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LIFE ON THE SANDY SHORES, THE FRUITFUL FARMLANDS AND THE MAGNIFICENT VINEYARDS.

New Buffalo Times

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LONG BEACH • MICHIANA SHORES • GRAND BEACH • NEW BUFFALO • UNION PIER • THREE OAKS • LAKESIDE • HARBERT • SAWYER issue 29, volume 76

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Short-term rentals discussion dominates Planning Commission meeting PAGE 4 DDA support Olsen choice for downtown sculpture PAGE 9 Chikaming Township approves road millage resolution PAGE 11

Open House boasts Building Trades students’ skills PAGE 12 New Buffalo Township Board Approved Exit 1 Bridge design, SLU for Carts on 12 PAGE 14

A celebration of cars and pin-up models at Full Throttle Throw Down PAGE 16

New Buffalo resident Mary Trusha turns 105 PAGE 23

PHOTO BY MANDY OWENS

Thursday, July 20, 2017


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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

Michiana Humane Society’s 8th Annual

Grand Cottage C O C K TA I L S at the

SATURDAY JULY 29

5pm - 9pm EDT • New Buffalo, MI

Cheryl Hamilton Mortgage Lender NMLS 436346

6 West Buffalo New Buffalo, MI 49117

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269-469-5552

MutualBank is here to serve you at our new location starting July 3, 2017! Visit us at bankwithmutual.com

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Join us for drinks and hors d’oeuvres on the shores of Lake Michigan. Enjoy a live auction including week-long stays at gorgeous properties as well as many other wonderful items. $100 per person. Reservations required. Proceeds benefit the Michiana Humane Society.

FOR TICKETS AND INFORMATION VISIT WWW.MICHIANAHUMANESOCIETY.ORG. Underwritten by:

Ron & Maureen Sippel SATURDAY, AUGUST 5, 2017 2PM TO MIDNIGHT

Sponsored by:

ENTERTAINMENT BY: “JACKSON BAND” DAYTIME & “IN LIKE FLYNN” NIGHT SERVING: CORN, ITALIAN SAUSAGE, POLISH SAUSAGE WITH A VARIETY OF SIDE DISHES BEER, WINE, & SPIRITS

NEW BUFFALO YACHT CLUB CELEBRATING 61 YEARS!!!

500 W WATER ST — NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-469-9808 WWW.NEWBUFFALOYC.COM

Animal Wellness Clinic • Baroda Founders Wine Cellar • blais rustic chic • Garden Creations LLC • Go Fish • Harbor Home & Interiors • Hearthwoods Custom Furnishings • It’s A Breeze • Linda Martin Award Winning Artisan Wines • Lindt Chocolate • New Buffalo Business Association • New Buffalo Savings Bank • POSH Upscale Consignment Boutique • Redman & Company Dog Day .. Care • Renny Mills Photography • Sunset Coast DJ • tyler boe • Whole Nine Yards • Yellow Bird Vacation Rentals • Craig Andree & Frank Quinn


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New Buffalo Times LOCAL INTELLIGENCE — SINCE 1942 —

ETHICS Society of Professional Journalism PROPRIETOR NEW BUFFALO TIMES, INC. PUBLISHER DEE DEE DUHN CONTENT/NEWS EDITOR KRISTIN E. FATOUROS NEW BUFFALO TIMES INTELLIGENCE CREATIVE DIRECTOR JOE DURK REPORTERS AND CONTRIBUTING WRITERS DEE DEE DUHN THERESE DONNELLY LINDA HENDERSON FRANCESCA SAGALA LAWRENCE VON EBELER NATALIE CACIOPPO KURT MARGGRAF ALEXANDER FATOUROS SOPHIA ROSE FATOUROS NEW BUFFALO TIMES INTELLIGENCE NEW BUFFALO TIMES POLITICS GUEST WRITERS PROOFER FRANCESCA SAGALA BROADCAST/ADVERTISING JANINE ADAMSKI (630) 370-0820 OR JANINEADAMSKI@GMAIL.COM INFO@NEWBUFFALOTIMES.COM

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FROM THE PUBLISHER

DESTINATION: HARBOR COUNTRY Many folks have a home on Lake Michigan that has been passed down to them through generations - a sanctuary to escape the city’s hustle and bustle, a place to regroup and enjoy family and friends. The shores of Lake Michigan are embedded in their ancestry. There are those who were born here and have always called Harbor Country their home, as well as all of the new residents, like Lois Lane, who have been coming here since colonial days before making this their forever home. There are those who are like me and somehow ended up here on their life journey (about 18 years ago) and found a forever home. We are blessed. And to our guests, I would like to say: welcome to Harbor Country! With so many guests in town, I don’t know what we would have

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The NEW BUFFALO TIMES is easy to find now, as we have the selected drop spots closer to you. Milda’s Corner Market Customs Imports Sawyer Garden Center The Whistle Stop David’s Delicatessen Grand Variety Barney’s Knoll Bros. Bud and Elsie’s Redamak’s Flip’s Big C Lumber Between Casey’s and Nancy’s For the most convenient location, you can subscribe to get the NEW BUFFALO TIMES in your mailbox or inbox. Please email us for E-TIMES, info@newbuffalotimes.com.

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NEWS AND EVENTS FROM THE NEW BUFFALO TOWNSHIP LIBRARY

done without the new parking lot at Buffalo and Whittaker streets. It’s such a blessing to the businesses! If it weren’t for the hard work of the city and the generosity of Leslie and Mark Danesi, parking in downtown New Buffalo would’ve been very difficult this summer. Not only does the lot contain more than 100 new parking spaces, it also encourages everyone to walk through town to get to the lakefront - what a boost that’s been for our little businesses! I don’t think that anyone who doesn’t have a business on Whittaker or Buffalo streets can understand the positive impact the new parking lot is having on our town. Thank you to all those who worked so hard to make this happen! Celebrate summer, dee dee duhn

Township library to host INSPYRAL

hildren are in for a glowing circus show with astounding LED props when the New Buffalo Township Library Summer Reading Program brings INSPYRAl Entertainment to the library’s Pokagon Room at 4 p.m. Thursday, July 20. Throughout the program, the Oklahoma-based Inspyral will teach participants key steps for fostering self-confidence. Participants will get hands-on experience while learning how to do something new, like platespinning, juggling, and hula hoop tricks. For more information, contact Youth Services Coordinator Kristy Miller. New Buffalo Township Library is located at 33 North Thompson Street in New Buffalo. — STAFF REPORTS

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CHILDREN’S SUMMER READING PROGRAM HAPPENING NOW ADULT SUMMER READING CHALLENGE PACKETS AVAILABLE (DUE AUGUST 19) AUGUST BOOK CLUB PICK: THE CIRCLE BY DAVE EGGERS THURSDAY, JULY 20

INSPYRAL (CHILDREN'S SUMMER READING PROGRAM) 4PM SCRABBLE CLUB 6PM

FRIDAY, JULY 21

STORY TIME 11AM YOGA 1:30PM

SATURDAY, JULY 22

FLOWER ARRANGING CLASS (WITH PREVIOUS SIGN UP) 1PM

TUESDAY, JULY 25

LEGO CLUB 3PM SCENES FROM THE SEAT OF A CYCLE: SUMMER NATURE SERIES 6:30PM

WEDNESDAY, JULY 26

STITCHES, NEEDLES, THREADS AND MORE 10AM-2PM

NEW BUFFALO TOWNSHIP LIBRARY 33 N THOMPSON ST NEW BUFFALO, MI (269) 469-2933

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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

Short-term rentals discussion dominates Planning Commission meeting

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LINDA HENDERSON IN NEW BUFFALO

hile the New Buffalo Planning Commission had few items on its agenda, two groups of citizens had plenty to say at the regular meeting Tuesday, July 11. Sara Dieffenbach, who resides at 415 West Clay Street, presented a request to the commissioners that she be allowed to open a 150-foot portion of a platted city alley, at no cost to the city, for ingress and egress to GREEN NAMED AS the rear of her property. The alley was originally platted THREE OAKS VILLAGE and dedicated as a city alley in 1929 and has remained undeveloped by the city. Currently, it’s being enjoyed MANAGER by the neighbors abutting the property as a mowed and fter weeks of reviewing landscaped greenway space. resumes and interviewing Dieffenbach stated that this has been a longstanding candidates, the Three issue for her, and stated she has had numerous meetings Oaks Village Council has selected and encounters with city staff since 2011. She claimed that its new village manager. constant flooding at the end of her off-street driveway on Caro, Michigan, native Mike West Clay Street has created poor conditions, and she felt Green was selected from a pool of that a rear entrance would alleviate some of the water and 23 candidates. He and one other flooding at the end of her driveway. That block of West Clay candidate interviewed with the Street was not served by a storm drain, which she claimed council during their Wednesday, was the cause of her flooding problem. July 12 meeting. Dieffenbach added that, in 2016, City Assessor A graduate of Central Michigan Chuck Sittig had confirmed that the land behind her home University, Green was currently was a city owned alley, and that a previous city manager working for Rockingham County in gave her verbal approval to use it. She stated that Sittig North Carolina as an International also said an alley would improve property values and be a City Management Association/ huge benefit to area homeowners. This was contrary to the NCACC Management Fellow. feelings expressed by her adjacent neighbors, all of whom The prestigious program places were present at the meeting. recent MPA graduates with county Dieffenbach proposed to improve a 150-foot portion managers to gain experience in of the alley coming off Willard Street. Additionally, she municipal management. Green proposed paving the 10-foot wide, proposed alley with told the council that he has driveway grade grave and removing a large tree in the worked on budgeting and grant center of the alley and bordering “weed” trees, all at her writing, among other duties. expense. She also stated that she would snow plow and Green arrived in Three Oaks maintain the alley. Dieffenbach said some neighbors had the day before the interview and raised objections, stating it would be unsafe for children spent time visiting businesses playing along the alley; however, she said that those with and attractions. When asked homes bordering the alley are more than 50 years old. They about possible ways to support also have no children, with the exception of one person financial growth for the village, he with grandchildren who occasionally visit. She stated that described a grant competition to there are other alleys being used throughout town. encourage small businesses. Four of Dieffenbach’s six neighbors attended the In a discussion before making meeting and raised objections to the proposed opening their decision, council members of the alley, which is adjacent to their yards and homes. noted they appreciated Green’s Letters of objections were also received by the city staff. energy and thoroughness in After discussion, the planners voted to have the city staff preparing for the interview. review the implications of the request and the legalities and Green is scheduled to officially 30start N Whittaker St • Open Dailyreturn the matter to them for future consideration. the $60,000 per year position In another matter, Sunset Shores Home Owners Thursday, August 1. — THERESE Association President Ron Watson addressed the board DONNELLY regarding the nuisance created by short term rentals that existed in their residential neighborhood. He stated that all 170 homes in the Sunset Shores subdivision are in an R-1 zoning district, and the short term rentals are threatening the residents’ quality of life. He said that the rentals violate common sense and decency guidelines, as well as violate R-1 single family home Zoning Ordinance requirements. Watson said they create excessive noise and have high occupancy, along with many vehicles. For example, Watson reported that, every weekend, one three-bedroom home usually has between 12 to 15 cars parked on the street and in the private Sunset Shores Park. He stated that other homes have many overflowing cars parked along the roadway, preventing a fire truck from getting down Shore Drive in an emergency. He said the rentals are causing a public health and safety hazard with their overcrowding as well as with their outside open fire pits and fireworks 30 N Whittaker St displays. He also cited the excessive garbage generated Open Daily by the rental occupants that is left out all week, only to be raided by raccoons, rodents and other animals. Watson added that the residents and the City of

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New Buffalo deserve more consideration, respect and compliance with the existing Zoning Ordinances from some of the offending landlords. Watson cited Section 2.6 of the Zoning Ordinance, which reads: “Dwelling, Single-Family: A detached building, designed for or occupied exclusively by one (1) family.” “Many of our problems would be solved if the existing R-1 Zoning requirements were enforced, but nobody enforces them,” he said. The police do come when called; however, usually, no tickets are issued to the offenders, he said. Watson suggested that the tickets be issued to the homeowners themselves. Additionally, Watson stated that the following cities and towns have short-term rental ordinances: St. Joseph, Bridgman, Three Oaks, and Grand Beach. He suggested that New Buffalo look at them for suggestions on developing a city ordinance. Watson also noted that there are nearby hotels that could accommodate these large groups; however, the short-term rentals are taking business away from them. “Many long-time residents are threatening to sell and move out of town. We will be in big trouble if we don’t do something to correct this,” he said, adding that they must “protect our rights to a peaceful and safe place to live.” Resident George Calnin asked, “Who has the burden here, the city or the residents?” He then quoted the definition of what a single family home is, as stated in the City Zoning Ordinance: “SECTION 2-8 DEFINITIONS “F” Family: (A). An individual or group of two (2) or more persons related by blood, marriage, or adoption, together with foster children and servants of the principal occupants who are domiciled together as a single housekeeping unit in a dwelling unit; or (B) A collective number of individuals domiciled together in one (1) dwelling unit whose relationship is of a continuing, non-transient domestic character and who are cooking and living as a single nonprofit housekeeping unit. This definition shall not include any society, club, fraternity, sorority, association, half-way house, lodge, coterie, organization, group of students, or other individual whose domestic relationship is of a transitory or seasonal nature, is for an anticipated limited duration of school term or during a period of rehabilitation or treatment, or is otherwise not intended to be of a permanent nature.” Calnin asked that the city do their job and enforce the R-1 Zoning Ordinance regulations. Roberta Kocuzh and Tim Schultz also spoke of similar nuisance issues, and requested that the city “control the out-of-hand rental home situation.” The commissioners said that while they agreed that the Zoning Ordinance should be enforced, the Planning Commission does not have the authority to do that. Chair Paul Billingslea suggested the city staff look into the matter and explore the legal limits of creating a short term rental ordinance, returning their recommendations to the Planning Commission. Billingslea added that this is a problem that exists across the city and region, not just in Sunset Shores. He said that the ordinance does not address this or the Airbnb market. It was also stated that other local home owner associations have established and enforce their own guidelines regarding short term rentals in their HOAs. Also speaking at the meeting was Ray Kirkus, who stated his objection to the recently opened free city parking lot and the signage located at the corner of Buffalo and Whittaker streets. Kirkus addressed his opinion in last week’s edition of the New Buffalo Times in a letter to the editor. The next Planning Commission meeting is a Site Plan/ Special Land Use meeting for a proposed North Barton Street Townhome development at 7 p.m. Thursday, July 25.

