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Issue 77

Maruia River

Accessible Wilderness Kayaking

Kayak Fishing Transforming the Family Kayak

Family Paddle to Fastest Paddle

The Journey to the Fastest Kayak Leg in the Speight’s Coast to Coast Proudly supported by:

Back Country Pit Stops When you’re Caught Short


Proud Sponsors of the


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Issue 77 Autumn 2015

PAGE 3


Contents

Multisport Family Paddle To Fastest Paddle Sea Kayaking Back Country Pit Stops Maruia River : Accessible Wilderness Kayaking

6 16

10

White Water Not For The Faint Hearted

47

First Aid Seizures

38

Bush Craft Water Water Everywhere!

33

PUBLISHER: New Zealand Kayak Magazine is published four times per year by Canoe & Kayak Ltd. PRINTING: MHP Print DISTRIBUTION: MagMag SUBSCRIPTIONS: (see page 46) New Zealand – 4 Issues = $25 Overseas – 4 Issues = $40 Pricing: At the time of printing the prices in this magazine were accurate. However they may change at any time.

20 24 42 43

Products Removable Sounder & Transducer Mount

37

Puzzles Sudoku Quick Crossword Puzzle Solutions

32 32 46

Kayaks Kayak listings

44

28

Fishing Small Kayak Fishing

EDITOR: Peter Townend Ph: 0274 529 255 Email: pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz

Technical EOTC Looking After Your Comms Trip Card - Orakei Korako Trip Card - Otamure Bay

Copyright: The opinions expressed by contributors and the information stated in advertisements/articles are not necessarily agreed to by the editors or publisher of New Zealand Kayak Magazine. CONTRIBUTORS: We welcome contributors’ articles and photos. Refer to www.canoeandkayak.co.nz/guide New Zealand Kayak Magazine ‘Contributors Guidelines’ for more details. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS TO: James Fitness Email: james@canoeandkayak.co.nz New Zealand Kayak Magazine

Photos: Front page: Competitors in the Godzone race Photo supplied by Godzoneadventure.com Contents page: Floating down the Maruia River Photo supplied by Nathan Fa’avae


Editorial Well, the summer is drawing to its end and now we have a couple of great months of settled weather and worst luck shorter days to enjoy them. Recent discussions have got me thinking again of what the outdoors and specifically the environment, the training or passing on of skills and knowledge to people means to our country and its population. This led me to think on the Value Proposition of the outdoors in New Zealand. I believe leaving a better place for the next generation and education are some of the most important things we can do as a parent. Add to this is a life filled with new experiences where new skills, knowledge and confidence can be built to look at new challenges with a ‘can do’ attitude for future difficulties or opportunities. What does the outdoors have to offer us, our community and the country? In business we are always striving to improve and using one of the standard thought provoking tools. A SWOT (Strengths, Weakness, Opportunities, Threats) analysis is often helpful for seeing the important issues that confront or confuse us. Value Proposition of the outdoors Strengths: Fitness, improved health, weight control, mental wellbeing, the participants ability to interact with others positively, the ability of a person to address issues in work and life, a more balanced approach to risks, confidence in an individual that flows into all parts of their life, a strong awareness of the environment and the community, revenue to the NZ economy though local and international tourists supports a great life style. From an environment stand point, it is about as low impact as any activity can be. Consider a golfer in contrast to a hiker and the environmental costs of maintaining a golf course compared to a bush track are like chalk and cheese. Weaknesses: With risk comes negative outcomes and yes people get hurt in the outdoors, however this needs to be kept in context as they also get hurt in the kitchen, on the roads and by their own and others hand. It is also fair to say that if a person has an understanding of their own abilities and have built confidence www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 77 in themselves they make better decisions and are safer because of it. Opportunities: A fitter healthier more mentally robust population. Increased numbers of overseas and local tourists and hence a building of a sector that supports NZ financially and environmentally. A growing, supported recreational sector providing more opportunities to the population to participate in the outdoors. A thriving natural environment that supports our (kiwi) way of life, both economically and personally. Threats: The degradation of our environment through a focus on ‘more is better’ when it comes to many high impact industries. A lack of a united voice for the outdoors that tells the world what the value is we offer and encourages the growth and ability of the industry. Rivers, lakes and coastal waters polluted by farming, development and urban waste, crime impacting tourists, lack of camping accommodation. Underfunding and lack of recognition of the Dept. Of Conservation and the volunteer sector. The urbanisation of the coastal zones that take away the vistas that give us a feeling of space and a connection with nature. So what could we do? Change or create national laws and council bylaws to reflect the importance our environment has to our continuing wellbeing. This should include: 1/ A law developed that requires all land owners to protect all water ways with planting and fencing and ongoing maintance. To support this, a government/council fund is set in place. A volunteer army developed in every region supported by local council along with social agencies with employment opportunities for beneficiaries to help land owners achieve this in ten years. 2/ Laws and bylaws developed so the road side and waste or unproductive land is planted, so all road to private boundaries and unproductive land are planted in native bush throughout the nation. This has started in some areas of motorway and council land and the impact on the area is stunning. This also requires a government/ council fund set in place and a volunteer army developed in every region supported by

