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LIFE ON THE SANDY SHORES, THE FRUITFUL FARMLANDS AND THE MAGNIFICENT VINEYARDS

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CHICAGO • LONG BEACH • MICHIANA SHORES • GRAND BEACH • NEW BUFFALO • UNION PIER • THREE OAKS • LAKESIDE • HARBERT • SAWYER

issue 3, volume 78

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Thursday, January 17, 2019

Three Oaks Village Council tables sewer rate hike PAGE 3 School board members sworn in, school entranceway upgrades approved at meeting PAGE 6

Water safety group works to restore New Buffalo’s lifeguard coverage PAGE 8

Villa Nova Pizzeria to debut new outdoor patio this spring PAGE 9

Passerby saves historic barn PAGE 10

TOPS

The Happy Music Kids Show: A show by kids and for kids comes to Radio Harbor Country PAGE 10

LALUMIERE DEFENDS #1 RANKING — PAGE 7 —

PHOTO BY STAN MADDUX


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2019

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2019

Three Oaks Village Council tables sewer rate hike

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BY THERESE DONNELLY

hile Three Oaks residents will soon see an increase in sewer rates, Three Oaks Village Council members tabled both a decision on Ordinance 212 that would increase the sewer rate and approval of an engineering proposal for the lagoon system upgrade spurring the rate hike at their Wednesday, Jan. 9,

meeting. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) required the village to make improvements to its waste processing system. Village President Dave Grosse said proposed upgrades include an aeration system to help process contaminants in the sewage lagoons. He said the final plan will likely raise the average water user’s monthly bill by between $10 and $12. He said average users go through 4,000 gallons or less each month. Higher usage would result in a larger increase. It was noted that while the Biochemical Oxygen Demands (BODs) in the system have greatly decreased, there are still some entering, likely from industrial use. Grosse said the village cannot check users for this until the DEQ has approved the village’s plan. In the meantime, he said, the village can contact potential sources and encourage them to test themselves and plan for possible changes. Grosse also noted the village’s bond to pay off the retaining ponds will be paid off in about two years. He suggested eliminating that expense may allow the village to lower sewage rates. Many in the audience expressed doubts regarding that suggestion. Councilmember John Pappa agreed the sewer system needs to be upgraded but said he did not believe the proposed scope was necessary. He said the surface area of the retaining ponds could handle the village’s output if Journeyman Distillery chooses to remain off the system and he thought any business would take steps to lower its discharge rather than face financial penalties. The Council agreed to establish a subcommittee, with members Pappa, Grosse and Colleen Newquist meeting with representatives from Journeyman, the DEQ and engineers to create a more detailed plan before the DEQ approves the Industrial Pretreatment Plan. Later in the meeting, Village Manager Mike Greene said if the recent cold weather continued, the ground will be hard enough to allow pond dredging to proceed. The Council voted to approve an amendment to the water reliability study contract by removing asset management from Moore and Bruggink, Inc., as the task will be covered by engineers working on other village projects. The amendment reduces the contract total by $14,400. In preparation for the sewer upgrades, the Council voted approving a public utility easement enforcement by Feb. 1. Grosse said equipment belonging to Journeyman is blocking the village’s access to an easement and the village has not been able to come to an agreement with the business on gaining access. Council members Becky Thomas and Newquist cast dissenting votes, with Newquist stating she felt the new subcommittee should try to come to a more amenable agreement with Journeyman before confronting them with an enforcement order. Grosse said councilmembers don’t have to take action Feb. 1 if they feel effort is being made to comply with the easement. The Council also agreed to form a subcommittee to determine how to word a sidewalk ordinance. Most Michigan municipalities make property owners responsible for maintenance of the sidewalk along their property. Councilmember John Kramer stated some residents would not be able to afford the associated costs. In cooperation with the Region of Three Oaks Museum, the Council issued a proclamation designating Jan. 16, 2019, as E.K. Warren Day in the village. The date is the 100th anniversary of the industrialist’s death. The Council also set the 2019 holiday calendar to set dates the village office will be closed.

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2019

REP. GRIFFIN ANNOUNCES INDISTRICT OFFICE HOURS

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hroughout January, state Rep. Beth Griffin (R-Mattawan) will meet with area residents during scheduled office hours. “I think it is important to begin this new term by hearing directly from people in my community,” Griffin said in a news release. “I look forward to having discussions on how we can move our state forward and hope to take any ideas shared and incorporate them into the House’s policy priorities for the upcoming year.” Rep. Griffin will be available Friday, Jan. 25, at the following times and locations: • 9 to 10 a.m. at Green Glass Coffee, 229 E. Michigan Ave., in Paw Paw; • 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Hartford City Hall, 19 W. Main St., in Hartford; • 1 to 2 p.m. at the South Haven Library, 314 Broadway St., in South Haven; and • 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. at Cooper Township Hall, 1590 D. Avenue W., in Kalamazoo. No appointments are necessary. Those who are unable to attend at the scheduled times but would like an opportunity to talk with Rep. Griffin may call her office at (517) 373-0839 or email BethGriffin@house.mi.gov. —

STAFF REPORTS

PAQUETTE, GRIFFIN AND LASATA BEGIN THEIR TERMS IN MICHIGAN LEGISLATURE

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ecently, southwest Michigan’s newly elected officials were formally sworn in at the state Capitol in Lansing. State Rep. Brad Paquette (R-Berrien Springs), state Rep. Beth Griffin (R-Mattawan) and state Sen. Kim LaSata (R-St. Joseph) all took the oath of office as the state marked the opening day of the 100th Michigan Legislature. Michigan Supreme Court Chief Justice Stephen Markman administered the oath to LaSata and Griffin, while Michigan Supreme Court Justice Bridget Mary McCormak administered the oath to Paquette. — STAFF REPORTS

Senator Stabenow introduces legislation to lower cost of prescription drugs

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.S. Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-MI), ranking member on the Senate Finance Subcommittee on Health Care, introduced legislation aimed at lowering the cost of prescription drugs. Americans pay – by far – the highest prices in the world for prescription drugs. Already this year, prices on more than 1,000 medications have experienced an average price hike of 6 percent. “It’s absurd that our own government is prohibited from negotiating lower prescription drug prices for seniors under Medicare and that people across our own Michigan border in Canada pay so much less for their prescriptions,” said Senator Stabenow. “My bills will help put an end to these outrageous practices and Big Pharma’s price gouging of American families. Pharmaceutial and health product lobbying reached $216 million last year, more than any other industry. Stabenow is introducing two pieces of legislation that will combat rising prescription drug costs: • The “Empowering Medicare Seniors to Negotiate Drug Prices Act” would allow the Secretary of Health and Human Services to directly negotiate with drug companies for price discounts of their drugs, which is banned under current law. • The “Affordable and Safe Prescription Drug Importation Act” authorizes the Secretary of Health and Human Services to issue regulations permitting wholesalers, licensed U.S. pharmacies, and individuals to import safe medications from licensed Canadian sellers that are manufactured at facilities inspected by the Food and Drug Administration. Currently, Americans pay about 40 percent more on prescriptions per person than Canadians do. This follows Senator Stabenow’s successful effort last year to get her bipartisan “Know the Lowest Price Act” passed into law - cracking down on outrageous gag clauses that stop pharmacists from telling customers that they could pay less for their prescription if they pay out of pocket. — STAFF REPORTS

