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LIFE ON THE SANDY SHORES, THE FRUITFUL FARMLANDS AND THE MAGNIFICENT VINEYARDS

New Buffalo Times

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CHICAGO • LONG BEACH • MICHIANA SHORES • GRAND BEACH • NEW BUFFALO • UNION PIER • THREE OAKS • LAKESIDE • HARBERT • SAWYER

issue 24, volume 77

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Thursday, June 14, 2018

New Buffalo Township approves bond resolution for Michiana Shores Water Project PAGE 4 Journeyman Distillery’s future hangs in the balance PAGE 5 School board members get Food Services update, discuss tuition rates PAGE 6

Walking with a purpose: One man’s 300-mile walk for charity PAGE 7

Goldberry Woods debuts organic farm stand PAGE 12 NBES students lauded for academic achievements PAGE 15 Healthy Head Space: Let’s talk about suicide PAGE 24

OPEN FOR THE SEASON

FRESH PICKS AT THE MARKET — PAGE 14 —

PHOTO OF THE NEW BUFFALO FARMERS MARKET BY HOLLY SHULMAN


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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

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ETHICS Society of Professional Journalism PROPRIETOR NEW BUFFALO TIMES, INC. PUBLISHER DEE DEE DUHN CONTENT/NEWS EDITOR KRISTIN E. FATOUROS NEW BUFFALO TIMES INTELLIGENCE CREATIVE DIRECTOR JOE DURK REPORTERS AND CONTRIBUTING WRITERS DEE DEE DUHN THERESE DONNELLY LINDA HENDERSON FRANCESCA SAGALA LAWRENCE VON EBELER KURT MARGGRAF ALEXANDER FATOUROS SOPHIA ROSE FATOUROS HOLLY SHULMAN NEW BUFFALO TIMES INTELLIGENCE NEW BUFFALO TIMES POLITICS GUESTS PROOFING FRANCESCA SAGALA BROADCAST/ADVERTISING JANINE ADAMSKI (630) 370-0820 OR JANINEADAMSKI@GMAIL.COM

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DESTINATION: NEW BUFFALO! While the season of bachelor and bachelorette parties never ends, this is certainly a prime time for them in New Buffalo Michigan, the capital of wedding parties! Not only are they coming from Chicago, but from as far away as Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. On one side of Casey’s ice house was a bevy of beauties from Pittsburgh and on the other side of the were handsome young men from Kansas City and Fort Worth. Before long, the future bride and groom were toasting each other. Another wedding party arrived, and it became one big party—all gathered right here in New Buffalo. Soon, the

members of the parties would go their separate ways to different parts of the country to prepare for their glorious days. The New Buffalo Farmers Market started off with a bang! It was definite success, as the all-new Whittaker Street filled with people. This Thursday will be a very special day with the Whittaker Street celebration and ribbon-cutting ceremony starting at 3:30 p.m. Don’t miss it. This will be a perfect way to kick off Father’s Day weekend. Happy Father’s Day to our heroes, our fathers.

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NEW BUFFALO TIMES distribution: Milda’s Corner Market Customs Imports Sawyer Garden Center The Whistle Stop David’s Delicatessen Grand Variety Barney’s Knoll Bros. Stray Dog Infusco Coffee Roasters Black Currant Bakehouse The Marina Grand Redamak’s Outpost Sports Big C Lumber Between Casey’s and Nancy’s Sawyer Hardware The Harbor Grand Froehlics . Three Oaks Journeyman Distillery . Three Oaks The Acorn Theater . Three Oaks The Lakeside Inn . Lakeside

LIBRARY TIDINGS NEWS AND EVENTS

Lyndsey Androstic, Holly James, Dog of Honor: Isabella P C, Bride: Lauren Androstic, Ingrid Voarts

I would like to make the following corrections to your article “Celebrate the new Whittaker Street:” The festivities will kick off at the northwest corner of Mechanic and Whittaker streets, near the new Fritz Olsen-created sculpture. The band’s name is The Patriot Brass Ensemble. The distinction between this name and The Patriot Singers Brass Band, which appears in the paper, is only important since the band members do not sing. Thank you. Diane Pyshos

FREE FOOD FOR LOW INCOME RESIDENTS OF CHIKAMING, THREE OAKS AND NEW BUFFALO TOWNSHIPS

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he New Buffalo American Legion will be hosting Feeding America West Michigan’s mobile pantry truck Friday, June 22, at the legion hall, 19139 US Hwy 12, New Buffalo. The distribution starts at 11 a.m. and is sponsored by The Pokagon Fund. — STAFF REPORTS

TUESDAY, JUNE 19

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

CITY OF NEW BUFFALO DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY (DDA) FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

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he City of New Buffalo in partnership with the New Buffalo DDA is in the final phase of making improvements to the community’s downtown area. This series of FAQs is published to answer questions about the Downtown Streetscape Project. Q: HOW MANY TREES WILL BE PLANTED AND WHERE WILL THEY BE LOCATED? A: A total of 24 trees will be planted. There will be 11 trees from East Buffalo to East Merchant Street; eight trees from East Merchant to East Mechanic; five trees from North Barton to West Mechanic parking lot.

New Buffalo Township approves bond resolution for Michiana Shores Water Project

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LINDA HENDERSON IN NEW BUFFALO TOWNSHIP

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he New Buffalo Township Board unanimously voted to approve the Bond Authorizing Resolution for the Michigan Shores Water Project at a special meeting Wednesday, June 6. The board members voting “yea” were: Supervisor Michelle Heit, Treasurer Jack Rogers and trustees Pete Rahm and Patty Iazzetto. (Clerk Judy Zabicki was absent.) The resolution gives the bond council the authority to sell the bonds that will finance $1,387 of the $1,787,000 Fires Assessment District water main improvement project. Funding will come from property assessments; the Township Replacement Fund, which will pay $120,000; and the Township Water Fund, which will contribute $146,000. The $125,000 that is in the Michiana Escrow Fund will also go toward the project. New Buffalo Township bond sales are being represented by Tom Traciak, a financial consultant from Umbaugh & Associates of Lansing Michigan, and attorney Ron Liscombe of Miller Canfield of Detroit. The bonds will be sold June 21, 2018. Prior to the sale, an official financial statement on the township’s financial picture was necessary. Zabicki stated that earlier this week, Standard and Poor’s issued an AA-plus rating for the township, which she said “was an excellent rating.” No other business was conducted at the meeting.

USACE awards New Buffalo $275,000 for dredging, beach revetment

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Lions golf outing coming next week

LINDA HENDERSON IN NEW BUFFALO

hings are looking up for the New Buffalo Shoreline Alliance (NBSA) and the beach re-nourishment program. On Monday afternoon, June 11, County Commissioner Ezra Scott reported that he had received a “good news” call from his contact in Washington, D.C. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) had just approved $275,000 for dredging and beach revetment in New Buffalo. This amounts to approximately 50,000 to 60,000 cubic yards of sand being dredged, which will be available to replenish the beaches south of the New Buffalo harbor break wall. Details on what exactly will be done are still in the planning stages, but sand will be dredged or pumped and placed on the southern beaches, which currently are under water. Also on Monday, Congressman Fred Upton announced that the USACE released their update Fiscal Year 2018 Work Plan that allocates more funds for recreational harbor dredging in Southwest Michigan. In addition to New Buffalo, Suagatuck Harbor/Kalamazoo River is to receive $375,000, and South Haven Harbor is to receive $365,000; St. Joseph Harbor has already been allocated $765,000 for commercial An example of a Stredkeeper dredging. Honeylocust is pictured below and The New Buffalo Shoreline Alliance’s larger plan is to hopefully receive funding from two of these trees will be planted at the East Mechanic and North the USACE Great Lakes Fishery and Ecosystem Restoration (GLFER) to build a rock wall Whittaker bump-outs, one on each out in the lake to provide a fish habitat and long-term wave protection for the southern side of the street. The third tree beaches. Letters of intent were submitted to GLFER by the City of New Buffalo willWhittaker be planted nearStthe 30 N • parking Open Daily shoreline and by New Buffalo Township. Scott learned that the project is on the October agenda lot by the pharmacy to soften the for the GLFER Board. He stated that normally a request of this type takes three to four appearance of the parking lot. years to be reviewed by the board, but with the help of the US Department of the Interior, the project is being heard 62 days following the receipt of the letters of intent and the request. “Things are really looking up,” Scott said. Scott and the New Buffalo Shoreline Alliance have been diligently working to get federal aid to protect the New Buffalo water pump house and the shoreline from New Buffalo to Grand Beach, which have all been seriously eroded since the installation of the New Buffalo harbor break wall in 1975. Storms and record high water levels, along with the absence of beach replenishment, have all contributed to the erosion problem, which was forecast in 1975 by the USACE. In February 2018, Scott, New Buffalo Shoreline Alliance President Ted Grzywacz, founding member Ed Oldis and Greg Weykamp, president of Edgewater Resources, were in Washington DC for a series of meetings to address the shoreline and pump house issues. They presented the issues and several remedies and asked for federal assistance with the project. Since that meeting, Scott has been in constant contact with the Pentagon and with the governor’s office in Michigan and with Congressman Upton’s office, and positive progress 30 N Whittaker St is being made. Further developments will be reported as soon as they are available. Oldis stated that the he, Scott and Grzywacz have met personally with Upton and Open Daily he expressed his thanks to Upton and his staff for helping to secure the USACE funds for New Buffalo harbor and beachfront. “This is very exciting news. We are getting something done,” he said.