local council along with social agencies with employment opportunities for beneficiaries to help achieve this in ten years. 3/ A complete moratorium is placed on all coastal development until legislation is developed that recognises natural and farming vistas of coastal land (sea, river and lake) have a significant impact on people living and visiting the country, and they should be protected from urbanisation. Where to from here? If you enjoy the outdoors, ensure you are putting something back, collecting rubbish, planting trees, reducing your impact on areas you visit, not spreading weeds and pests, and yes killing pests is essential too. But more than that we need to recognise what is irreplaceable for future generations and stop allowing those things from being taken away, species of flora and fauna, views of forests and farm land and our healthy waterways and coast. This requires a growing public pressure to ensure our politicians hear what is important to us. Utopia, a stunningly beautiful clean green country abundant in wildlife and safe to visit, producing a good living and life for its inhabitants. This should be forefront in our ambitions as this will bring more tourists and create added value in our produce, as well as protect the environment. Let’s all ‘think big’ on the environment and preserve something that our children and grandchildren will look at in the future and go ‘Wow! You got that right’.

Cheers Peter Townend

Issue 77 Autumn 2015

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Family Paddle to Fastest Paddle by Nathan Fa’avae

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Issue 77 Autumn 2015

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While the summer drought in Canterbury was causing headaches for farmers on the plains, it was at the same time providing amazing conditions for river runs draining from the Alps, warm crystal clear liquid. The Waimakariri Gorge is a stunning trip and one my wife Jodie and I had wanted to do with the kids for some time. We’ve both raced the Coast to Coast a number of times and the river always held special memories for us. It really is a truly magnificent gorge to pass through by kayak. Whilst on the river for a few days on a family paddle we witnessed many people training for the up and coming Coast to Coast just a few days later. I knew quite a few people going by in long skinny boats and chatted to them as we floated downstream. I started to get inspired to do the race myself, the main appeal being to hammer the kayak stage, my preferred discipline. I was training for the Godzone Adventure Race so I knew I was paddling well. After our family trip and camping at Gorge Bridge, the finish of the Coast to Coast kayak, I managed to hitch a lift to Mount White Bridge with my racing kayak for a quick run down the river. By coincidence, friends Richard and Elina Ussher were at the put in when I arrived and Rich wasn’t that keen on paddling so asked me if I’d mind going down with Elina, which I was more than happy to do. We had a zippy trip down the 67 km stretch of water and it once again got me thinking about doing the race. At the time I had a running injury so I needed to see how that would heal in the following weeks. About ten days out from the race I was happy my running was strong enough to get me over Goat Pass, I wouldn’t be quick but I wasn’t worried about that anyway, I wanted to get the fastest paddle. Now 42, I entered in the veteran category, I didn’t see any sense taking on the younger guys and felt there would be a fun competition in the old boys division. I paddled a ‘Flow Kayaks Rush’ a few times with the intention of racing it and while I

