearly permit will be allowed to be charged, enabling that town or city to collect 25 percent of the total taxes.

Mark Robertson appointed to City Council

Three members of the New Buffalo City Council selected native resident Mark Robertson to fill the seat vacated by the departure of John Peterson at a Special Council Meeting Thursday, Oct. 13, bringing the council to five members again. Following a very contentious opening to the meeting, Councilmembers heard from the candidates that were applying to fill the vacated seat: Lea Grzywacz, Kevin Huber, Chuck Krametbauer and Diane Nichols; Bill McCollum was unable to attend but submitted his resume. Ray Kirkus, who had applied, withdrew his name at the meeting. He stated he was running in the recall election against Mayor Lou O’Donnell IV and would withdraw from consideration. Robertson stated that he has attended City Council, Planning Commission and DDA meetings for more than four years and felt he could bring valuable insight to the Council. He pledged to review all the matters before the Council for consideration in the future. Councilmembers said they felt that Robertson brought added diversity to the Council and that he was very informed from attending many years of monthly Council, Planning Commission and DDA meetings. They also commented on the fact that they felt Robertson was an open minded and fairthinking person. “I have seen your face at every meeting, you have been here your whole life and I am glad to see your name was submitted,” said O’Donnell. The meeting opened with Councilmember Donna Messinger reading a statement in which she alluded to information on a sequestered audio tape. The tape in question is part of an ongoing Ethics Complaint investigation being conducted for the City by Attorney Sara Bell. All of the councilpersons were instructed by City Attorney Matt Derby at the Monday, Oct. 17, Special Council Meeting not to discuss the matter until the investigation is completed and made public. Following her statement, she walked off of the dais and left the building. Messinger did not participate in the selection of the new Councilmember. Before the Council interviewed the candidates, City property owner Ezra Scott challenged them, stating that they could not move forward with their selection because, per the City Charter, they did not have a proper quorum to vote. O’Donnell took a half hour recess to review Scott’s charges with the City attorneys and review the Charter himself; however, he found Scott’s remarks to have no basis of fact. When asked by O’Donnell where he got his information, Scott stated that he must have made a mistake. The City Charter, in fact, did allow for three members, a majority of the Council, to vote on the new member appointment. The meeting resumed, with Robertson being selected unanimously by the three remaining members, O’Donnell, Bob Spirito and Marl Kroll. Robertson’s term is through November 2018. — LINDA HENDERSON


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

New ZA candidates discussed at Chikaming meeting BY FRANCESCA SAGALA

hikaming Township has been busy searching for a new Zoning Administrator (ZA), it was announced at the Chikaming Township Board’s monthly meeting Thursday, Oct. 13. The Township has been on the hunt for a new ZA since Teresa Priest vacated the position. In May, Board members hired a new, part-time ZA on a temporary basis. He resigned suddenly at a July Board meeting. Trustee Bill Marske, who is also a member of the Planning Commission, said that the committee that was formed out of Planning Commission members to find a new ZA recently arrived at two candidates for the position. The committee, which is made up of Marske, Planning Commission chairman Andy Brown and member Grace Rappe, took these two candidates to the rest of the Planning Commission, recommending that they be hired “in conjunction with each other.” While each person would be working part-time, they would be sharing the full-time position as Zoning Administrator. After Marske first presented the recommendation, Treasurer Liz Rettig and Trustee Rich Sullivan agreed to meet with the candidates and discuss the job duties with them. Confusion ensued, though, when an audience member thought that they were actually hiring one person to be the ZA and another to be the new Building Inspector. Board members accepted the resignation of the Township’s Building Inspector later in the meeting. Sullivan chimed in that he, too, was confused as to if they were hiring two people for those two separate positions, which was what he thought he also originally heard Marske saying. He said the confusion resulted from the committee not concluding first if the position would be part- or fulltime and writing a suitable description for said job, as well as deciding on a suitable salary. e “This is what we asked for. This is what we were charged to do, this is what the Planning Commission was charged to do,” said Sullivan. Clerk Paula Dudiak said that she believed that Marske was merely misquoted as stating that they were hiring a new Building Inspector. She added that they thought someone would be at that night’s meeting to present the recommendation to them. Sullivan then said that he didn’t see any reason to meet with the candidates if the Commission planned on still presenting something to the Board, calling it a “cart before the horse” scenario. Tom Hackley, who formerly served on the Planning Commission, said he felt that it was really the “middle part” – the job description – that was missing. He felt it would just be a matter of the search committee calling another meeting where they could “put their discussion into words” to rectify the problem. “Everybody’s doing the best they can here - I think we need to keep this rolling rather than stop and say we can’t go any further because we missed that piece,” he said. A member of the Zoning Board of Appeals said he was encouraged by the news that they were moving ahead in hiring a new ZA, as the ZBA said they were ultimately “hurting” the public by accepting cases that were packaged that were incomplete. Dudiak said they had been striving to keep everything moving, as their interim ZA in New Buffalo had been looking at everything and the five cases that the ZBA had were “okay and ready to go.” Also at the meeting, Board members accepted the resignation of Building Inspector Christopher Miller as well as approved the hiring of two new front desk office employees: Peter Plikaitis for a full-time office position as well as someone who can aid in Deputy Treasurer duties and Kim Livengood for the part-time office position. Angela Reichart from the Harbor Country Public Arts Initiative (HCPAI) gave an update on the sculpture by Chikaming Township Hall. She said that the Township will be allowed to keep the sculpture for another year at no cost to them. She said that Krasl Art Center in St. Joseph,

Michigan, is looking to reclaim the piece in the park near the pond, as they have been looking to reclaim a number of their pieces in various communities throughout Harbor Country. Reichert added that the Park Board does have a “fabulous plan” for the park, which includes placing another sculpture there. Sullivan said that, while he himself had no objections to having a sculpture displayed in their parks, he has voted against it only because he wasn’t sure if residents POSTEMA NAMED were in agreement CHIKAMING OPEN of them asking for money to support LANDS EXECUTIVE the artist. Reichert DIRECTOR said she would seek he Board of Directors of public input next Chikaming Open Lands time they requested recently announced their money. appointment of Ryan Postema Board members as Executive Director of approved Chikaming Open Lands. supporting a Following the sudden resolution for passing of Chris Thompson refunding Galien in June, a Search Committee River Sanitary was appointed by the Board to District (GRSD) conduct a nationwide search bonds as a savings to fill the position. After in excess of $90,000 a comprehensive process over the maturity that spanned three months time of the bonds. and resulted in applications from around the country, the oard Committee recommended members and the Board of Directors approved unanimously approved the Option selection of Postema. One Postema has been the for the renewal of Land Protection Specialist at the Township’s Chikaming Open Lands for employee health the past three years. In that plan. Warner said capacity, he has had primary that with Option responsibility for land protection One, they have a and stewardship projects. He has difference that is also participated in a variety of 8.37 percent. This other aspects of the organization, figure doesn’t take from education projects to into account money development and marketing the Township saves activities. Prior to joining for the deductibles, Chikaming Open Lands, Postema which Warner spent eight years working explained has for Cardno, an international dropped to $400 environmental consulting for individuals firm, where he managed and and $800, which implemented large-scale he said “nets out” ecosystem restoration and native at approximately landscaping projects. a 3.26 percent With Postema’s leadership and increase for Option the community’s support, Board One. Another President Linda Puvogel said positive to Option that “as Chikaming Open Lands One is that it will members and friends, allow employees to we look forward to continuing seek medical help our conservation work in from specialized Southwest Michigan.” — STAFF doctors.

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REPORTS Board members approved the Township’s official trick-or-treating hours for Sunday, Oct. 30, between 4 p.m. and 6 p.m. Board members approved Fire Chief Mike Davidson attending a first responders conference in Frankenmuth, Michigan, Oct. 21 and Police Chief Todd Taylor attending a Michigan Association of Chiefs of Police event Feb. 8, 2017.

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CITY OF ST. JOSEPH TO HOLD PUBLIC AUCTION

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he City of St. Joseph will hold a public auction Saturday, Oct. 29, at 10 a.m. at the City’s Public Works facilities, which is located at 1160 Broad Street in St. Joseph, Michigan. “We have many items that can be made available to the public, freeing up needed storage space and returning proceeds to the public coffers,” said City Manager John Hodgson. When asked what items will be included, Hodgson said that there will be a “spectrum of items ranging from front end loaders, trucks, cars, copiers, to over 100 bicycles and even some leftover public art.” All City departments are participating by submitting excess property to the auction. Jerry Glassman, owner of Big Bear Auctions, LLC, and his crew will be on hand to lead the auction beginning at 10 a.m. Big Bear Auctions, LLC’s main office is located in Eau Claire, Michigan, with additional offices in Kalamazoo and Indiana. Glassman has more than 25 years of auctioneer experience with providing many types of auction services. All questions relating to the auction itself can be directed to Big Bear Auctions, LLC, either by contacting them through their website, www. BigBearAuctionCompany. com or calling them at 269461-6686. Items are not available for presale. A list of property to be auctioned will be available through Big Bear Auctions. For information relating to the City of St. Joseph and its municipal government, please visit www.sjcity.com or call 269-983-5541. — STAFF REPORTS

Action indeed is the sole medium of expression for ethics. — Jane Addams


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

ROD AND GUN CLUB TO HOST RUNNING DEER SHOOT

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he New Buffalo Rod and Gun Club will hold the Running Deer Shoot on the following Sundays: Oct. 23 and 30 and Nov. 6. The shoot starts at 10 a.m. Baked chicken and ham will be awarded to the top shooters. The club is located at 10487 Kruger Road in New Buffalo. Turn right onto Kruger Road, just before the Galien River Bridge on Red Arrow Highway. For further information, contact Bob Krueger at 269-6120983. — STAFF REPORTS

HAUSEFEST—A SPOOKTACULAR FUNDRAISER

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oin the Coldwell Banker Charitable Foundation for a spooktacular event benefiting the Ronald McDonald House Charities on Saturday October 29 from 7:30 pm until midnight at the Acorn Theater. The fun night includes live entertainment from The Rebecca Anne Band, food from Harbor Country’s favorite restaurants, a silent auction, dancing, and a Halloween costume contest, and much more! Kurt and Tracy Hauseman of Caldwell Banker New Buffalo have organized this fundraising event for the past five years. Tracy said, “We choose Ronald McDonald House Charitable Foundation because we have been very blessed in our lives and wanted to help families in one of the most difficult times of their lives.” Coldwell Banker Real Estate Company is also in affiliation with Ronald McDonald House charities and they support the local Real Estate offices in their fundraising efforts. Tracy stated, “In the past four years the HauseFest has raised $28,000 for the cause. We don’t do it alone, there are a lot of great people supporting the event with food, auction items, attendance and in-kind services and help.” Tracy said. Your participation helps provide a “home away from home” for families of hospitalized children. To order tickets, visit www. events.org/hausefest2016. Tickets are $50 in advance or $60 at the door (includes 2 drink tickets). The Acorn Theater is located at 108 Generation Drive in Three Oaks, Mi. — LINDA HENDERSON

New Buffalo Township receives “clean audit” at monthly meeting

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LINDA HENDERSON IN NEW BUFFALO