Why a national marijuana law could be closer to reality in 2019

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o far, the task of loosening marijuana laws has been left to individual states to implement. But that changed when the Democrats won control of the House of Representatives last month. “The states have been carrying the water for the pro-marijuana forces for several years but that may finally start to change,” says Sarah Lee Gossett Parrish (www.sarahleegossettparrish.com), a cannabis industry lawyer.  “The federal government is about to get involved in a big way.  Uniform national marijuana laws are certainly now on the table.” Oregon Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR)  has already laid out a blueprint to advance national marijuana legislation. Blumenauer’s plan could begin as soon as Democrats take the gavel next month, he says. His strategy would include starting to move the 37 bills currently unable to make it to the House floor under Republicans onto committee schedules, for hearings and proposed legislation. Here are some of the House committees that could be looking at marijuana issues and what they would be considering: The House Judiciary Committee. Rep. Blumenauer wants the House to “deschedule” marijuana.  It is currently labeled a “Schedule 1” drug, the most tightly restricted category reserved for drugs that have “no currently accepted medical use.”  Cannabis advocates have been trying to change that classification since 1972. House Veterans Affairs Committee. Hearings may be held on proposed legislation to give veterans access to medical marijuana. House Financial Services Committee. The focus would be on banking changes. Right now, cannabis businesses are unable to use banks, causing them to be an all-cash business, which makes them more susceptible to robberies and violence.  There are many other advantages for cannabis producers if they could have access to banking institutions. Further optimism about the future of passing national marijuana laws is due to two major roadblocks being removed. Attorney General Jeff Sessions was fired by President Donald Trump and Texas Rep. Pete Sessions was defeated by Democrat Colin Allred.  Although Jeff Sessions had more of a national profile, Rep. Pete Sessions was arguably more important for pro-marijuana forces to remove since he was chairman of the powerful House Rules Committee. He has been credited with keeping almost all  marijuana legislation from reaching the floor of Congress for a vote. “No marijuana bill could get a floor vote under Representative Sessions,” Parrish says. “He was probably the biggest legislative roadblock to comprehensive national marijuana legislation.  Now that he is gone, there is a lot of optimism that many of these bills may finally get a vote.” — SARAH LEE GOSSETT PARRISH

Rep. Paquette’s office open, ready to serve residents State Rep. Brad Paquette announced his legislative office is open and ready to serve residents of the 78th House District. “I am eager to get to work for the people of Southwest Michigan,” Paquette said. “Whether it is an issue you need help navigating, or an idea to help simplify government, I am ready to listen.” People can contact Rep. Paquette by calling (517) 373-1796 or by emailing bradpaquette@house. mi.gov. Correspondence can also be mailed to N-1097 House Office Building, P.O. Box 30014, Lansing, MI 48909. Rep. Paquette was first elected to serve the 78th District in the Michigan House of Representatives in November 2018. The 78th District encompasses portions of Berrien and Cass counties, including the cities of Buchanan, New Buffalo and Niles and the townships of Baroda, Berrien, Bertrand, Buchanan, Chikaming, Galien, Howard, Milton, New Buffalo, Niles, Ontwa, Oronoko, Pipestone, Silver Creek, Sodus, Three Oaks, and Weesaw. Residents can view updates from Rep. Paquette or subscribe to his news updates by visiting www. RepPaquette.com. — STAFF REPORTS

Sen. LaSata’s office is open and ready for business

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en. Kim LaSata announced Monday that her Lansing office is open and ready to meet the needs of constituents of the 21st Senate District. “My staff and I are delighted to serve Southwest Michigan residents,” said LaSata, R-Bainbridge Township. “Our office doors are open, and we look forward to hearing from constituents and assisting them with questions and ideas on issues affecting our district and state. We also welcome residents visiting the Capital to stop in anytime for a visit.” LaSata’s office is S-310 of the State Capitol in Lansing. Residents may contact LaSata by phone at 517373-6960, by email at SenKLaSata@ senate.michigan.gov, or via U.S. mail by writing to Sen. Kim LaSata, P. O. Box 30036, Lansing, MI 48909. The 21st Senate District includes all of Berrien, Cass, and St. Joseph counties. — STAFF REPORTS


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Curtain closing on hospital 30 N Whittaker St

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BY STAN MADDUX

Deli by day

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2019

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30 N Whittaker St Bar by night

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ranciscan Health has moved into its new hospital along Interstate 94 outside Michigan City. The emergency department at the new $233 million facility opened at 6 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 12. Patients at the old hospital on Michigan City’s west side began getting transferred to their new rooms about two hours later. The move was finished before the end of the day. Dean Mazzoni, president and CEO of the hospital, said the new hospital contains 123 inpatient Open 7 days Open 7 days Open Thursday-Monday Ope beds and the latest in advanced medical technology. davidsdeliandcoffee.com davidsdeliandcoffee.com thefalsefrontbar.com the He said there are plans for an urgent care facility inside a small portion of the old hospital at 301 W. Homer St. in March. What will be done with the rest of the empty, 400,000-square feet of space has not been decided. ‘’That’s a work in progress,’’ Mazzoni said. He said the goal is to repurpose as much of the old facility as possible and have it used for some type of medical related purpose. Mazzoni said service providers BEFORE AFTER and potential investors have Black Algae Streak Removal • Moss Removal Green Mildew Removal • Gutter Cleaning already been talked to about the site. SERVING SOUTHWEST MICHIGAN SINCE 1992 LICENSED - INSURED - OWNER OPERATED According to Franciscan CALL 269-429-4466 • TEXT 269-757-2050 officials, the land at the current site was donated in 1902 to the Sisters of St. Francis specifically for use as a hospital. The original 25-bed hospital opened two years later. In 1920, the hospital was expanded to 50 beds. Six years later, it was expanded to 100 beds. Another addition came in 1968. Then, 10 years later, the original structure was demolished, officials said. Trish Weber, vice-president of operations and chief nursing officer, said the move to a brand-new facility is exciting but tears had definitely been shed by her and other members of the staff. ‘’I’ve been here for over 20 years now and I will miss it. We’ve had a lot of great memories here,’’ she said.

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2019

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School board members sworn in

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BY FRANCESCA SAGALA

ew Buffalo Area Schools Board of Education members started the first meeting of the year, which was Monday, Jan. 14, by swearing in members and electing officers. Business Manager Dan Coffman administered the oath of office to Roger Lijewksi, Frank Magro, and Pano Arvanitis, who were each reelected to the board during last November’s general election, and Tricia Newton, who was elected to the board during the election. Board members also voted that the following members retain their current offices: Chuck Heit, president; Magro, vice president; Arvanitis, treasurer; and Heather Black, secretary. Board members approved a lengthy consent agenda, which included the appointment of Thrun Law Firm as general counsel; the posting of legal Tricia Newton, Roger Lijewski, Frank Magro notices in the and Pano Arvanitis take the oath of office New Buffalo Times; the board continuing its membership with the Michigan School Board Association (MSBA) and National School Board Association (NSBA); designating Superintendent Dr. Jeffrey Leslie, New Buffalo Secondary Schools Principal Wayne Butler, high school secretary Devinnie Wysocki, middle school secretary Barbara Coffman and Administrative Assistant to the Superintendent Yvonne Homolka to issue work permits; and designating Leslie, or his designee, to sign all necessary paperwork for sale/purchase of district properties and all other documents required by the district. Board members also approved the appointment of members to the following committees: executive/finance committee, Heit, Magro and Arvanitis with Black as alternative; personnel committee, Lisa Werner, Magro and Black with Heit as alternate; curriculum committee, Werner, Newton and Black with Arvanitis as alternate; building and ground, Arvanitis, Lijewski and Heit with Magro as alternate; Berrien County Intermediate School District, Newton with Werner as alternate; Berrien-Cass School Boards Association, Heit with Werner as alternate and Local Revenue Sharing Board (LRSB), Arvanitis with Heit as alternate. Also at the meeting, board members approved making safety upgrades to the middle and high school entranceways for a cost not to exceed $25,000. Leslie explained that he wanted to construct a door where a small window currently is on one of the walls in the entranceways of both schools. Currently, visitors must buzz in and wait until they get let into the double glass doors by either the middle or high school secretary. Leslie explained that visitors were supposed to sign into the office once they got buzzed in; however, some were slipping through without signing in, The new door would lead directly into the office, making it easier to ensure that visitors signed in. Leslie said he’d like to start on the construction before spring break so that it’d be completed by the time students returned. He added that he’d also like to work on the elementary school as well in the summer. Board members approved January as being School Board Recognition Month. The Board of Education being recognized as the policyholder for the New Buffalo 5-C Education Association regarding employee health insurance benefits per the Public Employee Relations Act (423.215, Section 15 - 3a) was approved. The employment of substitute bus driver Richard Fatter as regular van driver was approved. The employment of Peggy Swain as Bison After School Enrichment (BASE) aide was approved. Board members approved a two-year co-operative high school boys tennis program with Bridgman Public Schools and Lake Michigan Catholic (LMC) that will begin July 1. Leslie explained that the district was continuing its co-op with Bridgman next year and would also feature a couple tennis players from LMC.