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was super impressed with the design, in the end, I felt it was best to stick with the boat I knew best, my Sharp 6.5. I looked over the entry list and sized up my competition on the river. Dan Busch was the stand out paddler entered. A former NZ kayak representative and incredible down river paddler, I knew Dan (Bushy) would be setting the pace, he was the person to beat for the paddle award. I managed to do a couple of training sessions with Dan leading up to the race and I felt I had a small advantage over him in the boat; he’d done a lot of work on his running and cycling and I suspect his paddling had suffered a tad as a result. This was enough to give me the confidence to chase the fastest paddle time with gusto. I mainly trained on the ocean in my surf ski for the race and was quite surprised at the targets I was hitting with paddle in hand. I did eight weeks of paddle training leading into the race, averaging nine hours per week. I was doing a lot of cycling but no running due to a hip injury I picked up whitewater rafting over the Christmas period. I wasn’t worried about not spending much time on rivers as I’ve done enough river time in my life to get by. I was somewhat surprised when talking to a few of the top athletes in the longest day when they described the river as being ‘tricky’, ‘harder than

Issue 77 Autumn 2015

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other years’, ‘with some challenging rapids’. From my perspective, the river is barely Grade Two, the only challenge being getting a bit sore for paddling hard for four plus hours. Their comments boosted my confidence more as they were still being tested by the river. My support crew, the Maitland brothers Chris and Dave were in full support of me building my race around the fastest paddle. There was no way I was going to win the Coast to Coast so gunning for a stage time, a prestigious one at that, got us all excited. My race plan was to go steady for the 2 km run from the beach to the bikes, conserve as much energy on the first cycling stage and mountain run as possible without going backwards, fuel up on the short cycle to the river and once in kayak, unleash whatever strength I had and dump it all in the river.

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Issue 77 Autumn 2015

The plan worked well and I was particularly pleased to eat a freeze dried meal and can of creamed rice while riding to the river. With that amount of food in the system I knew I wouldn’t need to take my hands off the paddle for at least two hours. I had three litres of GU and a litre of Ensure set up as hands free drinking which would sustain me for the four hours needed.

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I entered the river in 9th place (in the longest day), my crew said that 3rd place started 22 minutes in front of me and encouraged me to aim to exit off the water in 3rd. Braden Currie and Sam Clark were over 30 minutes ahead and well out of reach, especially given they’re very strong paddlers also. Beginning the paddle I felt great, I could feel a lot of power in my arms and the cold windy conditions suited me, I had a fire burning. I started passing people immediately and after an hour I had moved into 6th place, by two hours I was in 5th place, three hours in 4th place and soon after I paddled into 3rd. About 15 minutes to go though I took a dreadful line and ended up getting out of my kayak and carrying it over the braids back to the main channel. The wasted minutes meant I slipped back to 4th but managed to pass my mate Trevor Voyce again to exit the boat in 3rd, my sole focus was getting over the timing mat as quickly as I could to stop the clock for the paddle time. I knew Bushy was behind me and would be storming down the river like a hurricane. As I hobbled up to my bike, fully spent after the effort on the water, I could hear Bushy arrive on the river bank, I glanced at my watch, pretty certain I had it in the bag, paddle time 4:19’07. I managed to ride well enough to take 4th overall and win the veteran category, but I had what I wanted, the paddle stage. It was really special being back racing the Coast to Coast, it was 1999 I’d last taken part in the Longest Day (placing 2nd) and 2000 in I had taken part (3rd family team). It is a brilliant event and forces one into having an awesome summer training for it. It is the ‘must do’ event for all Kiwis who consider themselves adventurers, even if it’s just a little bit.