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The New Buffalo Lions Club will host its annual golf outing Wednesday, June 20, at Whittaker Woods Golf Course. Check in is 7:30 a.m. The outing will begin at 8:30 a. m., with a four-man scramble, shot-gun start. There will be a luncheon following golf, with door prizes and awards for best flight winners, skins, closest to hole and longest putt. Chair Pete Rahm said, “We are asking local golfers to help support our community vision program. The vision assistance program helps to provide eye exams and glasses for Harbor Country residents who don’t qualify for The Pokagon Fund Vision Grant. This year, we have already helped several individuals in the community. Without the Lions Club’s assistance, they would not have been able to afford glasses. With our assistance, they are able to continue to drive and continue to be employed.” Enjoy a day on the course and support your community. Proceeds raised at the outing will stay in the Harbor Country community. The outing is $75 per player. For reservations and information, call Rahm at 219617-0654. Whittaker Woods Golf Course is located at 12578 Wilson Road in New Buffalo. — LINDA HENDERSON

‘Chair Affair’ to mark Neighbor by Neighbor’s first year

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eighbor by Neighbor will celebrate its first successful year of connecting Harbor Country residents to social services with a fundraiser, “Chair Affair,” from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, June 28, at Church of the Mediator, 14280 Red Arrow Highway, Harbert. One-of-a-kind chairs have been repainted, restored or reupholstered by local artists and will be auctioned off. Tickets are $20 each and space is limited. Call Neighbor by Neighbor at 269231-0648 to purchase tickets. All proceeds will support the continued work of Neighbor by Neighbor. — STAFF REPORTS

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Homeowners warned about forest tent caterpillars

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orest tent caterpillars are making a nuisance of themselves across Michigan, eating leaves from sugar maple, aspen and oak trees and leaving small strands of webbing as they go. The insects, which are native to Michigan, occur in widespread outbreaks every 10 to 15 years. The most recent outbreaks peaked in 2002 and 2010. They’ve been spotted across the Lower Peninsula and in the eastern Upper Peninsula. Outbreaks usually last two or three years; this is the second or third year for outbreaks in some areas. An infestation of forest tent caterpillars rarely is fatal unless a tree has other stresses, said Scott Lint, forest health specialist with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources’ Forest Resources Division. “The larvae begin feeding on new leaves in spring, and can strip the leaves from a tree,” Lint said. Many people also are seeing “tents” of web in trees; however, one shouldn’t confuse the forest tent caterpillar with a similar pest, the eastern tent caterpillar. That one creates tents in black cherry, apple and other fruit trees. Eastern tent caterpillars are dark-colored with a light-colored stripe, rather than dots. They create localized silk tents that encase a portion of a tree, but never enclose leaves. “Its impact is minimal, but everybody sees the tents from alongside the road,” Lint said about eastern tent caterpillars. Forest tent caterpillars are dark-colored with pale spots. They spin silken threads but do not form an actual tent. They will gather in large colonies on the trunk of the tree when not feeding. Large caterpillars often will wander in search of more food as they completely strip a tree. Caterpillars will spin a yellow cocoon in mid-June, and mass flights of moths can occur in late June and early July. Adult moths do not feed, but mate and die within a few weeks after laying eggs. Eggs overwinter until spring, when they hatch. The forest tent caterpillar does have natural diseases, predators and parasites, including the large, slow-moving “friendly fly,” which lays its eggs on caterpillar cocoons, preventing them from developing into adult moths. These natural agents eventually will respond and bring the outbreak under control. Homeowners with trees that have been heavily defoliated should make sure those trees receive at least one inch of water per week during the growing season. Applying a slow-release tree fertilizer in the fall also will help trees recover quickly and prepare them for any defoliation that might occur next summer. Learn more about caterpillars and other insects that threaten Michigan’s trees at michigan.gov/foresthealth. — STAFF REPORTS

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JOURNEYMAN DISTILLERY’S FUTURE HANGS IN THE BALANCE

ourneyman Distillery will be able to continue business uninterrupted for at least a little longer. A cease and desist order from the Village of Three Oaks originally would have required the Three Oaks business to cease alcohol production to stop Friday, June 8; however, during the Village’s June 6 Downtown Development Authority (DDA) meeting, Village President David Grosse and Village Manager Mike Greene said no action would be taken until the Village Council’s regular June 13 meeting. Journeyman Distillery has been operating in the village since 2010, but village officials have said the business’ 2015 expansion has overwhelmed the village’s sewage system. Increased chemical discharge has reportedly caused the bacteria in the lagoons to drop. Without the bacteria to break down waste, the water is not being cleaned for discharge. The village has taken measures to reduce the sludge levels for discharge but has not been entirely successful. Journeyman owner Bill Welter agrees his business has increased its discharge but has challenged the claim that this is the root of the lagoon issues. At the DDA meeting, he quoted articles from the Herald-Palladium referring to sewer issues as early as 2004. Grosse said the issues referred to in the article were not the same issues the village is now dealing with at the lagoon. During the DDA meeting, several residents spoke in support of Journeyman, while acknowledging village officials had difficult decisions to make to resolve the matter. Welter has also noted that, when Journeyman first opened, there was no mention of the village’s ordinance limiting discharge into the municipal sewer system. If enforced, the cease and desist would only halt alcohol production at Journeyman, but Welter has noted if production halts, the catering and onsite restaurant aspects of the business would also have to halt. — THERESE DONNELLY

Senate committee approves LaSata plan to protect sexual assault victims

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ast week, the Senate Judiciary Committee unanimously approved state Rep. Kim LaSata’s bill expanding the 24-hour OK2SAY hotline to include reporting on sexual abuse, assault and rape. “The recent Larry Nassar scandal, along with the testimony from his survivors, illustrated that Michigan must open up the avenues of communication to victims of sexual offenses,” said LaSata, who co-chaired a House inquiry into the recent Larry Nassar scandal. “OK2SAY has proven itself to be an exceptional tool for children who are bullied, hear about threats to their schools and anyone who witnesses a drug deal. A sexual assault survivor may feel a lot of emotions, but they should not feel like they have no way of reporting a vicious crime against them.” OK2SAY was introduced as a method of reporting criminal activity at school in a confidential way; however, it has it has been expanded to include other crimes and has received 10,734 reports through December 2017. LaSata’s House Bill 5539 received unanimous support by the Senate panel, joining a landmark bipartisan plan to increase protections to Michigan’s residents in the wake of the Nassar sex abuse scandal. “This legislation will protect children on college campuses and in our own neighborhoods,” said LaSata, of Bainbridge Township. “The Nassar inquiry really identified the many ways we can step up Michigan’s protections, while also identifying sexual predators, increasing penalties against their illegal behavior and helping survivors. The committee’s vote makes us one step closer to making Michigan safer.” — STAFF REPORTS

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

CHALK BOARD scholastics

School board members get Food Services update, discuss tuition rates

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BY FRANCESCA SAGALA

ew Buffalo Area Schools Board of Education members got an update on how students within the district get their daily nutritional fueling at their Monday, June 11, meeting. Food Service Director Patty Iazzetto was present to give a brief presentation on the Food Service Department. Currently, she said the district manages 702 food service accounts (which includes both students and adults). She added that they do 32 daily preschool snacks. For average daily participation, she said that 219 students participate in their breakfast program, while 328 students participate in the district’s lunch program. Out of the 618 students who are enrolled, 43 percent are eligible for a free and reduced lunch while 57 percent pay the full price. The district’s Food Service Department is comprised of Iazzetto and 12 employees. Iazzetto said that the department’s largest source of revenue are other funds and state and federal reimbursement. She said they spend the majority of their funds on food costs and wages and benefits. Iazzetto added that the department participates in a few Child Nutrition Programs: The School Breakfast Program, the National School Lunch Program, the Afterschool Snack Program and the Summer Food Service. In addition, they also participate in National School Lunch Week as well as do special meals throughout the year, such as the elementary school’s Muffins with Mom and Donuts with Dad and a special meal on Veterans Day. In addition to providing nutrition to students, Iazzetto said that the department was also concerned with food safety. She said that they’ve installed a temperature monitoring system on the freezers and coolers. When the city had a water boil advisory in April, she said they delivered cases of water throughout the district. Board members approved the 2018-2019 student lunch prices: $2.60 for the elementary school (which was $2.50 last school year) and $2.85 for the middle/high school (which was $2.75 last school year). Also at the meeting, board members did a second reading of and adopted the following board policies: #0140 - Membership/0143.1 - Public Expression of Board Members; #1421/3121/4121 - Criminal History Record Check; #4162 - Controlled Substance and Alcohol Policy for Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) Drivers and Other Employees Who Perform Safety Sensitive Functions; #5111 Eligibility of Resident/Nonresident Students; #7540.02 - Web Accessibility, Content, Apps and Services; #8321 - Criminal Justice Information Security (Non-Criminal Justice Agency); #7530 Lending of Board-Owned Equipment; #7530.02

- Staff Use of Personal Communication Devices; #7542 - Access to District Technology Resources and/or Information Resources from Personal Communication Devices; and #7543 - Utilization of the District’s Website and Remote Access to the District’s Network. Board members approved an additional work period of three days (22.75 hours), during the summer, for Melissa Lijewski, the district’s Title One director. Superintendent Dr. Jeffrey Leslie explained that the work period would allow for Lijewski to prepare for the myriad tests that students needed to take before they arrived for a new school year. Board members accepted, with regret, the resignation of JoAnn Wilson, a district bus driver. Ed Lijewski, director of transportation and technology, said that they were always looking for bus drivers. Board members accepted the resignation of Donn Edwards, Performing Arts Center Director, who will be retiring. Leslie said he will be staying on for the annual summer NightBlue performances. Board members accepted a fuel bid from Rackham Services in Niles, Michigan, to provide fuel products for the 2018-2019 school year. Board members approved the bid from Linear Electric, Inc., in the amount of $33,809.37, for the Elementary Parking Lot Project. The recently approved parking lot site plan will include a net gain of 33 parking spaces as well as parent and bus drop-off loops to eliminate vehicle congestion during drop-off and pick-up times. Also at the meeting, board members discussed district tuition rates for tuition students. Currently, Leslie said the rates are set at $5,000 per student and at $2,500 per student if they have a family who owns a business or who has land within the district. Leslie said he was concerned about attracting more students and families to the district, as they received less than 10 applicants for the second School of Choice window, which is ending this week. Trustee Lisa Werner suggested looking into other districts to see how they handled tuition rates. Leslie did say that, compared to surrounding districts, their rates were lower. Also part of the discussion was class sizes. Currently, Leslie said that the high school had approximately 15 students per class. Meanwhile, the elementary school had around 20 students per class. Leslie said that they’ve received 22 applicants for the position of high school English teacher (board members accepted the resignation of Matt Remmo at their last meeting), and that he should have a recommendation for them at their next board meeting.