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ARENA sports

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Bison trample Lakers BY STAN MADDUX

he game was competitive for a while but the Bison after halftime cruised to a 63-43 win at home against Lake Michigan Catholic in boys’ basketball Friday, Jan. 11. Cold shooting from New Buffalo heated up a bit while LMC on offense kept struggling to find the rim. Head coach Nathan Tripp said his players becoming more consistent applying pressure on defense was the major difference maker in the final outcome. ‘’That really turned the game around,’’ Tripp said. Tripp said more shots began falling for the Bison (6-2) when his players on offense started exercising more patience working the ball. Poor shot selection this season has been a problem but one Tripp feels will improve as his young squad gets more games under its belt. The Bison led by 18 points at the end of the third quarter and opened up a 56-33 lead with 4:36 left until the final buzzer. ‘’It’s a good win. We’ll definitely take it,” Tripp said. Sophomore guard Brennan Grott led Bison scorers with 16 points. Freshman Kaden Parmley and senior Ben O’Donnell were next with 12 and 9 points respectively. Sophomore Sean Gordon contributed 8 points and Junior Tucker Morse added 7 points.

Lalumiere defends #1 ranking

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BY STAN MADDUX

he high school boys’ basketball team from Lalumiere showed why it’s ranked #1 in the nation Monday night. A flurry of slam dunks to start the third quarter propelled the Lakers to a 89-36 home victory over Harlan Community Academy from Chicago. The first two dunks were from senior forward Keion Brooks, Jr. off passes from junior guard Wendell Green, Jr. A lay up from Green off an assist by Brooks who provided a third dunk came next before freshman Kamari Lands threw one down the rim during a 26-7 run. Lalumiere is 18-0 going into the Spalding Hoophall Classic in Springfield, Massachusetts. The Lakers open the competition against DeMatha Catholic High School from Hyattsville, Maryland. DCHS is ranked 19th in the nation. Lalumiere head coach Pat Holmes said his team has adjusted well to having a majority of new players on the roster to start the 2018-19 season. He sees a need for more consistency, though, especially on defense if his players want to bring home a national championship. ‘’They’re all gifted scorers and know how to play, but defensively doing what we’re supposed to be doing on every single possession that needs to get better,’’ Holmes said. The Lakers have racked up several recent wins by 35 points or more against teams such as Quakerdale Prep, International Sports Academy and Indiana Elite Prep. The 2016-17 LaLumiere squad was champs of the Dick’s Sporting Goods High School national title.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2019

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From the Bleachers COLUMN BY KURT MARGGRAF IN CHICAGO

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aseball is just around the corner and this season will bring Cub fans a new sense of wonder. After decades of futility the Cubs have won 387 games in the last four years, 116 more than the previous four. They have also made the playoffs three out of the last four years and, as well documented, won their first World Series in 108 years. As each of the last four seasons began, Cub fans have been confident that their team would be good enough to compete for championships, and the team hasn’t disappointed. With the season about to begin, the optimism of the previous four years is fighting with the skepticism of the previous century. While their main division rivals have added some really good players, the Cubs have been relatively quiet. The Brewers needed a catcher, so they went out and added switch hitting Yasmani Grandal, a significant upgrade. The Cardinals have added all star first baseman Paul Goldschmidt to their lineup and are poised to join the Brewers and Cubs at the top of the division. Even the Pirates and Reds have improved, while the Cubs have basically remained the same. There are some obvious areas of need that have not been addressed and it feels like the Cubs are not going to spend any money this offseason. I have a lot of faith in the Cubs front office and maybe they will make a splash before the season starts, or maybe the improvement will have to come from within. Regardless of what happens before the season begins, the regular season is going to be extremely competitive. I, for one, believe that all is, or will be good, and the Cubs will return to the top of their division and once again compete for the championship. And on the other side of town, the White Sox will begin their ascent. I’m not sure if they can win this year, but they will definitely be better and next year, they should be right near the top. All in all it promises to be an exciting season of baseball in Chicago. I watched the football playoffs this weekend even though the Bears were eliminated last week. I guess the four best teams are still standing, even though I think the Bears should be one of them, and the games this coming weekend should be real barn burners. Once again, the Eagles played better than I thought they would, but fell short when former Bear Alshon Jeffery let a ball slip through his hands directly into the hands of his opponent. His miscue allowed the Saints to escape with a victory and set up a showdown with the Rams next week. The other game will pit the Patriots against the Chiefs, and the winners will compete in the Super Bowl. Good luck to all four teams and next season I fully expect the Bears to go all the way. Albert Einstein said “It’s not that I’m so smart, it’s just that I stay with problems longer.” Be careful out there. Make good choices. Keep smiling. Talk to you next week. Peace, love, and happiness.

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A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be. — Wayne Gretzky

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2019

NICHOLAS BOWEN NAMED TO DEAN’S LIST

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icholas Bowen was named to the Dean’s list at Ohio Northern University’s Dicke College of Business Administration for academic performance for the Fall 2018 semester. To be named to the list, a student must be enrolled in at least 12 semester hours of coursework for that semester and attain a minimum 3.5 GPA. Congratulations to Nicholas Bowen for this achievement. — STAFF REPORTS

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Water safety group works to restore New Buffalo’s lifeguard coverage

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BY LEANNE R. PENNY

or decades, the New Buffalo City Public Beach has been a major tourist attraction for those who are looking to trade chores and work for a day of sun and sand. A day spent on the shores of Lake Michigan can help reset priorities and fill depleted inner reserves. What beach patrons may not be aware of, though, is that these idyllic sunny beach sessions are far safer with a trained lifeguard keeping an eye on the water. The public lifeguards posted at the city beach are managed and extensively trained by the city, enabling them to perform their duties with excellence. Lifeguard certification involves Red Cross training, surf rescue training, defibrillator usage, CPR and more. Unfortunately, in the past few years, budget cuts have hit the lifeguard program hard. Beach coverage went from being seven days a week to only four days of lifeguard staffing; however, a small group in New Buffalo is working alongside the city to restore full lifeguard coverage this summer. Nora Howe, the group’s spokesperson, has a love for water and is herself a retired lifeguard. “I grew up on the East Coast,” she said, “and those waves rolled slowly. But on Lake Michigan ,the waves hit you one after another, making it more dangerous than ocean waters.” The waves, coupled with the rip current caused by jetties and structures, make the southern part of Lake Michigan dangerous for swimmers. In fact, half of all drownings in the Great Lakes happen in Lake Michigan, and half of those happen on the shores between St. Joseph, Michigan, and southern Wisconsin. The water safety group hopes to ensure a full budget for the summer of 2019 to sufficiently cover training, equipment, and salaries for eight lifeguards. The goal is to have seven day coverage, with increased staffing on the weekends. The beach is a huge draw, especially in July. Last year, head lifeguard Faith Hoekstra reported having as many as 1400 patrons on the beach at one time. Having highly trained lifeguards are only part of the solution, though. “We are also looking for volunteers to patrol the beach,” Howe said. Volunteers would be asked to report to the beach on heavy attendance days to answer questions, hand out bandaids, and keep people off the jetty. “Lots of people try to talk to the lifeguards and they need to always keep their eyes on the water,” Howe added. Adults and teens are welcome to sign up as volunteers. Students would receive service hours. Water safety volunteers and lifeguards will be supervised by city Parks Supervisor Kristin D’Amico and Police Chief Rich Killips, along with Hoekstra. For more information about helping to increase lifeguard coverage or volunteering for beach patrol, contact Hoekstra at fhoekstra@ CityOfNewBuffalo.org