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Small Kayak Fishing

This article is about heading out for a fishing session on a kayak, not an all singing all dancing dedicated fishing kayak but a common old run of the mill family kayak that is normally reserved for the kids to play on down at the beach during the summer. As we have all seen kayak fishing is a huge growth sport in New Zealand. More and more people are realising that fishing from a kayak offers many benefits over the traditional boat fishing: Low to zero running costs, no motor to service on a kayak, no trailer to warrant and register every year, and you don't have to take out a small bank loan to fill it up with fuel at the gas station every time you want to go fishing. There's no lengthy wash down and flush after every trip, and it doesn't sit on the driveway reminding your better half that there's a huge chunk of change sitting there not being used. There’s still one hurdle to get over, whether it's a boat or a kayak you have chosen as your fishing platform, the initial purchase outlay. The difference in spend is worlds apart even between the most basic of boats and a top of the range fishing kayak. Most top end fishing kayaks will see your bank account lighter by around $3000 - $4000 whereas a boat is only limited by the size of your bank account but even a mid range boat setup could see you parting with ten times the amount you would spend on a kayak. Although with all that said and done even the dedicated fishing kayak is out of some people’s reach, the current economic climate is seeing some families on very tight budgets and as much as dad would like a fishing kayak the "fun/toy" budget won't stretch that far but there is a few hundred PAGE 10

Issue 77 Autumn 2015

By Jason Walker

dollars in the account to spend on the kids this summer, they love being at the beach and playing in the water as many a good Kiwi does so hey why not get them a kayak? Well, that's just great the kids get a kayak but dad can't have one to go fishing on, or can he...? A kayak for the family is a kayak that can be used by all the family for more than one purpose if you purchase well and are prepared to do a bit of DIY (or get your local Canoe & Kayak store to do it), and make a few compromises. I’ll now try and show you how you can take a quality NZ made family kayak and head out fishing from it. In this example I've selected a Frenzy kayak from Ocean Kayak, one of their most popular models. It's the typical family / kids kayak you'll see at many a beach during the summer and is a staple item at the kiwi bach, The Frenzy although targeted at the kids market is still a capable kayak for many dads to paddle with a manufacturers capacity rating of up 145 kg, it weighs in under 20 kg making moving it around is a breeze off the water and only measures 2.7 m long making it extremely manoeuverable and easy to paddle but hey it was designed for kids to use so it should be easy for dad to use too! There is one simple thing that changes a kayak from just ‘a kayak’ to ‘a fishing kayak’ - the rod holder - and as I'll show you they are easy to fit. Armed with nothing more than a cordless drill, a hole saw, and a drill, you can have a rod holder on your family kayak but why stop there, we always need a back up rod so let’s fit two.

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Step 1 Find a good flat area on the kayak to fit the rod holder. You want somewhere flat so that when you screw down the rod holder it gives a good seal to keep the water out. You’ll also need to ensure there is enough depth for the rod holder to clear the hull. A good place is behind you so they do not interfere with your paddle stroke. Using the rod holder gasket we mark the kayak where the holes need to be drilled.

Step 2 Drill out the centre hole using your hole saw, remove any burrs and dry fit the rod holder marking the screw holes that need to be drilled. To affix the rod holder you have several options available to you: self tapping screws, rivets, and well nuts, each has their pros and cons. In this case we have used well nuts as these give the best and the most waterproof seal.

Step 3 Fit the rod holder and screw it in tight. That's it you're done, how easy was that? Now you can carry on and add more rod holders as you see fit. For this kayak we fitted two one on each side at the rear. Of course if you are DIY challenged or just don’t want the pressure of doing this to your prized family kayak then have a chat to your friendly kayak retailer as most will be more than happy to help you out with this.

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Issue 77 Autumn 2015

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Restricted space Fishing kayaks are already restricted for space compared to boats but small kayaks are restricted even more, so you have to get creative or realistic with the amount of gear you can take with you, I personally softbait and lure fish so I was able to put a couple of spare jigheads, braid scissors, and a small spool of fluorocarbon leader in the pocket of my PFD and a pot of softbaits in the kayak footwells.

Get Creative Many smaller kayaks don’t have a paddle keep, but it fitted easily under the front bungy which held the paddle while I fished. So, can you hit the water yet? Yes you can but there’s safety points to keep in mind that apply to all fishing kayaks whether purchased as one or the newly converted family kayak.

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Issue 77 Autumn 2015

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PFD / Lifejacket

Leash it!