Michiana Humane Society Harvest Home Tour

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ew Buffalo Township received a clean audit report from Cooper Lawton and approved a number of items for purchase at their regular Board meeting Monday, Oct. 17. Certified Public Accountant Kevin Raade of Cooper Lawton (formerly Schaffer Layher) of St. Joseph, Michigan, presented the 2015-2016 audit report to the Board, saying that “overwell, the audit went well.” He said the firm gave the Township an unmodified opinion, which is a clean report. “We have always been able to issue a clean report here,” he said. He reported that the General Fund Balance was $2,569,814.00, which was slightly reduced from last year; however, he pointed out that there were expenses with the Township Hall construction project and funds which will be reimbursed in the coming year. He stated that if you backed out that expense, there was less than a 2 percent difference in revenues from last year. He said that the current General Fund Balance would cover expected expenditures over the next 32 months. “The State of Michigan recommends municipalities have two to four months in the General Fund Balance to cover expenses, so the Township is in a very healthy position,” he said. The Public Safety Fund is covering all of the needs currently: police, fire and ambulance. Resident Dave Stumm asked what would be the position of the Fund if the LRSB funds decreased in the coming year. Raade said that the Public Safety Fund would see an approximate $600,000 short fall. Juli Flick, Supervisor of the Township Police force, reported that in August, the department had 128 complaints, issued nine tickets and made five arrests. She stated that nothing was out of the ordinary or alarming. She stated that calls are always up during the summer months with disorderly and disturbance calls and auto accidents. Fire Chief Ed Lijewski reported ongoing maintenance on the trucks is being performed. He said that the department had a tailgating party at New Buffalo High School Homecoming and the kids loved climbing aboard the trucks. The department also went to the elementary school for Fire Prevention Week and the kids were able to see and climb on the trucks there. “It’s always fun to get down with the kids over fire safety,” he said. In new business, the Board approved the first payment to Kalin Construction for construction in Glassman Park in the amount of $25,051.50. Matt Davis of Wightman reported that Kalin Construction has completed clearing the area and grading the parking lot. The completion date for the project is Dec. 2. “It is coming along very nicely and it’s exciting to see the clearing,” he said. They approved a payment of $739.30 for the Corridor Improvement Authority (CIA) to Wightman and Associates for ongoing work on the corridor. When winter tax bills are collected in the Township, the CIA will be funded by the tax payments from those properties located in the district. Davis reported that there is an upcoming meeting with MDOT to discuss the visual impact at Exit 4 to keep it in line with the vision for the entrances to the Township. Supervisor Rose Dudiak agreed, saying that the current condition at Exit 4, which has become a dumping ground for road construction waste, needs to be cleaned up. “It looks really bad,” she said. The Board approved the transfer of $65,460, approximately 30 percent of the revenue collected from the winter taxes for Public Safety Fund, from the Public Safety Fund to the LRSB Discretionary Fund. They approved a down payment of $108,369 for the new Township fire truck, which was approved by the Board at last month’s meeting. Chief Lijewski reported that the chassis has been ordered for the manufacture of the new truck. He stated that the truck should be ready in about six months, depending on parts delivery. It was ordered from Spencer Manufacturing in South Haven, Michigan. Per a recommendation of Archie Barkman, Sewer Superintendent, the Board approved covering Sewer Specifications; the excavating and backfilling of force mains as specified by the GRSD. They approved a mileage reimbursement for William Lambert for Building Inspector training in Frankenmuth, Michigan, in the amount of $276.48 for 512 miles traveled over a four day, two location training. They approved signing a contract with the GRSD for the refinancing of bonds. The refinancing will save approximately $95,000 over the life of the current bonds. Dudiak stated, “With the nice lower interest rates we can refinance and save the taxpayers money.” The Board approved the purchase of underground alarm systems for lift stations for the sewer department for a not-to-exceed amount of $8,100. The alarms will avoid future spills and that keeps the DEQ happy, it was stated. The alarms will be purchased from Mission Systems. Prior to the regular Township Board meeting, the New Buffalo Township Election Commission met to appoint election Inspectors for the Nov. 8 General Election. They are: Republicans Carolyn Ghareeb, Irene Brinkman, Ernest Melichar, Mary Robertson and Judith Sachtleben and Democrats Chris Dudiak, Rachel Folino, Deborah Lindley and Dorothy Palen. Mary Robertson and Rachael Folino will represent the Board.

Celebrate the harvest season by joining the Michiana Humane Society’s 13th annual Harvest Home Tour Saturday, Nov. 5. This self-guided tour takes you through a variety of lovely homes throughout Harbor Country. The tour begins at 12 p.m. and ends at 5 p.m. All ticket holders must check in at It’s A Breeze located at 15300 Red Arrow Highway in Lakeside, from 11:30 a.m. until 3 p.m. the day of the event to pick up their program book, which includes a map. All of the homes will be located in Michigan: New Buffalo, Union Pier, Lakeside, and Three Oaks. Following the tour, from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m., ticket holders can enjoy a Wrap Up Party at Judith Racht Gallery located at 13689 Prairie Road in Harbert. The party will include a silent auction and a raffle for dinner for eight at Mesa Luna Restaurant, offered by the Michigan Friends of the MHS. A cash bar and complimentary hors d’oeuvres will be served. To view the numerous auction items available, visit the MHS website at www. michianahumanesocity.org Sponsors for the 2016 Home Tour include: blais rustic chic, Choose Chad, Harbor Country Storage and Maureen Culp at RE/MAX Harbor Country. All proceeds benefit the care and protection of homeless animals in LaPorte and Berrien counties. Tickets are $60 in advance and $75 the day of the event. Children over the age of one must have a ticket. Advance tickets may be purchased online or at participating locations through Friday, Nov. 4. Ticket locations include: blais, Brandt’s Old Fashion Emporium, Chesterton Feed & Garden Center, Darling Boutique, Frecklefarm, It’s A Breeze, The Villager and MHS. For additional information, call MHS at 219-872-4499. — STAFF REPORTS

Treat those who are good with goodness, and also treat those who are not good with goodness. Thus goodness is attained. Be honest to those who are honest, and be also honest to those who are not honest. Thus honesty is attained. — Lao Tzu


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

Beer in the Gardens

NEARBY STORAGE

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NATALIE CACIOPPO IN MICHIGAN CITY

riendship Botanic Gardens hosted their first Beer Fest featuring more than 15 breweries from around the Indiana area Sunday, Oct. 16. Tickets for the event were $50 online or at the door and included a 16-ounce pint glass, which was used for the purpose of sampling drinks. Those who received $60 VIP tickets were granted entrance to the Fest an hour early for a head start on the sampling before anyone else. Included in the breweries that participated were Bare Hands, Bell’s, Blue Moon, Burn ‘Em, Crown Brewing, Figure 8, Four Fathers, Greenbush, Ironwood, Lagunitas, Leinenkugel Misbeehaven Meads, Perrin, Round Barn, Three Floyds, Triton, Sam Adams, Shoreline, and Sun King. Food was provided by food trucks from The Green Machine, South Shore Ovenworks, and Redamak’s. The Crawpuppies and Matt Gabriel provided the entertainment. All of the proceeds from the event benefited Friendship Botanic Gardens.

New Buffalo, MI

269-470-3663 Pint glasses from various breweries

Jennifer Houck, Kelly Gombus and Nate Gombus

Perrin Brewing from Comstock, Michigan

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Redamak’s food truck

All of the different breweries under the big tent

BOATS, AUTOS, RV, TRAILERS & FLEX STORAGE www.nearbystorage.net


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

This week New Buffalo Times asked New Buffalo City Council candidates about Fountain Square, the Master Plan and the city manager position. Please note that answers are NOT edited nor proofed, they are unread until published. It is the hope that this effort will serve the community well. If a candidate chooses not to answer, it shall be noted. This week we will begin with the most asked question sent in by our readers.
What is happening with Village Square (referred to as the hole, slab) in the middle of downtown that has been unfinished since construction stopped in 2008?
How can the city leaders influence the Fountain/Village Square redevelopment? Or in your opinion, can they? The City is in the process of updating the City of New Buffalo Master Plan.
Please explain the importance or significance of the Master plan. What is the Current Status of the Master Plan? How would you proceed to further the completion of the Master Plan? How long will it take for the plan to be officially adopted?     The position of City manager is in a transition state.
How would you implement the hiring process for the new city manager? What do you feel are the important qualities and qualifications for a City Manager? Do you feel the City also needs an Assistant Manager? Or a dedicated administrative assistant to over see the hundreds of FOIA’s that come to the City monthly, as an example. Do you feel the city needs a full time staff attorney?  If so why?

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ENNIS, LIZ

We are all weary of the downtown space that sits empty, blank, disappointing and sad. The new fence is nice, neat and clean. And many are thankful for the removal of chain link that allowed us to see into the sad expanse of nothing. So, what to do? Perhaps the owner of this property will soon make a decision to move ahead and develop his property. Perhaps the city council can determine best practices for encouraging the owner to work with the City and together develop a future project that will add business, and community benefits for New Buffalo. At least the owner listened to the City when we cried foul for continuing to expose us to our blight. Look, we have tolerated the dismal and unkempt privately owned southeast corner of Whitaker and Buffalo St. for as many years and we haven’t seen any development from that local owner either. It’s time for all of us to make our opinions known in writing and discover ways to either work with such owners, change ordinances or take actions to prevent these and potential future community eyesores. #2 You Gotta Have a Plan, Stan… Otherwise you wind up with a mish mash of a mess, no matter what you think you are trying to accomplish.

It goes without saying that any organization or individual benefits from being able to work from a plan. This requires attention to the elements or tasks that, when undertaken, are first examined to determine their contribution to an overall vision. A City’s Master Plan should reflect an agreed upon vision of the best that can be imagined by those whose lives are affected by the reality and substance of the city’s future. The work involved in creating such a plan is no small task. A good plan should include the voices, ideas and expertise of all those or their representatives who wish to participate. City government and staff, leaders in business, education, recreation, entertainment, environment, and so many other entities ought to participate in some way as our Planning Commission works toward a completed document. In addition, a plan must include a ways and means section that spells out the specific undertaking and completion of the final plan. Actually any plan has to include in it the realization that plans sometimes go awry. Stuff happens. Maybe that’s why we’ve been talking about a Master Plan long before I ever arrived here more than 10 years ago. The good news is that it is really underway and being seriously attended to. Just a few days ago I witnessed our Planning Commission working diligently to establish dates and times for its further development. I believe we will soon hear about an opportunity for community members to join in on a conversation about our vision and perspectives about New Buffalo’s future. If I heard correctly, we should see a completed plan in 2017. I sincerely believe that this time it will actually happen. If I am elected to the City Council, I will direct continued attention to this undertaking. The Planning Commission will benefit from all of us working together to bring the Plan to fruition. #3 In my opinion, a City Manager must be knowledgeable about the laws, procedures and governance of Michigan cities. The position should require the completion of a master’s degree in city management. She or he must be experienced in directing and supervising all city functions. The individual must be a leader, a liaison, an excellent communicator and problem solver. This person wears many hats, spins many plates and therefore must be a calm and patient person able to multi-task, listen, learn ,and relate well to people. The City Council should be able to rely on this person to assist them and educate them as well. Community members look to the City Manager for answers and assistance and should be treated with utmost respect. City Council should speak with department heads and employees to get their perspective about their work, their view of the city as related to their work and the kind of traits they wish to see in a quality supervisor.

If Council Members are uninformed about the role of a City Manager, they should study and be certain of the qualifications deemed critical, important or less important as they arrive at consideration of candidates. At the same time Council members need to be in touch with representative business leaders and other community members. The Council should then outline their priorities or expectations for the person to be selected. The Council should develop and establish a specific set of procedures to post the position, contact agencies and individuals to find qualified candidates, develop a fair, open and transparent process for interviews and host meet and greets, if desired. Our city is undergoing a significant change in leadership now. Therefore, I believe we need to provide a new City Manager with sufficient support to do the job asked of him or her. I would support hiring an assistant manager, a position to be reviewed as to need on an annual basis. I do not support the hiring of a full time staff attorney at this time. We need to see how we get along with a new City Manager before taking such a step. We also must review current attorney costs with an eye to decreasing our need as our council, city manager and staff develop enhanced relations with each other and our community.

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KROLL, MARK

ow can city leaders influence the Fountain/ Village Square redevelopment? I believe City leaders can best influence progress on the Fountain/ Village Square redevelopment by moving forward with the Whitaker Street infrastructure improvements and finalizing the City Master Plan. Why would any property owner want to move ahead with a multi-million dollar project that will connect to inadequate water and sewer lines? Who would want to buy units in a project surrounded by crumbling streets and sidewalks, knowing the City was content allowing the deterioration to continue? This is just one of the reasons it is important to vote “YES” for the bond referendum. Please explain the importance or significance of the Master plan. The Master Plan will document the City’s vision of its future with clearly defined goals. It includes plans for residential use, commercial use,


www.newbuffalotimes.com public amenities and identifies the infrastructure improvements that will be necessary to achieve these goals. A current Master Plan will also help ensure any Fountain/Village Square development will fit in with the City’s vision. Many local, state and federal grants are contingent upon having a current Master Plan, so it is financially significant also. What is the current status of the Master Plan? I am encouraged by the Planning Commission’s progress on reviewing the Draft Master Plan. I hope their work on it will be completed by the end of this year. How long will it take for the plan to be officially adopted? Official adoption of the Master Plan by the City Council will follow the process required by the Michigan Planning Enabling Act. There are multiple steps in the process, so adoption may take several months after completion of the draft master plan What do you feel are the important qualities and qualifications for a City Manager? The City Manager job description lays out the important experience and educational requirements for the position, all of which I completely support. Do you feel the City also needs an Assistant Manager? I believe a qualified City Manager can effectively perform all of the necessary duties. Do you feel the city needs a full time staff attorney? The City Council is in the process of evaluating the option. I am waiting for additional information before making a decision.