ARENA sports

From the Bleachers COLUMN BY KURT MARGGRAF IN CHICAGO

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he hockey season ended with the Washington Capitals defeating the Las Vegas Golden Knights four games to one. The great Alex Ovechkin won his first Stanley cup, as did the Capitals, so it was a feel-good story, but if the Golden Knights had emerged victorious, it may have been the biggest story ever. Last year at this time, Las Vegas didn’t have any players. They chose unprotected players off of other teams’ rosters, players who were getting old, or had high salaries, or weren’t deemed worthy of protecting, and put together a team that played better than any expansion team ever in any sport. The fact that they were playing for the Cup was a minor miracle, and they are now my second favorite team in the N.H.L. The basketball season also came to a close this week with the Golden State Warriors defeating the Cleveland Cavaliers in four straight games. The two teams played for the championship for the fourth straight year, and the Warriors won for the third time. The Cavaliers have the best player of his generation, LeBron James, and little else, while the Warriors are loaded with great players, so the outcome was not surprising. Let’s hope the rest of the league can catch up to these two teams next season. The football season has yet to begin, but when it does, I’ll be as excited as I’ve been in many years. The Bears new coaching staff promises to take the team out of the past and into the future with an exciting new offense, and the defense should also improve. The Bears’ division, which includes Minnesota, Green Bay, and Detroit, is extremely good right now so I’m not sure if the Bears will compete for a championship, but I’m sure they’ll be much better and a lot more fun to watch. In horse racing, Justify became the 13th triple crown winner by winning the Belmont. Justify jumped out to the lead and never looked back. He’s a big horse in stature as well as heart and is a deserving champion. I have a feeling it’s going to be a long time until we see another triple crown winner. With all of the other major sports in their off seasons, it’s time for baseball to take center stage. The Cubs have 100 games left in their season, and right at this moment, they are playing like they did in 2016, the year they were champions. After starting the season indifferently, the Cubs have turned it around, winning nine of their last twelve to climb to within one half game of the leagueleading Brewers. On the other side of town, the White Sox just beat the Red Sox two out of three and seem to be getting better. The Sox started the season playing very poorly, but lately they have shown signs that their rebuild is starting to pay off. Here’s hoping both teams can make this an excellent summer. Won’t it be wonderful if sometime in the near future there’s a city series in Chicago? Groucho Marx said, “She got her looks from her father. He’s a plastic surgeon.” Hope all you Dads out there have a happy Father’s Day. Make good choices. Keep smiling. Talk to you next week. Peace, love, and happiness.


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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

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Walking with a purpose ONE MAN’S 300-MILE WALK FOR CHARITY

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BY HOLLY SHULMAN IN NEW BUFFALO

aul Binder is putting one foot in front of the other on a very long walk for a very worthy cause: to cover 300 miles in 30 days to benefit the ongoing missions of Fraternite Notre Dame. Binder is on his third pair of hiking shoes since starting his training. He took the first official step on June 1 at the Indiana /Michigan border. He’s trekking his way north along the Lake Michigan shoreline to finish at the town of Northport, Michigan. To achieve his distance goal, he keeps a pace of 10-12 miles per day, depending upon terrain and energy. His route follows the lakeshore via mostly beaches and beach roads. Some days are tougher than others. One day he had to climb straight up a bluff, because the beach he was walking on eventually disappeared. Binder travels light, with just a 32-ounce water bottle, sunscreen, Advil, Cliff Bars, mosquito repellent and 5-Hour Energy in his backpack. At 64 years old, Binder is enjoying his journey. He says he’s always been an outdoor enthusiast, from hiking the Grand Canyon to competing in triathlons, including Ironman. Binder is walking with a purpose, as he’s raising money for Fraternite Notre Dame’s two missions: one feeds the poor and homeless on the west side of Chicago and another supports children in Haiti who are in need of shoes. His goal is to raise $10,000. As of this writing, he is close to $4,200 and is approaching Lake Macatawa near Holland, Michigan. The public can donate $1 per mile or as much as they want to help out the missions. The easiest way to donate is online at firstgiving.com/ event/413898/paul-binder-charitywalk.

Paul Binder walking to make a difference

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

WE STAND WITH THE LGBTQ COMMUNITY

WE ARE

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

T NBYC sailors burn their socks to welcome summer

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LINDA HENDERSON IN NEW BUFFALO

om Smith, New Buffalo Yacht Club commodore of sail, brought back an old-time tradition, the Burning of the Socks, Saturday, June 9, following the Blessing of the Fleet at the New Buffalo Yacht Club. Members and guests, led by NBYC Commodore Dana Hybl, gathered on the patio to shed their winter socks and welcome bare feet and summer, despite the drizzly conditions. Boaters and landlubbers alike threw their winter socks into a fire pit, lit the socks and toasted the beginning of the summer season. The Burning of the Socks tradition began in 1978 in the Annapolis, Maryland, harbor boat yard, where owner Bob Turner had survived a long winter working on boats and shaving aluminum. One day that spring, he procured a 12 pack of Budweiser long-necks and invited his employees to join him. He told them, “I’m burning my socks. It’s time to move on and go sailing.” Turner then tossed his socks into a paint tray, soaked them in flammable adhesive remover and lit them on fire. Passersby stopped and got into the spirit of summer and donated their socks in exchange for a cold beer. Over the years, the ritual spread along the East Coast, the Gulf and into the Great Lakes and West Coast. Chicago has the White Sox and Boston has the Red Sox. With spring having sprung and boating season in full swing, sailors are burning their own winter socks. Sailors everywhere now say, “It’s a celebration. We take off our socks and get ready for summer.” Many sailors and boatyard workers consider socks annoying wintertime wear, as they prefer to spend warmer months bare-toed inside their deck shoes. So, at marinas and yacht clubs around the U.S. in the springtime and early summer, they get together to immolate them. Up in flames go the red socks, argyle socks, white socks, black socks, and grimy-grayish socks. At the annual events, poetry may be read, cold drinks are consumed and music is played, all while sailors try not to burn themselves in the process of avoiding wearing socks until the next snow flies. At the inaugural Burning of the Socks event at the Yacht Club, Hybl recited the following poem to commemorate the day as everyone cheered the flaming socks and welcomed another summer boating season; Goodbye to winter, Only deck shoes we wear! For the socks we are burning, Leave a stink in the air! Ron Donkersloot sets the fire

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Blessing of the Fleet held at NBYC LINDA HENDERSON IN NEW BUFFALO

he New Buffalo Yacht Club continued to pay honor to an age-old tradition with the harbor side Blessing of the Fleet Saturday, June 9. With rain coming down, members, guests and fellow boaters gathered in the club to hear an invocation and a prayer given by pastor Jeff Dryden of Converge Community Church in New Buffalo and Sawyer Highlands Church in Sawyer. Dryden began with a biblical reference to the old and new Testament. He referenced the story of Jonah and the whale. Jonah was an Israelite whom God had called to be a prophet but who refused to accept his divine mission and left on a sea voyage instead. God then raised a great storm as a sign of his anger with Jonah. The sailors, realizing that Jonah’s disobedience had caused the storm, threw him overboard in an attempt to save their ship. Jonah was saved from drowning when he was swallowed by a “great fish.” He lived for three days inside the creature, after which the fish “vomited out Jonah upon the dry land.” Thankful that his life had been spared, Jonah took up his prophetic mission. Dryden said that it was a good lesson for all to obey the commandments of God. He then offered a prayer for His mercy and His kindness for all. Dryden offered a prayer for all who enjoy the beauty of the harbor, the river and Lake Michigan and for all who set out upon the Great Lake, which at times can be quite turbulent. He offered thanks for every season and he thanked God for His creation: “Bless these waters and all that set sail upon them. Grant them wisdom and grant them protections. Grant them the ability to help one another and grant them friendship and respect in the community.” He prayed for everyone’s blessing and for calm storms on Lake Michigan and in each and everyone’s life journeys. In closing, Dryden asked that everyone be kind to one another and rejoice in their good fortunes.

Commodore Dana Hybl with Pastor Jeff Dryden

One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors -Plato


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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

Whittaker Street scoops FINISHING TOUCHES GO INTO WHITTAKER; DEDICATION IS THURSDAY, JUNE 14

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he finishing touches are going down on Whittaker, Merchant and Mechanic Streets in preparation for the Thursday, June 14 dedication of the North Whittaker Street Redevelopment Project. Monday, the rain held off and artist Fritz Olsen and his crew were busy setting the pedestal and sculpture at the northwest corner of Whittaker and Mechanic Street. The installation took approximately two hours to get everything perfectly level and perfectly mounted. The activity attracted many curious sight-seers who stopped to watch the meticulous installation. Mayor Lou O’Donnell IV, Councilman Mark Robertson and Bobby Spirito were also on site to witness the raising of the yet-to-be-named piece, which honors the Pokagon Band of the Potawatomie Indians. The limestone sculpture will be unveiled and blessed by Tribal member Marcus Winchester at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 14, preceding the ribbon cutting ceremony for the street project. This 4.3 million Downtown Redevelopment Project was made possible, in part, due to a generous $1.6 million grant from The Pokagon Fund. Following the dedication at Whittaker and Mechanic Streets, those attending will parade to the new Town Square at Merchant and Whittaker St. for the street celebration, which will include speeches, give-away momentos, treats, entertainment, a photo both and fun. Following the town celebration, the New Buffalo Farmer’s Market will open at it’s new location, along N. Whittaker Street. Merchant Street is now open and additional new parking places are identified. Merchant St. is now one-way off of Whittaker Street with traffic being routed west in front of Brewster’s Cafe and east along New Buffalo Savings Bank. Handicap Accessible parking is available at the corner of Merchant st. alongside the Villager store. The new street plan has added a total of 50 new parking places; there are parking lots on Barton and Mechanic St. and The Stray Dog has sponsored the free parking lot at Whittaker and Buffalo Street. Downtown parking is free, but limited to three hours from Memorial Day to Labor Day. Throughout the week the Pajay crews and Reith / Riley have been busy finishing the asphalt concrete work and striping the roadway along with restoration and clean-up details. The new light fixtures are still awaiting finishing work and the final inspection by AEP and the overhead wiring crossing Whittaker Street at Merchant and Mechanic Street are still to be removed by AEP. Activation is expected during the second week of