Please always wear a PFD or lifejacket when using your kayak. Your kayak may be stable and you feel safe in it but there is no telling when or for whatever reason you may end up out of your kayak and in the water. It may be a rogue wave or you’ve simply leaned out too far. If you are wearing a correctly fitting PFD then you are still safe and can proceed to re-board your kayak. It is now the law in many areas.

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Issue 77 Autumn 2015

PAGE 13


Communications

Clothing

Whenever you venture offshore in any craft you should always take at least one form of communication with you, this can be as simple as a mobile phone (in a waterproof case) but much better is a VHF radio. There are many handheld VHF radios on the market these days that are more than capable of doing the job and reasonably priced. Look for a submersible model if possible. Alternatively all you need to buy is a good quality VHF dry bag so you can use it out on the water with the confidence that it’s not going to die on you from getting wet. Ensure that whatever means of communications you take, that they are attached to you or your PFD rather than the kayak. In the worst case scenario you will need to raise the alarm with the Coastguard. If you have become separated from your kayak you can make the call; a VHF sitting on the kayak will never raise the alarm for you!

The same can be said for any sport, the correct clothing can make it or break it for you and you need to dress for the conditions. Kayaking is no different, above all else you need to keep warm and/or dry. In the winter a good set of kayak splash pants and top will ensure you keep the water off and stay warm and dry. In the summer you may find that the winter clothing is too hot and you can shed the heavy waterproof clothing and opt for more lightweight gear. Many of us will still keep the splash pants on but swap the top for a long sleeved rash or quick dry top instead. Also in the summer be very aware of the sun and make sure you apply plenty of sun screen, the sea actually reflects a lot of the UV back up at you so make sure you apply it under your chin too.

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Issue 77 Autumn 2015

www.PERFORMANCEPADDLING.co.nz www.kayaknz.co.nz


Trip Report Kayak fishing can be a group activity but due to the fact that we are most of the time paddling around in a single person kayak it also lends itself to being a solo activity and sees many of us heading offshore alone for a fishing session. We need to make sure that someone or some people know what our intentions are. This can be as simple as a two minute conversation with your better half letting them know where you are heading, and when you expect to return, other alternatives include a two minute form. As you can see there is plenty for you think about on how you could get involved in kayak fishing by making use of family kayaks you already own or at least plant a seed for when you are thinking about what toys you buy the family next summer.

Alternative – Kayak Kontiki Whilst working at the recent Hutchwilco Boat Show in Auckland it was pointed out to me that an electric kontiki retailer was selling their package for around $3000 – that to me sounded like a huge chunk of change.Not all of that $3000 was for the kontiki itself but also the backbone, hooks, winch etc, so you could replace the kontiki part with a kayak. Now that you’ve made your fishing kayak you don’t just have to use it for rod and line fishing you could turn it from a solo fishing kayak to a family fishing session by using the kayak to tow out a long line straight off the beach. A longline can be a great family activity especially now that dad can paddle the line out, drop it off and paddle back to shore, let the line soak for 30-60 minutes and then get the kids involved in winching the line back in and collecting the catch.

fishing kayaks, including one loaded with electronics, so I was definitely up against it. The fishing proved hard and after about an hour and a half no one had had a bite never mind land a fish. Between us we’d tried softbaits, pilchards and trolling lures. I’d only been using softbaits up to this point, but I did have a small 20g Jitterbug on my second rod so time to give it a go. First three or four drops nothing, then on the next a small tug. Excitement got the better of me, out the window went all the Inchiku rules and I struck hard, of course losing the fish. Ah well, at least now I knew there were fish down there! A couple more drops and some more taps then BAM! The rod loads up and there is a fish on the line, a short but fun fight followed and up pops a 32 cm snapper. Not huge but it was all that was needed to prove the point that the Frenzy worked as a fishing platform, it also gave one of the Ocean Kayak guys dinner that evening. So if you’ve been thinking of giving kayak fishing a go but don’t have access to a fully-fledged fishing kayak don’t be afraid of giving it a go in the family kayak, I hope to see you out on the water some time.