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O’DONNELL, LOU

hat is happening with Village Square,(referred to as the hole, slab) in the middle of downtown that has been unfinished since construction stopped in 2008? Earlier this Summer, at the request of the City, the owner installed a wood fence along the perimeter of the property to enhance the overall look of the site. The city has reached out to the owners to let them know we remain optimistic there will be some activity in the near future. How can the city leaders influence the Fountain/Village Square redevelopment? or in your opinion, can they? This location will be one of the centerpieces of our City and a major contributor to funding the downtown

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016 development through the recapture of taxes over time. I am very confident the leadership of our city including myself will project the excitement and desire our community has to seeing this project through. The City is in the process of updating the City of New Buffalo Master Plan. Please explain the importance or significance of the Master plan. The Master Plan represents the overall vision of a municipality and has several fundamental purposes. Presents a unified and compelling vision for a community, derived from the aspirations of its citizens, and establishes the specific actions necessary to fulfill that vision; Provides a legal basis for land use regulation such as zoning and subdivision control; Formulates foundation to obtain state funding; Acts as living document to assure city development to address needs of residents; Assures compliance with zoning and property uses. What is the Current Status of the Master Plan? The master plan is in the hands of the plan commission with the assistance of a professional consultant. Once it’s been forwarded to the City Council, I will be sure to make it our number one priority to finalize. How would you proceed to further the completion of the Master Plan? The plan commission has been scheduling special meetings to speed up the completion. How long will it take for the plan to be officially adopted?     If all goes well, it will be presented to the City Council this Winter for final approval/adoption. The position of City manager is in a transition state. How would you implement the hiring process for the new city manager? The position has been posted and I’m happy to say we’ve had a few resumes submitted already. If all goes according to plan, we’ll have a new city manager in place just as the interim manager is departing. What do you feel are the important qualities and qualifications for a City Manager? Running a city isn’t an easy task. It’s important that we hire a manager who has experience running a city and experience with handling the major projects and issues that we will be facing in the very near future. A plus would be to find a manager who’s involved with the International City Managers Association (ICMA) and, if from Michigan, the Michigan Municipal Executive association. In the past decade New Buffalo has had 7 different managers, that is not a good track record. It’s critical that we find a manger with the experience we need but is also the right fit for our community. Do you feel the City also needs an Assistant Manager? Or a dedicated

administrative assistant to oversee the hundreds of FOIA’s that come to the City monthly, as an example. We don’t actually see “hundreds” of FOIA’s monthly, but there are an overabundance of them. So many requests divert our staff from their daily activities and it’s become a tremendous expense to our city. As for an assistant manager or dedicated administrative assistant, I believe our new City Manager will need to assess the operational needs of the city and organize accordingly. Do you feel the city needs a full time staff attorney? If so why? With all the zoning ordinance revisions, which will be required after the master plan is completed along with an array of other issues the city currently retains attorneys for, there could be substantial savings over the next few years by hiring a full time staff attorney. This is another topic the new City Manager will need to examine.

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KIRKUS, RAY

t would have been prudent for the city to to jump in and purchase the property from the bank for the 1.2 million dollars Victor Ciardelli got it for and eliminate the city’s parking problem forever. Nonetheless, it is now private property and there are no ordinances that disallow vacant land in the CBD. The owners have discretion as to what can be built as far as commercial retail space or even mixed use with residences on the second floor. That issue is up to the developers. Obviously since the former Mayor and current outgoing City Manager have non-disclosure agreements with Mr. Ciardelli in regard to his plans for the property, the rest of the public is left in the dark. All one can hope is that whatever will be built will be in compliance with all codes, ordinances and height restrictions. The City is in the process of updating the City of New Buffalo Master Plan. Please explain the importance or significance of the Master plan. The Master Plan is not a requirement for municipalities. It is an option and a tool that is generally used to steer future development for a period of time. If a city chooses to adopt a Master Plan, it must create a Planning Commission and the Plan must be written by them and accepted by the City Council. That is the process. Without such a plan, the City is hard pressed in obtaining grants for projects as it is the only document that illustrates the future plans for land use throughout the city. What is the Current Status of the Master Plan? Currently there is an expired plan and a draft of a plan. In essence the City does not have a current Plan. The City Council had hired a company to assist the Planning Commission to write a plan, but that never happened. A plan was assembled

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and produced with literally no input from the Planning Commission under the Control of the city manager and apparently the mayor and input from the DDA. On November 7th , The Planning Commission will hold an event at the high school encouraging the publics input on what kind of town they wish to see in the future. Somewhat of a reboot to get the show back on the road. What needs to be clear is that the master plan is the People’s plan and therefore needs to use the peoples input. The more the public participates, the better the picture we as planners have to incorporate the People’s vision of a future New Buffalo. How would you proceed to further the completion of the Master Plan? There was a lot of hindrance and lack of cooperation with the Planning Commission the past year. It appears that the work will now be able to move ahead. Numerous workshop dates have been scheduled to review documents submitted to the PC with a nearly full membership in place. I believe and hope the process will move rather quickly now that everything is in order. There is only one snag, and that is approval from the Council to authorize funding for the consultant for his work and guidance. How long will it take for the plan to be officially adopted?     There are a series of steps that are required and are specified in the MPEA (Michigan Planning enabling act), but first a draft, one that is agreeable amongst the planners, has to be created. Following this approval, public hearings are scheduled and neighboring communities are informed and given time to comment. Finally the draft is presented to the City Council for approval and even then they can reject the plan and send it back to the planners with suggested changes. So there is no easy answer to this question as it is dependent on many unknown variables, but what I can say at this point, is it looks as though the current Planning Commissioners are exited and intent in moving ahead as quickly and diligently as practicable. How would you implement the hiring process for the new city manager? I’m not entirely sure how to answer this question. The hiring process would be similar to the hiring of any other professional. There would be ads placed, applications reviewed and an interview process, similar to the hiring of the current CM. The process is what it is, the criterion is what the focus should be on. What are we looking for? Last time around we got a well educated Harvard man, who has never worked as a city manager before, who seemed to be into every aspect of the city except for management, and who has worked on destroying the morale of city employees, upset citizens and worked on destroying this small town. I can’t recall when this city has been worse off.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 10


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

KNOW YOUR BALLOT

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avid’s Delicatessen & Coffee will be hosting a “Know Your Ballot” event on Tuesday, October 25th from 6-9pm. Candidates running for local office CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

That said, the process should be one that is all inclusive in searching for a candidate through the MML but also seeking local talent. The minimum qualifications are a Bachelor’s degree, however experience in administration, but more importantly, knowledge about our unique little town is an absolute necessity. Bringing people in from outside, who compare New Buffalo with every other Lakeside coastal town is not the answer. What do you feel are the important qualities and qualifications for a City Manager? I believe I answered this question while answering the previous one. Do you feel the City also needs an Assistant Manager? Or a dedicated administrative assistant to over see the hundreds of FOIA’s that come to the City monthly, as an example. The Short answer is no. This City has worked both ways with and without an assistant. If I recall correctly, the current City Manager was hired and paid a higher salary ($100.000.00) specifically because he was so well qualified in performing the tasks required of a City Manager, that there was no need to hire an assistant. In fact, this city manager was more involved in suing the Planning Commission, harassing private citizens and being involved in nearly everything, including skirting laws and ordinances which he was hired to enforce, than performing the duties of the City Manager and Zoning Administrator. He was about changing the rules in this entire town. However, in the final budget proposal, he proposed the City hire a full-time attorney he could use for his own assistant if he was not dealing with litigation. I would like to note that I would not be against the temporary hiring of an administrative assistant or intern during the peak season summer months when the City is really busy to assist in day to day operations. The FOIA requests are not generally filled by the City Manager, but rather the Clerk, who generally has a Deputy Clerk to assist in such tasks. Do you feel the city needs a full time staff attorney? If so why? No. The justification for such a suggestion is clearly the huge costs of litigation, most of it brought on by the city itself and not by others

have been invited to meet and greet with the public. There will also be information about other races and initiatives that will appear on the November ballot. This is

suing the city. It is not until this administration, meaning this council, this City Manager, and this interim law firm were in place that these cost have ballooned for such a suggestion to be a consideration. The problem with doing so is that most attorneys specialize in various components of law IE. real estate, criminal, municipal, corporate etc. Folks might say municipal is the one you want, but there are subspecialties there as well. Even today the city hires various attorneys, for Ethics- it’s Sara Bell, for a threat of a commutations tower to be installed- it was someone else. In addition an on staff attorney cannot act as a assistant to the City Manager and also the attorney of record for the city. The attorney position is defined in the Charter as the attorney works solely for the Council and not for the City Manager. Ray Kirkus -Proponent of limited government and individual rights.

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a nonpartisan event to encourage folks to make informed decisions in the voting booth. Everyone is invited to attend. — STAFF REPORTS

What do you feel are the important qualities and qualifications for a City Manager? Honesty and Integrity...transparency in reporting and recommending, and of course, management experience. Do you feel the City also needs an Assistant Manager? Or a dedicated administrative assistant to over see the hundreds of FOIA’s that come to the City monthly, as an example. NO! Isn’t that what the Clerk and the Deputy Clerk are for? Do you feel the city needs a full time staff attorney?  If so why? No. Because we don’t need one. The last time the city was sued is when it sued itself. Hopefully this won’t happen anymore.

KIRKUS, JEANETTE

ow can the city leaders influence the Fountain/ Village Square redevelopment? or in your opinion, can they? No they can’t. They can only have the developer follow law and codes. The City is in the process of updating the City of New Buffalo Master Plan. Please explain the importance or significance of the Master plan. It is important for the future growth of the town. Without it the city is unable to get grants for projects. What is the Current Status of the Master Plan? The Master Plan is in limbo, but I understand the Planning Commission is working on it. How would you proceed to further the completion of the Master Plan? I would work to give the Planning Commission all the funding and the tools they need to complete the Master Plan. 
How long will it take for the plan to be officially adopted?     It depends on how long it takes the Planning Commission to write and submit the plan. How would you implement the hiring process for the new city manager? Resumes and Interviews. Professional job postings- not seeking any more Harvard grads.

NEW BUFFALO TIMES

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SPIRITO, BOBBY

he City has been able to influence the owners of Village/Fountain Square in the past year with a couple of positive outcomes. They were persuaded to demolition the three-story brick building and the former Michigan Thyme building and they also enclosed the concrete slab with a fence that surrounds the entire block. Both of these actions removed a large part of the eye soar on North Whittaker Street. This put the development a step closer to a future.  We have all had to live with this eyesore for too many years, and we would all like to see it move forward.   The approval of the Whittaker Street development plan and a YES vote on the Bond referendum on the Nov 8 ballot is important to this project. Without new infrastructure; sewers, water lines and streets in the downtown district, it is unlikely any development will progress on that site.   The Master Plan is the road map or guideline for the city that influences

the future planning and development within the cities commercial, residential, parks and harbor areas. It is the vision for the future of the City. The Master Plan is currently being updated by the Planning Commission with the assistance of professional planners, Housel and Levigne of Chicago, who have submitted a draft Plan to the City Planners. The P.C. is expanding and modifying it with input from city boards and commissions. Commission.  A preliminary plan will be presented at public hearings for public review before a final version is presented to the council for adoption. The next public hearing is scheduled at New Buffalo High School cafeteria on Monday, November 7 at 7 p.m.  As a councilmen I will continue to monitor the progress of the Planning Commission. It is critical to the City that the plan be completed within the coming months and be approved for grand funding applications.   The council, with the assistance of the Michigan Municipal League (MML), is advertising for the position of City Manager.  I feel a future manager must be educated in public administration and municipal government, have strong leadership skills and be able to work with others in an open minded and fair manner.    Hiring an in-house attorney is being considered by the council. The council is looking at the financial benefits to the city and weighing the costs of an in-house attorney versus an outside legal firm. The high volume of Freedom of information (FOIA) requests submitted on a daily basis has created a huge demand on staff time and an in-house attorney would be able to help with that.  Currently the clerk, or the Deputy Clerk, must respond in detail, in a timely manner, to every request submitted, and many require legal review by our attorney. These requests cost the taxpayers money.  The cost of outside legal counsel as a result of the many litigious activities within the city may be able to be reduced.    I would appreciate your vote on November 8 and your vote for Mark Kroll, Elizabeth Ennis and Lou O’Donnell and a YES vote for the City Bond referendum.   