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Villa Nova Pizzeria to debut new outdoor patio this spring BY FRANCESCA SAGALA

hanks to recent upgrades, Villa Nova Pizzeria will be offering one more option for festive outdoor dining to New Buffalo residents and visitors once the winds turn warmer again in southwest Michigan. For the past few months, the popular New Buffalo eatery has been creating an outdoor patio. A large container, which arrived last November, will contain the bar area. A roof-in area is located on one side of the container. High and low tables are set up throughout one side of the patio. In one corner, a small putting green has also been set up to be enjoyed by diners. Villa Nova General Manager Spencer Coleman said that the patio will also allow for the restaurant to go from having six taps (five for beer and one for Sangria, he said) to 12 taps. Once the new patio has been completed, he said he plans on using a “bottoms up” beer dispenser. A bottoms up cup has a

hole with a metal ring around it at the bottom that is sealed with an FDAapproved magnet. When placed on a Bottoms Up dispenser, the magnet is lifted up so that the cup can be filled to a preprogrammed amount of beer. Coleman said this method is “efficient” and eliminates any excess waste. Coleman also plans on experimenting with fresh ingredients, such as freshly squeezed juices, for the cocktails in the summer months. The cocktails will also have a makeover, he said. “We’ll go from doing more basic cocktails to having craft cocktails,” he said. Coleman said he can’t wait to start concocting warmer weather cocktails soon on the new outdoor patio. This year’s roundup of winter cocktails have included Cranberry G & T, Peppermint Kiss Martini, Rumchata Eggnog, Cranberry Mule, Feliz Navidad Martini and Rudolph’s Punch. Coleman said the idea for an outdoor

patio was conceived by Villa Nova owners Dawn and Dave Workman after visiting Nashville, Tennessee, which is where their children have attended college. Down there, outdoor dining options are steadily growing in popularity. “I think they wanted to get in on the forefront of that (the outdoor dining trend),” Coleman said. Coleman said he hopes that the new patio will invite even more visitors to sit down and enjoy their meals while at the restaurant. Currently, Villa Nova contains several tables and chairs inside of the restaurant (and had some benches outside where the new patio will be located) along with its carryout and delivery options. He envisions families mixing and mingling with each other while enjoying their meals at some of the high tables on the patio. “The goal is for it to be a place to come to as a destination and not just a place to go,” he said.

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Coleman said he anticipated the patio possibly being finished in March (just in time for St. Patrick’s Day) or early April. Hopefully, he said it will draw even more first-time customers to Villa Nova than the restaurant already had in 2018. “It’s good pizza - and we want to get more people eating it,” he said. Having opened its doors in 2008, Villa Nova is now celebrating its 11th year in New Buffalo. In addition to its wide variety of pizzas, the restaurant also offers large and side salads, sandwiches, appetizers, pastas, calzones, and desserts. Besides cocktails, beer and wine is also available. Last September, Villa Nova was voted the number one suburban pizza spots by ABC 7 Chicago’s designated “Hungry Hound,” reporter Steve Dolinsky. It has locations in Stickney (the original Villa Nova) and Lockport, Illinois, and Chesterton, Indiana. The New Buffalo eatery is located at 134 E. Buffalo St.


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2019

Passerby saves historic barn

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BY STAN MADDUX

LaPorte area couple is extremely grateful to a passerby with a fire extinguisher for preventing their historic red barn from going up in flames. “To stop and take action. I can’t thank him enough,” said Shelby Moravec. She and her husband, Mark Kurth, own the old Forrester Farm near Indiana 2 and 100 South about five miles west of LaPorte. The property, including the barn and two story brick farm house built in 1856, is on the National Registry of Historic Places. The barn erected in 1917 is also on the list of the 200 most historic barns in Indiana. Jeff Jentzen said he was driving home January 9 from his job at Circle R Mechanical in Portage when out of the corner of his eye he saw flames flickering on the north side of the barn. He stopped and grabbed a fire extinguisher from his company-owned truck just as the smoldering flames seemed ready to take off. Jentzen after emptying the extinguisher ran over to the stately looking home and knocked on the front door. Moravec, doing some book keeping in her home office on the second floor, said she had no idea the barn caught fire. She grabbed an extinguisher from inside the barn then gave it to Jentzen, a former member of the Coolspring Township Volunteer Fire Department. Firefighters doused what little of the flames were still burning. The barn probably would have gone up like match sticks had another ten minutes gone without the fire being noticed, said Scipio Township Fire Chief Eric Fenstermaker. ‘’I think we would have had a totally different situation,’’ Fenstermaker said. Fenstermaker said the minimal damage was confined mostly to the door frame and a piece of the exterior wood siding. Moravec said the flames had just burned through a section of the siding and started climbing up the outside wall when Jentzen came along. Inside the barn were two restored Triumph brand motorcycles from 1968 and 1972 along with a 1957 Allis Chalmers tractor still in its original condition. “We dodged a major bullet,” Moravec said. Jentzen said he did what he felt he had to do. ‘’It was meant to be,’’ he said. Fenstermaker said the cause appeared to be electrical in nature. James Forrester came to the U.S from Ireland in 1818 and in 1834 arrived in Michigan City where he built a warehouse for merchandising salt, sugar, glass and other items, said LaPorte County Historian Fern Eddy Schultz. He later acquired farmland near Indiana State Prison then in 1837 sold all of his holdings and purchased the property in Scipio Township where he spent the remainder of his life. His family lived in a log cabin until the English Manor style farm house was built, Schultz said. Forrester served two-terms in the state legislature after the Civil War. Schultz said Forrester and his wife, Lavina, were attending the Indiana State Fair in 1880 when they both died from gas believed to have escaped from a defective pipe in a room. She wasn’t sure what was raised on the property but said farms in those days here grew predominantly corn. Kurth said hogs were also raised there judging by receipts from stockyards found in the attic. The foundation of a hog barn also remains on the property, he said., The house was empty for about 10-years before Moravec and Kurth moved in over three-years ago following an extensive renovation. Restoration of the barn was completed on the barn’s 100th anniversary. Kurth said the farm land surrounding the house was sold to other buyers. The couple operates a large vegetable garden to grow food for their own use. Kurth also restores antique cars and motorcycles in a garage behind the barn used to store vehicles once refurbished along with equipment used to maintain the property. “I feel extremely lucky.”