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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

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Township approves Exit 1 Improvement Plan proposal

T Berrien County approves Red Arrow Highway Honor to fallen police troopers

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BY GRACE BUONO

n Thursday July 13, the Berrien County council gathered to vote and approve the Red Arrow Highway commemoration after Trooper Gary Rampy and Trooper Charles Stark, who both were tragically killed in a shooting that took place 45 years ago. The two signs in their honor have been installed just off where Red Arrow Highway and US 12 intersect and just west of the flashing light in Union Pier. On December 31, 1971 both Rampy and Stark were shot and killed by a gunman. These deaths marked the 26th and 27th trooper to have been killed in the area. More than 45 years later, the Berrien CountyCommissioners, fellow officers and community gathered to remember their deaths once more. County Commissioner from the 9th District Ezra Scott both led this project as well as presented the signs at the County Commissioners meeting. The signs were produced in Kalamazoo through Rathko signs. Originally the signs that were to be presented at the meeting for the families of the fallen troopers were going to be made from cardboard, but Rathko donated higher quality signs for these family members. At the end of the presentation of the signs, 2nd District Commissioner Jon Hinkelman spoke to the room. “I would like to take this time to thank everyone who stands behind a badge for what you do for all of us,” Hinkelman said. “We can’t begin to express to you our thankfulness in these tumultuous times for standing behind that badge. So thank you very, very, much.” DeWayne Hellenga, a retired state police trooper, had been working in the New Buffalo area for just a month fresh out of recruit school when Rampy and Stark were killed. Hellenga was scheduled to work with Stark just the day after the tragedy took place. “The one thing I do know is that the community has always backed the police and when I say the community, I mean the expanded community in the area,” Hellenga said. “They did the same thing then as they did a year ago when two of our compatriots were murdered up in the court house. It just reinforces how the community supports us and how the police support the community.” Even 45 years after Rampy and Stark were killed, the community support is still strong. “A lot of time has passed and there are still people who remember as evident in the number of people in there,” Hellenga said. “Even though the county commissioner meeting is going on, I think half the people in there were just here for the dedication—probably more than that.” Tanya Minzghor, a current resident in Canadian Lakes, was married to Rampy when he was killed. She was present at the dedication to accept the sign in her husband’s honor. “I think it’s wonderful,” Minzghor said. “Like I was explaining before, all the other troops who were killed in the line of duty were killed on a state highway and this happens to be a county highway—so it took a little longer. But we’re thrilled anyways. Just thrilled that it’s done and we can’t thank people enough for what they’ve done.” As shown at the event, Minzghor has always felt the support from the police community. “I was 27 years old with two small children. Everybody pulls together. Its just they all come, they help, and they do whatever,” Minzghor said. “They’re there for you and they’re still there for you.”

Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth. — Buddha

LINDA HENDERSON IN NEW BUFFALO TOWNSHIP

he New Buffalo Township Board held a Special Meeting Wednesday, July 12, to approve a motion that the Corridor Improvement Plan be implemented at a quicker timeframe than was originally proposed. Recently, Township officials learned through their consultants, The Antero Group, that the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) is planning a significant rehabilitation of the I-94 overpass at Exit 1, with work being targeted for next year. Township board members learned that they have an opportunity to participate in the improvement project. Township Supervisor Michelle Heit stated that Exit 1 is the “gateway to Pure Michigan.” As a result, she said it should be instrumental in encouraging people to stop there. “We’re really excited about this opportunity,” she said. The “gateway” theme is included in the Corridor Improvement Authority’s (CIA) overall improvement plan within the Township Master Plan. With the MDOT project planning underway, the Township has an opportunity to realize significant cost savings should they implement their improvement plans along with that of MDOT’s. The time frame for the Township to submit their request is short, as final designs and cost estimates for their part of the project are due Friday, July 21. The board unanimously approved going forward with an MDOT partnership and hiring The Antero Group for a fee of $16,500 to prepare the necessary documents, such as an outline of the Township’s proposed improvements, scope of the work and fee estimates, for submittal to MDOT. Once the plans are finalized, the Township will apply to The Pokagon Fund for grant funding. MDOT is currently in the process of conducting traffic studies of the exit, as well as traffic at the commercial businesses surrounding the exit, to determine the need for added turn lanes and other roadway improvements. The Corridor Improvement Authority (CIA) covers an area from Wilson Road to the City of New Buffalo’s border, which is a key point of entry for visitors, as well as Exit 4 and Exit 6 entry areas. The Exit 1 phase of the project will include the I-94 overpass that will be rebuilt by MDOT; however, the Township has the opportunity to integrate aesthetic design improvements, such as concrete embossing, color choices, overhead and signage lighting designs, roadside landscaping at the exit ramps (requiring minimal maintenance), way-finding signage, a possible sculpture and bicycle and pedestrian paths. In addition, MDOT has plans to rebuild the overpasses at Maudlin, Kruger, Union Pier and Lakeside roads. The state owned overpasses are usually refurbished by the state every 30 years, Heit said. Trustee Pete Rahm added that they were lucky they had the “opportunity for beautifying the Township and for adding a positive impact to the area.” As stated in the Antero Group proposal, the highway gateway “will establish positive first impressions and provide spaces along the corridor to create an inviting theme that connects people to the larger community.” Further Exit 1 plans will be discussed at the Township board’s regular Monday, July 17, meeting (see page 14).

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STAND UP...

t seems like we keep hearing bad news about the Great Lakes lately - major budget cuts to critical Great Lakes programs, Asian carp found just nine miles from Lake Michigan, huge, harmful algal blooms in parts of the lakes threatening public health. It’s easy to get down when you only hear bad news. But you know what? The Great Lakes region is 40 million people strong, and we won’t be deterred by the headlines. Our summers are the time when we celebrate water. There is no better time than now to stand up for the lakes, clean water and the future of our communities. That’s why we’ve kicked off the Summer of Water. The Summer of Water is a celebration of the Great Lakes and a summer of action to protect them. Protecting the lakes starts with you, whether it be in your neighborhood or at your favorite lakefront spot. Join the Summer of Water to stand up for the Great Lakes and all that they offer.

— JOEL BRAMMEIER, PRESIDENT & CEO


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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

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Grand Beach plans land acquisition LINDA HENDERSON IN THE VILLAGE OF GRAND BEACH

he Village of Grand Beach Council and Park and Recreation Board held a joint meeting Thursday, July 13, to view a presentation by McKenna and Associates to discuss the plans for the proposed purchase of 42 acres of property that is being offered for purchase to the village by the Grand Beach Land Development. McKenna and Associates has been hired to advise and assist the village in the grant application process. Thursday’s meeting was the first work session held to discuss the grant application and a future concept plan for the property, which is located on the northeastern side of the village and abuts the Chikaming Open Lands Nature Perverse, Grand Beach Marsh. The land is bound by Grand Beach Road on the south, the Grand Beach Marsh on the east and Golf View Avenue on the north, and it abuts Fox Trial subdivision on the west. The village golf course driving range is also currently on the property. The purpose of the meeting was to gain input from the members of the village council and Park and Recreation Board and to hear from residents about their vision and wishes for the property. McKenna discussed schedules, the project, programming and what the next steps were should the project move forward to the grant application and acquisition stage. While the possible acquisition has received widespread support from residents, the council and the parks board, how to raise the more than $3 million needed to secure the purchase transaction is still being debated. Since the village doesn’t currently have the money available, the acquisition would have to be made by applying for, and successfully receiving, grant funding from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), by receiving private contributions for the purchase or by applying for other grant funding sources. Paul Lippens, AICP and Senior Principal Planner with McKenna and Associates, said that if the grant was successful, the MDNR would require a percentage of matching funds. He said that this could range from being 25 to 50 percent; however, the village would probably be required to submit 50 percent matching funds due to its high income level. Matching funds could also come from other grant sources, such as the village coffers, private contributions or in-kind donations. The MDNR Trust Fund grants are available for both acquisition and development of public parks

and preserves throughout the state. Money for the MDNR grants come from royalties of the Gas and Oil Trust Funds and not from federal government funds. At this time, it was determined that the Village of Grand Beach would focus on land acquisition. Future development could come in stages, although Lippens said it would be a good idea to have a concept plan in place. Those attending the meeting voiced strong support for keeping the land in its present natural state. Trail improvements and paths, along with an informational kiosk, were suggested. In the future, picnic tables could also be added, along with a small parking areas. It was stated that if the state grant was successful, all the public should have access to the land and not just Grand Beach residents. Another big factor in the grant approval by the state was ADA accessibility, Lippens said. If state grant money was used to acquire the land, no private development would be allowed on it. While private development was not favored by the residents who were present at the meeting, Village President Paul Leonard Jr. pointed out that a few new homes bordering Fox Trail could bring in needed revenue to the village tax base. The Park and Recreation Master Plan lists open land as being a highly desirable aspect for the village. Village residents value open land and wish to preserve it for their benefit and the benefit of future generations. Park Board member Karen McHugh said that the “overall goal and consensus is to acquire the property and protect the open land.” The 42 acres is also adjacent to a unique protected marsh area, the Grand Beach Marsh Preserve, which is owned and managed by Chikaming Open Lands (COL). COL Executive Director Ryan Postema said that the marshland is an 11-acre gem of coastal plain marsh that contains unique features, such as endangered plants and protected species, and that it’s a habitat for many animals. Typically seen on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts, coastal plain marshes exist here because of the unique feature of this land, which is close to Lake Michigan. He said that it is the only site in Southwest Michigan and Berrien County that contains this particular biodiversity of species of both plants and insects. The Grand Beach Marsh wetland is also an important environmental factor, he said. Postema said that the 42 acres offered for sale also contain approximately 10 to 15 acres of important wetlands, in addition to upland forest

and open prairie, which should all be preserved. “It is important to protect all of the unique environmental systems in the area,” he said. Postema said they had a “solid case” to leave the acres “as is, with limited use areas and a boardwalk area.” Lippens suggested redesigning some of the trails to be more sensitive to the environment, as well as to allow ADA access to some of the areas. Residents agreed that the paths, which were probably started by deer, should be maintained for walking and hiking. Many of them said that they have enjoyed hiking, camping and fishing in the area for more than 40 years. Councilman Blake O’Halloran, in discussing the many state presentations that he had attended, said, “The state is pretty clear: they want to preserve open land in Michigan, and preservation makes the most sense.” At the end of the meeting, Lippens said, “The consensus is pretty clear: protect as much as possible.”

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eonard stated that funds could come from a number of sources, including private donations, and that other options may not be agreeable to the public. He said that a bond is probably not feasible for the village to sustain, as it’s currently running in an operational deficit. Other options, he said, could include a tax millage or a property assessment. A Go Fund Me drive and inkind donations were also discussed. In the future, state roadway Act 51 money could be used for ADA and pedestrian path development. In the end, the consensus was that village residents had to “think in the big picture. This will require serious private funding.” Lippens said he felt that the village had a “good chance” of receiving the grant. He said that he and McKenna and Associates will develop a concept plan with graphics for a future meeting to gain feedback from the board and the public. Future meetings will be held in August, and a Public Hearing was proposed for September, with final grant preparation taking place in the early fall. The grant submission deadline is April 1, 2018, with an answer coming in Fall 2018. The GDLD Company is willing to cooperate with the grant funding timeline. “We are getting a head start on the project and a lot of details need to be worked out for the final grant submission,” Lippens said.


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E S T A T E

AUCTION

SATURDAY, AUGUST 19 TH

Niles, MI Berrien Co. 120± Acres Tillable Land

211

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A C R E S @ 11AM IN 6 TRACTS

Auction Location: Signal Point Golf Club 1475 Signal Point Dr. Niles, MI 49120 Property Location: 214 S. Philip Rd. Niles, MI

• Sportsman’s paradise retreat • 8 miles from Notre Dame Campus • 1.5 hours from Chicago • Private Hunting and Fly Fishing • Skeet Range

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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

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• 2,200 Sq. Ft. Home • 45’ by 100’ heated pole barn • Large Timber Woods • Secluded • Crop Land rental income • Concrete Underground Wine/Root Cellar

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Owners: BCMI - Auction Managers: Paul File - 269-208-1260 • Nick File - 269-605-9743 CALL FOR BROCHURE OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION

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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

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DDA support Olsen choice for downtown sculpture

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BY FRANCESCA SAGALA

piece of artwork formally recognizing The Pokagon Fund’s support for the future of New Buffalo will soon be on display, members of New Buffalo’s Downtown Development Authority (DDA) Board of Directors learned at their Thursday, July 13 meeting. DDA Chairman Robert Kemper announced that a public art committee has been formed to bring a sculpture recognizing the Pokagon Tribe to the city as a part of the North Whittaker Street Redevelopment Project’s Phase Two, which involves the reconstruction of New Buffalo’s downtown from Buffalo to Mechanic streets. In October 2016, the Fund awarded a $1.6 million grant to New Buffalo for its Downtown Revitalization Initiative. Kemper said that committee members included Pokagon Fund Board Member Debbie Schmidt, City of New Buffalo Mayor Pro Tem and Pokagon Fund City Representative Liz Ennis and DDA member and OutPost Sports Owner J.V. Peacock. At their first meeting, Fritz Olsen was named as the artist of choice to work on the commissioned piece. Kemper said that he felt that Olsen was a good choice because he’s a local sculptor, he’s never had a commissioned piece displayed in New Buffalo, he’s internationally renowned and he also works in stone. Kemper added that the timeline for the sculpture’s completion would be a short one, as it was the Fund’s desire to see it installed in time for Phase Two’s May 2018 completion date. John Krsul, who serves as Special Liaison to the Pokagon Fund Board of Directors, added that the Pokagon Fund Board was “comfortable” with Olsen being the designated sculptor. He said Olsen would be meeting with at least two Pokagon Fund Board representatives, both of who also sit on the council for the Pokagon Band, with regards to what would be an appropriate concept for the sculpture. One idea, Krsul said, was incorporating the concept of the “four winds” (east, west, north and south) into the sculpture, which was important to the Pokagons. “Fritz has been doing research and we’ve given him some information with regards to what’s important conceptually and spiritually for the Pokagon Band,” he said. Board members approved a motion supporting the Public Art Committee moving forward with Olsen being the artist for the downtown sculpture. Another way that the DDA plans to formally recognize the Fund is through signage. Once Phase Two construction has commenced this fall, Design/Visual Impact Subcommittee Chair Ellie Mullins announced plans to replace the downtown planters with signs thanking the Fund and the city for their support. In addition, the signs would also declare that North Whittaker Street would remain open despite the heavy construction. Kemper said that Abonmarche had expressed a desire to help with the signs’ design. In other DVI business, Mullins said that the next Phase Two streetscape workshop was scheduled for 5 p.m. Wednesday, July 19. Subcommittee members would be taking a field trip to Landscape Forms in Kalamazoo, Michigan Wednesday, Aug. 9. The trip will allow members to get an up-close look at possible amenities, such as benches, for the downtown. Also at the meeting, Entrepreneurial/Business Development Subcommittee Chairman Doug Roch announced that he and City Manager Dave Richards met with Police Chief Larry Pitchford, during which it was determined that they would hold off on enforcing the city’s downtown three-hour parking limit until next spring; however, they would begin publicizing future enforcement beginning Jan 1. One of the caveats of the city’s approval of Phase Two was that parking be strictly enforced, as the plan calls for parallel parking on both sides of North Whittaker Street. As a result, the downtown would be experiencing a reduction in parking spaces. Enforcing the city’s parking ordinance, Roch said, would ensure a higher turnover of spaces.