So how did we get on in the converted kayak? After fitting the two rod holders I hit the water with two of the guys from Ocean Kayak, we headed to a spot about one kilometre off Army Bay, Whangaparaoa to see if I could catch a fish from the Frenzy. The other two guys were both in proper

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www.c-tug.com Issue 77 Autumn 2015

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Back Country Pit Stops By Ruth E. Henderson

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Poo is not something we usually talk about in polite circles …some folk are so delicate that they

A welcome sight.

don’t or can’t even use the word toilet, but rather ‘go to the bathroom’, or ask where the ‘ladies or gents’ are. On the other hand, young parents endlessly compare notes on potty training or the virtues of different nappies. If you’re into kayaking, you are probably like me, in neither of those categories. However toilet waste in the environment is a concern; on a trip, the location of pit-stops, is part of my planning. There may be rules and regulations for vessels on the water, dogs and campervans on the land – but when you unavoidably end up paddling thru brown scum or step into dog poo whilst unloading your kayak – we know what you say, but who do you call? And perhaps more importantly, if you are caught short what do you do? DOC doesn’t always locate long-drops where one would expect, a classic would be Roberton Island in the Bay of Islands, and beyond the road end, which is where we often paddle…there are not many ‘public conveniences’. Finding a tree, for a wee, is ok if it’s just you, but there are places such as Deep Water Cove, B.O.I. popular with divers and hikers where the stench of urine is, to put it mildly, strong! So, what is best practice and why should we follow the guidelines? The first step is planning. When working out where you and your group are paddling and wanting to camp, look for places that do have toilets. Even in places where only boats can reach,

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in a lot of districts - certainly where I have been recently - Rotorua, the Waikato, and Auckland if not DOC then the respective councils are, in the main, doing a great job in providing these and telling you about it on their websites. They can be hard to spot from the water and if over-grown, on the land! When you discover other ones, mark them on your map for future reference, and spread the word, as a loo with a seat sure beats the next option; disposing of your own waste. To be commended are clubs and organisations such as the Classic and Wooden Boat Association who have addressed the toilet issue by gaining permission from landowners to build and maintain toilets in places they frequent. Peeing shouldn’t be a big issue. The other week at the International Kayak Week, the accepted view was to pee into the sea or below the high tide mark. And girls, using a ‘shewee’ were just as discreet and inoffensive as boys. Number two’s are a different story. Obviously, seeing, smelling, or stepping into someone’s excreta is not nice, but worse than that leaving human waste in the wild can mean you are contaminating water supplies and soils and lead to the spread of diseases such as Giardia. This parasite can survive in cold water, and infects the intestine resulting in chronic diarrhoea, nausea, stomach cramps, and dehydration. Not a gift to give to friends or strangers! In rocky areas (including alpine or snow areas) carrying out your waste in a “poo pot” or re-sealable plastic bags is an option. There are plenty of hints on how to do this, and how to make your own “poo pot or tube” on

A Wooden Boat Association toilet - a welcome lunch & loo break on Lake Rotoiti, Rotorua.

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Issue 77 Autumn 2015

www.kayaknz.co.nz


the web. In Alaska we were instructed to poo on a rock, and then toss it in the tide. Tricky! But in popular ‘Thunder Bay’ near Cox Glacier, on the Harriman Fiord in Prince William Sound it was better than inadvertently digging a hole, on top of someone else’s hole!

Luxury in the bush - a composting toilet.

However, for most of us, we are paddling below the snow line and a shallow hole is our option. Select a site for your hole that is a least 50 m away from water, stream beds, tracks and campsites. Use a trowel or folding spade to dig a hole 150 – 200 mm deep (length of finger-tips to just above your wrist) and 100 – 150 mm wide. After use, back fill with soil and camouflage with leaves or twigs. If in a group, have one person dig a bigger hole for everyone to use. It is helpful if you find some wood or other flat material to use either side of the hole for footrests whilst squatting…prevents sandy soil caving in, and maybe you falling in too. If you use toilet paper (versus using leaves e.g. rangiora bushman’s friend, moss or bark) then use only plain, unbleached, non-perfumed types. Don’t burn it, you could end up creating a bush fire! Bury your paper or carry it out in a re-sealable plastic bag. As well as a lightweight trowel, handbag