The Happy Music Kids Show A SHOW BY KIDS AND FOR KIDS COMES TO RADIO HARBOR COUNTRY

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he idea occurred to five-year-old Karina Hamann at WRHC studios while watching her grandmother, Jane Pellouchoud, record her popular radio salute to records, “The Ol’ Vinyl Show.” Karina: I want to do a show by kids for kids. Her grandmother as well as her mother, Gina Pellouchoud, thought this was a terrific idea. So, Gina appealed to the station’s programming committee, who gave it their blessing. And Gina and Karina were on their way to the land of happy music. They already have two shows “in the can,” that’s radio slang for ready to air. Gina: It’s really a cool program because it’s kid’s folk music. I have a playlist I saved from “Smithsonian Folkways” for children. Sort of an alternative take on kid’s music. The adorable, strawberry blonde Karina was poised and singing happily for most of this interview, which was conducted at Infusco Coffee in Sawyer, Michigan Gina: I want music that sounds authentic with real instruments, not tinny synthesizer stuff. Each show has a theme. The first one was animals. Karina: (singing) “We like the zoo cause we’re animals too.” The second show is about food. Gina: A lot of the origins of the style of music she likes are from a set of five records my friend gave me of all Fifties music like “How Much Is That Doggy in the Window.” Gina loves to say “put on my happy music.” It changes your whole outlook. When you’re in a funk, it distracts you and makes you feel better. That explains the show’s name “The Happy Music Kids show. Karina: (singing) “How Much is That Doggy in the Window?” Gina: Most of the show is music. We talk a little. We introduce the songs. We do a few poems or riddles. We might have guests … like if we did another food show, we could have kids talking about their favorite foods and foods they like to make. And Karina will sing along with songs. I think kids love hearing other kids sing. Her grandmother will be there and sing along too. Karina: I like doing the radio show, I like listening to myself. Gina: Yesterday we were recording “The Happy Music Kids Show.” And when it was over, Karina said “It’s over? We have to do another one.” So we did another one … she just wanted to keep going. She could dance and sing a-long all day and it would make her happy. Karina is the main person announcing songs. And her mother weaves in and out assisting where she can. Gina: I help because she’s five. It’s mostly her brainchild, it really is. Her mother, Gina Pellouchoud, is an educator, working in Buchanan schools. Karina goes to kindergarten in Buchanan. The Happy Music Kid’s show airs at 4:30 p.m. on Mondays, right after “It’s Elementary,” a show featuring kids from River Valley Elementary School. Radio Harbor Country is your community radio station since 2006. Tune in to 93.5 FM or 106.7 FM on your radio or stream live at RADIOHARBORCOUNTRY.ORG. — GAIL ISAACSON


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Want to Read More in 2019? Join New Buffalo Library’s Book Club

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BY LEANNE R. PENNY

well known quote by Ray Bradbury states that “You don’t have to burn books to destroy a culture. Just get people to stop reading them.” It seems as though the busier we get the lower we place the priority of reading, all the while checking out books for our children and leaving our own books unread. Reading an old-fashioned paper book can expand our perspective, increase our empathy, and boost healthy brain function. Yet still, we struggle to pick up a book and put down our phones- what’s the deal? Whether or not ‘reading more’ made it onto your list of New Year’s resolutions, chances are you’re looking to make some changes this year. Sadly, most goals set on January 1st fail by the second week of February. However, research suggests that one of the best ways nurture a new habit is through accountability, or getting others involved. If you’ve set a goal to read more in 2019 and are looking to engage the buddy system, the New Buffalo Township Library has a book club to help you get started. On the second Thursday of each month, a group of insightful readers gather to discuss that month’s selection. The organizer of the group, Rosemarie Blum has been leading and organizing the group for the past 3.5 years. “I’ve always loved reading and talking about books, so leading the group is basically heaven to me” says Blum who often prepares recipes to share with the book club which correspond to the book at hand. Here are a few more tips to read more in 2019: When you leave the house, always bring a book with you, so you can fill unused minutes reading. You get what you measure, so consider starting a reading log. You can use an app like Goodreads or use a paper notebook to log your reading and watch it grow! If you can’t stop to read a book, try audiobooks, which can be purchased through an app like Audible or downloaded through access provided by your local library.

JACKIE’S CAFÉ TO HOST CHINESE NEW YEAR/ VALENTINE BENEFIT DINNER, COOKING DEMO

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hef Jackie Shen is preparing to celebrate the Chinese New Year and Valentine’s Day with a special buffet dinner, which will take place from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 4, at Jackie’s Café. Guests can enjoy the cooking demo featuring her famous “Chocolate Bag” dessert, which will be the Valentine treat of the evening, at 5 p.m. Dinner will begin at 5:30 p.m. Tickets are $45/person (prepaid). All proceeds will be benefitting the River Valley Senior Center. For reservations, contact Jackie’s Café, 801 W. Buffalo St., New Buffalo, at 269-469-1800 or River Valley Senior Center, 13321 Red Arrow Hwy., Harbert, at 269-469-4556. — STAFF REPORTS

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Where: New Buffalo Rod & Gun Club, 10487 Kruger Rd, New Buffalo, MI For more information or to sign up email the Rod & Gun Club @ NBRG271@gmail.com or Norm/Pat Hood at defensivesolutions.sb@gmail.com registration and payment deadline 21 January 2019. Sign up early to guarantee a spot in this class.


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Some people think happiness is a luxury, but it’s a necessity.. You need to make space for it in your life. — Christie Brinkley


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2019

MICHIGAN CREDIT UNIONS RAISE $158,000 FOR CHILDREN’S HOSPITALS

FACING FORECLOSURE? BERRIEN TREASURER CAN HELP!

n 2018, the Michigan Credit Union League (MCUL) focused its fundraising efforts on the Children’s Miracle Network (CMN), a non-profit organization that raises funds for children’s hospitals, medical research and children’s health awareness. Through the League’s #KekeChallenge, silent and live auctions, fun run, golf outing and matching donations, MCUL raised a total of $158,635 last year. A large portion of this fund was raised through MCUL’s #KekeChallenge campaign, which donated $1,000 to the CMN Hospital of choice for each credit union that participated in the viral video challenge. “What started as a light-hearted idea and challenge by One Detroit CU CEO Hank Hubbard became a groundswell of fun, humorous promotion of individual credit union brands and the credit union spirit,” said MCUL President and CEO Dave Adams. “More than 25 credit unions and $22,000 in fundraising associated with the #KekeChallenge videos helped put Michigan’s CMN fundraising over $150,000 for 2018. MCUL thanks our credit union community for its sense of commitment to service but also for its willingness to find casual, fun ways to promote the special and unique character of credit unions.” Another $10,000 of the total sum raised is the result of a generous donation from the CO-OP Network. MCUL wants to thank CO-OP Network CEO Todd Clark for his organization’s recent contribution. MCUL is pleased to be able to donate this amount to a cause as worthy as CMN; however, while the League is delivering the check, this is on behalf of the Michigan credit union community and all that they do to contribute, whether it’s participating in the League’s #KekeChallenge or attending many fundraising events throughout the year and at the Annual Convention & Exposition. The League looks forward to seeing what its movement can do for CMN Hospitals in 2019. — STAFF REPORTS

errien County Treasurer Bret Witkowski will meet with property owners who are in danger of losing their homes to foreclosure due to unpaid property taxes. Those who owe 2016 and/ or 2017 taxes can set up a monthly payment plan to avoid foreclosure. Last year over 400 property owners avoided foreclosure by signing up for a monthly payment plan. This program has served to benefit property owners and allow them to avoid forfeiting their properties with an overall success rate of 92%. If you are unable to come to either the Treasurer’s St. Joseph office (at 701 Main Street) during normal office hours of 8:30-5:00 PM, or the Niles office on Tuesdays from 9:00 – 12:00 PM, Treasurer Witkowski has set special times when you can meet with him in Niles, Three Oaks, and Benton Harbor. For questions please call 269-983-7111, Ext 8569. The times and dates for these meetings will be held at the following locations to add convenience to Berrien County property owners. • January 26th 11:00 AM- 3:00 PM Niles Public Library 620 E. Main Street Niles, MI 49120