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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

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My Rescue finds a home at Animal Hospital LINDA HENDERSON IN NEW BUFFALO

y Rescue Dog and Cat sculptures created by artist and singer Martha Cares have been greeting visitors and passersby at the New Buffalo Animal Hospital on West Buffalo Street in

New Buffalo. Leslie Sorenson, who works at the hospital, said that they met Cares at the Journeyman Distillery Artisan Show this past spring, and really liked her My Rescue pieces. She said that she and her parents, Dr. Harry and Cathy Sorenson, like “supporting local artists, and we liked the idea of supporting the animal rescue project, My Rescue.” Leslie added that the colorful and cheerful red dog and yellow kitty sculptures bring attention to the hospital and make it “more noticeable” to the passersby and clients. Cathy said she felt the sculptures were really beautiful. “We are thrilled to have them, they found the perfect home,” she said. According to Cares, this is the first time that she has included both the red dog and the kitty together in one piece. “They look so happy together and I am getting really good responses from the sculptures,” she said. Cares said the red dog was her original piece. She said she was inspired after she rescued her dog Poppy in 2011 from Save a Stray. “Poppy is the inspiration behind all of the dogs and cats. The pieces happened very organically,” she said, adding that the “first piece sprang out of my heart.” Proceeds from the My Rescue collection go toward helping dogs and cats all over the country. Cares said she has donated thousands of dollars and pieces toward helping animals “because Poppy has brought so much love into our lives.” She said her My Rescue pieces have a presence in all 50 states, including national museum exhibits.

“I just love helping animals, and I hope my art gives them a voice,” she said. As stated on the My Rescue website: “In America, 6-8 million animals are taken in by rescue organizations and shelters each year. Saving the precious life of an animal through volunteering, adoption or donation moves well beyond rescue of a fellow living creature, for through these generous acts of love, we, too, are rescued.”

through Oct. 8, and is free to the public. Cares will also be exhibiting there. Cares said that her pieces are scheduled to be displayed in a Georgia museum. As of today, they have been exhibited in other museum collections and donated to benefits around the country, from Texas, to California, to Wyoming. This fall, Cares will introduce a very special piece that she hopes will educate the public about puppy mills and make a difference to help animals in a loving way. When not creating art pieces, Cares, who’s also an accomplished soprano, lends her voice to opera productions. Watch for her performances locally when she sings with the Harbor Country Opera. Her next performance will be at the Acorn Theater Friday through Sunday, Aug. 4-6, where she will perform excerpts from two iconic operas, Les Miserable and Phantom of the Opera.

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Leslie Sorenson with Martha Cares and My Rescue piece

Cares has displayed her My Rescue pieces at the ArtPrize exhibit, which is an annual internationally known art competition in Grand Rapids, Michigan. For 19 days each fall, ArtPrize displays art throughout the city. In 2016, 1,453 works created by artists from 40 states and 44 countries were exhibited in 170 venues. More than $500,000 in prizes is awarded each year. This year, ArtPrize will take place Sept. 20

he cheerful My Rescue sculptures are now permanent pieces of public art among the growing number of sculptures installed in New Buffalo and throughout Harbor Country. Cares said “they have found their perfect home” with all the other doggies and kitties. To view the pieces, visit the New Buffalo Animal Hospital located at 600 West Buffalo Street. The hospital has five veterinarians who are on staff to provide care and services to the furry and feathered Harbor Country residents and visitors. Grooming and boarding services are also offered. To see more of Cares’s work, including sculptures and print media, visit her and her husband, Fritz Olsen, at their shared studio and gallery located at 6914 Holloway Drive in Sawyer, Michigan.

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RESIDENTS TO SPEND A “NIGHT OUT AGAINST CRIME”

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esidents throughout St. Joseph Township and City will join forces with thousands of communities nationwide for the 34th annual National Night Out crime and drug prevention event, which will take place from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 1, at Riverview Park’s Briarwood Pavilion. The event involves residents locking their doors, flipping on outdoor lights and spending the evening outside with neighbors and police. Ronald McDonald, who will be there to greet the children, will be making an appearance. Included in the night’s programs will be a Jaws of Life demonstration as well as the display of fire trucks, police cars and other local emergency equipment. Parents will be able to have their children’s fingerprints taken and a photo ID created for the MICHIP children’s identity program. Free hot dogs, soda, chips and ice cream sundaes made with Sherman’s ice cream will be available. Night Out Against Crime is sponsored nationwide by the National Association of Township Watch (NATW and co-sponsored locally by the St. Joseph Township Neighborhood Watch Program, Target, Pri Mart Petroleum, Jeff’s Towing and Recovery, the Christian Reformed Church of St. Joseph, Riegel Construction, Martin’s Super Market and the Vineland Center. The program involves more than 10,000 communities from all 50 states, US territories, Canadian cities and military bases around the country. In all, more than 34 million people are expected to participate. “This is a night for America to stand together to promote awareness, safety and neighborhood unity. National Night Out showcases the vital importance of police-community partnerships and citizen involvement in our fight to build a safer nation,” said National Project Coordinator Matt Paskin. Riverview Park is located at 2927 Niles Road in St. Joseph, Michigan. — STAFF REPORTS

THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

Chikaming Township approves road millage resolution

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BY FRANCESCA SAGALA

t their monthly Thursday, July 13, meeting, members of the Chikaming Township Board approved a resolution that has the potential to bring new life to township roads. Board members agreed that a resolution for a 1.00 road millage be placed on the upcoming November ballot. Township Supervisor David Bunte explained that the millage issue has been previously discussed, as they were in need of more funds to fix several township roads. He said the township was funding around $150,000 a year for road improvements, which he said “goes little to nowhere.” Trustee Bill Marske said that the millage would at least allow them to possibly return the roads to their previous state. He said that it cost them more than $250,000 to fixe one mile of Flynn Road. With that amount in mind, Marske said they should now expect to pay at least $200,000 per mile to fix a road; however, Bunte said he believed the amount was much higher. Treasurer Liz Rettig inquired if the millage would allow them more “leeway” in prioritizing what roads within their jurisdiction were the most in need of repair. Bunte responded that it would allow them to have more of a say in what roads needed the most repair. He added that all funds raised would stay within the township, and that none of it would go to the county. “It’s our money to use as we wish to take care of the township,” Bunte said. Also at the meeting, Board members approved signing a petition for the Berrien County Drain Commission to perform work on Sawyer Village Drain #448, or what is most commonly known as “the Drain.” Corvette Central Owner Jerry Kohn distributed a map to board members that outlined the issues associated with the drain, particularly the periodic flooding that occurs within the Township and the tributary to the drain. Berrien County Drain Commissioner Chris Quattrin that outlined the steps needed to be taken to fix it. Once a township has petitioned the drain office, it will then go to the Board of Determination, who will select a panel of three people as well as one alternate person. Quattrin said they’d “engage” an engineer to visit the township and inspect the drain, and that the engineer would present potential issues to the Board of Determination. The board will then make a “determination of necessity” to determine if work is needed. The drain office would then come up with a design, bid it and get a price on the project. On a “Day of Review,” project costs will be reviewed. Two Town Hall meetings will jumpstart the construction process, during which a “pretty finalized design” will be presented. Quattrin said that engineers have inspected the drain before; however, they have only performed what he called “patchwork” on it. He said filing the petition will allow them the opportunity to “look at it globally” and really address its issues, as well as take into account the development happening along the drain. Bunte gave a brief review of the township’s new office hires. He said that Kimberly Swartz has replaced Deputy Treasurer Pete Plikaitis as the township’s front desk clerk, although Plikaitis will still be staying with the township on a part time basis and helping with the website and other maintenance issues. Meanwhile, Sabina Kotov is currently undergoing training to be the new deputy treasurer. A final payment of $21,942.59 to the Township Sewer Department for the balance due on the Flynn Road Reconstruction Loan was approved. Board members approved Melissa Flick as the administrator of the township’s newly formed Parking Bureau. Board members approved Special Land Use (SLU) permit applications, which were previously approved by the Planning Commission, for properties located at 14950 Red Arrow Highway in Union Pier and 15412 Red Arrow Highway in Lakeside.

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Film highlights Pokagons A movie that takes viewers beyond the Four Winds Casino by highlighting the early days of the Pokagon Band history will debut at Vickers Theatre at noon Saturday, July 22. The movie takes viewers through the times of tribe patriarch Leopold Pokagon (1775-1841) and his son Chief Simon Pokagon (18301899). The Pokagon Band of Potawatomie Indians owns the Four Winds Casino in New Buffalo Township. Network News Producer Nick Bogert volunteered to produce the film for The Region of Three Oaks Museum, with whom he also produced Father of the Featherbone, a movie based on the life of Three Oaks forefather E.K. Warren.   Nine music selections for the movie were chosen with the help of Garth Taylor and musicians from the School of American Music, which include Mindy Burns, Elin Blake, Leslie Blake, Barb Lange, Gabriel Sagewalker and Recording Engineer Evan Margol.  Several selections will be performed live on the evening of the premier showing. Radio Harbor Country staffers helped by recording narration for the movie as well as playing “voice parts,” including Robin McBride reading Simon’s writings and quotes, Arnie Saks reading as a French fur trader and Father Stephen Badin and Julie Rheinstrom reading a Potawatomi translation and the words of a critic describing Simon’s work. Following the premier showing, Bogert will answer questions from the audience.  There will be a $2 donation to the museum, and DVDs and books will be available for purchase. Vicker’s Theatre is located at 6 North Elm Street in Three Oaks, Michigan. — STAFF REPORTS

Harbor Country Opera to bring back “Le Miserables,” “Phantom” nce again, Harbor Country Opera will be Emanuel Caraman as the Phantom. (Audience members

adding its magical touch to two of the most beloved musicals of all time, “Les Miserables” and “The Phantom of the Opera.” Performances will take place at the Acorn Theatre at 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 4 and Saturday, Aug. 5 and at 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 6. Harbor Country Opera Founder Robert Swan and his opera crew of the finest singers in the Midwest will be performing a concert highlighting the finest music from both of these iconic shows. Included in the line-up of performers is Martha Cares, crowd favorite John Concepcion and new Romanian tenor sensation

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will remember Caraman from last year’s “La Traviata.”) As a special treat, tenor Darrell Rowader will travel from Phoenix, Arizona, to reprise his powerful performance as Jean Valjean in “Les Miserables.” Warren Moulton’s rendition of “Stars” will also be included in the show. (Visit harborcountryopera.org for video samples.) Tickets are $35 for Friday’s and Saturday’s show and $25 for Sunday’s show. Tickets can be purchased at www. acorntheater.com or by calling 269-756-3879. The Acorn Theatre is located at 107 Generation Drive in Three Oaks, Michigan. — STAFF REPORTS


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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

ARENA sports

CHALK BOARD scholastics

From the Bleachers COLUMN BY KURT MARGGRAF IN CHICAGO

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i ho, hi ho, it’s off on an adventure I go - to Baltimore for a Cubs-Orioles game! When the Cubs were down three games to one in last year’s World Series, the outlook for my trip looked pretty dim. We had placed a friendly wager with a friend who lives in Baltimore and grew up in Cleveland. Since the Cubs rallied against Cleveland, as the winners, we got to go to a game in Baltimore at Camden Yards. It’s always fun to visit other cities and watch a ballgame. (I sometimes wish I had done it more often.) At approximately 11 a.m. Saturday morning, we arrived at the airport, eagerly awaiting a game in Baltimore to see the Cubs play the Orioles. When we found out our flight was delayed for an hour, we weren’t too upset, as it gave us a chance to talk to fellow passengers who were also going to the game. We were having fun when the news flashed that the flight was being delayed another hour…and another. I grew sadder with each announcement of a delay. When we finally started boarding the plane, the game had already started, and the Cubs built an 8-0 lead. When we landed, I checked my phone and found out the Orioles had come all the way back to tie the game 8-8. When our friends picked us up, I wasn’t the happiest guy around. Then, like magic, Addison Russell hit a homer, and the Cubs won. We had such a great night catching up with our hosts that by the time we awoke the next morning, my sadness from missing the game had vanished. We spent Saturday touring Baltimore and attending a party with a group of friends. Even though we didn’t get to a ballgame, I thought the trip was a success, as the city was fascinating and our friends were wonderful. Since our plane wasn’t leaving until 5 p.m. and the last game of the series started at 1:30 p.m., our hosts suggested that, after brunch, we take off for the ballpark. We purchased tickets and walked around the park, taking in the sights and smells. When we arrived at our seats, we settled in to watch a few innings, and what a joy they were to watch. The Cubs’ newly acquired pitcher, Jose Quintana, was great, and the Cubs were hitting the ball all over the place. In the fourth inning, Kris Bryant hit a two run homer to put the Cubs ahead 6-0. We stayed around a little longer before leaving the park, where we ran into the Orioles mascot. I shook his hand and took off for the airport, feeling wonderful about our weekend and the fact that the Cubs won all three games in Baltimore. Maya Angelou said, “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” Be careful out there. Make good choices. Keep smiling. Talk to you next week. Peace, love, and happiness.

Open House boasts Building Trades students’ skills

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BY FRANCESCA SAGALA

nother successful house is in the books for the New Buffalo High School Building Trades class. An Open House was held Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 14, 15 and 16, during which interested buyers could receive a full tour of the inside of the brand-new house. The house is located in Summerhill Cottages at 11130 Strawberry Fields Avenue in New Buffalo. The class, which is led by Building Trades Instructor Robert Hughes, has previously flipped houses throughout New Buffalo. Last spring, the school district purchased five lots in the Summerhill subdivision. Next school year, the students will begin constructing another house on one of the four remaining lots. Superintendent Jeffrey Leslie said the three-bedroom and two-bathroom house includes a host of amenities, such as “a ton of spray foam insulation” in the master bedroom and the 1,584 square foot unfinished basement. Also included in the basement is an egress window for a future bedroom and extra plumbing, giving the future home owner the opportunity to also construct an extra bathroom down there. A back deck is attached to the kitchen area on the first floor, which Leslie said is made of synthetic wood and is “maintenance free.” A large living room with a Superintendent Jeffrey Leslie shows a vaulted ceiling is also located on the kitchen cabinet to Barbara and Mark first floor. Overall, the first floor is Smith in the Building Trades House 2,109 square feet. Leslie said the class is made up of students from New Buffalo as well as the neighboring River Valley and Lakeshore school districts. While the class is open to all Berrien County students, he said that it mainly attracts students from the south side of the county. Leslie said he was particularly impressed with the students’ attention to detail while building the house, such as with the intricate tiles placed on the floor of the bathroom opposite the basement stairs. “I’m really proud of what they’ve been able to accomplish,” he said, adding that he knew of one school district whose Building Trades class only constructs storage sheds. Present at one of the open houses were Barbara and Mark Smith, who have called a former Building Trades project their home for the past 47 years. The couple said the Kissman Drive house was built by one of the first New Buffalo Building Trades classes in the 1970s, when it was a cooperative with several neighboring school districts. Since first purchasing it, Barbara added that they’ve added on twice to the house. “We’re still there,” Barbara said when asked what she thought of the students’ projects and the experience the class gives them.