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE • SINCE 1942

NBT did not receive responses from Lea Grzywack Kevin Huber, Ray Lawson, Diana Nichols or Si Osiri


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

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LETTERS TO THE PAPER:

THE VIEWS EXPRESSED HERE DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE IDEAS OR OPINIONS OF THE NEW BUFFALO TIMES. WE ASK THAT LETTERS BE UNIQUE TO THE NEW BUFFALO TIMES AND SHOULD BE 500 WORDS OR FEWER. LETTERS MUST INCLUDE A PHONE NUMBER OR EMAIL ADDRESS. PLEASE NOTE THAT PUBLISHED LETTERS WILL BE EDITED FOR SPELLING AND GRAMMAR. THE NEW BUFFALO TIMES RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHOOSE WHICH LETTERS ARE SELECTED FOR PUBLICATION. EMAIL US AT INFO@NEWBUFFALOTIMES.COM.

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QUOTE THE VOTE...

ere are some interesting thoughts and quotes from previous voters. “Voting is the most basic essential of citizenship and I think that any man (or women) in this country who fails to avail himself (or herself) of that right should hide in shame. I truly wish there was some sort of badge of dishonor that a non-voter would have to wear.” -India Edwards “In a president, character is everything. A president doesn’t have to be brilliant. He doesn’t have to be clever; you can hire clever, you can hire pragmatic, and you can buy and bring in policy wonks. But you can’t buy courage and decency, you can’t rent a strong moral sense. A president must bring those things with him (or her).”— Peggy Nonan “In God We Trust.” — VIOLET B. WALLER NEW BUFFALO

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A NOTE OF CREDIT...

give credit to New Buffalo City Council candidate Ray Kirkus for clearly and openly stating an opinion that gets to the very heart of the many challenges that face the City of New Buffalo, and lead to the never-ending and embarrassing bickering and legal wrangling that pass for political discourse with the New Buffalo City Council. Kirkus states, “I, like most others are relieved when the tourists go home so we can enjoy the peace and tranquility for the remainder of the year.” Is Candidate Kirkus correct? Are “most” New Buffalo residents glad to see visitors leave? Do business owners, job seekers, economic developers, and the Pokagon Casino management desire New Buffalo City Council members who want to continue to foster the insular and self-defeating “us vs. them” (read: F.I.P.) culture that manifests itself in joblessness, shuttered storefronts, failed businesses, and desolate New Buffalo streets for much of the year? Are Michigan lake towns north of New Buffalo still fighting amongst themselves, after all these years, over their civic and cultural identities? Or are council members in St. Joseph, South Haven, and Saugatuck, et al, enthusiastically embracing their status as tourist destinations, and working hard to make their cities yearround attractions for visitors, so that jobs and economic opportunities can thrive for their residents? Thank you, Mr. Kirkus, for courageously starting this important discussion that weighs so heavily on the future vitality of the City of New Buffalo. — VINCE BONNER

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MOVING FORWARD...

very day I have renewed hope for the future of New Buffalo. And nearly as often, my hopes for New Buffalo are defeated by situations that defy any possible explanation. I recently attended a community event in Chicago celebrating the 25th anniversary of CCLF (Chicago Community Loan Fund), a Chicago community lending organization. It is a consortium of private and non-profit organizations, all rowing together to visualize, initiate, create and provide funding and technical assistance for neighborhood projects. It was very inspiring and reminded me of the days when my husband and I provided assistance to neighborhood development organizations. Over ten years ago, we moved our home and our careers to New Buffalo with dreams of contributing to New Buffalo’s future. Well, here we are, over 10 years later, with the same deteriorating streets, 100-year old water and sewer lines, a one block hole on our main street, a fractured city hall, multiple city staff resignations, hundreds of FOIA requests, and contentious leader relationships. It’s so hard to believe that this is our current state of affairs in a city with such exquisite assets: a healthy financial statement with very low debts, Pokagon grants, highly functioning and well-regarded school district, substantial second homeowner taxes, beautiful natural resources, and caring residents. There are two ways we can make a difference on November 8th to shift from dysfunction to moving forward: Vote YES for the bond proposal. This bond referendum is for street improvement projects including water, sewer, and residential street repaving which are long overdue. This is NOT an extra millage request. There will be NO property tax increase resulting from this bond. This is NOT about politics—it’s about investing in our community. There is sufficient cash flow from old, paid bonds and water and sewer funds to pay the debt service for this bond. Also, when the DDA begins to receive funds from the DDA district’s incremental increase in taxes, these funds will also be used to pay bond debt service. There is no truth whatsoever to claims being made by one or two individuals that this bond will cause a tax increase or an imbalance of power in our city’s boards and commissions. Although the bond proposal did not have to be included in the ballot, let’s rally around our collective ability to voice our YES votes to fix seriously deteriorated conditions in our city. Vote for City Council candidates Lou O’Donnell IV, Bob Spirito, Mark Kroll and Liz Ennis. These candidates bring the

most extensive work and civic experiences needed to move our city forward. Further, they conduct themselves in a civilized, thoughtful, and lawful manner. They have pledged to communicate with positive language, a respectful and receptive attitude while seeking to understand all sides of an issue. Positive role modeling is absolutely needed, particularly with communications inside and outside city hall. I have no doubt that these individuals will be able to change the culture within city hall from one of negativity, paranoia, and doubting to one of positivity, production, and purpose. The outcome of this election will have an effect on our city for decades to come. Please vote YES for the bond proposal and please vote for O’Donnell, Spirito, Kroll and Ennis to help our city heal, refresh, and reach our potential! — DIANE PYSHOS

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SOME FANFARE...

ndy Vavra is up for reelection as our County Commissioner. As a constituent and a friend, I know he works tirelessly with little fanfare. During the past two years, Andy has worked to improve and expand services with no new taxes and no borrowed money. For instance, in 2015 the Health Department was consolidated from four north county sites to one main office in a renovated facility (the four sites were sold to the private sector). The new Animal Control Facility features better pens and a greater capacity. The Jail Intake Renovation provides additional cells, improved video arraignment and extends the life of the facility for more than 30 years. This year an Indigent Defense Office was established, and standard audits were implemented to ensure uniform reporting and appropriate fiscal oversight of our senior centers. Andy’s work with the Berrien County Land Bank resulted in demolition of over 240 derelict buildings, acquisition of 260 taxes-inarrears properties and 247 quiet titles, 11 rehabs and 6 new constructions with 175 properties sold to the private sector. And, the 2017 budget includes upgrades for the Galien River Park. All of these projects were paid for with savings, grants and property sales, i.e., no new taxes, no borrowed money. Andy is one of the most active and respected commissioners in our county. He represents us with a leadership style that works−he is calm, objective and fair.  Andy does not “toot his own horn,” rather he is dedicated to doing a great job for you and me. The results of his work provide all of us with safer communities and increased property values with no new taxes!  Please

join me in supporting Andy Vavra for County Commissioner. — VICKIE WAGNER THREE OAKS

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BOTTOM LINE

linton lies with half truths. Trump, is an ‘-ist, -ist, -ist’. We have had much too much of this talk. Ask your self why? I say because both, BOTH, parties can not or do not want to talk much about what the real problems are and why they have not done more to correct. Jill Stein of the Green Party is smart, articulate and would beat Hillary badly in a debate. Gary Johnson would challenge Donald. That is why the major parties would not allow them to debate. Mark Twain famously said, “If voting made any difference, they would not let us vote.” That leaves us with the choice of who has the best chance to make some progress? Which group has had eight years to make some progress. Which group has a chance at a cleaner slate. Which party has won on a false promise of ‘hope and change’ with little results. Which candidate has a proven record of the ability to build things? Which candidate would put coal, coal miners, coal families, coal mine owners, coal communities out of business. Which candidate has the physical and moral stamina to be the President. Which President left American citizens, employees to die without at least a meaningful attempt at a rescue? Leave no one behind. ‘What difference does it make now’. What it means is, who would care to serve abroad with out some assurance that your company or country would come to your rescue in time of need? Or at least make an attempt to save them. Which party has at least some new ideas for some progress? Which party has been promising to fight for the inter cities for decades with little or no progress? Which party promises every four years and then goes away after buying the votes and never delivering? What do these city people have to lose? Folks, get beyond the smoke and mirrors and squealing. Pay attention to the real issues and the answers offered in the next few weeks. The country will survive which ever of the two deplorable candidates wins. However the parties and the policies are much more important. The president is a figure head. An Actor. Like Regan, Obama, Teddy Roosevelt. They must be able deliver a good speech, or hire good speech writers. A figure head. Who do you want to see on the new dime. Or the new $2 bill. Vote. — GEORGE DOBIE NEW BUFFALO

The supreme quality for leadership is unquestionably integrity. Without it, no real success is possible, no matter whether it is on a section gang, a football field, in an army, or in an office. — Dwight D. Eisenhower


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

ARENA sports

CHALK BOARD scholastic news

From the Bleachers COLUMN BY KURT MARGGRAF IN CHICAGO

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ike most of Chicago, I have been consumed by the Cubs for the past week. After knocking out the San Francisco Giants, the Cubs are now in a battle with the Los Angeles Dodgers for the right to represent the National League in the World Series. As almost everybody in the world knows, the last time the Cubs participated in the World Series was 71 years ago, in 1945, and they haven’t won the World Series in 108 years. Believe me when I tell you that many are convinced they will never be champions, but I am not among the non-believers. Last year they got to the championship series by defeating the Saint Louis Cardinals but were then swept by the New York Mets. With a few key additions and another year of experience for their younger players, the Cubs and their fans are hoping for, and maybe even expecting, an even better result this year. The series against the Giants was an emotional rollercoaster. Each team fought hard and took temporary control of the series, only to have the other team come roaring back. The Cubs won the first two games and in Game Three, Jake Arrieta hit a three run homer off Giants ace Madison Bumgarner, much to the delight of every Cub fan. When the Cubs brought in their flame thrower, Aroldis Chapman, to close out the game and the series, he was roughed up, and the Giants took a two run lead. I was in touch with many fans that night through texts and calls and many were afraid that the team would fall apart, but Kris Bryant hit a two run homer in the ninth to tie the game, and Cub fans breathed a sigh of relief. The Cubs ended up losing in 13 innings but by then it was 2:30 a.m. and many fans had fallen asleep. When they awoke the next morning, many were sure the sky was falling, and the feeling intensified as the Giants took a 5-2 lead into the 9th inning. There was little joy in Wrigleyville, but the Cubs changed that with an historic four run rally to take the lead. Chapman struck out the side in the bottom of the ninth to preserve the series clinching win. The series against the Dodgers began with the Cubs taking a three run lead in the first game. They seemed to be on their way to an easy victory, but the Dodgers tied the game in the 8th. The Cubs loaded the bases in the bottom of the inning and reserve catcher Miguel Montero hit a pitch hit grand slam homer to give the Cubs the victory in Game One. Game Two saw Clayton Kershaw outduel Kyle Hendricks to give the Dodgers a 1-0 victory. Javier Baez is having a terrific post season and is quickly becoming a fan favorite. The series moves to Los Angeles for the next three games, then returns to Chicago for the final two (if needed). So far, the post season has been extremely exciting and it seems like the best is yet to come. I fully expect many more ups and downs, but I believe this may finally be the year all Cub fans have been waiting for. Piglet: “How do you spell love?” Pooh: “You don’t spell it; you feel it.” Go Cubbies. Talk to you next week. Peace, love, and happiness.

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Andrick Villa uses a computer plugged into his 3-D printer

NBHS students embrace 3-D printing

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BY FRANCESCA SAGALA

ew Buffalo High School students have come a long way with 3-D printing since receiving a set of 10 3-D Rep Rap Delta printers nearly two years ago. Several 3-D printers now occupy an entire classroom located within the high school. There, students devote an entire class using them to print a new monthly creation. Medallions with the school’s official Bison logo on them was an early project, with student Noah Sharum working on the design. Recently, he added that they made a set of 3-D shapes for New Buffalo Elementary School students. High school science teacher Richard Eberly said that the printers have made the students self-reliant, as they have used them to build new printers. For example, students Sarah Baughman, Andrick Villa and Alaina Maniscalco said one of their first projects was modifying the 3-D printers, which involved using the printers to print new parts for it. “We’re learning how to make our own stuff,” said Sharum. Sharum said the printers use Polylactic acid (PLA) plastic, which is biodegradable and made from cornstarch, for printing their various projects. He said that the

PLA must first be heated to 210 degrees Celsius (or 410 degrees Fahrenheit). It eventually cools not long after it exits the printer’s extruder. Students spray hairspray on the mirror at the bottom of the printers, ensuring that the final product doesn’t stick. Students can leave the printers unsupervised overnight, seeing the progress of their creations when they arrive at school the next day. Located at the bottom of the printers is a computer board, which Sharum called the “heart” of the printer. According to Eberly, students must follow a list of project guidelines, which involves first proposing their project, explaining how they’re going to design it, building it and then publishing it by designing a website. So far, students’ projects have included a USB cell phone charger, a hair straightener, a 3-D phone case and a portable battery charger with a digital flash drive with storage on it. In addition, Eberly added that other students are also coming in to print miniature boats during their bonus period. Eberly added that students from a variety of grade levels participate in the 3-D printing process, and that he is even working on involving middle school students in it.