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• February 14th 5:00 PM-7:00 PM Three Oaks Public Library 3 N Elm Street Three Oaks, MI 49128 • March 2nd Benton Harbor City Hall 11:00 AM-3:00 PM 200 E. Wall Street Benton Harbor, MI 49022 By law, you need to pay your 2016 and prior unpaid taxes, or enter into a payment plan, or your property will be foreclosed April 1st, 2019. If the delinquent taxes are not paid or made subject to a payment plan by April 1, 2019, then the Treasurer cannot do anything under the law to allow you to keep your property. So please take advantage of this opportunity to save your property. — STAFF REPORTS

Stirring the Coffee WHATEVER HAPPENED TO PESHTIGO COURT? BY GAIL ISAACSON

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n a frigid day in January 1986, I went to interview for a writing job. The ad agency was located on Chicago’s magnificent mile. I parked my car on Illinois Street, a nether world beneath posh North Michigan Avenue. At that time, Illinois Street was a wasteland of parking lots all the way from lower Michigan to Peshtigo Court. The only lots with spaces were near the Kraft Building at Illinois and Peshtigo. Growing up in Chicago, I had seen this art-deco kingdom of cheese many times, mostly from the back seat of my father’s car. As we passed on Lake Shore Drive, I would look down at the building in awe. I thought it was a castle. Peshtigo Court was the moat. When I was older, I got to know the area. In the late nineteen seventies I worked on Hubbard Street above the jazz club called Andy’s. During my lunch hour, I would explore. Industrial and grimy, lower Illinois and Grand Avenues were the battery of Chicago. I started my journey on the lakefront at a decaying Navy Pier which today, restored to a sparkle, is Chicago’s number one tourist attraction. Walking East, I’d encounter the fire department gym, famous for its boxing rings where prize fighters Barney Ross and Casius Clay once sparred. Next, I’d have to stop at Rocky’s Bait Shop, renowned for French fried shrimp. On a balmy day in the nineteen seventies, I would spot newspaper columnists like Mike Royco dissing a four-hour lunch at “in” spot Riccardo’s, for a paper bag of shrimp and a whiff of Lake Michigan. Others seeking a cheap lunch would leave the high - heeled bunch at Tribune Tower, climb down the iron steps and descend into the land of greasy spoons. Jerry’s Deli on Grand was Chicago’s version of Seinfeld’s soup Nazi. As patrons entered, Jerry would yell “WHATDYA WANT, WHATDYA WANT?” If you were undecided, he’d bellow, “make up your mind, I don’t have all day!” Jerry’s is where I lunched on that cold day in 1986 - after I did not get the job. Afterwards, I walked towards Peshtigo Court to retrieve my frozen Mustang. The jitters I felt during my job interview were nothing compared to how stupid

A good laugh is sunshine in the house. — William Makepeace Thackeray

I felt losing my car in the sea of parking lots that once was Illinois Street. As dusk fell, I was still dragging my shivering self down the distressed Illinois Street pavement. Soon the ad agency exec I had met came down for his car - whistling jingles I would never write. I finally spotted Jeffrey Baron, a guy I knew from high school. He took pity on me, having lost his own car on Illinois Street more than once. He drove me up and down the street of bad dreams till I found my shivering Mustang. In 1972, the kingdom of cheese was miracle whipped to Glenview. The former Kraft building served as makeshift city offices for decades. In 2004, it was torn down, leaving lonely Peshtigo Court to fend for itself. Today, Peshtigo Court can hardly be found. It exists as a narrow strip, between Illinois and Grand Ave. – a streak of the past crammed up against haughty condo developments. There is only one parking lot left on Illinois Street. Instead, high - rise apartment buildings, movie theaters and bowling alleys now claim this ground. The murky Illinois-Grand underworld is now a fashionable district called “River East.” How do I know so much about it? I own a small apartment there. This winter when I walked my dog Maggie near Peshtigo Court, I imagined the snow as Kraft Marshmallow Crème. Maggie found Illinois Street to be top dog sniffing territory, no doubt picking up ghost scents of fried shrimp from Rocky’s Bait shop. Peshtigo Court was named for a town in Wisconsin near the summer home of Chicago’s Mayor Ogden. Peshtigo, Wisconsin suffered a fire on October 8, 1871 - the very same day as the Chicago fire. The Chicago fire became famous. The Wisconsin tragedy was eulogized by an obscure lane in Chicago. Presently it is jammed with equipment for the construction of tall buildings. Peshtigo Court languishes in the shadows. The greasy spoons, fishermen and prize-fighters are gone. In their place are tourists who, in their haste to find Navy Pier, walk right past lonely Peshtingo Court, paying it no notice at all. Oh yes, and someone who remembers Peshtigo Court – from the days when Cheez Whiz actually had cheese in it.


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THE CITY OF NEW BUFFALO, MICHIGAN IS HIRING SURF RESCUE LIFEGUARDS FOR THE 2019 SUMMER SEASON.

is read FROEHLICH

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PAY $11.00/hr.

Americ

America NOTICED!

DINE IN • CARRYOUT • CATERING EVENT SPACE • GOURMET GROCERY DOWNTOWN THREE OAKS

Participate in Democracy. Read your Public Notices.

Look what

FROEHLICH’S

lakes and rivers within Berrien County. Deputies will be responsible for proper maintenance on boats, engines, trailers and vehicles, and caring for all County issued gear and equipment.

Look what

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of theFind Marine Safety Act on Lake out about these Michigan as in well aslocal the newspaper! many inland and much more your

NEW BUFFALO Year Around Rental. Large 2 and 3 bedroom apartments. Will be available in September/ October. Quiet Living, no pets. ✩ $750-$925 per month. For more information call 269-469-1364.

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Public notices help expose: ● fraud in government! DUTIES the supervision of the Marine ●Under dishonest businesses! Lieutenant and/or Marine Sergeant, ● unfair competitive practices! responsibilities include enforcement

FOR RENT NEW BUFFALO RETAIL US 12 high-visibility rental & pop-up spaces next to popular yoga studio. Great parking. 700-2,000 SF. Call to view/rates @ 312-259-4011.

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HOURS Hours are based on a 40-hour work week, and is weather dependent. Deputies will be required to work weekends with holidays mandatory.

SPIN CYCLE CLASSES OFFERED

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America didn’t NOTICE?

www.eqfitnessnb.com | getfit@eqfitnessnb.com

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The City of New Buffalo is an equal opportunity employer.

What if

705 W. Buffalo, New Buffalo 269-586-4280

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This is a salaried position exempt from overtime pay with a salary range expected at $50,000 to $55,000. Qualified candidates should submit a resume before February 8, 2019 to the City Manager, City of New Buffalo, 224 W. Buffalo Street, New Buffalo, MI 49117 or email manager@ cityofnewbuffalo.org.

REQUIREMENTS Must be 18 years of age and out of high school at least one year prior to the start of the boating season. Must be able to pass a complete background check, and swim test. Able to work well with others. Prior boating knowledge and a mechanical aptitude, computer skills along with written and verbal communication ✩ skills desired.

HOUSE FOR RENT NEW BUFFALO 3bd, 1ba, home. Approximate 1500 sft. Large yard, country living, close to town. Call 219-872-3843 forinformation, scheduled viewing.

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New Buffalo offers an excellent benefit package including health insurance and retirement. The ideal candidate will have either 3 years of previous experience in upper level supervision or a minimum of 5 years’ experience in public works operations.

Applications (PDF) can be downloaded from the Berrien County website, or picked up from the County Administration Personnel Office. All applications must be returned to Personnel.

Premiere 24 hour fitness facility for men & women 18 years and older. Membership options available for both full-time and part-time residents, call for details!