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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

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MAC Race hit by storms, challenges

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LINDA HENDERSON ONSHORE

Harbor Country Rotary’s Ribfest draws hundreds WORDS AND PHOTOS BY LAWRENCE VON EBELER

arol and Gene Svebakken’s estate (an original Warrren property) was the posh site for the massive crowd of the Rotary Ribfest, with a crowd of 350 people last Saturday Night. There were 300 tickets sold before the event, “The largest amount sold in advance ever before” said Larry Shawver, President Emeritas and founder of the Harbor Country Rotary Club. They cut off the tickets sold at the door at only 50 because of concerns for having enough ribs for the staggering crowd. Under a large white tent the guests were served seven different rib recipes by seven different restaurants and then voted for their favorite. The Red r Arrow Road House won handily and subsequently received the gorgeous pig sculpture made by the brilliant Steve LaGattuta. The other participants for the rib cook off were: Piggin’ and Grinnin’ from Benton Harbor, Lark’s Barbecue from Benton Harbor, Wood, Stock and Grill hailed from Niles, and Classic Catering from Bridgman, and Smokey Joe’s from Michigan City. All need to be thanked for their participation and expense. There was also an entertainment tent with a family group of three who went by the stage name of

Grounded. The elder sister sang and was accompanied by her two younger brothers, one on guitar and the other on percussion. The other group playing were called “The Concepts”. The party would not have been a party without the music they provided. The wine and cold drinks concession was a busy tent with four worker bees keeping up with the demand for beer, wine and cold drinks provided by Greenbush Brewery and Round Barn. The four servers were kept hopping all night long on this warm summer night. Not everyone was able to find a seat at a table, but they nonchalantly nestled down in the lush, soft grass and the shade of the beautiful trees to eat and watch the fascinating scene, not unlike an “Afternoon at the Grande Jatte”. It was a gratifying evening, especially for the Harbor Country Rotarians who worked so hard, but who now have funding to tackle even more than what they’ve been doing. Outgoing Rotary President Tom Flint was instrumental for the event and could be seen smiling, even through his huge beard. A lot of people were smiling Saturday for the outpouring of support to make the Ribfest the Rotarian’s “Event of the Year.”

he 109th Race to Mackinac has proven to be one for the history books. The Chicago to Mackinac race began with the majority of the 301 race boats starting at the Chicago Lighthouse located off Navy Pier Saturday, June 15. The 46 boats in the Cruising Division began the race Friday, July 14. Normally, racers cross the finish line at Round Island Lighthouse, located off Mackinac Island, on Monday, with some arriving early Tuesday morning; however, Mother Nature threw a curveball into this year’s race, and only 40 boats were reported crossing the finish line by midday Monday. Infinite Diversion, which was in the Cruising Class, was the first to cross the finish line Sunday, July 16. On Sunday afternoon, a large number of the fleet were tracked between Big Sable and Little Sable Points, many long hours from The Bridge and The Island. Winds on Monday were reported to be in the two to three knot range with very little breezes reported in the Straits of Mackinac approaching the Island. Saturday night’s severe storms and Sunday’s high winds hit the majority of the racing fleet off the Muskegon area, with many of the boats suffering damage. One multihaul boat capsized, with four crew members thrown into the turbulent, icy waters. Luckily, they were quickly rescued by U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Biscayne Bay. Other race boats that were in the area also responded to the distress call. Off the Muskegon shoreline, another racer was safely rescued by the USCG Meridian X after going overboard and surviving in the high seas and darkness for more than an hour. Highly anticipated race competitor Windquest, a MAX 86 owned by Grand Rapids, Michigan’s Amway President Doug DeVos, rolled over after being hit. Although it righted after 45 seconds, the vessel sustained much damage to its sails and headboard car, and the crew was forced to retire from the race and head back to their home port in Holland, Michigan. The MAC race is always full of challenges, from high winds, storms and becalmed seas to pesky flies and chilly conditions; however, Saturday night’s storms and Sunday’s high winds proved to be too much for many of the racers and vessels. As of Monday afternoon, 82 boats had retired from the race, with more expected to report an early exodus. It may be the most boats to retire from the race since the July 20, 1970 MAC, when 88 boats left the race after suffering storm damage and enduring havoc. The winds clocked at 45 knots both Saturday and Sunday, with gusts reaching 50 knots and 8- to 10-foot seas. The winds had all but died on Monday, becalming the fleet. Crews reported being soaking wet, cold, and exhausted from struggling with nature and broken equipment and shredded sails. Those that are docked on the Island have reportedly begun celebrating a hard won race.


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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

Drowning Tragedy On July 10, 2017 at 7:16 p.m. deputies with the Berrien County Sheriff’s Department responded to a report of a child drowning in a swimming hole, on a rural property along Jeffery Road near Spring Creek Road in Galien Township. After significant rescue and recovery efforts, Sadie Geigler, a 7 year-old female of Michigan City, Indiana was pulled from the water. Life-saving efforts were continued by Three Oaks Ambulance personnel and SMCAS Paramedics. However, Geigler was ultimately pronounced deceased at Lakeland Hospital – Niles. This incident remains under investigation by the Berrien County Sheriff’s Department Road Patrol and Detective Bureau. Sheriff’s Deputies were assisted at the scene by the Michigan State Police, Three Oaks Police Department, Pokagon Tribal Police Department, Three Oaks Ambulance, Galien Township Fire, Weesaw Township Fire, and Bertrand Township Fire. — STAFF REPORTS

MASONIC LODGES TO PROVIDE FREE CHILD ID PROGRAMS THROUGHOUT BERRIEN COUNTY IN AUGUST

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here will be five free Michigan Child Identification Programs conducted by Masonic Lodges in Berrien County in August. The dates, times and locations are as follows. • Tuesday August 1 at Riverview Park in St. Joseph from 5:00pm to 8:00pm. This is during the National Night Out event. • Saturday August 5 at Gemini Fun & Games in Coloma from 9:00am to 12:00pm. This is during the Coloma Glad – Peach Festival. • Monday August 14 at the Berrien County Fairgrounds in Berrien Springs from 4:00pm to 6:00pm. This is during the Berrien County Youth Fair. • Tuesday August 22 at The Berrien County Health Department in Benton Harbor from 10:00am to 2:00pm. This is during the Back to School Bash event. • Sunday August 27 at The Redbud Community Center in Buchanan from 2:00pm to 5:00pm. This is during the Buchanan Faith and Family Day event. Each child that goes through the process will receive a dental impression as well as a CD containing a photo, video, digital fingerprints and their vital information. Parents or legal guardians of children who participate must be present and fill out a permission slip for the child to receive this service. Children who have already received the service are encouraged to repeat the process every two years to keep the information in the completed packets current. The Michigan Child Identification Program provides the family with everything needed for the Amber Alert System. Since 2005 over eighty-five thousand Michigan children have received this valuable service. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children considers the Michigan Child Identification Program to be one of the most comprehensive of its kind. For questions or more information about the event call 269-612-7424 or consult the Michigan Child ID Web Site at www.michiganchildid.org. — STAFF REPORTS

New Buffalo Township Board Approved Exit 1 Bridge design, SLU for Carts on 12

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LINDA HENDERSON IN NEW BUFFALO TOWNSHIP

t their regular meeting Monday, July 17, the New Buffalo Township Board further reviewed the Exit 1 Bridge Improvement Plans for the Corridor Improvement District (CID) and approved a concept drawing for the I-94 Exit 1 Bridge and a Special Land Use (SLU) for Carts on 12. Their CID consultants, Antero Group, gave an update on the Exit 1 Bridge Improvement project that MDOT has slated for the summer of 2018. Eric Neagu presented a rendering of the new bridge, which featured a sign reading, “New Buffalo: the Gateway of Michigan,” along with nautical themed light posts. He stated that he, Supervisor Michelle Heit and Clerk Judy Zabicki had met with Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) representatives regarding MDOT’s plans for a significant renovation of the Exit 1 Bridge and entrance and the Township’s vision. He said MDOT was very receptive and enthusiastic with regards to working with the township to enhance Exit 1. The opportunity to work in partnership with MDOT on the improvements will move the township’s Corridor Improvement Plan ahead of schedule and will save them a significant amount of money. “Exit 1 is the most important gateway into Michigan for tourism,” Neagu said. Further enhancements to the entrance ramp and Exit 6 are also in the works. The Township Board held a Special Meeting Wednesday, July 12, to review and discuss an entryway bridge improvement opportunity. (See page 5 for further details) Heit thanked Neagu and the Antero Group for their fast response and turnaround of the project, and added that she was “really excited” about it. Antero will prepare cost projections and further details of the plan this week for submission to MDOT. Also at the meeting, the Board unanimously supported going forward with the bridge design and project. Berrien County Sheriff Deputy Rick Edgerle gave the May township call report. Overall, he said that 121 complaints were answered, eight tickets were issued and seven arrests were made. The year to date statistic through the month of May for Berrien Country said that 1,325 complaints were worked, 309 tickets were issued and 197 arrests were made. Fire Chief Ed Lijewski reported that the department had responded to 87 calls yearto-date. During the past week, they had also responded to a mutual aid call with 12 firefighters in Three Oaks. He said he anticipated that three additional high school students will enroll in firefighter classes this fall. The department will begin their annual routine testing of equipment this month. In new business, the Board approved a SLU for Carts on 12, upon the Planning Commission’s recommendation. The SLU is for an Open Air Business for 19429 U.S. Highway 12, property #11-13-0019-0002- 10-0, subject to the following findings and conditions that were previously recommended by the Planning Commission, as well as others that were also approved by the Township Board: extend a fence on the southwesterly side of the property as far as business activity occurs; remove business sign in the front, which is in the right-of-way; store

nothing within the 10-foot setbacks; conduct a cleanup of the debris and semi-truck trailers and tires and have an enforcement officer conduct an inspection. Prior to the Board’s vote on the SLU, neighbor Cheryl Marie shared her objections to the SLU on behalf of herself and her husband, Michael Patrick. Neighbors Dennis and Janice Richards also voiced their objections to the SLU and to a recently installed fence, which they said was made from shipping crates and offered little privacy. Cheryl Marie presented the Board with a nine point check list, which listed property condition requirements with which the Board should comply before approving the SLU. She also read a three-page document, “Notice of Invalidity of Immediate Approval of the Special Land Use for the Property Known as 19415 US HWY 12/ Property #11-13-0019-0002-10-0 and as 19425 US Hwy 12 Property #11-13-0019-0003-00-3 or Either of Them.” The Board addressed the question of the shipping crate fence, saying that township ordinances did not prohibit the use of this material. Heit did suggest that Carts on 12 Owner Ed Arnold be a good neighbor and replace the fence with something more appealing. Following the Board’s approval, Cheryl Marie readdressed the Board, repeating her list of objections. She said that because they did not perform their “ministerial duty,” they have caused harm to their rights and interest and had violated state statues. She said that this SLU matter has been an ongoing issue for four years. Furthermore, she said that she would be bringing the matter to court. The Board approved a Resolution of Support for New Buffalo Shoreline Alliance. This resolution is in response to the erosion that has caused significant damage to property and shoreline recession along the lakefront in the City of New Buffalo, New Buffalo Township and the Villages of Michiana and Grand Beach. The Resolution stated that the township will work with the three municipalities to help in the application of a Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) grant through FEMA for remediation and restoration. Board members unanimously approved a $15,500 quote from Midwest Glass and Mirror for replacement of glass at the two receptionist windows. The sliding windows will be replaced with security glass that has a pass through underneath the glass, which is in contrast to the current, malfunctioning sliding windows. A replacement for the Board representative on the joint City and Township Cemetery Board was also approved. Heit will replace Pete Rahm as the township representative on the Pine Grove Cemetery Board with a term that expires Dec. 31, 2020. The Board approved expenditures related to firefighter leadership training for Officer Jamie Fleck. The expenditure covered mileage and meals for classes that were attended by Fleck for three days in May and June. The total amount that was approved was $ 658.84. The next regular meeting of the New Buffalo Township Board is Monday, Aug. 21, at 7 p.m. at New Buffalo Township Hall on Red Arrow Highway.


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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

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Corps of Engineers event to highlight shore erosion, the Regulatory process

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he U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Detroit District Regulatory Office invites the public to attend their outreach event, “Waterways, Wetlands, and You! - Lake Michigan Shoreline Special Edition,” at 10:30 a.m. at New Buffalo Township Library Thursday, July 27. The event will focus on shoreline erosion and shore protection projects.  Shoreline property owners, contractors, consultants, municipalities and anyone with an interest in shoreline processes and shore protection projects are all encouraged to attend.  The Corps Great Lakes Hydraulics and Hydrology Office will discuss coastal erosion in Lake Michigan and the factors that influence it, including water levels, sand supply and shore protection. The Detroit District Regulatory Office will provide an overview of the Regulatory Program, with topics including permit requirements for structures, work, and placement of dredged or fill material in wetlands and waterways; information on applying for permits and services that the Corps Regulatory Office provides to the public. Information and tips on preparing a complete permit application package will be provided, along with an opportunity to meet with a Regulatory Project Manager to discuss proposed or completed projects. While there is no fee for the event, space is limited. To RSVP, contact 313226-7495 or lre_reg_outreach@usace.army.mil. To learn more about the Corps’ Detroit District Regulatory Program, visit the website at www.lre.usace. army.mil/Missions/RegulatoryProgramandPermits.aspx.  New Buffalo Township Library is located at 33 North Thompson Street in New Buffalo. — STAFF REPORTS

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Old Car Show in La Porte coming next weekend

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he La Porte County Historical Society is hosting its 10th annual Old Car Show from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, July 29. The Car Show is held on the grounds of the museum located at 2405 Indiana Avenue, which is on Highway 35 at the south entrance to La Porte, Indiana. The event is open to cars 30 years and older. Nearly 100 classics and muscle and collectible cars will be on display on the day of the show. Vehicle owners are welcome to bring their cars to the museum beginning at 8 a.m., with registration continuing through 11a.m. The registration fee is $10 per vehicle. Owners will receive this year’s custom dash plaque and other items in their “goodie bag,” as well as the chance to win a trophy. Trophy categories will include La Porte County Historical Society President’s Choice, as well as Curator’s Choice and a Preservation Award. Plaques will also be given for five Owner’s Choice awards and five Public’s Choice awards. In addition, vehicle owners will be eligible to win a Door Prize. Public viewing of the cars will begin at 9 a.m. The public will be charged $5 per carload, which will include admittance to the car show and the museum for that day only. Those attending will be given ballots to vote for the Public’s Choice awards. Ballots need to be cast by 2 p.m. in order to meet the 2:30 p.m. trophy presentation deadline. Onsite refreshments provided by Home Run Hot Dogs will also be available for sale. New this year will be a program presented by Jef Shively of the Kokomo Automotive Museum on the Haynes-Apperson Automobiles. The program will begin at 11:30 a.m. in the museum’s meeting room. The La Porte County Historical Society Museum houses the Kesling Automobile collection, as well as the W.A. Jones Collection of Ancient Weapons and more than 80,000 other artifacts depicting the vast history of La Porte County. For more information, visit www.laportecountyhistory.org or call 219-324-6767. — STAFF REPORTS

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raudulent calls have been received by businesses, and perhaps residents, in New Buffalo. The voice on the other end of the line claims to be from NIPSCO, and says that your electricity will be shut off in minutes if you do not pay a bill (NIPSCO does not service Michigan). This scam has been reported to NIPSCO and local authorities. It is thought that the calls are also being made to Indiana residents.