sized hand sanitizers are a good idea. Have a look at www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/know-before-yougo/care-codes in particular ‘Activity minimal impact’ for tips on camping and “disposing of human waste where no toilets are provided”. A lot of websites on the subject are ‘rubbish’ but www.lotsafreshair. com has many camping tips including one post called “poos, wees and other mysteries”. And ladies take a look at this website to see not one but seven different FUD’s (female urinary devices) www.backpacker.com/gear/ apparel/trail-clothes/category-womens-apparel/gear-review-femaleurination-devices

Keep it clean - bring a spade. Whangamumu, Northland.

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The best reviews appear to be for these ones: www.sheewee.com and www.freshette.com

Issue 77 Autumn 2015

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EOTC

Education outside the class room –

There is nothing like the face of a child that has just accomplished an activity that is outside their comfort zone. This is what EOTC is all about. A challenge that broadens the mind and body. Taking the young into the outdoors;

By James Fitness

gives them an understanding of their environment

impresses upon them the importance of their social responsibility and their part in looking after their environment

and challenges them to do so.

A physical challenge overcome, imparts the knowledge that a challenge can be measured and with knowledge and skill, taken head on. A challenge is not a near death experience, but it is outside the comfort

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zone. Perhaps with a perceived risk in the mind of the student. A paddle across the harbour – further than they have paddled before, or a short trip - viewing wild life up close, surfing or river paddling all have fears for the student to overcome. It is sometimes surprising how small the obstacle is that can stop us stepping up to a new challenge and there is no better classroom than the outdoors for being confronted with your own personal challenge. The outdoors is a learning environment that develops the understanding of ‘self’ and ‘others’ and the students place in it all. It develops personal management tools for dealing with life’s challenges. These are bought into context of prior experiences and achievements and the tools used to deal with them. It’s all about testing boundaries in a safe and controlled way. Our philosophy: “Skills are undertaken or taught in a safe, progressive manner and the participant enjoys the experience and gains success and confidence”

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So what does the education department say about EOTC? “Education outside the classroom is curriculum-based teaching and learning activities that go beyond the walls of the classroom. It includes any curriculum-based activity that takes place outside the school ranging from a museum or marae visit, to a sports trip, field trip, or outdoor education camp. Experiences outside the classroom reinforce learning by enabling students to make connections between what they have learnt in the classroom and the world beyond the classroom. EOTC experiences also give students opportunities to demonstrate the key competencies identified in The New Zealand Curriculum; particularly managing self, relating to others, and participating and contributing.

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Schools are responsible for ensuring their EOTC activities are carried out safely. School boards have a responsibility under the National Administration Guidelines (NAGs) to provide a safe physical and emotional environment for students and, as employers, to the health and safety of employees, students, and other visitors to the school, under the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992.” (www.ero.govt.nz/National-Reports/Education-Outside-theClassroom-Schools-Use-of-EOTC-Guidelines-October-2011/Whatis-EOTC) How does this affect the Outdoor Education Sector? We often hear, that schools are just not doing Outdoor Ed as a part of their EOTC program because of the extra paperwork. The perceived risk, rather than the actual risk also stops activity. There are many schools that now employ suitably qualified companies to run specialised activities for them. This removes the concerns for teachers and Boards. “The Health and Safety in Employment (Adventure Activities) Regulations 2011 sit under the Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992. They require those commercial adventure tourism and outdoor operators in New Zealand who provide adventure activities to undergo a safety audit and become registered.” (http://www.supportadventure.co.nz/adventure-activitiesregulations#Regulation)