June, and until that occurs temporary lighting will remain in place. Please refrain from chaining bikes to the new light poles, new bike rack will be installed soon. The final coat of asphalt was laid on Whittaker Street, Merchant and adjoining intersections on Monday, June 4, and the street reopened to vehicles and parking early in the evening. Whittaker Street opened with flair on Memorial Day weekend, as it was showcased for the start of the summer season and it was the jewel of the busy weekend. Residents and visitors oohed and aahed as they enjoyed walking and visiting the nearly completed, eight month development and beautification project. The first coats of asphalt were laid by Reith and Riley on Saturday, May 19, and to the joy of everyone, the newly paved street opened to traffic on Saturday evening. The following week, May 21, numerous crews again worked into the evening hours to add the finishing touches to to the streetscape. The final trees were planted, landscape plantings were completed, aggregate walk-thru areas were poured, concrete detailing was completed and the furnishings were put in place. The new street and wide sidewalks are receiving rave reviews from most everyone. True to the City Council’s, Abonmarche and Pajay Constructions promise, to be substantially completed by Memorial Day, the 4.6 million dollar Whittaker Street Redevelopment Project Phase II & III is nearly completed, after 34 weeks of the Phase II/III construction project. The busy holiday weekend, with near perfect weather, found the sidewalks filled with people, the beautiful benches occupied and N. Whittaker Street flowing with beach, boat, shopping and dining traffic. Although not an official part of the Whittaker Street Redevelopment Project, the road crews from Reith Riley Construction were working late into the evening hours Wednesday, May 23, finishing Oselka Drive and Water Street, just as they had worked late the previous weekend to asphalt N. Whittaker and W. Merchant Street. Oselka Drive and Water Street, which were both in need of reconstruction and resurfacing, were part of the City Street Resurfacing Program 2018; the new roadways certainly enhance the finished N. Whitaker Street Project and the downtown area. Excitement was in the air all weekend, all about town. People commented that the beautiful new street, and streetscape, along with many noticing the elimination of overhead electrical wires, which opened up the views to the town jewel, Lake Michigan, even more than

previously. Overhead wiring crossing Whittaker Street at Merchant Street is still to be removed and rerouted underground in the coming weeks. The street was lined with parallel parked cars, whose drivers were enjoying breakfast, shopping the now accessible stores and strolling along the new, roomy 16 foot wide sidewalks. Please keep in mind that, while construction appears complete in some places, most of Whittaker and Merchant are still active construction areas, so be aware of your surroundings. May was a busy month of finishing the details. During the week of May 14 brick pavers were installed on the east and west sides of the intersection, the Town Center, at Merchant and Whittaker Streets. The glass light fixtures were installed on the new silver poles. All of the overhead wiring along N. Whittaker has been replaced with underground feeds, which now allows for clear views to Lake Michigan. During the week of May 14 and 21, new trees were installed along N. Whittaker; their installation was followed by the planting of perennials and native grasses to enhance the streetscape. Please appreciate the new landscaping and do not walk through the newly planted areas. Streetscape amenities, wall veneer installation on raised areas and furnishing were installed along the streetscape, some veneer work is still needed to be finished. . The city reminds the merchant and restaurants that there is a City “Streets and Sidewalks” ordinance (Section 18-1) which, “prohibits placing any obstructions on any sidewalk, street, alley, lane, or public grounds within the City, which shall in any manner prevent or obstruct the full and free passage of the whole or any part thereof.” Please comply with this prohibition until such time as the downtown pedestrian traffic flow can be studied or a new sidewalk ordinance is adopted. Work Anticipated, Week of 06/11/2018: (Please note the outlook below is approximate): Utility companies will continue removing overhead wiring on Merchant Street; concrete work for sidewalks will continue on the north side of East Merchant St. and where needed off of Whittaker Street; East Merchant Street may be closed intermittently between Whittaker and Thompson where sidewalk and crosswalk work is being completed; Concrete crosswalk to be installed at Buffalo intersection. Please keep off newly poured concrete, do not deface surfaces. Also to be completed are final paving and striping, and signage installation, and final clean-up The Pine tree which was located at the corner of Mechanic and N.

Whittaker Streets was removed on Wednesday morning, May 2 to make way for the new sculpture by Fritz Olsen, that is planned to honor the Pokagon Band. The former Christmas tree has been reinstalled at the Transient Marina.Most of the outdoor furnishings have been delivered and placed along the streetscape. The Downtown Development Authority (DDA) has chosen outdoor cafe seating and the City Council approved the purchase at a special meeting on Friday, June 1. The outdoor cafe seating will soon be installed for those designated areas. The installation of the underground conduit is completed on North Whittaker Street and on East and West Merchant. The individual conduit lines will service electric feeds for the light fixtures and the other conduit lines will provide for the irrigation system to service the landscape areas. Although not a part of the N. Whittaker Street Redevelopment Project plan, Amtrak replaced the railroad crossing on N. Whittaker Street, which resulted in a full street closures during the week of April 16 and the first part of the following week. The new crossing was open to traffic on Tuesday, April 24. One may notice some areas where the sidewalk slopes and are set back from the outer sidewalk by retaining walls. Those areas have been carefully engineered to provide ADA access to all shops and restaurants along the streetscape, which naturally slopes downward toward the lake. Previously many of the buildings had steps at their entrances, which made it difficult for those with disabilities to enter them; most of the stepped-up entryways have been eliminated in this project. When possible during the final week of completion, North Whittaker Street and the sidewalks will remain open and passable for vehicles and pedestrians. Abonmarche thanked everyone for their cooperation and patience. At a recent public meeting, they stated, “We will continue to work with residents and businesses to the extent feasible to minimize disruptions, we ask for your cooperation and patience as we work to complete this exciting project for New Buffalo.” The city council awarded Nature’s Way the landscaping contract on Feb 20. The irrigation system work is completed, trees have been planted and additional landscaping was installed this past week. Nature’s Way will maintain all the new planting. The boat ramp parking lot has been cleared of the sand and dirt pile that remained from the downtown street brick deposit. The old street bricks were previously offered, for the taking, to area residents. The majority of the good bricks were quickly taken, leaving


www.newbuffalotimes.com Streets. This work will not only result in the much needed replacement of water and sewer lines, but will result in an entirely new streetscape for the downtown. The Pokagon Fund provided a $1.6 million dollar grant toward the project. The City Council approved going for bid on Phase III of the project at their January 16, 2018 council meeting. Phase III includes the amenities package, such as benches, bike racks, waste receptacles and trees and landscaping.Pajay crews scooped their first shovels-full of asphalt and dirt from North Whittaker Street Phase II on Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017. The project was expected to be substantially complete for Memorial Day weekend activities in 2018, and it was. The crews strived to keep the roadway open, where possible, after construction hours and on weekends. Parking on adjacent streets was developed to serve the downtown area while N. Whittaker Street was impacted due to construction and to accommodate the overflow seasonal needs. Parking is available on N. Barton Street, at the Barton and W. Mechanic Street parking lot, on East and West Mechanic Street and at the city lot on the corner of Buffalo and N. Whittaker Street and on N. Thompson Street. Threehour parking is now available on N. Whittaker Street. All construction schedules are subject to change without notice due to weather, underground issues, and other unforeseen circumstances. For further information go to www. cityofnewbuffalo.org. — COMPILED BY LINDA HENDERSON, ABONMARCHE AND THE CITY OF NEW BUFFALO

FRIENDSHIP BOTANIC GARDENS PRESENTS MOONLIGHT IN THE GARDENS BALL

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riendship Botanic Gardens is presenting its 3rd annual fundraising event in the Stardust Grand Ballroom at Blue Chip Casino in Michigan City, Ind. from 6:00-10:00 p.m. CDT on June 16, 2018. This will be a celebration of our rich legacy and a preview of plans for our successful future. The Moonlight in the Gardens Ball will include appetizers, cocktails, a formal dinner, and ​silent and live​auctions. Highlights in the evening include a live orchestra and guest speaker Mayor Ron Meer of Michigan City. During the live auction, two mystery blockbuster packages will be up for grabs. In order to continue our rejuvenation and revitalization of the Gardens, we need support from dedicated sponsors. All proceeds from the event contribute to the continued restoration and maintenance of the historic 105 acres of Friendship Botanic Gardens. This will allow us to grow towards our goal of becoming the region’s destination for community members, enabling us to further our mission of “creating a nature-filled sanctuary for all people, as we enrich our community through cultural, educational, and social events." For further information please contact 219 878 9885 or info@ friendshipgardens.org. — STAFF REPORTS

Kind friend, It matters little to more likely Zero your Opinion of me, only the wise can judge me -Dino

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R U O SS H E C 24 C A

behind the broken and partial bricks in a large pile of dirt and sand. The redevelopment plan called for the sanitary sewer to be laid in the middle of the street, the new water service main lines are on the west side of the street, with lateral lines connecting to the east side. And the storms sewers are run along the east side of N. Whittaker Street. Phase II work continued throughout the month of March, April and May with the replacement of gas lines and the burying of the electrical lines, which has been completed, except for the lines traversing Merchant Street at Whittaker. New curbs and retaining walls were also installed. In April and May crews completed the curb and sidewalk installations and perform the final site grading and installed light pole foundations. In May new light fixtures were installed. Final roadway paving, landscaping and site amenities were completed the week of May 21. Final finishes are still underway. The project was substantially completed by Memorial Day weekend, as projected and promised by the City Council, Abonmarche and Pajay Construction. Everyone worked many hard and long hours to meet their promise and the end result is receiving rave reviews. The City of New Buffalo, in partnership with the New Buffalo Downtown Development Authority (DDA), championed the much needed improvements to the community’s downtown area. The work on N. Whittaker Street reflects the final portion of the $4.3 million investment in the downtown, which began in the spring of 2017 on East and West Mechanic and N. Barton