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This position is responsible for the planning, organization and direction of the day-to-day activities of the public works of the City of New Buffalo; providing for the operation and maintenance of City parks and recreational facilities and other duties assigned by the City Manager; providing for the maintenance of City streets and alley rights-of way, including, but not limited to complete streets infrastructure (motorized and non-motorized transportation), the stormwater management system, sanitary sewer collection system, urban forestry program, decorative street lighting program, Department of Public Works facilities, City vehicle and equipment maintenance.

This is a temporary/seasonal position. New deputies will begin training on the weekends in April. Patrols will begin with the Memorial Day holiday and end with the Labor Day holiday.

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The deadline to apply for Marine Deputies during the 2019 boating season has been extended to February 15, 2019. All applications must be received in Personnel or post marked by February 15, 2019.

Please submit your classified ad via email at classifieds@newbuffalotimes. com. New Buffalo Times can now accept online payments with a credit card or paypal. Go to our website, www.newbuffalotimes.com, and submit $14 per week for a classified ad of up to 160 characters. Deadline is Friday 5PM before the following week’s publication.

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MARINE DEPUTY APPLICATIONS – DEADLINE EXTENDED

CLASSIFIED ADS

R U O SS H E C 24 C A

PUBLIC NOTICES

THE CITY OF NEW BUFFALO IS SEEKING APPLICANTS FOR THE POSITION OF DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS.

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America

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HOME CLEAN HOME Affordable, reliable and ready to ● School district budgets serve all of your cleaning needs! ● Property auctions Residential, rentals, and business Public NWI/New hearings Buffalo services- ● serving and●surrounding areas. Local tax changes 219-393-9501.

● Adoptions

Media@NewBuffaloTimes.com NEW BUFFALO TIMES READERSHIP

Find out about these and more in your local paper!

5,000+ unique Readers weekly

• High Quality Participate in Democracy. • LowPublic Cost Notices. Intelligent • Local • Affluent • Dynamic Read your TJ Corse Media@NewBuffaloTimes.com Phone/Text (269)405-3255


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2019

SERVICE DIRECTORY

Tom Rossman, Agent 815 E Buffalo New Buffalo, MI 49117 Bus: 269-469-4442 Toll Free: 866-848-5266 www.tomrossman.net State Farm, Bloomington, IL 1211999

Professionals in all of your tree care needs “Opening Doors To Affordable Housing”

We Build Modular Homes Year Round Located On The Corner of Fail Road & Highway #2 Over 5 Model Homes On Display

800-729-5664 www.laportehousing.com

REMOVAL STORM DAMAGE TRIMMING FIREWOOD PRESERVATION LOT CLEARING SNOW PLOWING

free estimates

Commercial • Residential 37 Years Experience • Insured Dennis Jeffers, sr. 219-393-3155 maplecitytree@comcast.net

&

ADVERTISING . MARKET . DIGITAL

Residential/Commercial Weekly — Daily — Monthly Special Occasions Free Estimates

Tree SpecialiSTS

Hutter Associates, p.c.

Mac and PC Upgrades and Repairs Small Business Professionals

Harbor Time Professional Cleaning Services LLC

Maple City

New Buffalo Times PLEASE CONTACT JANINE L. ADAMSKI

JANINEADAMSKI@GMAIL.COM (630) 370-0820

Tax Services Accounting Services (Compilations & Reviews)

Quickbooks ProAdvisors Business Consulting CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

Serving Harbor Country Since 1982

JAMES R. HUTTER, CPA MATTHEW E. HOLLANDER, CPA

LOUISE SAYDEE

269-231-5763

269.469.5858

LOUISE@HABORTIMEPCS.COM

huttercpa.com

LAWN CARE & LANDSCAPING SNOW PLOWING • LICENSED & INSURED FREE ESTIMATES Office (269) 545-8242 • Cell (269) 845-0410

Not the time to check your child’s car seat. safercar.gov/TheRightSeat


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THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2019

HOROSCOPE JANUARY 17-23, 2019

AS INTERPRETED BY SANDY “STAR” BENDT ARIES MARCH 21—APRIL 19 Your energy levels are good, and you are ready to strike out on your own or challenge some existing authority patterns. You may feel some constraints on personal freedom but the more brick walls you hit the harder you will push. The key to getting ahead is conquering your inner demons first.

LIBRA SEPTEMBER 23—OCTOBER 22 There are some shifts coming in your community or circle of friends and they may not settle down completely until the summer. Also, there may be some unusual arrangements made at home. You may have to shift the furniture around or change your sleeping habits as a result of these changes.

TAURUS APRIL 20—MAY 20 There is a strong need to be alone or figure things out on your own this week. Your actions may be taken as secretive or suspicious by others but it’s best to keep things to yourself for now. There is an element of distrust or skeletons coming out of the closet but make decisions on your own anyway.

SCORPIO OCTOBER 23—NOVEMBER 21 You may hear some harsh words or opinions from associates that might really discourage you but in reality, you are getting some serious constructive criticism that can really give you some insight into what changes you need to make to succeed. You are getting some golden information here.

GEMINI MAY 21—JUNE 21 You would like to prove yourself or get others to do things your way but there may be some developments that stem from competitive actions that may cause some challenges or hardships down the road. It’s best to get input from friends rather than exclude them now.

SAGITTARIUS NOVEMBER 22—DECEMBER 21 Embrace who you are and have the confidence to branch out on your own. You are being called upon to go on a journey or a pursuit that will aid you in uncovering your personal talents and assets. Be true to yourself and move beyond familial boundaries when needed.

CANCER JUNE 22—JULY 22 You will be pressed to follow the norms or work within existing parameters and will be quite comfortable doing so because of the results you get but you won’t truly fix financial issues until you shift some of your ideas about personal wealth and your ability to make money for your talents.

CAPRICORN DECEMBER 22—JANUARY 19 The vibes coming at you from the stars could really be causing an emotional response from you this week. The best way to deal with this is to be very direct and honest about where your boundaries are. The key here is to stick up for yourself and campaign for your family.

LEO JULY 23—AUGUST 22 Your mind is full of great ideas and it would be wise to write them down because there may be some logistic issues or the need for outside help that could be avoided if you do the proper planning now. You can feel that situations are shifting, and preparations made now will definitely help you later.

AQUARIUS JANUARY 20—FEBRUARY 18 Relationships will be undergoing a lot of shifts over the next six months and it’s important you get in touch with how you feel about partnerships now. There is a sense that you feel distant from partners or like you are not well matched. Conversations could get a little out of control.

VIRGO AUGUST 23—SEPTEMBER 22 Family and domestic issues will be coming up this week and children or young people may cause a bit of a stir or present ideas that go against the traditional modus operandi. Because of this you will get a deeper understanding of what it means to support and protect those you love.

PISCES FEBRUARY 19—MARCH 20 Money and resources will be secured this week but understand that your career or working relationships will be undergoing some shifts over the next several months. These changes will bring an increase in the overall value of your work but be aware that there will be some clashes with authority.

I have learned that friendship isn’t about who you’ve known the longest, it’s about who came and never left your side. — Yolanda Hadid

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2019

EVENTS Reach 5,000 + unique Event goers each week. Please send your Event you wish to publish including the number of times in Advance of your Event that you wish to Advertise to Media@NewBuffaloTimes.com Additionally, please mail $28 for each time you wish your Event published to New Buffalo Times P.O. Box 369 New Buffalo, Michigan 49117 Thank You Reaching 5,000 + unique Event goers each week.

DAILY EVENTS

NEW BUFFALO TOWNSHIP LIBRARY See weekly library events on page 3.

EVERY MONDAY

ZUMBA 6:30PM. New Buffalo High School High Gymnasium/Dance Studio. 111 E Clay St. New Buffalo. 219-614-8847. Teacher is Marie Crist. $7 per class.

EVERY WEDNESDAY KNITTING AT THE DELI 2-4PM. David’s Deli. All are welcome.