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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

A celebration of cars and pin-up models at Full Throttle Throw Down

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The Top 12 contestants strike a pose

BY FRANCESCA SAGALA

hiny hot rods, cool tunes and pretty ladies in pin-up attire abounded at US 12 Speed and Custom’s sixth annual Full Throttle Throw Down Car Show Saturday, July 15. Guests strolled the grounds of the popular car destination, admiring the hot rods, street bikes and show cars that were on display. In addition, guests could also enjoy Mexican cuisine provided by Rio’s and live entertainment from the North of Memphis band. Everyone congregated inside the large garage for the fifth annual pin-up contest in the afternoon, which featured 19 contestants. Contestants strutted across the stage in front of a panel of judges, which included members of the US 12 Speed and Custom crew. At one point, Pablo Wreggelsworth, who was once again serving as the lively emcee for the competition, jokingly declared the all-male panel to be their “ugliest” one yet. (Last year, the panel was comprised of previous pin-up girl contestants.) “Have a drink, arm wrestle, or US 12 Speed and Custom Owner Rocky Troxell whatever” was Wreggelsworth’s (second from the left) hands out car trophies with Emcee Pablo Wreggelsworth advice to the judges before they the help of Miss Full Throttle 2016 Jessica Golden (center) introduces the Top 12 left to deliberate over the winners. (far right) contestants As was custom, Wreggelsworth asked pin-up contestants questions revolving around the main topic of the day: cars. “They were good in character, they had fun with the questions and they were beautiful,” Wreggelsworth said of the contestants. The top 12 pin-up contestants were: Conner Dawson, Sarah Garcia, Sydney Snyder, Cassandra Pearson, Tara Hernandez, Laura Wreggelsworth, Virginia Martynowicz, Suzi Howard, Chrystal Rike, Afften Mroz, A 1965 Chevy Chevelle on display Crystal Rike, aka Crystal Rose Summer Ferguson and Andrea Sandusky. Winning the title of Miss Throttle 2017, as well as a $500 check, was Dawson. Second place went to Howard, who also received $300, and Garcia won third place as well as $200. All 12 contestants, along with the winners of that day’s car contest, will appear in this year’s pin-up calendar. Winners of the car contest also received a hot rod trophy, which US 12 Speed and Custom Owner Rocky Troxell explained was built inhouse from spare car parts. Troxell said they “probably had the most we can possibly get” in terms of the official car count for this year’s contest. “The show’s getting bigger and bigger every year,” he said, and gave a special thanks to event sponsors and community members for their support. According to its website, US 12 Speed and Custom “designs, builds, modifies and finishes street and race cars as well as dragsters,” and specializes in custom fabrication and finish. They are located at 19015 US Miss Full Throttle Conner Dawson, aka Conner Von Dutch, Highway 12 in New Buffalo. recieves her $500 check from 2016 Miss Full Throttle Jessica Golden

Brittany Crane, aka Bitchin' Brittany


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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

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Bold new merchant shocks Three Oaks!

WORDS BY LAWRENCE VON EBELER, PHOTOS BY OTHERS

n unabashed merchant/artist has arrived in Three Oaks, undeterred by tradition and convention. Suzanna Bierwirth’s arrival on the retail scene in Three Oaks has been nothing short of shocking. Shocking because of her incredible taste level in her collections and store design standards. Shocking because she has already blown the doors off, in her little shop that can barely keep it’s highly curated inventory in stock. Suzanne’s mission statement is not extraordinary but for the fact that she really, truly means it. “Our Mission is to curate the ever changing direction of art, jewelry, and objects for the contemporary home, office or studio.” Every piece in her inventory is hand selected with her stratospheric standards, which does not mean that everything is priced likewise, to the contrary. Suzanna’s husband Brad Simpson, also a designer and craftsman, built the entire store and its fixtures. You don’t have to look twice to appreciate his skills. He also designs and builds custom furniture for his exclusive clientele. Ask to see him, he’s usually in the back working on new pieces for clients. The store’s collections run an astonishing gamut of looks and an incredible price point range. You can purchase a greeting card for as little as $5.00, which puts Hallmark to shame, as the ones here are all hand made. You can spend as much as $500.00 for an architectural terrarium with the interior holding a famous Barbara Presti botanical garden. Of European decent, Suzanna’s accent is charming and engaging, and she always looks the part as a gallery-type director in her simplistic, but elegant fashion statement. That does not imply that she is “cool” or indifferent as some might assume, but rather she is amazingly warm which is her nature to make everyone comfortable. Keep in mind, she does her own gardening at home where she and Brad have a two acre garden where they grow their own fresh vegetables, in their “spare” time! They recently purchased the building around the corner and behind them. Asking if they were going to move into that I was advised “Of course not... we just got this store finished, but we thought it was a way of showing our confidence in this nice little town and the direction that we think it’s heading: up, up and up!! Suzanna arrived in the US 18 years ago penniless and set out looking for a job immediately. She landed her first job with the first company she interviewed with, and has been with them for all of this time as a designer and executive, until recently when she accepted a new position with a cutting edge company in the new Detroit surge in design and cutting edge companies. (more on that later!! She will still be at her new Goods and Heroes store for the regular hours. She is a human dynamo!! Store hours are now Fridays 12 to 6, Saturdays from 11 to 6 and Sundays from 11 to 5. They are located at 24 North Elm Street in Three Oaks. You may want to see their website at goodsandheroes.com


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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

Acorn audience selects Singer/Songwriter winners

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WORDS AND PHOTOS BY LAWRENCE VON EBELER

nother nail-biting evening of joy and disappointment was experienced at the Acorn Theater the night of Thursday, July 13, during the fifth annual Singer/Songwriter Contest. This year, more than 100 applicants were considered for the contest. From the top 10 finalists, three austere judges chose three finalists to perform a second set. Out of those three finalists, audience members chose a winner and two runners-up. Carly and Martina Spiro, who are 15-year-old twins from Chicago, walked away with $1000 in first prize money. Both girls sang with a guitar and keyboard, as well as a combination of other instruments. They said their career began “inadvertently” when they wrote “Make Me Happy” after being bullied at school. After enrolling in the Evanston School of Rock, they recorded the song with Delmark Records. One of the songs from their debut album, “All That I Am,” was picked as a finalist out of 16,000 entries for the 2016 International Songwriters competition. Since then, they have recorded several albums and toured the United States for scores of concerts. Placing second in the contest was the super talented and beautiful Laura Joy from Oak Park, Illinois, who received a $500 cash prize for her song, “Takes A While.” Third runner-up was Dina Balich with a multi-talented performance that included her singing and playing the baby grand piano. Balich received a $200 cash prize for her stirring arrangement, “Slow Dance.” James Neary, who was the first Singer/Songwriter Contest winner from five years ago, opened the evening’s festivities. Pianist Travis Forker performed in the interlude while the voting was being conducted. Serving as judges were Joe Bisceglia, a successful singer/songwriter/ entertainer from Chicago; Jeremy Bonfiglio, an award-winning journalist with a career spanning 25 years, and the talented Frank Sintich, who has performed for more than 30 years with bands in Chicagoland theaters and club venues. Acorn Executive Director Sandra Thompson, who’s also the creator of the Singer/Songwriter Contest, was pleased with the theater’s full house, as well as the extreme talent that has evolved over the years since the contest’s humble beginnings. “We are gratified and proud of the quality of artists performing here for all of these years,” she said, and added that the contestants “all deserve prizes as far as I am concerned.” The Acorn Theater is located at 107 Generation Drive in Three Oaks, Michigan. For upcoming performances and reservations, contact 269-756-3879 or visit acorntheater.com.

Winners: Carly and Martina Spiro

Judges: Joe Bisceglia, JeremyBonfiglio and Frank Sintich

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Environmental Assurance Program verifies local farm

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BERRIEN COUNTY FARM RECOGNIZED BY MAEAP

he Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development’s (MDARD) Michigan Agriculture Environmental Assurance Program (MAEAP) is recognizing Coloma, Michigan’s R&B Miller Farms, Inc. as a verified farm in the Cropping System for implementing appropriate pollution prevention

practices. The program assists farmers in complying with state and federal environmental regulations and with Right to Farm practices. Technical assistance was provided by the Berrien Conservation District. “By taking the steps necessary to become an environmentally verified operation, this Berrien County farm has contributed to the assurance of sustainable farming practices,” said MDARD Director Jamie Clover Adams. “Michigan is leading the national agriculture community in effective stewardship practices with the voluntary, incentive-based MAEAP program. The continued success of the program demonstrates that environmental sustainability and economic development are not mutually exclusive,” Adams added. MAEAP is a collaborative effort of farmers, MDARD, Michigan Farm Bureau, commodity organizations, universities, conservation districts, conservation and environmental groups and state and federal agencies. More than 100 local coordinators and technical service providers are available to assist farmers as they move through the MAEAP process toward verification. An average of 8,000 Michigan farmers attends educational programs annually, 10,000 Michigan farms have started the verification process and more than 4,000 farms have been verified to date. To become MAEAP verified, farmers must complete three comprehensive steps which include attending an educational seminar, conducting a thorough on-farm risk assessment, and developing and implementing an action plan addressing potential environmental risks. MDARD conducts an on-farm inspection to verify program requirements related to applicable state and federal environmental regulations, Michigan Right to Farm guidelines, and adherence to an action plan. When completed, the producer receives a certificate of environmental assurance. To remain a MAEAP verified farm, inspections must be conducted every five years and action steps must be followed. MAEAP is a multi-year program allowing producers to meet personal objectives, while best managing both time and resources. The program encompasses four systems designed to help producers evaluate the environmental risks of their operation. Each system – Livestock, Farmstead, Cropping, and Forest, Wetlands, and Habitat – examines a different aspect of a farm, as each has a different environmental impact. By participating in all four systems, producers can comprehensively evaluate their entire farming operation for potential environmental risks.  For more information, visit the MAEAP website at www.maeap.org or contact your local conservation district and Joe Kelpinski, MDARD’s MAEAP Program Manager, at 517-284-5608. — STAFF REPORTS

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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

City Council meets, hears concerns

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THERESE DONNELLY IN NEW BUFFALO

ork on the Whittaker Street project is almost half done, as Phase I is nearing completion and engineers expect to go out for bid on Phase II early next month. At their July 18 meeting the New Buffalo City Council approved the final payment request to Payjay Inc. for Phase I, totaling $1,160,704. In reviewing the request, Mayor Lou O’Donnell said that after a change order, the Phase I work came in just $4,524.64 over the original bid and was completed on time. A final inspection was performed June 23. O’Donnell also said engineers expected to go to bid on Phase II August 10. Planning is also underway for a statue that will be in placed on Whittaker Street in recognition of The Pokagon Fund’s contributions to this project and other work in the city and surrounding municipalities. Sculptor Fritz Olsen, a locally-based, internationally-recognized artist, was recommended by the DDA Public Arts Subcommittee and approved by the Council for the work. John Krsul, special liaison to the board of directors at The Pokagon Fund, said Olsen’s design was “quite magnificent” and incorporated natural elements-something the Band required. He said Olsen’s design, which will be reviewed by the Band for approval, can be made and installed within the $60,000 budget. Krsul noted since their inception The Pokagon Fund and the Local Revenue Sharing Board have distributed more than $75 million to area projects. After a closed session, the Council also approved a labor agreement with the Police Officers Labor Council. O’Donnell said, much like the agreements with other city departments, the new terms include a three percent pay increase and require members to pay 20 percent of their health insurance. He added the city is looking for health plan options that will save the city and employees money. The Council voted unanimously to repeal Ordinance 221, eliminating the Civil Service Board. It was noted the board lacks a quorum and hiring practices and conduct are covered in the City’s employee handbook and contracts. The City’s charter does not require a Civil Service Board. The Council accepted Kristin D’Amico’s resignation from the Planning Commission and appointed Roxanne Lauer to fill the vacant seat with a term ending May 2018. D’Amico was recently hired by the City as Recreational Facilities Superintendent. During the public comments segment of the meeting, resident Ray Kirkus asked why the position went to someone he said did not meet the application deadline and did not have a required degree. After the meeting, O’Donnell explained the position was originally offered to a candidate who declined, so the City made a second posting, which D’Amico met. He also noted the job did not require a degree. The job description on the City’s webpage says candidates should “have, or be close to completing, a Bachelor’s degree in Recreation Management, Public Administration, or a related field.” Kirkus also asked about work done on a vacant lot the city owns on Jameson Street, saying the City cannot profit from selling the

land and any money exceeding the original purchase price will go to Berrien County. O’Donnell said to eliminate standing water and breeding mosquitoes the land was filled using dirt from the Whittaker Street project and trees had to be cut down to allow that dirt to be spread. O’Donnell also said the City is working to drain and fill other areas of standing water. He said no decision has been made on what the City will do with the lot, but he hopes to sell them for development to add houses to the tax rolls. Kirkus told the Council he was glad the City was leasing a lot on the southeast corner of Whittaker and Buffalo streets for public parking but said allowing Stray Dog to have a sign on the lot in exchange for paying the lease violated the City’s ordinances against off-site signage. Councilmember Mark Robertson said his interpretation of the language of the sign ordinance allowed for the sign, as essential services were exempt from the ordinances and he saw the parking, which eased congestion, a service. During the public comments, resident Donna Messinger questioned why City Manager David Richards had not attended the June and July Council meetings. O’Donnell stated Richards’ brother was undergoing surgeries that coincided with Council meetings and Richards had been absent to support him. Using the City Manager’s submitted reports, the Council agreed to go out for bid to wrecker services. Roger’s Wrecker currently has a contract with the City which expires in September. The Council approved advertising surplus and obsolete equipment from departments for sale via sealed bid.

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he Council passed a resolution for a hazard mitigation grant offered by FEMA. New Buffalo Township passed the same resolution July 17 and Grand Beach was expected to pass it at their July 19 meeting. The shoreline is impacted by erosion, especially since the Army Corps of Engineers ceased beach nourishment in 1995. FEMA has $250 million in grant money available for projects to reduce or eliminate long-term risks of damage to people or property. A request to transfer a Class C & SDM liquor license to Bear and Bee LLC was tabled. If approved, the license would allow David’s Deli to serve beer and wine. The Council agreed to meet with a representative from the business before making a decision. Before approving the evening’s consent agenda, the Council made a correction to the June 20, 2017 minutes to show Councilmember Liz Ennis had asked, not stated, if current municipal funds from The Pokagon Fund would be used for planned dune walk renovations. The funds will not be used on the project. At the end of the meeting, Ennis reported The Pokagon Fund’s Neighbor-to-Neighbor program has begun training workers to provide services to residents in need. She encouraged residents to let neighbors in need of assistance know about the new program. She also noted preparations are underway to mark the Fund’s tenth anniversary.