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

Bond Referendum FAQ’s

VOTE YES ON NOVEMBER 8TH FOR BOND REFERENDUM The bond referendum on the November 8 ballot is for street improvement projects including water, sewer, and residential street repaving which are long overdue. th

Q: WHY ARE THESE STREET IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS IMPORTANT TO NEW BUFFALO? Many pipes are more than 100 years old. In some locations, the occupants must run the water in the winter to avoid frozen pipes. The condition and width of downtown sidewalks and parking are unsafe. In our residential streets, many water lines have broken and collapsed, causing damage to homes and requiring repeat repairs. The most critical needs are the Mechanic Street and North Whittaker sewer and water mains. Q: WHAT WILL THE BOND REFERENDUM PAY FOR? The bond referendum (along with the other fund sources below) can pay for street improvement projects including water, sewer, street repaving, downtown amenities and sidewalks in prioritized locations. Q: WHAT OTHER FUNDS ARE BEING USED TO PAY FOR THESE PROJECTS? Pokagon and LRSB funds, water and sewer funds, and state gasoline tax funds. Grants will also be pursued. Q: WHY NO TAX INCREASE WITH THIS BOND REFERENDUM? First, there are several sources of funds to pay for the proposed street, water and sewer improvements (see Q&A immediately above). The bond represents only a portion of the total project costs which means that the other funding sources will not have to be repaid. Second, the city will only sell bonds as needed to support the project costs. Third, there are several available sources of city funds to pay the new bond debt service, namely: 1. Retired bond funds used for the city hall construction have been paid off this year and the budgeted debt service from the old bonds can be allocated to the new bond payments; 2. Water and sewer funds (also called enterprise funds) can be allocated to the portion of the bond used specifically for water and sewer. This has been carefully budgeted by the city to be sure the correct fund sources are used for the corresponding fund costs; and 3. General Funds: These are funds that come from operating cash flow and are not related to water and sewer, dredging, streets or parks and available to use for any other purpose including repayment of debt payments. Q: WHAT HAPPENS IF THE BOND REFERENDUM IS NOT APPROVED? The street improvement projects, including water, sewer, and residential street repaving will be substantially delayed since these types of projects are typically completed with bond funding.

Q: WHY ARE BONDS NEEDED? Total project costs for critically needed water, sewer and street replacements exceed funds available from the other funds outlined above. Also, the $1.6M Pokagon Funds cannot be used for below-ground infrastructure. Q: WHAT WILL BOND FUNDS BE USED FOR? Approximately $1.5 Million is going toward residential street repaving in order of priority based on condition. Remaining funds will be used as needed for: • Whittaker, Mechanic, Merchant and Barton Streets infrastructure (water and sewer replacement) and street repaving • Additional parking spaces and paving • Public restrooms Q: WHY IS THE PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE OVER GALIEN RIVER INCLUDED IN BOND PROPOSAL RESOLUTION? This is only for engineering studies to determine the most cost effective and safest options of adding a pedestrian bridge. The existing pedestrian walkway, which is adjacent to the road, is an unsafe situation. The city is looking at this in terms of long-range planning. Q: WHAT ARE THE TOTAL PROJECT COSTS FOR WATER AND SEWER REPLACEMENT, INFRASTRUCTURE, STREET REPAVING AND STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS? Exact project costs are not known at this time since plans have been sent out to bid and the city is awaiting final cost estimates. Also, additional parking spaces are still in the planning stage. The city will inform the public of total costs as soon as they are known. Q: WHY GET A BOND NOW IF TOTAL COSTS ARE UNKNOWN? There are several reasons: 1. It would not be fiscally responsible for the city to pay for plans and specifications to obtain final bids without knowing that the bond is approved. Since the bonding process takes time, it was important to begin the bonding process prior to completing and submitting plans and specifications for bid. 2. Since there has been a referendum added to the ballot, it has added additional time to the bond process. Since the bond referendum needs to be voted upon, if the city waited for final costs to come in before the election, we would have to wait for next May’s election which would delay these critical projects by another year. 3. Since there are at least $4 Million in infrastructure needs and the City can easily afford the bond payments, it was prudent financial and business planning to request the $4M bond amount. 4. Bond rates are very cheap right now (around 2.7%) and it is projected that rates will increase by the end of this year. The strategy is to obtain inexpensive funds now to avoid any future tax increase.

HIGHLIGHTS:

This is NOT an extra millage request There will be NO property tax increase resulting from this bond The water and sewer systems and many streets are in critical condition This is NOT about politics—it’s about investing in the community

Q: HOW WILL THE BOND BE STRUCTURED AND HOW WILL THE BOND PAYMENTS BE REPAID? It is expected that the bond term will be up to 15 years at approximately 2.7%. Former, higher rate bonds in the amounts of approximately $2.5M have been retired. For example, the bond for the city hall construction was at a rate of 5.7%. The difference between the old bond payments and the new bond payments (approximately $200,000/year) can be covered by the city’s water and sewer fund and general fund accounts. The City can still handle additional financial needs well beyond this bond repayment. Q: ARE THERE ANY OTHER BOND REPAYMENT SOURCES OTHER THAN THE CITY’S OPERATING CASH FLOW? Yes, it is projected that DDA TIF funds will eventually be able to pay a portion of the bond repayments. Q: HOW WILL IT BE DETERMINED WHICH RESIDENTIAL STREETS ARE BEING REPAVED WITH THESE BOND FUNDS? Residential street repaving will be determined on a prioritized basis based on condition and need. The bond funds for residential street repaving will “catch the city up” for over 10 years of ignoring or delaying street repaving needs. Q:WILL SOME RESIDENTIAL WATER AND SEWER MAIN LINES BE REPLACED? Yes, based on condition and need. For example, the same water main in one of our residential streets keeps breaking, resulting in repeat repairs that are no longer cost effective. This would be an example of a water main that would most likely be replaced with a portion of these bond funds. Q:WHAT IS THE REPAVING PLAN FOR RESIDENTIAL STREETS NOT INCLUDED IN REPAVING WITH THIS BOND ISSUE? On a prioritized basis, a repaving plan will be completed for the next few years so that several streets per year will be repaved using street reserve funds. Q:WHY SHOULD THE CITY TAKE ON ADDITIONAL DEBT WITH THE BOND ISSUE INSTEAD OF USING ITS OPERATING CASH FLOW TO TAKE CARE OF THESE PROJECTS? This situation is similar to a homebuyer deciding whether or not to purchase or fix up a house with a mortgage vs. cash on hand. The home buyer or home owner can either obtain a mortgage now and use their earnings to repay the mortgage over time or they can save up for many years and purchase or fix up their house after waiting a decade or more to have sufficient funds. It is a fiscally responsible decision to purchase, replace or repair assets with affordable debt payments instead of waiting a decade or more to pay with cash. In the City’s case, the water, sewer and street needs are so critical, the city cannot wait for even a year to take care of these critical projects.

PAID FOR BY FORWARD NEW BUFFALO 2016, PO BOX 163, NEW BUFFALO, MI 49117

Q: WHAT ABOUT THE CLAIMS FROM SOME RESIDENTS THAT THIS IS JUST THE BEGINNING FOR TAKING ON MORE BONDS THAN THE CITY CAN AFFORD WHICH WOULD ULTIMATELY BANKRUPT THE CITY? There is no truth to these claims. The city started planning the Whittaker Street infrastructure project over 13 years ago and has more than sufficient funds to support the bond repayments without raising taxes. No other major projects are contemplated in the near future. If and when the city decides to embark on additional capital improvements, it will be evaluated through careful planning and budgeting. This bond will actually take care of much of the 5-year capital improvement projects in a little over one year. Q: DOES THE CITY HAVE ANY OTHER FUNDS TO USE FOR STREET REPAIR AND REPAVING? The city receives approximately $200,000 a year from the Major and Local Streets Fund/Reserve ACT51 account (state gasoline tax funds). This account is being depleted each year due to pipe breaks, patching and repair requirements. Q: IF THIS BOND REFERENDUM IS NOT APPROVED, IS IT POSSIBLE FOR TAXES TO DECREASE? Theoretically, yes, however, a city must continually invest in capital improvements to maintain its systems, infrastructure and roads to support its residents’ and business’ current needs, along with providing infrastructure to support future growth. With no investment in infrastructure, property values may decline, resulting in lower tax payments to the city. Paradoxically, since the city’s operating expenses remain the same, lower tax payments to the city could result in an overall tax increase by the city to cover basic operating expenses. These street improvements will be a building block to help increase a year-round economy by attracting a more diversified population to attend our schools and shop at our businesses which will, hopefully, create an increase in wages in the community. The #1 priority identified in public meetings was to get our failed downtown project started again and the proposed infrastructure and street improvements would be required to support a $25 Million development at the former Fountain Square project. Q: WHY IS THERE A BOND REFERENDUM ON THE BALLOT IF THERE IS NO MILLAGE INCREASE AND NO INCREASE IN TAXES? Although the bond referendum is not needed, the law allows residents to add a bond referendum to be voted upon. One city resident decided to pursue the bond referendum.

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016 Generation Gap takes the stage

Booths crowd the downtown

Three Oaks throws fourth Wurst Fest

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BY FRANCESCA SAGALA

Lindsey Schaffer and Lilly Halliday

Allison Hess at the Sweet GoodHess booth

or the fourth time, visitors converged on a portion of Elm Street in Three Oaks, Michigan, for the “wurst” time ever during the Village’s annual Wurst Fest Saturday, Oct. 15. Started in 2013 to recognize Drier’s Meat Market’s 100th year in business, the festival featured live music from the bands Generation Gap and The Pointn’ Fingers Band as well as singer/guitarist Dan Moore throughout the afternoon. Booths featuring food and crafts from various businesses lined the street, and beer/ cider and wines from local breweries and vineyards. Children could also get in on the fun by having their faces painted or decorating pumpkins to celebrate the fall season.

Leo Jovanovic of Janice’s Garden gives a sample to Jenny Thomas(right)

Lisa Halliday, Julie Schaffer and Susan Hall

Mickey and Evelyn Hurley show off their newly painted faces

Shelby Sexton shows off her craftsmanship

Jack Smith chooses decorations for his pumpkin

Children enjoy the bouncehouse


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

Federal dredging funds in question LINDA HENDERSON IN NEW BUFFALO

n the evening of Thursday, Oct. 6, the New Buffalo Harbor Commission heard a presentation regarding the state of dredging and maintenance in the Great Lakes by Chuck May, chairman of the Great Lakes Small Harbor Coalition. In his opening remarks, May stated that he got involved with the lack of dredging in recreational harbors in 2007 when Barracuda, a racing yacht returning from the Mackinac Race, attempted to take refuge from a storm in his local harbor. The yacht ran aground in four feet of water at the mouth of the Portage Lake Harbor of Refuge, which was said to be 11-13 feet in depth. May stated that the vessel was a total loss and the three passengers were rescued after a three-hour struggle against the 8 to 10 foot waves. He said that the incident was a wakeup call, as it “led to my journey through a 20-year crisis that had been brewing, but we didn’t know it.” He was referring to the fact that the Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and the Federal Government have not acted as stewards of the harbors by continuing with ongoing dredging and maintenance as they had pledged. “Infrastructures are failing and there are inadequate depths in many of the harbors,” May said. The Barracuda event prompted May to form a grassroots organization of recreational harbors in Michigan to advocate for funding. It became apparent to them that the crisis was much bigger than Michigan, and they built the organization into representatives from all of the harbors, recreational and commercial, throughout the five Great Lakes, forming the Great Lakes Small Draft Harbor Coalition. He stated that there are 56 harbors in Michigan, 40 recreational harbors and 16 commercial harbors. Currently, there are 112 Great Lakes harbors, including 10 large ports, in the coalition. May said the problems lie in the fact that the federal government, Congress and the president have not been appropriating funds to the harbors that are gained from the Harbor Maintenance Trust (HMT). Prior to 1985, all of the tax money raised from shipping went back to the USACE for harbor maintenance, but between 1985 and 1995, only 50 percent of the tax from the HMT was given to the USACE. In 1995, President Bill Clinton captured 100 percent of the HMT to be used elsewhere in the federal budget, with no dollars going to the harbors. In 1998, some commercial harbors received budgeted funds, but there has been no money budgeted for recreational harbor maintenance since that time. (New Buffalo is a recreational harbor.) According to May, more than $9 billion of HMT funds have been “misappropriated,” meaning that Congress has not budgeted any money to be spent to keep the harbors dredged and maintained. He said that between 1998 and 2011, money was funded to the Great Lakes but only a fraction was actually appropriated, as most of the funds went unspent or went to other federal budget items. The Harbor Maintenance Tax was established more than 30 years ago from a 0.125 percent user fee on the value of cargo shipped. According to the website, the intent of the HMT was to guarantee that no US port would suffer from a lack of dredging and that those who utilize the ports pay for it. Approximately $1.8 billion in HMT revenue is collected yearly, enough to keep all of the ports and harbors in good working order; however, much of the funding never goes back to the ports. Since 2011, there have been no “earmarks” in Congress, which occasionally could be acquired by congressmen for their local harbor projects. In 2014, Congress approved the Water Resource and Reform Development Act (WRRDA), which was supposed to increase funding from HMT, with full funding being returned by 2025; however, that Act is also questionable, according to May. He stated that if the money was approved, money budgeted now could sustain the harbors in their existing condition, but there wasn’t enough budgeted funds to return the harbors to a healthy state. In 2014, USACE identified 16-19 small harbors in Michigan in critical need of dredging, including New Buffalo. The USACE needs $140 million to maintain all the harbors in the Great Lakes and $48 million just to do the small harbor