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

Toast the Coast Wine Fest premiering at a new location

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he 13th annual Toast the Coast-Lake Michigan Shores Wine Festival will be held from 1 to 9:30 p.m. Saturday, June 16, at a new location in Warren Dunes State Park. The festival will feature fantastic regional live music programming, a big top tent that will house awesome wineries, access to the beach and beautiful Lake Michigan, an enviable sunset and a whole lot of world-class wines. Guests can enjoy the day below the backdrop of the towering sands of beautiful Warren Dunes State Park. Guests can sample wines by taste or by the glass (tickets include a tasting glass). Included in the lineup of wonderful, locally-grown-and-produced varietals from The Lake Michigan Shore AVA are: 12 Corners, Baroda Founders, Cody Kresta, Cogdal, Contessa, Dablon, Domaine Berrien, Fenn Valley, Gravity, Hickory Creek, Karma Vista, Lawton Ridge, Lazy Ballerina, Lemon Creek, Round Barn, St. Julian, Vineyard 2121, Warner and White Pine. This year, guests will have the convenience of driving into the state park and parking directly adjacent to the festival and beach. Warren Dunes State Park charges the following nominal fees for parking per car: resident daily parking, $6 and non-resident daily parking, $8. Or, visitors can use the Michigan State Passport for parking, which can be found at http://www.michigan.gov/ dnr/0,4570,7-153-10365_55798---,00.html. Live music performers will include the following: The Hampsheres, who perform an eclectic selection of soul/Motown and R & B standards, as well as a few dusty gems; the Jamiah Rogers Band, one of Chicagoland’s hottest bands producing vocals, guitar and drum; Slim Gypsy Baggage, a four-piece, female fronted group that is backed by guitar, drums and bass, with a style that ranges from rock country/America roots and blues, a twangy post-funk meets Caribbean acid jazz, with the aesthetic of college rock jams; Jake Mack and the Lesser Stags, a tube-driven rock and Americana quartet from Chicagoland specializing in a high-energy eclectic repertoire of covers and originals; and Sean Wiggins, a nationally known artist who has more than 100 songs in her catalogue and more than 1,000 independent CDs sold. Advanced ticket sales are $10 and $15 at the gate. Tickets include a souvenir wine glass. Children under 12 years are free. The event is wheelchair accessible. No pets and no smoking are allowed. For more information, visit www. lakemichiganwinefest.com. Warren Dunes State Park is located at 12032 Red Arrow Hwy. in Sawyer, Michigan. — STAFF REPORTS

Lubeznik Arts Festival to feature a collection of creatives

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uests can come to the Lubeznik Center for the Arts (LCA) for northwest Indiana’s premiere art festival, the Lubeznik Arts Festival (LAF), from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18. Now in its 37th year, LAF attracts thousands of shoppers and art enthusiasts to Michigan City’s North End. Held on the third weekend in August, this festival features contemporary art and food. It draws repeat visitors from Chicago, South Bend and northwest Indiana, as well as Michigan’s nearby Harbor Country communities. Previously held offsite, the festival is now held on LCA’s grounds to connect festivalgoers to the gallery spaces, to experience the stature of exhibitions and to connect with programs more effectively. There will be more than 100 national artists and community booths for the public to enjoy as well as a delicious array of food for all tastes and an art scavenger hunt for families. Individual fine artists and fine crafters have been selected through a jury process. Additionally, regional galleries who represent the best in emerging contemporary art have also been invited. Single day admission is $5. There will be free admission for LCA members, children ages 16 and under and active military personnel with ID. Free offsite parking and shuttle service is available and encouraged. The LCA is located at 101 W. 2nd St., Michigan City, Indiana. — STAFF REPORTS

Is it what we choose to like that we naturally become excellent @ ? -The Applicant Life grants nothing to us mortals without hard work -Horace

Goldberry Woods debuts organic farm stand

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oldberry Woods Bed and Breakfast now has an onsite stand and is selling tomato plants, lettuces, rhubarb and annuals and succulents arranged in vintage planters. For the last six years, Goldberry Woods Bed and Breakfast has been using organic farming methods to grow a huge variety of fruits and vegetables for their overnight guests and family. They intend to add more items to the stand as the season progresses, such as lavender, cut flower bouquets and arrangements and fruits and vegetables, as well as fun novelties, such as cucamelons and ground cherries. While not USDA certified, Goldberry Woods aims to be completely transparent in their growing methods and loves sharing gardening techniques and learning from visitors. They invite customers to walk the fields and orchards, ask questions and enjoy knowing where their food was grown. Goldberry Woods is open daily from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. They are located at 9902 Community Hall Road in Union Pier. — STAFF

REPORTS


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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

New Buffalo farmers market debuts children’s art

Cathi Rogers, events manager of New Buffalo Business Association (NBBA), announced a few months ago a collaboration with the New Buffalo Elementary School and art teacher Matthew Raney for the creation of market art for the 2018 farmer’s market season. There were 250 students who participated in the project, resulting in seven winners. After weeks of hard work by the students, the committee pored over the amazing art and created what they felt was the perfect group of designs to highlight the kindergarten through fifth grade art work. “We are proud to unveil the design collection at this week’s farmers market (on Thursday, June 14). There will be $1 buttons, $2 stickers and kids market bags to purchase. In the future, T-shirts may be available for purchase also,” Rogers said. The proceeds from the sales of the artwork will be donated to the New Buffalo Township Library children’s reading program. Each grade was given an image to paint. The kindergartners were all given a quarter piece of a sunflower to paint. The final piece has four different images that will be on display and available on buttons and stickers. The winners from each of the grades are as follows: first grade for a pumpkin design is Adalyn Russell, second grade for carrots is Madeline Robertson, third grade for a mushroom design is Cora Moser, fourth grade for a broccoli design is Alisun Yanz. The fifth-grade class was allowed free reign to draw a fruit or vegetable of their choice There was a tie: Ava Totzke won for her design of a peapod, and Josette Humphrey won for her design of a radish. The final art winner, fifth grader Mia Ciccarelli’s colored carrots, will be featured on a limited market bag for $5. The New Buffalo Township Library will sponsor a farm petting zoo Thursday, July 5, for all ages to enjoy and celebrate the market in downtown New Buffalo. In addition to the kid’s art collection sales, the NBBA is offering adult market bags, buttons and T-shirts with new designs created by Fusion Design Group that portray our “Bee, Love, Support” logos. The New Buffalo farmer’s market is held every Thursday evening on the beautifully redeveloped North Whittaker Street. The market is open from 4 to 8 p.m. While shopping in the market, guests can visit local merchants who are open during extended market hours. Wrap up your shopping experience with a cool beverage or a meal at one of the fine local eatery establishments in the downtown neighborhood district. — COMPILED BY

Fresh picks at the New Buffalo Farmers Market

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BY HOLLY SHULMAN

isitors enjoyed a great line up of outdoor shopping, tasting and browsing at the season opener of downtown New Buffalo’s weekly farmers market Thursday, June 7. From 4 to 8 p.m. every Thursday through Sept. 6, colorful tents selling a great array of fresh picked, hand-made and gourmet local specialties will flank the beautiful new North Whittaker Street. With car traffic blocked off, shoppers have a lovely and safe space to stroll with families, strollers and dogs. The wide open and newly paved avenue allows for leisurely browsing at all the booths, with a grand view down to the lake. Although it was still early in the season for many of the area’s local harvests, visitors still had plenty of fresh picks from which to choose: strawberries, rhubarb, kale, lettuce, tomatoes, asparagus and more. Gourmet foods included fresh baked breads, pies and cookies, fresh pastas, fresh seafood, flowers and plants. Delicious selections of locally made wines, vinegars, nuts and candies, jellies and jams, coffees, sauces dips and more were not just available to buy, but also for sampling. Beyond the many appetite temptations, there were also creative fashions, hand-made crafts, jewelry, home accessories and decor. At one booth, visitors could even get their knives and tools sharpened. Live music and a balloon artist added a party-like atmosphere to the event. Several booths were hosted by notable organizations and charities gathering support for their worthy causes. The New Buffalo Business Association (NBBA) said they were pleased with the participation for the kickoff event, with 54 local vendors from Harbor Country and further afield in Indiana and Michigan. This Thursday, June 14, the farmers market will follow the official North Whittaker Street ribbon cutting and sculpture dedication scheduled for 3:30 p.m. Guests can stop by the NBBA welcome booth to purchase their 2018 market bag or T-shirt, with the first 100 guests taking one home for free. All proceeds from booth rentals, bags and T-shirts will benefit the New Buffalo Township Library.