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Ozinga acquires Eagle Ready-Mix, adds new locations in Goshen, Elkhart

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ecently, Ozinga announced the acquisition of Eagle Ready-Mix, providing the 89-year-old family-owned American company with two additional locations in Goshen and Elkhart, Indiana. These locations will operate immediately and help support the company’s operation in North Central Indiana and Southwest Michigan. With other locations throughout Illinois, Wisconsin and South Florida, Ozinga has been servicing Indiana communities for more than 45 years. The company’s decision to add the additional locations helps demonstrate confidence in the construction industry and enables Ozinga to be a part of future residential, commercial and industrial jobs that will stimulate local economy. The acquired facilities are located at 65723 Lincoln Highway 33 East in Goshen and 21298 Protecta Drive in Elkhart. Since 1991, Eagle Ready-Mix has been a family owned and operated ready mix concrete supplier and manufacturer of precast concrete products. Rich in values and principles, Eagle Ready-Mix is a perfect fit with Ozinga’s culture and values. The company is excited to welcome the Eagle employees into the Ozinga organization. “For 26 years, Eagle Ready-Mix has been a trusted name in the Elkhart and Goshen region for quality concrete and great service,” said Joe Sanders, Executive Vice President of Ozinga’s Indiana operation. “The Ozinga team is thrilled to welcome them aboard.” Known for its iconic red and white striped trucks, Ozinga supplies concrete, aggregate materials, and energy solutions to a wide array of customers. Ozinga also offers transportation and logistics services through an extensive network of truck, rail, barge and ship terminals. “Building a business is about making a difference in the world around you,” said Jeff Ozinga, co-owner and executive vice president of Ozinga’s ready mix operations. “At Ozinga, we take pride in becoming members of the local community, and we are excited to build relationships with new customers and coworkers that will positively influence residential and commercial growth throughout Indiana and Michigan.” The 89-year-old company was founded by Ozinga’s great-grandfather in the Chicago area in 1928, and has remained a family-owned business ever since. — STAFF

REPORTS

MASTER GARDENER TO DISCUSS NATIVE PLANTS

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aster gardener Laura Henderson will be presenting Why and How to Garden with Native Plants at the New Buffalo Township Library Monday, July 17 at 6:30 p.m. Henderson has spent years learning about, and gardening with, native plants and will be sharing her knowledge with you. Learn about the importance of native plants, what plants you should use in your own gardens and yards, and where you can get them, as well. Part of the Library’s annual Summer Nature Series, this presentation is free and no sign up is required. Visit www.newbuffalotownshiplibrary.org for a full calendar of the library’s upcoming events. (33 N Thompson St., New Buffalo (269) 469-2933). — Staff Reports


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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

U-M unveils tuition guarantee for Michigan students with need

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he University of Michigan will launch a new financial aid program for in-state students that offers a “Go Blue Guarantee” of free tuition for up to four years for students with family income of up to

$65,000. The new program, which includes families earning up to what is roughly the state’s median income, will launch Jan. 1, 2018. Recently, it was approved by the university’s Board of Regents as part of the fiscal year 2018 general fund budget for the Ann Arbor campus. “Today, our long-standing commitment to ensuring that qualified students from Michigan can afford a U-M education becomes a guarantee,” said U-M President Mark Schlissel. “The ‘Go Blue Guarantee’ cuts through the complexities of financial aid to help us reach talented students from all communities in our state. I have always believed that talent is ubiquitous in our society, but opportunity most certainly is not. The ‘Go Blue Guarantee’ helps us ensure wider opportunity,” he added. The guarantee amplifies the university’s longstanding commitment to meet financial need for all in-state students and it does not reduce any needbased aid for students from families earning more than $65,000. In fact, many in-state students from families earning up to $125,000 a year are awarded scholarships and grants that pay half their tuition. The president thanked the Board of Regents and donors to the university for their support in eliminating financial roadblocks for students seeking to attend U-M. “I must thank the members of the Board of Regents for their dogged commitment to access and affordability of a U-M education,” he said. “They urged us to be bold, and the ‘Go Blue Guarantee’ could not have happened without their encouragement and support. And tremendous credit also goes to our generous donors whose philanthropic commitment to financial aid underlies the financing of the ‘Go Blue Guarantee.’” Interim Provost Paul Courant, the university chief academic and chief budget officer, said the “Go Blue Guarantee” is based, in part, on first-year results of the HAIL (High Achieving Involved Leader) scholarship. The HAIL effort found that targeted communication and simplifying the aid application process for high-achieving, low-income students markedly increased the number of those students enrolling at U-M. There were 262 HAIL Scholars in the Fall 2016 freshmen class. The HAIL pilot is now in its second year. U-M has long made financial aid a priority. Again this year, financial aid was increased by 9.5 percent ($15.3 million) in the general fund budget, bringing the total budget for need-based undergraduate financial aid to $176.7 million in the coming year. This means financial aid in the coming year will more than cover the $424 increase in the most common lower-division, in-state tuition for the academic year that was approved in the general fund budget for fiscal year 2018. The university also provides needbased financial aid to out-of-state students and meets full financial need for those students from families with incomes up to $90,000 a year.

In-state undergraduate tuition will increase by 2.9 percent to $14,826 for the most common lowerdivision rate. Comparable tuition for out-of-state undergraduates will be $47,476, an increase of 4.5 percent. Tuition for most graduate programs will increase by 4.1 percent. The undergraduate financial aid budget has increased 11.3 percent per year, on average, over the past decade. This compares to an average annual growth rate of 4 percent for in-state undergraduate tuition. The university’s generous need-based financial aid program includes all in-state students with financial need and typically includes Michigan families earning up to about $125,000 a year or more, depending on specific circumstances. Courant explains that the university’s sustained attention to providing need-based financial aid means today’s students with financial need are paying less to attend U-M than students of a decade ago, that students are graduating with lower debt and that the average net price of attendance compares favorably with peer institutions across the nation. U-M has a six-year graduation rate of 90 percent, more than double the national average. A noted economist and professor of public policy, Courant said U-M’s commitment to the “Go Blue Guarantee” is extraordinary for a single campus at a public university. Comparable “tuition guarantee” programs, like those in California and New York, are statewide programs that leverage substantial state grants made directly to students. The average state grant received by students at UCLA, for example, exceeds $10,000 a year, compared to the average state grant for Michigan students of $715. “This makes the U-M commitment of university resources even more remarkable and critically important for these academically talented, instate students,” Courant said. “We are making a commitment in order to make sure in-state students have access to the life-changing educational opportunities at a large research university like U-M.” In a comparison that includes more than 30 other state flagship universities, only the University of Virginia has a higher average than U-M for institutional aid provided to incoming freshmen. The data from 2014-15 show U-M provides $13,796 on average for those students. The $2.05 billion general fund budget for the Ann Arbor campus was approved by the Board of Regents on a 7-1. Revenue includes an expected state appropriation of $314.6 million, up 1.9 percent; indirect cost recovery on research funding of $239 million, up 5.5 percent; $1.49 billion in revenue from tuition and fees, up 6.8 percent. In addition to supporting the university’s overall commitment to academic excellence and affordability, the approved budget provides new investments to enhance the student experience by expanding engaged-learning experiences and servicelearning opportunities. The budget devotes new funds to increase opportunities for students to collaborate with U-M’s world-class researchers; undertake experiences to work, study and do research in international

NEW BUFFALO TIMES

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settings and obtain real-world experience through internships, client-centered assignments and other immersive educational projects. In the coming year, the university will launch a multiyear examination of large introductory undergraduate courses to explore how digital technology, evidence-based teaching methods and other approaches can boost student performance and enhance engagement. This promises to be a high-impact investment, because almost one third of the credit hours generated in any given semester are taken in large foundational courses. The budget includes support for ongoing work related to the university’s strategic plan for diversity, equity and inclusion; further investments in the biosciences; support for faculty to engage in public service; improvements in classroom technology; and adding more class sections with fewer than 20 students. The total fiscal year 2018 operating revenue budget for the Ann Arbor campus, including Michigan Medicine, Athletics, University Housing, other auxiliary activities and programs supported by designated gifts and grants, is $8.4 billion. Separately, the Regents approved tuition and housing rates on the UM-Flint and UM-Dearborn campuses and a small increase in the student fee to support the University Health Service. Gifts and other non-general fund sources are increasingly important to the university’s financial health. Philanthropy is an essential component of the university’s commitment to academic excellence and access and affordability. The university has another year remaining in its Victors for Michigan fundraising campaign, which already has raised more than $4 billion and is closing in on a sub-goal of raising $1 billion for student support. Regents approved a 1 percent increase for residence hall and apartment rental rates for fiscal year 2018 to cover increased costs and an additional 2 percent increase dedicated to funding major renovations of housing facilities. With a number of residence halls still in need of renovation, the overall 3 percent increase will support future upgrades while offsetting the projected rise in day-to-day operating costs for all buildings. The cost per student for a double room with a basic meal plan will total $11,198 for the fall and winter terms, an increase of $326. Need-based grant aid will mitigate this increase for students with financial need. Rental rates in Northwood Community Apartments for graduate students and students with families will increase by an average of 1 percent. University Housing is a self-funded auxiliary unit of Student Life within the university. Over the past 10 years, University Housing has embarked on a program of substantial cost controls, reducing costs by $16.7 million. Additional U-M benchmarks • Freshman retention rate: 97 percent • Six-year graduation rate: 90 percent • No. 1 U.S. public research university: $1.3B • No. 2 U.S. public research university: top-rated graduate programs • Earnings of U-M graduates after 10 years: nearly double the national average. — Staff Reports

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE • SINCE 1942


www.newbuffalotimes.com

New Buffalo resident Mary Trusha turns 105

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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

BY GRACE BUONO

uly 12, 1912 Mary Trusha was born. 105 years later, she still lives to tell stories, make her family laugh, and of course, eat birthday cake. Today, Trusha resides at Carol’s Home Adult Foster Care center located on Wilton Avenue just off Highway 12. Carol’s Home Adult Foster Care is a rather unique set up for adults needing care. Rather than having large numbers of patients with little one-onone care from nurses, Carol’s Home is devoted to individuality with never taking in more than 6 patients at a time. On Wednesday July 12, family gathered at Carol’s Home to celebrate Trusha’s birthday. From her daughter all the way down to greatgrandchildren, everyone was happy to be there with Trusha. Family members have their own favorite memories of Trusha from over the years. Gale Trusha, Mary’s daughter-in-law, can’t begin to describe how it feels to be celebrating a 105th birthday. “It’s just awesome,” Gale said. “You have no idea how she Mary Tousha was, she was just a spitfire. We’d go on shopping trips for years, even after Mike passed away.” Mary Trusha had two children, Marist and Mike Trusha. Sadly, Mike Trusha passed away years ago but her daughter was present at the birthday celebration. Tammy Ryan, one of Mary’s granddaughters, is just amazed at how much history her grandmother has lived through. “She lived through the depression,” Ryan said. “She believed that kids deserved one toy. She said, ‘I had one doll growing up and all these toys that kids have nowadays, no.’” Ryan, like all of Trusha’s family, always mentions Trusha’s interests in staying healthy throughout her life. “She never got on that med train. She doesn’t take medicine because she doesn’t believe in it. She always did all the research herself for vitamins and what to eat and what not to eat,” Ryan said. “She would read Prevention Magazine and actually ordered Prevision Magazine for all her grandkids and had it sent to us for several years in a row.” Even at 105, Trusha has lived a life of good health. “Fifteen years ago she was having chest pains so I took her to the doctor—a heart specialist,” Ryan said. “The nurse practitioner came into the room to give us the results, and he was beside himself. His exact words were ‘you don’t understand. I don’t see patients like this. She has absolutely no blockage.’ I thought that was totally awesome.” In fact, Trusha’s family has a long line of longevity. Her grandfather died at 101 after falling off a horse. Even at over 100, he was in good health to ride a horse. Many family members, Ryan included, always think back to how Trusha would drink a beer a day to stay healthy. A combination of beer and fresh air may very well be the secrets to her longevity. Ryan said, “She loved beer. She said beer was healthy. She loves fresh air, especially the fresh lake air of New Buffalo.” Jennifer Grantham has worked at Carol’s Home for 17 years. Since Trusha began living in the home three years ago, Grantham has gotten to know her quite well. “She’s a fun spunky old lady,” Grantham said. “She makes me laugh. She sleeps a lot, but that’s normal for her age. But it’s the fact that she’s got spunk left—a lot of times they don’t have it at this age but she’s full of spunk.” A combination of her humor and spunk makes Grantham particularly enjoy taking care of Trusha. “She’s my favorite, I know you’re not supposed to have favorites but she is,” Grantham said. “She doesn’t know a lot of stories from when she was younger, but she makes stories up that would make you almost pee your pants.” Ryan in particular is very pleased with the care her grandmother is receiving at Carol’s Home. “I know she’s getting well taken care of,” Ryan said. “I pulled her out of a nursing home because they let her get a bed sore. I knew that she would not get one here. They don’t take Medicaid or Medicare here so you have to come up with the money yourself but it’s worth it.” 105 years later, Trusha is still making all those around her laugh and smile. As the birthday song filled the living room of Carol’s Home, a large white and purple sheet cake was brought out for Trusha. And, in keeping with her lifelong passion for health, family members scraped frosting off pieces of cake because Trusha had long thought it was unhealthy.

Premiere 24 hour fitness facility for men & women 18 years and older. Membership options available for both full-time and part-time residents, call for details!

705 W. Buffalo, New Buffalo 269-586-4280 www.eqfitnessnb.com | getfit@eqfitnessnb.com

SPIN CYCLE CLASSES OFFERED

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219 W. Madison, New Buffalo, MI 269-586-3748

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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

REAL ESTATE

MORTGAGE RATES 30 Year Fixed Jumbo.. 4.52% 30-Year Fixed............. 4.04% 15-Year Fixed Jumbo... 3.93% 15-Year Fixed............. 3.20%

LAKEFRONT • NEWS • BANKING STATISTICS FOR LEASE • NOW FOR SALE • CONSTRUCTION

US CDS (NATIONAL AVERAGE) 1 year............................ .58 6 month......................... .34 1 month......................... .10 KEY RATES Fed Fund Rate................ .37 Fed Reserve Target Rate. .75 Prime Rate..................... 3.5 US Unemployment Rate.. 4.6

It is hard to contend against one’s heart’s desire; for whatever it wishes to have it buys at the cost of soul. — Heraclitus

New Buffalo Times LOCAL INTELLIGENCE — SINCE 1942 —

Rob Gow Chris Pfauser

13592 Prairie Road, Harbert $2,950,000 | 6bd, 7ba PRICE REDUCED

312 Marquette Drive, New Buffalo $1,750,000 | 3bd, 2ba

JUST LISTED

JUST LISTED

ShorelineAdvice.com 269.612.4104

50 Pocantico Trail, Michiana $975,000 | 3bd, 5ba

PRICE REDUCED

11798 Riviera Drive, New Buffalo $819,000 | 4bd, 3ba

9331 Dunewood Drive, Bridgman $725,000 | 5bd, 3ba

JUST LISTED

JUST LISTED

30 West Buffalo Street | New Buffalo, Michigan 900 North Drive, New Buffalo $619,000 | 3bd, 2ba

102 S Mayhew Street, New Buffalo $525,000 | 4bd, 4ba

16039 Greenwood Avenue, Union Pier $399,000 | 3bd, 3ba


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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

H a r b o r S h o re s Li f e . c o m

Imagine what they’ll remember!