maintenance. In 2014, there was $275,000 allocated to New Buffalo, but it was not funded. He said if all of the money was approved by Congress to be funded between 2018 and 2020, all of the harbors could be returned to a healthy level. He said Congress had voted yes to authorize the funds but no to appropriate the funds to the USACE and the local harbors. The Energy and Water appropriations bill now under consideration by Congress provides for funding, which is $76 million below the 2016 WRRDA target level and misses the intention of the Act. It has not yet been approved. Recreational harbors are considered by USACE as low priority, although they effect the economy, livelihood and recreational opportunities of more than 2.5 million citizens in the communities surrounding the Great Lakes. If the lack of clear passage in a harbor were to force a closure of a harbor, the far reaching economic effect for a community would be devastating. Small recreation harbors support tourism, the sport fishing industry, and charter services, all of which bring extra dollars into a community. Most harbor also support residential homes, hotels and resorts, whose real estate taxes support the community as a whole, including the school system. A closed harbor could bring unprecedented hardship on community. May said that in Michigan, there are 13 recreational harbors with water depths of less than four feet (including New Buffalo’s shallowing at the mouth of the harbor), and that there are nine small commercial harbors and 19 other recreational harbors. Nine commercial harbors and one recreational harbor, with contamination issues in the Upper Peninsula, receive WRRDA money in 2016 for dredging. In 2014, the USACE identified 16-19 small harbors in critical need of dredging, including New Buffalo. He said that the coalition asked for $20 million dollars to be budgeted in 2016 for the Great Lake Small Harbors, but that bill has not yet been signed by the House of Representatives. He reported that the State of Oregon has a fulltime lobbyist in Washington who has created an “orchestrated success,” producing funds for dredging nine harbors. Oregon even purchased their own dredging equipment from funds allocated to them. He suggested that Michigan and the Great Lakes states follow suit and hire a lobbyist, adding that the “squeaky wheel gets the grease.” In 2015, the Army Corps of Engineers, which seems to recognize the problem, suggested to some communities that they take title to the federal channels so that they can maintain them without the involvement or approval of the government. May strongly advises against taking that avenue. In closing, May stated, “I think New Buffalo has the largest influx of recreational boaters I’ve seen on the Great Lakes.” “Who will champion for New Buffalo? The day of the Army Corp looking out for us are gone, we must pursue to get attention and funding. Better organization and networking at the Federal and State level is required to win,” he added.

D

redging in the New Buffalo federal channel has been accomplished in recent years from funds set aside in the City’s Emergency Dredging Fund (EDF), from Pokagon Fund grants and from Hurricane Sandy Recovery funds. The EDF is funded by the voluntary donations from nine harbor entities located in the harbor who contribute annually to the fund: Dunewood Condominium Association, Harbor Point Shores and Harbor Landings Condo Associations, Lake Michigan Yacht Club, Oselka Marina, Pleasure Isle Marina, South Cove Condo Association, The Moorings Condo Association and The Peninsula Home Owners Association, with additional funds allocated from the City boat launch fees. The EDF has a current balance of $362,640.85. The lack of dredging by the USACE has also meant that there has not been any beach nourishment south of the break wall since 1995, as was promised by the Army Corp. The sand from the dredging was supposed to be placed on the beach front along Dunewood and Sunset Shores to mitigate the erosion caused by the construction of the New Buffalo break wall by the USACE in 1975.

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

PUBLIC NOTICES

CLASSIFIED ADS TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD, PLEASE CONTACT

Please submit your classified ad via email at classifieds@newbuffalotimes.com. New Buffalo Times can now accept online payments with a credit card or paypal. Go to our website, www.newbuffalotimes.com, and submit $10 per week for a classified ad of up to 160 characters. Deadline is Friday 5PM before the following week’s publication.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC ACCURACY TEST NEW BUFFALO TOWNSHIP The Pubic Accuracy Test for the November 8, 2016 General Election will be held on Monday, October 24, 2016 at 3:00 p.m. at New Buffalo Township Hall, 17425 Red Arrow Highway, New Buffalo, Michigan.

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This test is held to demonstrate that all votes cast in the election will be accurately counted by the electronic tabulating equipment. PAUL OSELKA NEW BUFFALO TOWNSHIP CLERK

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BEAUTIFUL TOWNHOUSE FOR RENT Monthly Rent—$1050 Charming townhouse is located in the heart of New Buffalo, just a short walk to the beach as well as the Galien River Preserve, the Marina, and the Amtrak train. This 2 Bedroom unit has an extra-large master bedroom and 1.5 Baths with front & rear facing decks in a park-like setting. It is freshly painted and has beautiful new floors and crown molding. The unit also comes with an assigned off-street parking space and a detached garage. Available now for 9 month or 1 year lease. Tenant has to cover electric and cable/internet/phone. No Smokers or Pets. Security Deposit required. If interested, please contact (312) 203-6615.

NEW BUFFALO TIMES

LARGE NEW SPACIOUS LUXURY APARTMENT Above my garage includes: Central air, Gas heat, Cable Television and Wi-Fi. Super Nice, Bathroom and Kitchen. Everything included for $625 per month. 269-470-9911 NEW BUFFALO 1 Bedroom Apt. $545/per month. Water & garbage included. No pets. No smoking. 269-861-1001 NEW BUFFALO Apt. Large 1 bedroom, 1 bath, 2nd floor, water incl. No Smoking, no pets $575/mo. Contact 269-612-2889. NEW BUFFALO House 3 bedroom, 1 bath completely remodeled, all appliances and central air. No smoking. No pets. $875/mo. Contact 269-612-2889

FOR LEASE

UNION PIER Divisible 3,200 square feet Coffee/Bakery/Office /Commercial Phone or Text 269-876-7452. UNION PIER Divisible 8,000 square feet retail/office/commercial Phone or Text 269-876-7452.

FOR SALE

NEW BUFFALO TOWNHOME AND BOAT SLIP Recently updated, 2 Bedroom. 1.5 bath, Roof Top Deck, attch. 1 car garage and a 50 Ft. Boat Slip adjacent to the unit. Located on the harbor, with a gated community, with a community swimming pool. Price Reduced to $273,000. Available immediately. For information or to schedule a showing call 219-796-5514

ITEMS FOR SALE

Solid Wood Dining Set: table/chairs, hutch and server $350.00. Solid wood bunk bed set w/ trundle desk and book shelf $300, Ping Pong tble w/acces $75, 6 outdr chairs/ cushions $75. call/txt 708-648-5019 or spetersfam@sbcglobal.net. 10 month five burner gas range. 36” wide, slide in. Extra large oven, storage drawer under . Italian Cosmo manufacture. Selling due to total kitchen remodel. New $1700, asking $1000, or best offer. Located in New Buffalo, MI. Call Jude 312-520-0829.

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE • SINCE 1942

SERVICES

FISH FOR STOCKING Most Varieties For Pond Lakes Call Laggis’ Fish Farm 269-628-2056 DAYS 269-624-6215 EVENINGS.

HELP WANTED

CAREGIVERS Seeking experienced, responsible caregivers in your area. Based in St. Joseph, Home Helpers provides in-home, non-medical care for families throughout Berrien County. Call 269-983-4800 or email 57554@ Homehelpershomecare.com. MASSAGE THERAPIST Must have MI license and insurance. Call Melissa 219-898-5398. GROUNDSKEEPER Garden, lawn, equipment maintenance, supervise crew, security, other duties. 40 hr week April-October. Wages negotiable, paid bi-weekly. Mail resume to Friendship Gardens, PO Box 8834, Michigan City, IN 46361 or email internationalfriendshipgardens@ yahoo.com. No phone calls please. ACCOUNTING HELP WANTED Accounting. Quick Books online Phone/text 269-876-7452. AD SALES PERSON WANTED Outdoor Advertising Markets: New Buffalo, La Porte, Michigan City, Bridgman, St. Joseph, MI Phone/text 269-876-7452. ROOFING AND CONSTRUCTION COMPANY SEEKING FULL TIME ROOFING AND SIDING INSTALLERS AND LABORERS Three years experience and valid drivers license required. Qualifying applicants. Call Sarah at 219-363-6151. LAKESIDE HOUSEKEEPER Seeking an experienced housekeeper one full day per week. Please have local references and be willing to do dishes, laundry, organization etc. Text or call 574-849-7383. FULL/PART-TIME MASSAGE THERAPISTS We are looking for full/part-time massage therapists and nail technicians. Please call 269-4699111 if you are interested. NEW BUFFALO Skills needed: Climbing, Patience, Flexible Schedule, Part Time, Outdoor work, Excellent Pay. Please call 269-469-8453


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

REAL ESTATE

LAKEFRONT • NEWS • BANKING STATISTICS FOR LEASE • NOW FOR SALE • CONSTRUCTION

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MORTGAGE RATES 30 Year Fixed Jumbo.. 4.37% 30-Year Fixed............... 3.68 15-Year Fixed Jumbo... 3.75% 15-Year Fixed............. 2.79% US CDS (NATIONAL AVERAGE) 1 year............................ .54 6 month......................... .34 1 month......................... .11 Fed Fund Rate................ .37 Fed Reserve Target Rate. .50 Prime Rate..................... 3.5 US Unemployment Rate.. 4.5

What we define as a bubble is any kind of debt-fueled asset inflation where the cash flow generated by the asset itself - a rental property, office building, condo - does not cover the debt incurred to buy the asset. So you depend on a greater fool, if you will, to come in and buy at a higher price. — James Chanos

New Buffalo Times LOCAL INTELLIGENCE — SINCE 1942 —

Rob Gow Chris Pfauser

13592 Prairie Road, Harbert $2,950,000 | 5bd, 4.5ba

46302 Fairway Drive, Grand Beach $1,599,000 | 5bd, 4ba

PRICE REDUCED

PRICE REDUCED

ShorelineAdvice.com 269.612.4104

11086 Riverview Drive, New Buffalo $997,000 | 4bd, 5ba

13748 Suns End, Harbert $899,000 | 1bd, 1ba

4030 Pontchartrain Drive, New Buffalo $749,000 | 4bd, 4ba

615, 619, 623 Marquette Drive, New Buffalo

PRICE REDUCED

3 Premium Homesites in Wolverine Beach

PRICE REDUCED

Beach Access

30 West Buffalo Street New Buffalo, Michigan

665 Longwood Drive, Sawyer $599,000 | 4bd, 3ba

615-623 Marquette Drive, New Buffalo Starting at $699,000

13111 Eryanen Way, New Buffalo $540,000 | 4bd, 4ba


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

EATS

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Character contributes to beauty. It fortifies a woman as her youth fades. A mode of conduct, a standard of courage, discipline, fortitude, and integrity can do a great deal to make a woman beautiful. — Jacqueline Bisset


www.newbuffalotimes.com MAay Jane Evans with Nancy Gino

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016 Rich Shoemaker with Bob Stella and Ron Ferguson