Sensational strawberries

Browsing the booths

LINDA HENDERSON

There is no Tomorrow? -Dino

BBQ Bug at the Farmers Market

Leo and Amber Rodriguez of Sommerfeldt Farm

Fashion fun


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NBES students lauded for academic achievements

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ew Buffalo Elementary School students were recently recognized for their hard work at the school’s end-of-theyear awards ceremony Friday, June 8. Benita Puskunigis received the “Principal Award.” This award is for special recognition of exemplary achievement and contributions to the quality of school life by showing strength of character, appreciation of civic responsibility, strong leadership qualities that promote kindness, and caring and respect for others. Award recipients are also involved in outside activities and clubs and have a strong attendance record and limited referrals. To be considered, a student must have attended NBAS for more than two years. Benita is the daughter of Benediktas and Gita Puskunigis. In addition, Ethan Lijewski and Ava Totzke both received the American Legion Award for being outstanding citizens. Aiden Lowery was the recipient of the B.I.S.O.N. award, which is given to the student who best demonstrates high standards of behavior and character. To be considered, students must have no referrals, a positive attitude toward classmates, school and community and display an understanding and appreciation of civic responsibility. The Presidential Excellence Award is given to fifth grade students who demonstrate a commitment to learning in academics, earned all As during third, fourth and fifth grades, achieved high standardized test scores and showed growth and improvement in all subject areas. This year’s recipients were Lucas Behzadi, Mia Ciccarelli, Addison Lamport, Ellen Ripley, Aiden Sokol, Riley Tertel and Ava Totzke. Recipients of the Presidential Achievement Award were: Ethan Lijewski, Deonna McGrew, Nicollete Durham, Gianna Burian, Ryker Donkersloot, Vaugh Nikkel, Benita Puskungis and Ella Vyskocil. Students who receive the Presidential Achievement Award demonstrate a commitment to learning despite obstacles, achieve high scores or show outstanding growth and improvement, demonstrate an achievement in the arts and maintain a school record that would have met the school’s selection criteria for the President’s Award for Educational Excellence but illness, personal crisis or special needs prevented the student from maintaining such standards despite hard work. Students in third through fifth grade who received As and Bs for all three trimesters received the Principal’s List Award. Recipients were: Aaron Berk, Lane Collins, Anne Gradowski, August Johnson, Parker Krohn, Michael Kuhn, Landon Lijewski, Cora Moser, Ian Sokol, Kaitlin Thompson, Harlow Allee, Drew Bowen, Adamary Cardenas, Owen Gotcher, Bailey Heimbach, Henry Hutchinson, Noelle Penny, Rex Porter, Kendall Roch, Jeffrey Tertel Olivia Dupree, Max Gotcher, Maddie Grzywacz, Charlotte Humphrey, Bianca Illesca-Villa, Khyra Lakin, Isai Lopez, Gabe Medina, Jackson Neubauer, Lieve Siewert, Alisun Yanz, Max Brown, Mona Dali, Nick Haskins, Jesse Kelly, Ava Mancini, Samantha Newton, Samuel Tripp, Lucas Behzadi, Mia Ciccarreli, Ryker Donkersloot, Addison Lamport, Vaughn Nikkel, Ellen Ripley, Ella Vyskocil, Jossette Humphrey, Ethan Kishta, Ethan Lijewski, Elizabeth McDonald, Aiden Sokol, Riley Tertel, Ava Totzke and Lily Wulff. Perfect Attendance awards went to Jaxson D’Arcangelis, Deshawn Nesbitt and Callan Davis. Many students also received additional awards for attendance, art, music, Spanish and Safety Patrol. — STAFF REPORTS

THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

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17

PUBLIC NOTICES

WATER QUALITY DATA

The table below lists the EPA's regu lated and unregulated contaminants detected in The City of New Buffa lo's drinking wa ter during 20 17. Unless otherwise noted, the data presented is from January1, 2017 to December 31, 20 17. Detected Substance (units)

Range Of Detects

Highest Level Detected

EPA's MCLG's

EPA's MCL

Violation Yes /No

Like ly Sources of Substance

Regulated Monitoring (Sampled At Water Treatment Plant)

THE CITY OF NEW BUFFALO ANNUAL DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT FOR THE YEAR 2017 In 1998, a new federal rule was passed to ensure that customers of community water supplies receive annual documentation of drinking water quality. The City of New Buffalo is your water supplier and we are pleased to present you with this annual water quality report Our goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable drinking water supply that meets all federal and state requirements. The results of this report show that we are reaching our goal. SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT: Your water comes from Lake Michigan (a surface water source). Our raw water is pumped to our Water Treatment Plant which treats and delivers finished water to storage tanks, distribution mains and finally to your household water tap. The State of Michigan performed an assessment of our source water in 2003 to determine the susceptibility or the relative potential of contamination. The susceptibility rating is on a six tiered scale from “very-low” to “high” based primarily on geologic sensitivity, water chemistry and contaminant sources. The susceptibility of our source water is rated “moderately high”. SUSCEPTIBILITY DETERMINATION: THE source water assessment for the City of New Buffalo’s Water Intake includes 8 listed potential contaminant sources within the susceptible area, plus agricultural, urban and industrial runoff from the New Buffalo River Source Water Area. Combining these potential contaminant sources with the moderately sensitive intake yields a moderately high susceptibility determination for the City of New Buffalo’s source water. This assessment provides the city with a basis to institute a source water protection program as another tool to assure the continued safety of our water supply. A copy of the full Source Water Assessment Report can be obtained by contacting the City of New Buffalo at (269) 469-1500. HEALTH AND SAFETY INFORMATION Drinking water, including bottled water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of these contaminants does not necessarily pose a health risk. The sources of both tap and bottled drinking water includes: rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of land or through the ground, it dissolves. Naturally occuring minerals and in some cases, radioactive materials, and can pick up substances resulting from animal or human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water (untreated water) include: Microbial Contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife; Inorganic Contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring, or result from urban storm water runoff and residential uses; Organic Chemical Contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are by-products of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gas stations, septic systems, and urban or agricultural runoff (i.e., pesticides and herbicides); or Radioactive Contaminants, which

*Turbidity (ntu)

0.12

0.3* or no 0.02-0.12 sample above 1.00

Chlorine Residualfree (ppm)

1.77

0.80-1.77

0.68

0.68 (Single Sample)

Fluoride (ppm)

N/A

No

Soil Runoff

4.0

4.0

No

Water additive used to control microbes

4.0

4.0

No

Water Additive Which Promotes Strong Teeth; Erosion ofNatural Deposits

Regulated Monitoring For Stage I Disinfection By-Product Rule (Sampled In Water Distribution System ) Detected Substance (units)

Highest Running Annual Average

THM (Total Trihalomethanes) (ppb)

44

HAAS (Total Haloacetic Acids) (ppb)

25

Range Of Detects

EPA'S MCL

44 (Single Sample)

80.0

NIA

No

60.0

N/A

No

25

(Single Sample)

EPA'S MCLG

Violation Yes/NO

Likely Source of Substance

By-Product of Drinking Water Chlorination

By-Product of Drinking Water Chlorination

Additional Regulated Monitoring (Sampled In Water Distribution System) Detected Substance (unit s)

Highest Running Annual Average

Range O f Detects

MRDL

MRDLG

Violation Yes I No

Total Chlorine Residual (ppm)

0.80

0.30-1 .22

4.0

4.0

No

Likely Source of Substance Water Additive Used For Disinfect ion

Regulated R Lead and Copper Monitoring (Sampled At Customer's Tap - 2015) 90th

**Copper (ppb)

140

Sites Found Above AL 0

** Lead ( ppb)

7.4

1

Detected Substance (units)

Percentile Detected

EPA's AL

15

1300

EPA's MCLG

Violation Yes/NO

1300

No

Corrosion of Household Plumbing

0

No

Corrosion of Household Plumbing

(Page 3

Likely Source of Substance

Special Unregulated M o n i t o r i n g (Sampled At Water Treatment Plant) Detected Substance (units) Sodium (ppm)

Highest Level Likely Source of Substance Detected

7

Erosion of Natura l Deposits

Additional Unregulated Monitoring {Sampled At Water Treatment Plant) Detected Substance (units)

Highest Level Detected

Likely Source of Substance

Hardness as CaC03 (ppm)

160

Erosion of Natura l Deposits

Sulfate (ppm)

29

Erosion of Natural Deposits

PH (ph units)

7.6

Measurement of Acidity of Water

Chloride (ppm)

15

Erosion of Natura l Deposits

Note 1: Definitions arc on page number 5. Note 2: The EPA requires monitoring over 80 drinking water contaminants. Those l isted above are only those contaminant s detected in your d1inking water. For a complete list contact the Water Filtration Plant.

can be naturally occurring or the result of oil and gas production and mining activities. All of these contaminants were below the level of concern in your water supply. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline at {1-800-426-4791 or visit (www.epa.gov/ogwdw).

To ensure that tap water is safe, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribes regulations, which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water, provided by public water systems. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) establishes limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health.

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18

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

CLASSIFIED ADS

PUBLIC NOTICES INFORMATION FOR VULNERABLE POPULATIONS: Some people may be more vulnerable le to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immunocompromised persons, such as persons undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with IDV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. Federal guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidiurn and other microbiological contaminants are also available from EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline, (1-800-426-479 1). Effects of Lead in Drinking Water: If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The City of New Buffalo Water Department is responsible for providing high quality drinking water but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426479 1 or at http://water.epa.gov/drink/ info/lead. The City of New Buffalo maintains a state certified microbiological laboratory that tests your water 365 days a year. If you have any questions concerning your water utility, or need a copy of this Water Quality Report mailed to you, please contact Mr. Ken Anderson, Water Superintendent, at (269) 469-0381 or by E-Mail @ nbcwaterdept@comcast.net. You may also attend our monthly City Council Meeting on the 3rd Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at 224 West Buffalo Street (New Buffalo City Hall). WATER QUALITY DATA The table below lists the EPA’s regulated and unregulated contaminants detected in The City of New Buffalo’s drinking water during 20 17. Unless otherwise noted, the data presented is from January 1, 2017 to December 31, 20 17. DEFINITIONS RAA—Running Annual Average. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) -The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of Microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Level Goal (MRDLG)—The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there

is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLG’s do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.

Please submit your classified ad via email at classifieds@newbuffalotimes. com. New Buffalo Times can now accept online payments with a credit card or paypal. Go to our website, www.newbuffalotimes.com, and submit $10 per week for a classified ad of up to 160 characters. Deadline is Friday 5PM before the following week’s publication.

AL (action level)—The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceed, triggers treatment or oilier requirements which a water system must follow. MCL—Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLG as feasible using the best available treatment technology. MCLG—Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. NTU—Nephelometric Turbidity Units ppb—Parts per billion ppm—Parts per million TT—Treatment Technique (IT) is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Unregulated Contaminants— Unregulated contaminants are those for which EPA bas not established drinking water standards. The purpose of the unregulated contaminant monitoring is to assist EPA in determining the occurrence of unregulated contaminants in drinking water and whether future regulation is warranted. 90th Percentile—90 percent of the samples were at or below the numbers listed. (Copper= 140 ppb, Lead= 7.4 ppb). N/A—Not applicable. *-Turbidity—Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of water. We monitor it because it is a good indicator of the effectiveness of our filtration system. 100 percent of our samples met the required limits of less than or equal to 0.30 NTU in 95% of samples taken each month and shall not exceed 1.0 NTU at any time. **-Lead & Copper—The state allows us to monitor for some contaminates less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants do not change frequently. Some of our data, though representative, may be more than one year old. Copper and lead samples were collected on 6-3-15 through 6-10-15. Infants and children who drink water containing lead in excess of the action level could experience delays in their physical or mental development Children could show slight deficits in attention span and learning abilities. Adults who drink this water over many years could develop kidney problems or high blood pressure. This concludes our report for the calendar year 2017. Your 2018 Water Quality Report can be expected before July 1, 2019.