GOLF

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REAL

ES TATE

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M A RIN A

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HOT E L

B e n t o n H a r b o r | S t . J o s e ph

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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

es id R in a r T m a e t S machines working hard toy & big ten your famil h g li En & in a t enter

www.hesston.org

Look for the billboard at CR 1000 North and IN-39 GPS: 1201 East 1000 North LaPorte, IN 46350

Kind words do not cost much. Yet they accomplish much. — Blaise Pascal

PUBLIC NOTICES INVITATION TO COMMENT ON A COMMUNICATIONS FACILITY All interested persons are invited to review and request further environmental processing of an FCC application for a proposed 350-foot (358 feet maximum with appurtenances) self-support communications tower located at 18555 La Porte Road in the Town of New Buffalo, Berrien County, Michigan (approx. 41 – 47 – 04.06N, 86 - 44 – 04.16W). The application may be reviewed by entering the 854 file number A1085113 at this website: www.fcc.gov/asr/applications. Interested persons may raise environmental concerns by filing a “Request for Environmental Review” within 30 days of this publication. The structure will be marked/lighted in accordance with FAA Advisory Circular 70/7460-1 L Change 1, Obstruction Marking and Lighting, a meddual system – Chapters 4,8(M-Dual),&12. Instructions for filing requests are contained on the following website: www.fcc.gov/asr/environmentalrequest. The FCC strongly encourages requests to be filed online; however, written requests may also be sent by mail to the following address: FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554. (#15548-FCC)

SERVICE DIRECTORY

Tom Rossman, Agent 815 E Buffalo New Buffalo, MI 49117 Bus: 269-469-4442 Toll Free: 866-848-5266 www.tomrossman.net State Farm, Bloomington, IL 1211999

WOOD LOOK VINYL PLANKING SNAP TOGETHER FLOATING FLOORS 13 COLORS TO CHOOSE FROM $2.27 SF FULL CARTONS ONLY LET’S DO IT TOGETHER

269-469-8453 Harbor Time Professional Cleaning Services LLC

MAKE OLD LOOK NEW AND NEW LOOK GOOD!

CALL EDDIE THE HOUSE PAINTER FOR YOUR POWER-WASHING NEEDS...

Residential/Commercial Weekly — Daily — Monthly Special Occasions Free Estimates

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Outbuildings, Walkways & More. Also Specializing In Respraying Wicker & Wrought Iron Furniture.

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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

OBITUARIES Allan Howard Boyd

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The family prefers memorial contributions be made in Allan’s memory to: Friends of New Troy, 13372 California Road, New Troy, MI 49119. Arrangements have been entrusted to Pobocik Chapel Wagner Family Funerals, Three Oaks, Michigan  49128. Please share a memory or a message online at www.wagnercares.com.

Cemetery, Michigan City, Indiana. The family prefers memorial contributions be made in Sadie’s memory to: Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health, 705 Riley Hospital Drive, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202. Arrangements have been entrusted to Pobocik Chapel Wagner Family Funerals, Three Oaks, Michigan 49128. Please share a memory or a message online at www.wagnercares.com.

1925-2017

llan Howard Boyd, age 92, of Bridgman, formerly of New Troy, passed away peacefully, Wednesday, July 12, 2017, at his home in the presence and comfort of his family. Allan was born May 8, 1925 in New Troy, Michigan, where he grew up and spent most of his life, the son of William and Jesteena (Waters) Boyd. He married Edith “Jimmy” Johnson on May 15, 1947, and had three children together. He became a Catholic and was a devout Christian all of his life. Allan and his father cofounded “Boyd and Sons Garage” and Allan maintained it until 1967. He became the transportation and maintenance supervisor for Bridgman Public Schools until his retirement. He proudly served as Weesaw Township Supervisor for 27 years. He was also Assessor for both Weesaw and Galien Townships for many years. Allan was passionate about flying and had an appreciation for cars and loved working on them. His wisdom, perseverance and reason will be greatly missed.          Allan is survived by his children: Jan Barton, Brett (Melissa) Boyd; his grandchildren: Jill, Cari, Lori and Carson; his great-grandchildren: Jordan, Calvin, Maison, Kell, Eleanor; his sister Jeanine Krieger; his brother Dean (Ann) Boyd; and several nieces, nephews, and friends; as well as his beloved dog, “Sarge.” He is preceded in death by his parents, his eldest daughter Jamie Hanson, his grandson Christopher Grimes, his brothers Donald and William, and his sisters Donna and Barbara, and his baby sister Jean. Family and friends gathered Monday, July 17 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Pobocik Chapel Wagner Family Funerals, 106 Ash Street East, Three Oaks, MI 49128. The Funeral Mass was held Tuesday, July 18, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. at St Agnes Catholic Church, 5760 Sawyer Road, Sawyer, Michigan 49125.  Allan was laid to rest at New Troy Cemetery, Weesaw Township, Michigan.  Celebrant will be the Reverend Father Van.

Almeda Oak

Sadie Belle Geigler

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2009-2017

adie Belle Geigler, age 7, of Michigan City, passed away Monday, July 10, 2017 in Galien, Michigan. Sadie was born September 17, 2009 in Talladega, Alabama, the daughter of Jason Geigler and Erin LaFollette. Sadie will always be remembered for her contagious laugh.  She was known for just always being such a happy child. Sadie was your typical girlie girl, except with a tom boy twist. There were not many moments you wouldn’t find Sadie dancing. She always dreamed of being a professional dancer when she grew up.  Sadie had a natural ability with animals. She loved her dog, “Sadie.” They were inseparable. Sadie was the only one her horse “Bridgett” would take to. She could ride her horse bareback. Sadie was a member of “The Sister’s Club.”  It is a club she and her sisters, Jessica and Zoe, made just for themselves.  Sadie will be greatly missed by family and friends. She is survived by her parents: Jason Geigler and Erin LaFollette; her sisters: Jessica and Zoe; her brother Jason Jr; her grandparents: Dorothy and Tim Greene, Bob and Donna Geigler, Mary and Jon Reed, Moses and Sharon Moore; her great-grandmothers Sylvia Rayfield and Virginia LaFollette; and a host of uncles and aunts, nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends. Family and friends gathered Tuesday, July 18, 2017 from 6-8 p.m. at Pobocik Chapel Wagner Family Funerals, 106 Ash Street East, Three Oaks, MI 49128. The Funeral was held Wednesday, July 19, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. also at the funeral home.  Pastor Joe Shelton officiated. Sadie was laid to rest in Swan Lake

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1921-2017

lmeda Mae Oak, age 95, of Bethany Beach, Sawyer, Michigan, passed away peacefully on Tuesday, July 11, 2017, in St Joseph, Michigan, in the presence and comfort of her family. Almeda was born November 8, 1921, in Chicago, Illinois, the daughter of Enoch and Alice Stolberg. She will always be remembered for enjoying being with her family as well as all of her close friends. Almeda will be greatly missed. She is survived by her beloved husband Sven; her children: Beverly (Mark) Nichols, George (Rhonda) Lind; her stepchildren: Kristin (Bill) McGregor, Arnie (Laura) Oak; her grandchildren: Tim (Katie), Allison (Mark), Scott (Sherry), Rebecca (Eric), Elin Rose, Will, Alex, Emily, Sam; her 8 great-grandchildren; her 2 great-great-grandchildren; and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends. Almeda is preceded in death by her parents, her first husband Edward Lind, her brother Edward Stolberg. Family and friends gathered Friday, July 14, 2017, from Noon (Michigan time) until the Funeral Service at 2:00 p.m. at Pobocik Chapel Wagner Family Funerals, 106 Ash Street East, Three Oaks, Michigan 49128. The Reverend Jay Fast officiated. Almeda will be laid to rest in Oak Hill Cemetery, Alsip, Illinois. The family prefers memorial contributions be made in Almeda’s memory to: Harbert Community Church, 6444 Harbert Road, Sawyer, Michigan 49125. Arrangements have been entrusted to Pobocik Chapel Wagner Family Funerals, Three Oaks, Michigan 49128. Please share a memory or a message online at www.wagnercares.com.

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William “Bill” Ward

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1931-2017

illiam “Bill” Ward, 85, of Bridgman, and formerly of Sawyer, passed away peacefully on July 9 at his residence in the presence of his family. Bill was born September 1, 1931 in Bald Knob, Arkansas to Rufus and Vera Lee Ward (Harris). He married Louise Nasir on March 1, 1950 in Detroit, Michigan. Bill was a veteran of the Korean War and he retired from the River Valley School District as Head Custodian. Bill will be greatly missed and fondly remembered by his family and all who had the fortunate opportunity to know him. Bill is survived by all his children, Glenn (Kathy) Ward of St. Joseph, Justine (Steve) McNabb of Harbert, Cathy (Marc) Fielding of Union Pier and Joann (Michael) Sepic of Benton Harbor. Bill also leaves behind three grandchildren: David (Sarah) McNabb of Sawyer, Scott (Jada) McNabb of Greer, South Carolina and Brandon (Katie) Danneffel of St. Joseph, along with thirteen great-grandchildren, and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends. He is also survived by his precious companion, Callie the cat. Preceding Bill in death were his wife Louise, six sisters, two brothers, and many close and dear friends. Bill will always be remembered by his family as a very caring father who would not hesitate to reach out to anyone who might benefit from his friendship or help. He loved all wildlife and especially enjoyed watching the birds eating food outside his window that he had placed there every day. Bill was an avid sports fan and enjoyed the Detroit Tigers and Redwings. He was loyal to both teams throughout their peaks and valleys. Family and friends gathered Sunday, July 16, from 3:00 p.m. until 6:00 p.m. in Pobocik Chapel Wagner Family Funerals, 106 Ash Street East, Three Oaks, Michigan 49128. Funeral services were held at St. Mary of the Assumption Catholic Church in Three Oaks at 11 a.m. on Monday, July 17. Bill’s remains will be laid to rest next to Louise at Riverside Cemetery in Three Oaks. The family prefers contributions be made in Bill’s memory to the Humane Society of Southwestern Michigan. Arrangements have been entrusted to Pobocik Chapel Wagner Family Funerals, Three Oaks, Michigan 49128. Please share a memory or a message online at www.wagnercares.com.


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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

CLASSIFIED ADS TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD, PLEASE CONTACT

Please submit your classified ad via email at classifieds@newbuffalotimes.com. New Buffalo Times can now accept online payments with a credit card or paypal. Go to our website, www.newbuffalotimes.com, and submit $10 per week for a classified ad of up to 160 characters. Deadline is Friday 5PM before the following week’s publication.

SALES

ESTATE AUCTION Saturday, July 22nd @10 AM 1211 Bell Rd. New Buffalo Huge estate featuring many tools, computers, electronics, appliances, and much more. Call for details or plan to attend. 269-612-8107

FOR RENT

STORAGE BARN 20 Ft. x 60 Ft. Storage Unit. Pull Thru Bay, 2 – 14 Ft. doors, insulated, renter can heat. $575 per month. State Road 39 Storage. Available July 10. 219-362-8817 NEW BUFFALO Apt. Large 1 bedroom, 1 bath, 2nd floor, water incl. No Smoking, no pets $575/mo. Contact 269-612-2889. NEW BUFFALO House 3 bedroom, 1 bath completely remodeled, all appliances and central air. No smoking. No pets. $875/mo. Contact 269-612-2889.

NEW BUFFALO 2 BOAT SLIPS AVAILABLE 35 Ft. South Cove slip and 30 Ft. Mooring slip. Each slip has full amenities available for the season. Includes; Water, electric, dock box, pool, restrooms with showers and a parking space. Cable and Wi-Fi is also available for a fee. For information, call Tom at 630-638-0608. NEW BUFFALO Live year round in New Buffalo! 2 and 3 bedroom apartments available September 1st.  Large apartments with quiet living.  No pets.  Call for more information.  269-469-1364

FOR SALE

NEW BUFFALO TOWNHOME AND BOAT SLIP Recently updated, 2 Bedroom. 1.5 bath, Roof Top Deck, attch. 1 car garage and a 50 Ft. Boat Slip adjacent to the unit. Located on the harbor, with a gated community, with a community swimming pool. Price Reduced to $268,000. Available immediately. For information or to schedule a showing call 219-796-5514.

4 bedroom home 2 bath. Available until May 13. $1500 with utilities. 269-470-5838.

Home theater, $2500 for set or can split. 4 Palliser Pacifico brown leather reclining seats. Carada 98” screen. Epson 8350 projector <900 hours on bulb. masseje@ yahoo.com

UNION PIER Furnished 3 Br 2 Bath apartment. Updated, hardwood floors, fireplace, central heat and air conditioning. 2 blocks to beach access. New Buffalo Schools $1150 + Utilities Call Diane 312-480-9530

Brown leather Marshall Fields sleeper sofa, $750. 82” x 35” tall x 36” deep. Email for photos. masseje@yahoo.com

NEW BUFFALO 5 bedroom 2 bath home on large wooded lot. Walkable to town and beach. Detached 2 car garage and storage shed. Central heat and air conditioning $1275 + utilities. Call Diane 312-480-9530 UNION PIER 2 bedroom Cottage, unfurnished $975 per month, plus utilities Call 219-898-7512 NEW BUFFALO FURNISHED APARTMENT Brand new on market intimate, peaceful, in downtown New Buffalo putting you in walking distance to the lake, harbor, shops, restaurants and New Buffalo activities. Must see to appreciate the calming beach colors, accents, and retro modern ambiance. Has queen size bedroom for you and full size sleeper sofa in living room for guests. Has Smart TV with Comcast, DVD, blue ray and streaming capabilities, plus high speed internet. Has central heat and air conditioning for your comfort and off street private parking for your convenience (2 vehicles). No smoking, no pets. Weekly rate $1,500, monthly and full summer season negotiable. For information, please call 405-420-2000.

MOBILE HOME 2 Bedrooms w/ a large bath. Fixed Manufactured Home, 1988 Park View Park model. Located in Three Oaks Estate. $5,000 or Best offer. 269-405-0192 (call after 5 p.m.) 5500 WATT GENERAC GENERATOR 11 horsepower, output 230 volts, 110 volts or 12 volts. Generac engine, AC circuit breakers on each circuit. Runs all night on one 5 gal fill of gasoline. Great for contractors or homeowners. Wheels out, air cooled, excellent condition. Made in the USA. New $1,200 asking $500. Call 219-778-2708.

HELP WANTED

CARING DRIVERS WANTED Transport people to pre-scheduled medical appointments in Berrien County and beyond. Must have reliable 4-door vehicle, cell phone and access to internet or fax. Great way to supplement social security, disability or a pension income. (989) 871-2289 GROUNDSKEEPER Garden, lawn, equipment maintenance, supervise crew, security, other duties. 40 hr week April-October. Wages negotiable, paid bi-weekly. Mail resume to Friendship Gardens, PO Box 8834, Michigan City, IN 46361 or email internationalfriendshipgardens @yahoo.com. No phone calls please.

ROOFING AND CONSTRUCTION COMPANY SEEKING FULL TIME ROOFING AND SIDING INSTALLERS AND LABORERS Three years experience and valid drivers license required. Qualifying applicants. Call Sarah at 219-363-6151. LAKESIDE HOUSEKEEPER Seeking an experienced housekeeper one full day per week. Please have local references and be willing to do dishes, laundry, organization etc. Text or call 574-849-7383. FULL/PART-TIME MASSAGE THERAPISTS We are looking for full/part-time massage therapists and nail technicians. Please call 269-469-9111 if you are interested. FULL TIME PAINTER WANTED 10 years minimum experience required. Starting Salary $14.00 per hour. Call Eddie at 269-462-1122. Housekeeper Wanted New Buffalo home, 3 days a week, 4 hours per day, $10 per hour. Assume all household responsibilities. A background check will be required. For information, call Dana 219-847-7777. NEW BUFFALO Lawn Service crew openings. CALL 269-469-2340 WANTED: Live-in couple or a single for long term employment to assist with the household duties. Must speak good English, possess a valid driver’s license, and willing to travel with the couple.Beautiful live-in private quarters, and many benefits.  Serious prospects only to be interviewed. 630-325-7044 or 630-981-1450.

SEEKING EMPLOYMENT

Responsible, compassionate lady looking for caregiver positon. Please call 269-479-5833.