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Arts, crafts and sweet treats enjoyed at arts and crafts show LINDA HENDERSON

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IN NEW BUFFALO

Gayle Godsey with her painted glaswear and jewelry

Joan Putzke with her memorial nutcrackers

Pat Ramsby with her sports and holiday creations

Trish Smith with her hand painted items

Liz Rettig, Paula Dudiak and Karen Gear with Sherri Kerhoulas

Hollis Oselka, Cookie Ferguson, Judi Sachhtleban with (front) Cleo Kennedy and Carol Boch

he New Buffalo Service League’s “ladies in pink” held a very successful arts and crafts show Saturday, Oct. 15, in both of the New Buffalo High School gymnasiums, commons area and cafeteria. Now in its 34th year, the show draws repeat customers as well as new people when they hear about the high quality items offered and, of course, the famous apple slices and home baked goods. This year, more than a thousand people attended the show. The raffle ticket sales were up from last year and the famous apple slices were again in high demand, with many people buying treats for their friends and neighbors. There were also brisk homemade bakery items and breakfast and lunch sales all day. Event Chair Nancy Gino and her committee organize the show throughout the year. This year, there were more than 115 crafters this year offering everything from handmade clothing and textile art to seasonal decorations, ceramics, woodwork, baskets, pet items, jewelry, original art and local art photography and specialty food items. “It was a fun day and I was overwhelmed with the enthusiasm of the members and their commitment was over the top,” said Gino. Gino gave a big thank-you to Keith Carlson and the engineering staff and Patti Iazzetto in the kitchen for their nonstop help and support. Proceeds from the event fund scholarships for area seniors. Last year, the Service League gave $7,500 to college bound local students. “As in past years, the Service League Scholarship Fund was the big winner,” she said. Although many come for the great shopping, there are also those who come for the fabulous bake sale. Items prepared by Service League members include homemade candies and fudge, muffins and unique breads, cakes, pies and cookies. Breakfast and lunch is served in the cafeteria and the breakfast casseroles, croissant chicken salad sandwiches and sloppy Joes are always big sellers.


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

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SERVICE DIRECTORY

Tom Rossman, Agent 815 E Buffalo New Buffalo, MI 49117 Bus: 269-469-4442 www.tomrossman.net State Farm, Bloomington, IL 1211999

Excellence in Family Dentistry

Blackburn Family Dental Jay Blackburn, D.D.S., P.C. 105 West Merchant Street (269) 469-3140 New Buffalo, MI 49117 Fax (269) 469-6182 e-mail: jayblackburn@gmail.com

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

$4.5 million distributed to local governments by LRSB from the Four Winds Casino-New Buffalo

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LINDA HENDERSON IN NEW BUFFALO

he Pokagon-New Buffalo Area Local Revenue bodies and payments made are: New Buffalo Public Sharing Board distributed $4,570,168.84 to the Schools $1,593,422.65, New Buffalo Township $83,743.56, local communities at a special meeting Tuesday, Berrien County $482,009.97, Berrien County (RESA) Oct. 18. This was an increase of $93,130.30 over $191,356.56, Lake Michigan College $144,128.68 and New the 2015 distribution of $4,477,038.54. Buffalo Township Public Library $55,387.03. The Board distributed the funds for Specific Actual Costs The Pokagon Tribe also agreed in the 2000 State (SAC), Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) and Discretionary Compact to disburse the remaining 35 percent of the funds payments to all of the municipalities in the LRSB/Pokagon to the government entities that are within 10 miles of the Fund area. Four Winds Casino Resort to assist with any financial They also paid the Berrien County Road Commission impact that the casino may have on the communities. $50,429.56 for the Wilson Road repaving project and These are the Discretionary Funds and they total they deducted .5 percent for an administrative allocation $1,373,102.47 in 2016; this disbursement is an increase to the Board in the amount of $22,385.18. The balance of of $18,859.34 from the 2015 payment. (The discretionary the funds was distributed funds are included in the to the municipalities, above totals). $3,923,149.92 The Discretionary The past two years, the Fund payments and the total amount awarded to percentage received by the LRSB has been down municipality were: New approximately $1 million, Buffalo Township 40 which may have been the percent or $ 549,240.99, New Buffalo City 20 percent result of the Four Winds or $274,620.49, Chikaming Casino – New Buffalo no Township and Three Oaks longer including revenue Township each received 10 from the Free Promotional percent or $ 137,310.25, Play slot machine revenues, Berrien County 7 percent as they did in the first five or $ 96,117.17, Three Oaks years of distribution. The largest recipient Village 5 percent or $ was New Buffalo Area 68,655.12, Grand Beach Wayne Warner, Bob Spirito, Matt Weesaw (back) oversee Andy Schools. They received Village and Michiana Village Vavra and Jack Rogers sign checks a total of $1,607,153.67 each received 2 percent largely because of the PILT payment. The second or $27,462.05, New Buffalo Public Schools, New Buffalo largest amount went to New Buffalo Township, the host Township Public Library, Berrien County (RESA) and Lake community, who received $1,072,522.73. Berrien County Michigan College each received 1 percent or $13,731.02. received $703,281.14. The City of New Buffalo received To date, the casino has distributed $50,473,109.08 in $274,620.49. Berrien Regional Education Services LRSB Funds to the municipalities. This does not include Authority (RESA) received $214,568.59. Lake Michigan The Pokagon Fund, which is a separate non-for-profit College received $157,859.71. Chikaming Township and organization which is also supported by revenue from the Three Oaks Township each received $137,310.25. Three Four Winds Casino-New Buffalo. Oaks Village received $68,655.12. New Buffalo Township Public Library received $69,118.06. Grand Beach Village rior to the check distribution, Pano Arvanitis, and Michiana Village each received $27,462.05. NBAS School Board President, expressed his The Specific Actual Cost (SAC) payments totaled thanks to the LRSB. He said, “The New Buffalo $574,158.18, down $ 33,564.27 from 2015. The majority of Area Schools would like to thank the Tribe and that funding went to New Buffalo Township, $439,568.18, the board for your hard work, we appreciate the to pay for the police department, which is contracted gift you give us from the LRSB and hope you continue to through the Berrien County Sheriff’s Department. Berrien work together in the future.” County received $125,154.00 for various departments, Tribal representative Matt Weesaw again stated the including the Judicial and Jail system, 9-1-1 and the Health Tribe’s position for determining Specific Actual Costs Department. Berrien RESA received $9,482.00. (These (SAC) next year would be by the rules. “Unless they (the figures are included in the above totals). requests) meet the definition of SAC the Tribe will not The City of New Buffalo and the Village of Three Oaks support the request.” He added, “The lawyers were very did not request SAC reimbursement because they did not clear. It will not be business as usual anymore.” feel they met the required documentation standards. Chairman Andy Vavra expressed the Board’s The specific costs come off the top of the revenue sharing appreciation and thanks to the Pokagon Band for their before the PILT and Discretionary percentage distribution contribution to the local governmental bodies. Vavra also is calculated. The balance of the funds distributed after thanked the Board secretary for her quick turnaround SAC payments was $3,923,149.92. in calculating and issuing the checks after last Tuesday’s The total distribution comes from two percent of the “net meeting. Lastly, he expressed his gratitude to the Board winnings” derived from the electronic games at the Four for coming together. Winds Casino in New Buffalo, but this year it does not The LRSB members and the communities they represent are: Chair Andy Vavra, Berrien Country, Bob Spirito, include Promotional Free Play revenues. City of New Buffalo, Jack Rogers, New Buffalo Township, The Four Winds Casino is located within New Buffalo Matt Weesaw, Pokagon Band and Chikaming Township Township on Pokagon Tribal sovereign land and they Supervisor Wayne Warner who represents Chikaming do not pay property tax. The Pokagon Band agreed to Township, Three Oaks Township and the Villages of Grand make Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) annually to Beach, Michiana and Three Oaks and New Buffalo Area governmental bodies that would have benefited from Schools. assessed taxes on that property prior to their ownership. PILT payments were included in the above totals and are The next meeting of the LRSB will be Nov. 15, one equal to 65 percent of the total distribution dollars. week later than normal, due to the presidential and local The PILT payment for 2016 is $2,550.047.45, which is elections Nov. 8. The meeting will be at 8:30 a.m. at New $35,024.49 more than the 2015 distribution. The taxing Buffalo Township Hall.

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

City Council approves recommendations from Planning Commission

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THERESE DONNELLY IN NEW BUFFALO

he New Buffalo City Council’s meeting on October 18 was short but tense at times, with much of the audience divided. At a meeting last week, Councilmember Donna Messinger accused a city employee of making threats against her. City officials have not commented on the allegations, citing advice from city attorneys, but Messinger has indicated the comments were recorded and she had heard a copy of the tape she felt had been edited. Mayor Lou O’Donnell said on the advice of both attorney Sara Bell, who is investigating the recording, and attorney Mitt Drew, who spoke to the Council during the earlier meeting, no action would be taken and councilmembers would make no comment until an investigation has been concluded. When the floor was opened to public comment, resident Susan Gotfried accused City Manager Rob Anderson of using the investigation to hide the recording. During the meeting, the council recognized former mayor Pete Weber with a plaque for his work. Based on recommendations from the Planning Commission the Council voted on two agenda items. The first, for a motion to vacate a portion of a platted street at 1603 E. Detroit Street. City Manager Rob Anderson explained to the Council that the land in question was “a very strange configuration” as the surrounding pieces of the platted land had been vacated years earlier but one portion had not been. He noted there was no recent appraisal of the land, but that was only required in cases where the city used public funds to obtain the vacated property. In this case, Anderson said, there was no indication that had happened. The council voted to approve the recommendation from the Planning Commission to approve the vacating of the street. Again following the Commission’s recommendation, the Council voted to deny a plan for townhouses on North Barton Street. Anderson explained that the staff report found the developers were looking to build solely residential buildings in the mixed-use area. He added that if residents feel residential buildings are a better fit for the location, it may be best to change zoning. The Council approved a DDA revenue sharing agreement presented by Anderson. The Downtown Development Authority is formed by volunteers from the community while Anderson said in other municipalities DDAs have paid staff. The agreement will put money into a TIF fund to be used for administrative costs associated with the DDA’s work. The Council passed resolutions to approve the Galien River Sanitary District Refunding Contract and to support the National Park Service’s efforts to create a Lake Michigan Water Trail. Prior to approving the evening’s agenda, the Council removed three items because minutes from previous meetings were not available in time for Tuesday’s meeting. Messinger asked why the minutes were not prepared in time and Mary Robertson said that the staff had been inundated with FOIA inquiries and other time-sensitive requests and had not been able to complete the minutes. Councilmember Bob Spirito reported the Local Revenue Sharing Board had made its distributions earlier in the day and awarded $274,620.49 to the city. Anderson reported during the LRSB meeting there was discussion of the city’s decision not to apply for specific actual costs. Anderson also said without funding from the LRSB and The Pokagon Fund, the planned downtown project would be “very, very stripped down.” Kevin Huber was sworn in as a member of the Local Officers Compensation Commission with a term ending May 2019. O’Donnell noted if Huber is elected in November he will need to resign from the LOCC. The Council all encouraged residents to vote in the November election.

ATTENTION: THREE OAKS NOW HAS THURSDAY DELIVERY!