The New Buffalo Police Department is seeking qualified applicants for a part-time position of Administrative Assistant (between 28-30 hours per week). The job would include performing a wide variety of general secretarial and administrative support activities, working closely with the Chief of Police and officers. Some specific duties include maintaining security and confidentiality of records, generating analytical and statistical reports, typing and proofreading reports, letters, ordering supplies and services. Applicants must have excellent interpersonal and customer service skills and have the ability to handle confidential information in a professional manner. Candidates also must be proficient with general office equipment, including computers, software, telephone, calculator, shredder, copier, and laminator. They must have an excellent knowledge of the English language, including spelling, grammar, and punctuation, and must be able to meet deadlines and file documents and reports as necessary. Applicants must have a high school diploma or GED and at least 3 years of administrative support or customer service experience and proficient in Microsoft Office. Please submit a resume to the City of New Buffalo, 224 W. Buffalo Street, New Buffalo, MI 49117 Attn: Clerk by June 22, 2018. For the full job description go to www. cityofnewbuffalo.org/employment.asp The City of New Buffalo is an equal opportunity employer.

STATE OF MICHIGAN PROBATE COURT COUNTY OF BERRIEN NOTICE TO CREDITOS Decedent’s Estate Estate of Glenn Stanley Davis Date of Birth 6/17/1973 TO ALL CREDITOR: NOTICE TO CREDITORS: The decedent, Glenn Stanley Davis died 4/19/2018. Creditors of the decedent are notified that all claims against the estate will be forever barred unless presented to James Roe-Stanley Davis, personal representative, or to both the probate court at 811 Port St. St. Joseph, Michigan. and the personal representative within 4 months after the date of publication of this notice. 5/ 2 /2018 James Davis Personal Representative 9 1/2 South Elm Street Apt. #4 Three Oaks, Mi 49128 269-405-7060 Representing

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NEW BUFFALO TOWNSHIP 17425 RED ARROW HIGHWAY NEW BUFFALO, MI 49117 269-469-1011 New Buffalo Township is seeking a fulltime Administrative Assistant, 35 hours a week. Duties include, bookkeeping, accounts payable, payroll, some human resources work. All interested parties should submit their resume’ to New Buffalo Township via mail or during business hours, 9:00-4:00, on or before Friday, June 22nd.

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Justified wears the Triple Crown LINDA HENDERSON IN NEW

C

BUFFALO

heered on by fans wearing yellow foam crowns instead of the Egyptian headdresses that greeted American Pharoah in 2015, Justify won the Belmont Stakes on Saturday to earn the 13th Triple Crown in the 150 years of American thorough breed racing tradition. Justify entered the race as the undefeated winner of the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness Stakes and captured the Belmont Stakes victory on Saturday, June 9. Justify came to the track under sunny skies and no mud, the same track where Pharoah ended a 37-year Triple Crown drought in 2015 and, guided by the same trainer, Bob Baffert and seasoned Mike Jockey Smith he made history. Following the victory, 52-year old jockey Mike Smith, the oldest jockey to capture the crown, was moved to tears. His horse had accomplished what few before him could do. In addition to winning six straight victories in about four months. Justify did not disappoint the crowd of about 90,000 as he quickly went to the lead and stayed there, Despite a pack of contenders closing in behind him, Justify maintained the lead on the inside post to capture the 150th Belmont Stakes by a length and three-quarters and become the 13th Triple Crown winner. Justify completed the mile and a half on a (dry) fast track in 2 minutes 28.18 seconds. In a surprise burst of energy, Gronkowski, came from the last position to finish second, one of the other favorites, Hofburg, was third. For trainer Bob Baffert, 65, he became the second trainer to secure two Triple Crowns, joining James Fitzsimmons, who was known as Sunny Jim and trained Gallant Fox and Omaha in the 1930s. Baffert trained American Pharoah, who won the 2015 Triple Crown honors.

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

REAL ESTATE

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he topic of suicide is intense and scary and leaves us feeling powerless. The truth is that many of us have lost someone we love through suicide. Today, I broach the topic from a place of love and tenderness, and without judgement. For some, this may feel like a welcome conversation; for others, it may not. It’s okay. Don’t read further. Maybe just clip and toss this one into a drawer in case you ever need it. My own experience with suicide is long and complicated. I lost my biological grandfather to suicide shortly after I met him. I suddenly had “new family” dealing with complex grief and a confluence of other emotions, some not so tender, that frequently accompany suicide. What I held back from them is that I had my own brush with suicide as a 12-year-old kid, struggling with trauma and abandonment. More recently, a very close friend of mine suffered a psychotic break and while we were scouring the city for them, they were being rescued from the train tracks. I was shaken for months. How could I have not seen? Not known? Why didn’t I do something more? Sooner? These questions are common. I hope this column provides some guidance. We begin by seeing each other. Say hello, offer to help with groceries, shovel a path, just let people know they are seen. When someone is isolated or struggling, come together as a community to assist. Maybe it is a group of friends, or a church group, or a book club. Keep an eye on each other. If someone withdraws, check in. If someone is grieving a break up or other loss, offer to be around after the first flurry of activity has died down. If someone seems to be acting strangely or out of character, dig deeper. Listen to people - if someone indicates that their options are narrowing, or there is no way out, take heed. Ask questions. Do not be afraid. Ask, “Are you thinking about hurting yourself?” Asking doesn’t give someone the idea - that belief is an unfortunate legacy from the age of taboo. Remaining nonjudgmental is critical here, while allowing them space to explore their ideas. If you have trouble asking the question, practice with a trusted person. It took me a few times before I felt comfortable, and now I feel like I ask everyone that question! If someone confides in you that they have a plan, it is important to get help right away. A number of studies show that suicidal urges tend to last 72 hours, and with good care, they may not resurface. Thankfully, this was my case. For others, it is a lifelong struggle. Someone has confided in you, now what? Our first duty is to life. If you are with the person, stay with them, reassure them that you are fine, and you are there to help them. Call 911, and calmly explain where you are and what is going on. If you are not with them, keep them on the line and text the necessary information for someone else to call 911. I tend to ask if there are any weapons in the house, just so the EMTs know. This isn’t their first call, so you can rely on the responders to know how to handle the situation. Your job is to stay (as long as it is safe) and make the call. Express acceptance, and that the help they need is coming. Please avoid expanding the conversation - allow the person in need to direct it. They may mention their family, or something else. (“Yes, they want you safe.”) Resist the urge to pull in others, as the person in need may be having conflicts we don’t know about. Resist the urge to tell them how great their life seems, as this can cause guilt and anguish. All this applies whether the person is sober or under the influence, and whether this is the first crisis or the fifth. Always err on the side of caution. There is a lot of research being done but getting the research out of the universities and into practice takes time. We have precious little time. Many therapists institute safety plans with clients. We create “hope boxes” filled with meaningful bits, and we mentally create storage boxes for distressing thoughts. We solution seek. There will be times when sitting with the person is enough. I recommend this approach if you are a part of a larger safety plan that has been created in therapy. If you offer or are asked to be a part of someone’s safety plan, make sure you understand the plan, and your role in it. Be clear about the next steps. A long time ago I heard the story of a man who died by suicide by leaping from the Golden Gate Bridge. He left a note on his dresser. It read, “If one person says hello to me, I will not jump.” Let us all err on the side of decency and love. We are not powerless. If you or someone you know could benefit from counseling, please visit namCounseling.com

Never discourage anyone... who continually makes progress, no matter how slow -Plato


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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

HOR0SCOPE JUNE 14-20, 2018

AS INTERPRETED BY SANDY “STAR” BENDT ARIES MARCH 21—APRIL 19 Your emotions could get the best of you this week. Try being more passive. No loud voices, or dominate posturing is required. Remain open and receptive, but nonreactionary. Be like a flower, beautiful and still, using your presence alone to get others to move in your direction.

LIBRA SEPTEMBER 23—OCTOBER 22 You may be put in the leadership position because your ability to communicate and delegate has been noticed professionally, this week. Your skills are better used in conjunction with others now, so don’t go it alone. Public speaking or leading a group discussion opportunities are also coming in.

TAURUS

It is important you build trust with friends before you share intimate details of your life or another’s. Avoid gossiping. Keep your personal thoughts or negative experiences you may have had with another private. You never know, who knows who, or what may come back to haunt you.

SCORPIO OCTOBER 23—NOVEMBER 21 A good business instinct will be present this week, and if you have been waiting for the right moment to make financial moves, you will get the go ahead now. It is time to show up and put up. If you are thinking of taking classes or starting a new training program, luck will be with you in acing it.

GEMINI MAY 21—JUNE 21 Getting ahead materially is in the cards this week. It may come through a past partner or through joining forces with a close friend. You will have opportunity to create more luxury and value w in you life, when you accept the status and strength that comes with joining forces with another.

SAGITTARIUS NOVEMBER 22—DECEMBER 21 You will feel a strong need to protect yourself and loved ones, this week. You will be watching out for your family and close friends, ready to give support and a shoulder to cry on when needed. You will be very intuitive, so you will know when others are feeling insecure or unsure.

CANCER JUNE 22—JULY 22 This is an excellent time to establish heathy routines and break bad habits p once and for all. Revamp your wardrobe, hairstyle, or attitude and start a new trend that incorporates taking good care of yourself. Set aside ten minutes of your day to sit quietly and send love through you entire being.

CAPRICORN DECEMBER 22—JANUARY 19 The tendency to withdraw and restore yourself psychologically or spiritually will be felt this week. Almost instinctively you will know when situations are getting too heavy or emotionally taxing. Honor those feelings, don’t push through out of obligation, take time for your mental health.