SERVICES

FISH FOR STOCKING Most Varieties For Pond Lakes Call Laggis’ Fish Farm 269-628-2056 DAYS 269-624-6215 EVENINGS. BRIAN’S DETAILING Have a dirty car? Why not have someone come to you. Have your car vacuumed washed and waxed for a shiny sparkling car every time! Call Brian at 219-841-2620 DRAWING CLASSES Ron Ferguson’s Adult Drawing Class. Saturday’s from 2-5p.m. Elsie Earl Studios, 200 W. Buffalo St., New Buffalo. For details visit www.elsieearlstudios.com

Author, bookstore team up to benefit foster kids

B

rothers T.J. Hackworth and Sean Baptist, the author and illustrator of the awardwinning children’s picture book Bedtime for Buzzy, have teamed up with Forever Books to offer a special “Buy One, Give One” promotion running from Saturday, July 29 through the end of August.

For every copy of the critically-acclaimed book that is purchased between July 29 and Thursday, Aug. 31 from Forever Books or from www.bedtimeforbuzzy.com, the publisher will donate a copy for the benefit of a foster child to the Berrien County Department of Human Services. “We are very happy to announce this small way to encourage reading and introduce a fun story to area foster kids and to publicly recognize the extraordinary contributions that Berrien County foster families make,” Hackworth said. The promotion will begin at 1 p.m. July 29, with a book signing and reading of Bedtime for Buzzy with Hackworth at Forever Books. In addition to helping a foster child by purchasing a copy of the book, local families can also consider becoming a licensed foster home themselves. “Here in Berrien County, we have approximately 340 kids in foster care and the majority of those children are placed in our approximately 100 licensed foster homes, so we are always looking for more families that are willing to get licensed,” said Heather Hoffman, a children’s services supervisor with the Berrien County Department of Human Services. In the cleverly-illustrated Bedtime for Buzzy, a young boy is playing with his toys and doesn’t want to go to bed – until he imagines his toys coming to life, one by one, to convince him that going to sleep is the best way to continue his adventures. Bedtime for Buzzy has been honored with a number of awards, including being named a Distinguished Favorite in the Children’s Fiction category of the 2017 Independent Press Awards, a Finalist in the Preschool Picture Books category in the 2017 National Indie Excellence awards, and as an Honorable Mention in both the “Picture Books 5 and Younger” and “Best Illustrations” categories of the 2017 Purple Dragonfly Book Awards competition. These accolades add to the critical acclaim already received by the 28-page, hardcover book, including positive reviews from the Children’s Book Review, Foreword Reviews, Kirkus Reviews and BlueInk Reviews. The book is published by Downtown & Brown Ventures and is available for purchase at www. bedtimeforbuzzy.com. Forever Books is located at 312 State Street in downtown St. Joseph, Michigan. — STAFF REPORTS


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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

HOROSCOPE JULY 20-26, 2017

AS INTERPRETED BY SANDY “STAR” BENDT ARIES MARCH 21—APRIL 19 Are you really doing all you can to better your life experience? Are you being true to your inner needs for optimum health and well being? These are questions only you can answer. Take some time this week, to evaluate how you are treating yourself physically. Honor your body, and honor your soul.

LIBRA SEPTEMBER 23—OCTOBER 22 Make adjustments in your interpersonal relationships. Change it up by disclosing more of your personal feelings and past experiences. This is the time to share more of your life experiences, and reconnect in a way that creates a supportive bond. Open the door to the vault, and share your fears.

TAURUS APRIL 20—MAY 20 You may be questioning yourself as to wether or not you have successfully dealt with issues at home, or wether the changes you instilled at home, created the harmony and peace you had hoped for. There are responsibilities at home that need to be addressed before you can rest this week.

SCORPIO OCTOBER 23—NOVEMBER 21 You will be questioning wether the changes you made in your career, this spring, are really paying off. The new moon this week, will illuminate any authority issues you have, and help you see exactly what is causing your oppositional attitude. Accept and love all aspects of yourself.

GEMINI MAY 21—JUNE 21 In romantic relationships, it is important that you are friends, someone you can socialize with, as well as spend quiet time with. Be true to that need this week, take time to harvest friendship, get out and socialize with your partner. If single, look for a romantic connection through a friend.

SAGITTARIUS NOVEMBER 22—DECEMBER 21 When dealing with higherups this week, pay attention to the details. Don’t just make assumptions or think that the little details will get worked out later. Ask questions, prepare for the “what if’s.” You can ensure a smooth and successful ending by attending to the fine print now.

CANCER JUNE 22—JULY 22 Breakthroughs at work will finally come in this week. Your earning power will be back up and your ability to manage time and people will improve. Cancer has been through many changes this summer and things will finally start to pay off now. Don’t stop pushing for what you want yet.

CAPRICORN DECEMBER 22—JANUARY 19 Situations at home may not turn out the way you had envisioned. You may not be all that happy with the way others are dealing with their commitments or the way they are operating their finances. You can only control you. Let others make their own decisions and don’t take on their issues.

LEO JULY 23—AUGUST 22 Some of your belief systems could be challenged this week. Don’t blow your top if your reality is challenged or if someone doesn’t want to conform to your standards. This is an opportunity for you to move out of your comfort zone and adjust your value system. Utilize your sense of humor to cope.

AQUARIUS JANUARY 20—FEBRUARY 18 Watch the way you communicate your need for support this week. You don’t have to do things alone, and there is no reason why you have to face challenges on your own. Let others help you by communicating in a direct manner that utilizes respect, not manipulations. Let friends be there.

VIRGO AUGUST 23—SEPTEMBER 22 There could be some skeletons falling out of the closet this week. Why not let them escape? Maybe it’s time you let things out, and expose some of your darker feelings. Embrace who you are totally, let all parts of you be exposed to the light. It is our cracks that give us our unique beauty.

PISCES FEBRUARY 19—MARCH 20 Don’t underestimate the value of your ideas or your personal property, this week. Consider what you contribute to a company before accepting a salary that is beneath you. Look at what you bring to relationships before you accept mediocrity from partners. You really have a lot to offer.

PLEASE GO TO WWW.NEWBUFFALOTIMES.COM TO SUBSCRIBE VIA PAYPAL OR CREDIT CARD

New Buffalo Times

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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

EVENTS

CITY OF NEW BUFFALO

POLICE BLOTTER JULY 10-16, 2017 JULY 10 VCSA Open Intoxicants B&E Larceny from Building General Assist JULY 11 OWI Civil Complaint Fingerprints/NBAS Employment False Alarm Retail Fraud JULY 12 NB City Fire/Assist Other Agency JULY 13 Welfare Check General Assist JULY 14 Open Door/Suspicious Situation Civil Dispute/Child Custody General Assist (x2) Warrant Arrest Berrien County Sherriff/Assist Other Agency MDOP Ordinance Violation/Fireworks Complaint Suspicious Situation JULY 15 Suspicious Situation OWI NB City Fire/Assist Other Agency Medic 1/Assist Other Agency CSC 4th Degree General Assist NB City Fire/AEP/Assist Other Agency Civil Dispute (x2) Ordinance Violation/Fireworks Complaint JULY 16 General Assist (x2) Suspicious Situation False Alarm

PLEASE SEND US EVENT INFO TO EVENTS@NEWBUFFALOTIMES.COM . NEW EVENTS EACH WEEK. — COMPILED BY LINDA HENDERSON

DAILY EVENTS NEW BUFFALO TOWNSHIP LIBRARY See weekly library events on page 3.

EVERY MONDAY, WEDNESDAY & FRIDAY TENNIS 9AM-11PM. NBHS Tennis Courts. 1112 W Clay St. New Buffalo. Open play for adults. All levels welcome.

EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SUNDAY OPEN TRAP PRACTICE 6:30-9:30PM. New Buffalo Rod and Gun Club. 10487 Kruger Rd. New Buffalo. Open to the public. Contact Bob Kruger at 269-612-0983.

EVERY WEDNESDAY PIPE ORGAN CONCERT SERIES NOON CST. First Congregational Church. 531 Washington Street. Michigan City. Concerts performed by National organist on an 1891 Roosevelt tracker pipe organ. KNITTING AT THE DELI 4-6PM. David’s Deli. All are welcome. WEDNESDAY NIGHTS IN THE PARK 6-9PM. New Buffalo Township Park. 17425 Red Arrow Hwy. New Buffalo. 269-4691011.www.newbuffalotownship.org. Enjoy live music and food in Memorial Park band shell. Alcohol, smoke and pet free. Food served at 6:30, cash only. Limited parking/car pool suggested. July 26: Keith Scott (Blues) and food by Buffalo Bills.

EVERY THURSDAY NEW BUFFALO’S FARMERS MARKET 5-8PM. East Merchant St. Downtown New Buffalo.

LAST THURSDAY OF THE MONTH THE HARBOR COUNTRY BOOK CLUB 6:30PM. New Buffalo Township Library.

EVERY FRIDAY STORY TIME AT THREE OAKS LIBRARY 10:30AM. www.threeoakslibrary.org.

EVERY SATURDAY & SUNDAY SKIP’S OPEN-AIR EUROPEAN FARMER’S MARKET 9AM-3PM. 16710 Lakeshore Rd. New Buffalo. 269-469-3341. THREE OAKS FARMERS’ MARKET 9AM-PM. 4 N Elm St. Three Oaks. Small farmers offering fresh produce, fresh flowers, plants and many other things.

EVERY SATURDAY YOGA AT THE PARK 9AM. New Buffalo Township Park.

SATURDAY NIGHTS ALIVE 6-8PM. Corner of Whittaker and Merchant Sts. New Buffalo. Live music on the corner. Enjoy jazz country, reggae and more through Labor Day. Presented by the NBBA. MUSIC IN THE PARK 6:30PM. Dewey Cannon Park. Downtown Three Oaks. July 22: Ben Benedict (Bluegrass).

SECOND SUNDAYS OF THE MONTH SECOND SUNDAY CONCERTS 4-5PM Fernwood Botanical Garden. 13988 Range Line Road. Niles. 269-695-6491 www.fernwoodbotanical.org. The Three Divas (vocalist) will perform. Admission is free after 3:30PM.

THURSDAY JULY 20 PETTY BREAKERS 8PM. Acorn Theater. Tickets $30.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, JULY 21-23 BLUE MOON VINTAGE MARKET 10AM-5PM. Blue Moon Vintage Market. 16860 Three Oaks Rd. Three Oaks. 219-851-0900.www.facebook.com/ bluemoonvintagemarket/. Free Admission.

FRIDAY, JULY 21 CORKY SIEGEL & HOWARD LEVY 8PM. Acorn Theater. Tickets $35.

SATURDAY, JULY 22 CELEBRATE CHIKAMING— A COMMUNITY PICNIC NOON-6PM. Harbert Community Park and Township Hall. Red Arrow Hwy. Harbert. 269-635-8620. www.chikamingtownship.org. Adult and kids games, sack races, frisbee toss, dog competition, food, Greenbush Beer, and a live broadcast from Radio Harbor Country, plus hands-on police and fire safety demos. Prizes and more. THE NEWPORTS BLUES • ROCK • SOUL W/OPENER LINSAY & RUSSELL JOHN 8PM. Acorn Theater. Tickets $15.

THURSDAY, JULY 27 WATERWAYS, WETLANDS, AND YOU! LAKE MICHIGAN SHORELINE SPECIAL EDITION 10:30AM. New Buffalo Township Library. 313-226-7495. Presented by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers. This event will focus on shoreline erosion and the regulatory process. There is no fee for the event, but space is limited.  Please direct your RSVP and any questions by telephone or by e-mail to lre_reg_outreach@usace.army.mil.

FRIDAY, JULY 28

MARK NIZER 4D 7PM. Acorn Theater. Tickets are $15 & $25.

SATURDAY, JULY 29

COCKTAILS AT THE GRAND COTTAGE 5-9PM. Grand Cottage. New Buffalo. www.michianahumanesociety.org Tickets: $100 per person.

SATURDAY, JULY 29

MY FAIR LADY—SMSO BEACH CONCERTS 6:30PM, Concert 7:30PM. Shadowland Pavilion, Silver Beach. St. Joseph. Rain Location: St. Joe HS Auditorium. St. Joseph. 269-982-4030. www.smso.org. Tickets: Reserved $25, day of $30. Lawn; Adults $15 of Day of $20. Children $5 (12 & under) $10 day of.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2 CLASSIC CAR SHOW 5:30-8PM. Downtown New Buffalo

THURSDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 3-6

GREAT LAKES GRAND PRIX WEEK 200 Heisman Harbor, Along the Lakefront in Washington Park and Downtown Michigan City. www.superboat.com/2013michigan-city-schedule

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, AUGUST 4-6 LES MIZ/PHANTOM EXCERPTS— HARBOR COUNTRY OPERA 8PM Fri & Sat. 4PM Sun. Acorn Theater. Tickets are $35.  

FRIDAY, AUGUST 4

FIRST FRIDAY’S ART WALK 5-9PM CST. Uptown Arts District. N Franklin St. Michigan City. www.uptownartsdistrict.org. Art galleries, shops and boutiques along N Franklin St. are open until 9PM. JAZZ IN THE VINEYARD W/ JOAN COLLASO & THE LARRY HANKS TRIO    6:30-9PM. Lemon Creek Winery. 533 E Lemon Creek Rd. Berrien Springs. 312282-4486. www.volunteerswmi.org. A Benefit Event for Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children (CASA). Tickets: $50 per ticket, includes: 2 glasses of wine, music throughout the evening and food by Classic Catering and area chefs.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 5

NBYC CORN AND SAUSAGE ROAST 1PM-Midnight. New Buffalo Yacht Club. 500 W Water St. New Buffalo. 269-469-9890. Annual event under the Big Top. Fresh roasted corn, sausage and sides. Jackson Band performs from 2-6PM. The In Like Flynn band performs from 8PM. until midnight. The public is invited.

The information for these events is correct, as of the Tuesday before publication date. Please contact the events listed with any questions. Please send us any events at events@ newbuffalotimes.com. Deadlines are the Fridays before the following week’s publication.


www.newbuffalotimes.com

THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

Pottawattomie Country Club | 1900 Springland Ave | Michigan City, IN 46360 | www.pottawattomie.com

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THURSDAY, JULY 20, 2017

Explore the

beach! Make your day an adventure on a paddleboard or kayak. Outpost Sports has a new fleet of rental boards and sit-in or sit-on-top kayaks waiting for you at our New Buffalo Store. Rent by the hour, day(s) or week. Groups of up to 40 people welcome. Reservations accepted. Lessons available.

We can deliver rental kayaks, paddleboards and bikes to your door for a delivery charge.

Or call, 269.469.4210. St. Joe, MI: Rentals only on Silver Beach

Visit our beach stores in New Buffalo and South Haven and our year-round store in Mishawaka to shop a great selection of bikes, boards, kayaks and beach gear and attire. N E W B U FFALO , M I | 2 69 .4 69 .4 210 S O U TH HAV E N , M I | 2 69 . 6 37.5 5 5 5 M I S HAWAK A , I N | 574 . 259 .10 0 0

Profile for New Buffalo Times

July 20, 2017  

The weekly edition of the NEW BUFFALO TIMES.

July 20, 2017  

The weekly edition of the NEW BUFFALO TIMES.

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