CREATIVE EDITORIAL MARKETING

DESIGN

CALL TODAY! WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!

219-331-9230

EVERY THURSDAY & SUNDAY OPEN TRAP PRACTICE 6:30-9:30PM. New Buffalo Rod and Gun Club. 10487 Kruger Rd. New Buffalo. Open to the public. Contact Bob Kruger at 269-612-0983.

LAST THURSDAY OF THE MONTH

HARBOR COUNTRY BOOK CLUB 6:30PM. New Buffalo Township Library. 33 N. North Thompson. New Buffalo.

EVERY FRIDAY

STORY TIME AT THREE OAKS LIBRARY 10:30AM. www.threeoakslibrary.org. KARAOKE NIGHT 7-11PM. Dooley’s Lake House Pub. 310 W Buffalo St. New Buffalo. 269-469-2247. www.dooleyslakehouse.com. Kids and adults are welcome!

EVERY SATURDAY

YOGA AT THE PARK 9AM. New Buffalo Township.

EVERY 2ND & 3RD SATURDAY NEW TROY FLEA MARKET 9AM-3PM. New Troy Community Center. 13372 California Rd. New Troy. Admission is free.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 19

WHAT ANIMAL IS IT? TRACKS, SCATS AND SIGNS 10AM. Jens Jensen Nature Preserve.

6851 Parkway Dr. Sawyer. Join Casey Struecker as she leads Harbor Country Hikers (HCH) on a wilderness forensics hike through Jens Jensen Preserve. THE CHICAGO EXPERIENCE 8PM. Acorn Theater. The Chicago Experience invites you to relive memories of the music that captured everyone’s hearts, from the early hits off Chicago Transit Authority’s 1968 selftitled album, such as “Beginnings” and “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?”, through the 1980s, with Chicago’s hits “Hard To Say I’m Sorry” and “You’re The Inspiration.” Box office opens at 4 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at www.acorntheater.org.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26

2019 FOURTH ANNUAL NEW BUFFALO WINTERFEST AND THE RUNNING OF THE BULL AFTERNOON PUB CRAWL 1:00 Dooley’s Lake House Pub. 2:15 Bentwood Tavern at Marina Grand. 3:15 New Buffalo Yacht Club. 4:15 Terrace Room at Harbor Grand. 5:15 Stray Dog Bar & Grill. 6:15 Crawl to Casey’s. Admission is FREE. Food & Beverages: Pay as you go (cash required at NBYC). Dress Code: Costumes encouraged, but anything goes! Questions? NewBuffalo.Bull@gmail.com. WINTER WINE DINNER AT BREWSTER’S 7PM. Brewster’s Italian Cafe. 11 W Merchant St. New Buffalo. Enjoy an evening with John and Kathleen as they guide diners through a multi-course dinner with wine pairings for each dish. For tickets, visit brewsterswinedinner.eventbrite. com or email brewstersnewbuffalo@gmail. com. Tickets are $65. Seating is limited.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27

LUCKY BRIDE WEDDING SHOW NOON-4PM. Four Winds Casino. 11111 Wilson Rd. New Buffalo. The upscale bridal show will feature premier wedding vendors from Southwest Michigan, The Region, and Michiana. General admission tickets are $7.50 in advance and $10 at the door. VIP tickets are $22.50

and Limited Lucky Bride tickets are $50. For tickets, visit luckybrideevent.com. AFTERNOON TEA 2PM. New Buffalo Township Library. 33 N Thompson St. New Buffalo. Tickets for the fifth annual tea are on sale through Jan. 26. Tickets are $8 per person.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2

WEDDINGS & WHISKEY AT JOURNEYMAN 1-4PM. Journeyman Distillery. 109 Generations Dr. Three Oaks. The event, which will include vendors and beverages, will allow guests to stroll Journeyman’s Warren Hall and Grainery event spaces and connect with professionals who can take their wedding day from special to spectacular. The cost is $5. For tickets, visit www.journeymandistillery.com. or call 269820-2050. LION’S CLUB EYE BALL 6:30PM. Grand Beach Club. 48200 Perkins Blvd. New Buffalo. Featuring dinner, a cash bar and entertainment. Tickets are $75 per person or $500 for a table of eight. Please RSVP to Sue Giglio at 517-862-6571 or sgiglio2016@yahoo.com.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9

SAWYER DANCE TROUPE ANNUAL FATHER-DAUGHTER DANCE 6:30-8:30PM. Trinity Lutheran Church. Sawyer. The Sawyer Dance Troupe presents it’s annual Father-Daughter Dance to be held on Saturday February 9th at Trinity Lutheran Church in Sawyer, Michigan from 6:30 to 8:30pm. Cost of $20 per couple ($5 additional child) includes a hot dog supper, door prize, and keepsake photo. There will be a professional DJ and amazing raffle prizes!

The information for these events is correct, as of the Tuesday before publication date. Please contact the events listed with any questions. Please send us any events at events@newbuffalotimes.com. Deadlines are the Fridays before the following week’s publication.

A true friend is one who overlooks your failures and tolerates your success! — Doug Larson


www.newbuffalotimes.com

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2019

follow me to bali on facebook! — dee dee @customs_imports

January Sale! OPEN SATURDAY AND SUNDAY DURING THE MONTH OF JANUARY $5 OFF PURCHASE OF $25 OR MORE $15 OFF PURCHASE OF $50 OR MORE $40 OFF PURCHASE OF $100 OR MORE INCLUDING NEW ARRIVALS: FAUX FUR VESTS & ACCESSORIES, REPURPOSED MILITARY CANVAS HANDBAGS & TOTES, ACCENT CHAIRS, INDIA TAPESTRIES, ESSENTIAL OILS, WALL DECOR, MIRRORS, BUDDHAS & MORE! 139 N WHITTAKER STREET • DOWNTOWN NEW BUFFALO, MICHIGAN • 269-469-9180 FOLLOW ON FACEBOOK & INSTAGRAM

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 2019

500 W. BUFFALO ST. / NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-469-2265 6801 W. US 12 / THREE OAKS, MI 269-756-2265 WWW.HORIZONBANK.COM

DOWNTOWN BEACH LOCATION 207 N. WHITTAKER ST. NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-469-5055 9AM-10PM — 7 DAYS A WEEK

15412 RED ARROW HIGHWAY LAKESIDE, MI 49116 269-612-0290 WHLNINEYDS.COM

WE PROUDLY SUPPORT OUR BISON ATHLETES!

134 E. BUFFALO ST. NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-469-0200 WWW.VILLANOVAPIZZERIA.COM

212 S. WHITTAKER ST. NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-469-4438 WWW.HARBORCOUNTRYINSURANCE.COM

310 W. BUFFALO ST. NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-469-2247 DOOLEYSHOUSE310@GMAIL.COM

219 W. MADISON AVE. NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-586-3748

45 N. WHITTAKER ST. / /New NEW BUFFALO, MI 45 North Whittaker Buffalo, MI 269-469-2222 269-469-2222 67016701 W. West US 12 / /THREE OAKS, MI US 12 Three Oaks, MI 269-756-2222 269-756-2222 742 S. WHITTAKER ST. NEW BUFFALO, MI 269--469-3697

Sawyer Road / Sawyer, MI 6485 6485 SAWYER RD. / SAWYER, MI 269-426-3100 269-426-3100

WWW.NEWBUFFALOSAVINGS.COM

C. BRYAN STROTHER, DC 1 W. MADISON NEW BUFFALO, MI 269-469-1310 WWW.NEWBUFFALOCHIROPRACTOR.COM

Profile for New Buffalo Times

January 17, 2019  

The weekly edition of the NEW BUFFALO TIMES.

January 17, 2019  

The weekly edition of the NEW BUFFALO TIMES.

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