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VICKER’S THEATRE: A THREE OAKS TREASURE

V

icker’s Theatre was founded venue for Vickers and other small in 1911 by Mr. Frank Lee. cinema houses, who previously Over the decades and after had to do low rent films to keep several ownerships, John Vickers the theater going. bought it in 1996 and turned it Now there are marvelous films into its present day format as at the Vickers, including “Equity,” an “art house” cinema - but not which is a shrewd tale about the “super artsy,” said Managing women on Wall Street and the Partner Bill Lindholm. glass ceiling, and “Southside with Lindholm You,” a story and partners about the Joe and Obamas in Judy Scully their youth. now decide “Mia Madre,” what will be which is in featured.) The English, Scullys and Italian and Lindholm are French, is very particular an uplifting about the story about theater, someone and take dying. “You’ll great care in feel like Bill Lindholm preserving you’ve known its decor and contents. It attracts the characters for years,” the various organizations and review said. That opens Friday the businesses, such as Chikaming 21st. Open Lands and Fernwood After the movie, you can skip Botanical Gardens. It also holds across the street to Elm Street free documentaries once a month, Bistro, where the food is farm with professionals leading a fresh and you can have the best discussion afterward - a generous French Onion soup you ever had. donation to the public. Or, for the best hamburger in Lindholm attended Illinois America, Nelson’s is right down Wesleyan University, where he the street too. studied art and theater. He now The Vicker’s restrooms are performs a phenomenal review elegant. The theatre has a digital before the films begin. His projector, new chairs, new paint performances, which are clearly almost daily, a spotless carpet and inspired and very cerebral, are fun comfortable stadium seating. It’s monologues, regardless of the close to perfection, and has great film type. His monologue is worth seating on its little balcony. the price of admission. Lindholm said, “The theater has Lindholm said that since the a life of its own, we are just the advent of digital cameras, lower caretakers.” budget films are possible within Tickets are $10 ($8 for seniors). the industry, so the aging, popular Vickers Theatre is located actors are back from retirement at 6 North Elm Street in Three and back up on the silver screen, Oaks, Michigan. They can be including Sally Fields, Christopher reached at 269-756-3522 or www. Plummer and Judy Dench. They vickerstheatre.com. — LAWRENCE VON EBELER have opened up a whole new


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

HOROSCOPE OCTOBER 20-26, 2016

AS INTERPRETED BY SANDY “STAR” BENDT ARIES MARCH 21—APRIL 19 There will be an opportunity to go deeper, and expand your understanding of how to create peace in relationships. There is a better chance for harmony, now. Don’t shy away from your feelings, and certainly don’t ignore the validity of your experiences.

LIBRA SEPTEMBER 23—OCTOBER 22 You will be feeling much more in sync and connected to others, now. If you have been somewhat estranged, or out of sorts, you will get the opportunity to talk things over, and work out any bad vibes. Be sure you address any hurt feelings first, and keep the conversation upbeat.

TAURUS

Focus your energy on getting your work space organized this weekend, and prepare to dig in, Monday. You are going to be very busy with paperwork. If you have been putting off reading, filing or creating documents, there is a good chance it will need to done now.

SCORPIO OCTOBER 23—NOVEMBER 21 There are going to be some interesting twists and turns, this week. You will be surprised by opportunities to go deeper into unusual topics, with people who you thought were into other things. Let others open up about their experiences, and be ready for some crazy plot twists.

GEMINI MAY 21—JUNE 21 This is an excellent time to work on creative projects, or things that require an artistic flare. There is a good chance you will have to take the lead, if working on a group project. If working one on one, you will be the one more focused on the business side of things.

SAGITTARIUS NOVEMBER 22—DECEMBER 21 Expect to feel a nice burst of support from the women in your life, this week. Feminine energy will strongly influence your career, and you will benefit from your connections to female friends. Receptive, connecting energy is what will bring about the changes you seek.

CANCER JUNE 22—JULY 22 There is a rebellious side to Cancer, many people overlook. This week you will be questioning some long standing beliefs or reevaluating ideas that many others hold fast. There could be some power struggles, but you will refuse to live in a world that is not in line with your true self.

CAPRICORN DECEMBER 22—JANUARY 19 If your home life is feeling a little stifling, or has become a source of stress, get out with friends. Talking things over, and hearing yourself say things out loud, will help you understand why things feel so off course at home. Plus, reconnecting with the gang always feels good.

LEO JULY 23—AUGUST 22 This is an excellent week to make changes to your home. Brainstorming will bring about many innovative ideas, that will help you rework your living space. Take your time when deciding on what colors to use in your décor. Certain colors could affect you more than usual now.

AQUARIUS JANUARY 20—FEBRUARY 18 The teacher has arrived. Listen up, take your hands off, and watch how others do things, for a change. You are very innovative, and can usually find the best ways to handle technical projects, but sometimes it is better to follow others and learn to do it their way.

VIRGO AUGUST 23—SEPTEMBER 22 When it comes to change, you will be much more optimistic. You are more apt to make positive, life affirming choices, now. So, if you have been wavering on financial commitments, perhaps they have not had the humanitarian side necessary for you to feel good about.

PISCES FEBRUARY 19—MARCH 20 Commitment issues could creep up unexpectedly, this week. You may not realize that part of your indecisiveness, is a reflection of not wanting to have to count on someone else. You are starting to feel more secure on your own, and have come to enjoy your independence.

APRIL 20—MAY 20

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

EVENTS

CITY OF NEW BUFFALO

POLICE BLOTTER OCTOBER 9-15, 2016 OCTOBER 9 NB Township PD/Assist Other Agency (x2) Medic 1/Assist Other Agency (x3) OCTOBER 10 False Alarm MDOP Assault/Battery/Suspicious Suspicious Vehicle Motorist Assist OCTOBER 11 Suspicious Situation/Open Door MSP/Assist Other Agency General Assist/Council Packets Hit & Run Property Damage Accident False Alarm OCTOBER 12 False Panic Alarm OCTOBER 13 Suspicious Situation/Open Door False Alarm VCSA Welfare Check/911 Hang Up NB Township PD/Assist Other Agency OCTOBER 14 False Alarm Medic 1/Assist Other Agency General Assist OCTOBER 15 Michiana PD/Medic 1/Assist Other Agency Medic 1/Assist Other Agency

PLEASE SEND US EVENT INFO TO EVENTS@NEWBUFFALOTIMES.COM COMPILED BY LINDA HENDERSON

DAILY EVENTS

NEW BUFFALO TOWNSHIP LIBRARY See weekly library events on page 3.

EVERY MONDAY

ULTIMATE MONDAYS 6-8PM. Township Memorial Park. New Buffalo. 6PM warmup followed by game. Ultimate Frisbee on a small field; High school age or older, for info txt 206-465-5875.

EVERY WEDNESDAY KNITTING AT THE DELI 4-6PM. David’s Deli. All are welcome.

OPEN MIC NIGHT 8PM. Acorn Theater. 107 Generations Dr. Three Oaks. 269-756-3879. www.acorntheater.com. Admission is free.

Enjoy a day of family fun. Hayrides, corn mazes, backyard 500, Some activities are weekends; pumpkin bounce, decorate your own pumpkin, fire pit, brats, hot dogs, popcorn, and more. Private party’s are encouraged to make reservations.

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY ECONOMIC BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE 4:30-5:30PM. New Buffalo City Hall. Topic: TBD. Both Committees overlap for discussion between 4:30-5PM.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21-23

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27 GRIFFIN HOUSE WITH OPENER CAROLINE GLASER 8PM. Acorn Theater. Tickets: $35/$30.

BLUE MOON VINTAGE MARKET 10AM-5PM. 16860 Three Oaks Rd. Three Oaks. 219-851-0900. Admission is free.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21

SOUND AND VISION: THE MUSIC OF DAVID BOWIE 8PM. Acorn Theater. Tickets: $10.

AN EVENING WITH CHAD STUART AND JEREMY CLYD 8PM. Acorn Theater. Tickets $40.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29

SATURDAY & SUNDAY, OCTOBER 22-23 & 29-30

OPEN TRAP PRACTICE 6:30-9:30PM. New Buffalo Rod and Gun Club. 10487 Kruger Rd. New Buffalo. Open to the public. Contact Bob Kruger at 269-612-0983.

THE HESSTON GHOST TRAIN NOON-5PM CST. Hesston Steam Museum. 1201 E 1000 North. Hesston, IN Spooky fun for your young ones and the kid in you. Open for breakfast at 9AM. Admission no charge, Train rides: Adults $5, Children 3-12 are $3. Train rides Adults $5, children $3.

EVERY FRIDAY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22

EVERY THURSDAY AND SUNDAY

STORY TIME AT THREE OAKS LIBRARY 10:30AM. www.threeoakslibrary.org FISH FRY 5-9PM. American Legion Post #169. New Buffalo.

EVERY SATURDAY-SUNDAY

STORYBOOK TRAILS New Buffalo Township Memorial Park. New Buffalo. Walk along trails a read stories with your children. Co-sponsored by New Buffalo Township Library.

EVERY SATURDAY

THREE OAKS’ FARMERS MARKET 9AM-2PM. Corner of Central & Elm. Downtown Three Oaks. www.threeoaksfarmersmarket.com. YOGA CLASSES AT TOWNSHIP HALL 9:30-10:30AM. Township Hall. 17425 Red Arrow Hwy. New Buffalo Session are $10 per week.

FRIDAYS-SUNDAYS IN OCTOBER

DINGES FALL HARVEST 9AM-7PM. Dinges Farm. 15219 Mill Rd. Three Oaks. 269-426-4034. Farm stand and craft store open daily.

BOO AT THE ZOO!!! Washington Park Zoo. Michigan City. 219-873-1510. www.michigancityparks.com. Trick or treat in the land of critters, one of the largest Halloween celebrations in LaPorte County. Fun for all ages. Costumes are encouraged. Please call the zoo for times and fees. FERNWOOD HALLOWEEN FOR DOGS 6PM. Fernwood Botanical Garden. 13988 Range Line Rd. Niles. 269-695-6491. www.fernwoodbotancal.org. Take advantage of this rare opportunity to have your pup visit the grounds.

THREE OAKS TRICK OR TREAT 4-6PM. Three Oaks Village. Get your costumes planned out and get your bag ready to Trick or Treat in the Village of Three Oaks. 5TH ANNUAL HAUSEFEST 7:30PM-Midnight. Acorn Theater. A Ronald McDonald House Benefit. Fundraiser and Costume Party. Tickets are $50 in advance, $60 at the door. NEW BUFFALO HALLOWEEN PARADE & TRICK OR TREAT 1-4:30PM. N Thompson. New Buffalo. www.newbuffalo.com. Judging starts at 1PM SHARP, then parade steps off at North Thompson Street, trick or treat is scheduled 2:30-4:30PM.

THE NEW BUFFALO ROD & GUN CLUB RUNNING DEER SHOOT 10AM. 10487 Kruger Rd. New Buffalo. 269-612-0983. DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY DESIGN AND VISUAL IMPACT COMMITTEE 4-5PM. New Buffalo City Hall. 200 W Buffalo St. New Buffalo. Topic: Lighting sand Signage.

Action indeed is the sole medium of expression for ethics. — Jane Addams

HAPPY HALLO-WINE @ THE ROUND BARN 1-7PM. Round Barn Winery. 10983 Hills Rd. Baroda. 800-716-WINE. www.roundbarnwinery.com. An extra tasting token when you show up in creative Halloween get-up.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 30

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 30 & NOVEMBER 6

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26

TOAST THE COAST BREWERS FEST 1-7PM. Weko Beach. Bridgman. www.wekobeachbrewersfest.com. No backpacks, outside coolers or dogs allowed. This is a rain or shine event. General admission is $25 in advance or $35 at the door, includes 15 tasting tickets. Designated Driver/Under 21 is $15.

The information for these events is correct, as of the Tuesday before publication date. Please contact the events listed with any questions. And please send us any events at events@ newbuffalotimes.com. Deadlines are the Fridays before the following week’s publication.

New Buffalo Times LOCAL INTELLIGENCE — SINCE 1942 —


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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

500 W. BUFFALO ST. / NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-469-2265 6801 W. US 12 / THREE OAKS, MI 269-756-2265 WWW.HORIZONBANK.COM

207 N. WHITTAKER ST. NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-469-5055 MON-FRI: 7AM-12AM SAT: 8AM-12AM / SUN: 9AM-12AM

13964 GRAND AVE. NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-469-9402

WE PROUDLY SUPPORT OUR BISON ATHLETES!

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g thin o l C 2 0 1 3 % o F F 212 RS. WHITTAKER ST. Ea 50 E R W NEW BUFFALO, MI M M U a l l S 5 0 % o F F 269-469-4438 WWW.HARBORCOUNTRYINSURANCE.COM WEaR 0% oFF R E t 5 n Wi UP to % oFF S y 0 to MER otS-25-5 ES. M U S yl Bo Ugg ElECt St S

105 W. BUFFALO ST. NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-469-4210 WWW.OUTPOSTSPORTS.COM

269-469-2247

45 N. WHITTAKER ST. / NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-469-2222 742 S. WHITTAKER ST. NEW BUFFALO, MI 269--469-3697

134 E. BUFFALO ST. NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-469-0200 WWW.VILLANOVAPIZZERIA.COM

6701 W. US 12 / THREE OAKS, MI 269-756-2222 6485 SAWYER RD. / SAWYER, MI 269-426-3100

C. BRYAN STROTHER, DC 1 W. MADISON NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-469-1310 WWW.NEWBUFFALOCHIROPRACTOR.COM

October 20, 2016  

The weekly edition of the NEW BUFFALO TIMES.

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