LEO JULY 23—AUGUST 22 Your outward expressions may not be a true reflection of your inner emotions now. There will be a tendency to hide your true feelings from others and perhaps an outright denial of your emotions. Try as you may, they could leak out in inappropriate ways. Be honest with yourself to avoid drama.

AQUARIUS JANUARY 20—FEBRUARY 18 Be careful not to overindulge in food and drink with friends, this week. Be sure to incorporate more physical activity when visiting with friends. Avoid watching movies, playing cards, or activities that involve sitting for long periods. Set up that volley ball net and get moving.

VIRGO AUGUST 23—SEPTEMBER 22 Who is the life of the party? You are. Your presence will be sought after and your phone will be ringing at all hours. Embrace this social time and the summer weather. Invite friends and coworkers over for a BBQ, and let the good times roll. You’ve waited all winter for this sunshine.

PISCES FEBRUARY 19—MARCH 20 Wether you know it or not you are widely loved and appreciated. This week, you will feel very respected and honored. You just need to look around, and see how many lives you have affected for the better over the years. Once you accept how much you have helped people, you will accept their help.

APRIL 20—MAY 20

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

EVENTS

PLEASE SEND US EVENT INFO TO EVENTS@NEWBUFFALOTIMES.COM . NEW EVENTS EACH WEEK. — COMPILED BY LINDA HENDERSON

DAILY EVENTS

NEW BUFFALO TOWNSHIP LIBRARY See weekly library events on page 3.

EVERY MONDAY

ZUMBA 6:30PM. New Buffalo High School High Gymnasium/Dance Studio. 111 E Clay St. New Buffalo. 219-614-8847. Teacher is Marie Crist. $7 per class.

EVERY TUESDAY

CHELLBERG FARM CAMP 9AM-2PM CST. Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore Park. 700 Howe Rd. Porter, IN. 219-395-9555. www.duneslearningcenter.org. Session 1/Ages 5-6: June 5, 12, 19; Session 2/Ages 7-8 July 10,17, 24. $75.

EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SUNDAY

OPEN TRAP PRACTICE 6:30-9:30PM. New Buffalo Rod and Gun Club. 10487 Kruger Rd. New Buffalo. Open to the public. Contact Bob Kruger at 269-612-0983.

EVERY WEDNESDAY

CREATIVE EDITORIAL MARKETING

DESIGN

CALL TODAY! WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!

219-331-9230

KNITTING AT THE DELI 3-5PM. David’s Deli. All are welcome.

WEDNESDAY NIGHTS IN THE PARK 6-9PM. New Buffalo Township Park. 17425 Red Arrow Hwy. New Buffalo.269-469-1011. www.newbuffalotownship.org Enjoy live music at 7pm. and food in Memorial Park band shell. Alcohol, smoke and pet free. Food served at 6:30, cash only. Limited parking/biking or car pool suggested. 6/20 Blue Ice (Chi-Blues and Det-boogie).

FIRST WEDNESDAY OF THE MONTH

NEW BUFFALO CLASSIC CAR CRUISE 6-9PM. Downtown New Buffalo.

EVERY THURSDAY

NEW BUFFALO FARMERS MARKET 4-8PM. Whittaker St. Downtown New Buffalo.

LAST THURSDAY OF THE MONTH

HARBOR COUNTRY BOOK CLUB 6:30PM. New Buffalo Township Library.

EVERY FRIDAY

STORY TIME AT THREE OAKS LIBRARY 10:30AM. www.threeoakslibrary.org.

EVERY SATURDAY & SUNDAY SKIP’S OPEN-AIR EUROPEAN FARMERS MARKET 9AM-3PM. 16710 Lakeshore Rd. New Buffalo. 269-469-3341.

EVERY SATURDAY

THREE OAKS FARMERS MARKET 9AM-2PM. 1 Elm St. Three Oaks. Small farmers offering fresh produce, fresh flowers, plants and many other things. Rain or Shine. YOGA AT THE PARK 9AM. New Buffalo Township Memorial Park. 17425 Red Arrow Hwy. New Buffalo. SATURDAY NIGHTS ALIVE 6-8PM. Corner of Whittaker and Merchant Sts. New Buffalo. Live music on the corner. Enjoy jazz country, reggae and more through Labor Day. Presented by the New Buffalo Business Association. MUSIC IN THE PARK 6:30PM. Dewey Cannon Park. Downtown Three Oaks. June 16- SOUTH SHORE CONCERT BAND. Free

FRIDAY, JUNE 8

CALIFORNIA SURF-BEACH BOYS TRIBUTE 6:45 & 9:15PM. Acorn Theater. Tickets: $25 adults, $15 under 18 years.

THURSDAY, JUNE 14

RIBBON CUTTING CELEBRATION & SCULPTURE DEDICATION 3:30PM. Whittaker and Mechanic Streets. Downtown New Buffalo. Join the fun and share in your hometown Pride. Give-aways, food, treats and music. Free event.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 15-17

12032 Red Arrow Hwy. Sawyer. www.lakemichiganwinefest.com. Wine, music, and food on the shores of Lake Michigan. Advance Ticket sales $10. At the gate $15. Kids under 12 free. No pets or smoking allowed. PETTY BREAKERS 8PM. Acorn Theater. Tickets $30.

MONDAY-FRIDAY, JUNE 18-22, JULY 9-13, JULY 23-27

DUNES DISCOVERYCAMP Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore Park. 700 Howe Rd. Porter, IN. 219-395-9555. www.duneslearningcenter.org. Dunes Learning Center, campers explore rivers, search for salamanders, identify insects, hike through dunes, cool off in Lake Michigan, laugh with new friends and sing around the campfire. For ages 9-13 years. $450 per child. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20 LIONS CLUB GOLF OUTING 7:30AM. Whittaker Woods Golf Course. 12578 Wilson Rd. New Buffalo. 219-617-0654 Four man Scramble, Shot-gun start. Call Lion Pete Rahm.

FRIDAY, JUNE 22

THE ROLLING STONES BEST SELLING AUTHOR BILL GERMAN T 8PM. Acorn Theater. Tickets $20.

FLAG DAY CELEBRATION & WORLD’S LARGEST FLAG DAY PARADE 3PM. Sunday Parade. N Elm Street and Downtown. Three Oaks. 269-756-9221. www.threeoaks village.org. Activities all day Saturday throughout the Village. Now in its 66th year, the World’s Largest Flag Day Parade has grown to a weekend celebration. In addition to the parade, weekend activities include the Kid Zone, pet parade, Art in the Park, Sat. fireworks, a DJ at the American Legion and Softball tournaments at the American Legion on Fri. and Sat. A fly-over kicks-off Sunday’s parade.

SATURDAY, JUNE 23

SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JUNE 17-18

HEARTLESS: MIDWEST’S PREMIER TRIBUTE TO HEART 8PM. Acorn Theater. Tickets $30.

FATHER’S DAY AT HESSTON STEAM MUSEUM 9AM CST. Hesston Steam Museum. 1201 E 1000 N. Hesston. IN. www.hesston.org. Trains roll at Noon, and dads ride for $1 with paid child. All you can eat pancakes on Sunday at Doc’s. Sunday also offers an Antique Truck Show. Admission to the grounds is free. Ride costs on the three trains vary.

SATURDAY, JUNE 16

13TH LAKE MICHIGAN SHORE WINE FEST: TOAST THE COAST 1-9:30PM. Warren Dunes.

SHIFTING SANDS EDUCATOR’S WORKSHOP 9:30AM-3:30PM CST. Paul Douglas Center. 100 N Lake Street. Gary, IN. 219 395-9555. www.duneslearningcenter.org. Connect environmental education, history and art in your classroom lessons with the companion guide to the regional Emmy nominated documentary. Shifting Sands explores how the Indiana Dunes region and its influential environmental battles offer a model for a sustainable future. $10 includes DVD, book, guide and lunch—only 30 spaces available.

SUNDAY, JUNE 24

BECKIE MENZIE & TOM MICHAEL 4PM. Acorn Theater. Tickets $27.

The information for these events is correct, as of the Tuesday before publication date. Please contact the events listed with any questions. Please send us any events at events@ newbuffalotimes.com. Deadlines are the Fridays before the following week’s publication.

Journalism is what we need to make democracy work -Walter Cronkite


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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

Pottawattomie Country Club

Full family golfing privileges, use of the driving range, swimming pool, casual and formal dining privileges, club and family events. This membership is perfect for families: live, laugh, golf, and enjoy a life well played!!! A limited number of memberships are available, $1500.00 Dollar initiation fee waived. Just $300 per month ($1500 per year F&B minimum). Contact our Business Office for details. Call 219-872-8624, Ext. 1000 or email pccbusinessoffice@pottawattomie.com.

For a limited time, Pottawattomie Country Club is offering an Annual “Epic Golf Membership” at $300 per month.

1900 SPRINGLAND • MICHIGAN CITY, IN • WWW.POTTAWATTOMIE.COM

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THURSDAY, JUNE 14, 2018

Explore the

beach! Make your day an adventure on a paddleboard or kayak. Outpost Sports has a new fleet of rental boards and sit-in or sit-on-top kayaks waiting for you! Rent by the hour, day(s) or week. Groups of up to 40 people welcome. Reservations accepted. Lessons available.

We deliver rental kayaks, paddleboards and bikes to your door! Free delivery is available to the Galien River Access in New Buffalo. Call 269.469.4210.

Visit our beach stores in New Buffalo and South Haven and our year-round store in Mishawaka to shop a great selection of bikes, boards, kayaks and beach gear and attire. NE W B U FFALO , MI | 269.469.4210 S OUTH HAV E N , MI | 269. 637.5 5 5 5

S T. J OS EPH, MI | 269 -9 83-2010 800 LIONS PARK DR. & SILVER BEACH KIOSK

MI S HAWAKA , I N | 574 .259 .10 0 0

June 14, 2018  

The weekly edition of the NEW BUFFALO TIMES.

June 14, 2018  

The weekly edition of the NEW BUFFALO TIMES.

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