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Issue 77 Autumn 2015

What does this mean? When taking students on activities, you can be assured that your chosen operator has had their safety systems audited and are working to the latest best practice. Look for an “Outdoorsmark” certification or similar. Unless you have outdoors qualified teachers it may become more difficult to take young people to the outdoors. How do we solve this? In the short term, employ a reputable, qualified company to run your program. In the long term, qualify your team. So although schools may not be affected by the Adventure Activities Regulations directly, they are bound by EOTC guidelines and require qualified staff and Safe Management Systems to run outdoor activities. Unless you have these, an easy option is to engage the services of a suitably qualified outdoor activity provider. We like to visit and discuss the schools requirements to develop a programme that suits your needs and gets the maximum results for the students while keeping the activity fun, challenging and safe. Contact your nearest Canoe & Kayak Centre for details. This is the opportunity to give your students a great outdoor experience, in a safe environment, with a robust Safety Management System and qualified instructors and over twenty years of experience to boot. Time to sit back and let someone else take the stress of running the day for you.

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Standard activities include

• R u n n i n g a f u n a d v e n t u r e t o a local destination as a class team building exercise. • A focused skills session to develop solid skills • Development of skills for assessment against unit standards. • Assessors for unit standards.Rescue courses • Surf courses • Pool training sessions • Eskimo rolling courses • Instructor training and assessment to NZQA STANDARDS

• Guide Training and assessment to NZQA STANDARDS • Hire equipment • Multi day adventures • All age groups • Sea kayaking courses and tours • River kayaking courses and tours • Sit on tops courses and tours • Group management training • Equipment maintenance training • Loading equipment on trailers and cars • Packing kayaks

Heli-kayaking on the Ngaruroro River with St. Paul’s Collegiate Tihoi Venture School. www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 77 Autumn 2015

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Looking After Your Comms. Don’t be caught out at sea without reliable communications this winter!

As we bid farewell to another glorious kiwi summer and start to reminisce about all the hot sunny days we’ve had, we begin to feel the first shivers of winter creep down our spines. We all know how treacherous the sea can be - especially in New Zealand where the weather is fine one minute and stormy the next! It’s a good time to check if your communications devices have survived the summer heat and salt water, or even start to think about upgrading. Check list: 99 Battery contacts are free from corrosion. 99 There is no moisture trapped between the battery and unit. 99 Seals are in good order.

99 O n y o u r P L B , c h e c k t h e e x p i r y d a t e o f t h e b a t t e r y. Get this serviced if required.

99 If you are going to store the unit, ensure the battery is fully charged before you do.

99 Clean with fresh water if your unit is water proof, if not clean with a damp cloth to remove any salt crystals.

If you are finding your VHF is no longer holding it’s charge, or is becoming unreliable it is time to upgrade.

Cobra MRHH 350

HELP!

There are a number of new VHFs out on the market that are smaller, lighter, more power efficient, float and even have strobes attached. These VHFs weigh in at between 260 and 290 grams.

When disaster strikes who are you going to call when you are out of Cell Phone range?

The Icom IC-M23 floats on its back when dropped overboard and flashes bright red even when the power is turned off. The flash can even be detected by rescue helicopters’ heat sensors! The Cobra MR-HH350 also floats and has a nifty BURP that vibrates water out of the speaker. Of course both these VHF radios are submersible to IPX7 standards (1m depth for 30 min.)

Icom IC-M23

)DVWÀQG3/% IURP\RXU&DQRH .D\DN&HQWUH

It is best practice to carry two forms of working electronic device. That is two different types. If one mobile phone won’t work – then there is a good chance the other won’t either. So carry a handheld VHF as an economical and useful piece of equipment.

*36 )ORDWV 7RXJK 5HOLDEOH :DWHUSURRI

Contact your nearest Canoe & Kayak stores or go online at canoeandkayak.co.nz for more information.

Your position is transmitted to the Rescue Co-ordination Centre within a few minutes and the search area is narrowed down to a few square metres. Peace of mind for loved ones and so small it fits in a pocket! Distributed by Bright Ideas ELB Ltd Ph: 0800 713 656 www.brightideas.co.nz

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Ask for a Beckson Pump Most kayakers only ever buy one pump. Make it the best kayaker’s bilge pump. Ask other kayakers and checkout what the professionals use. Chances are they will recommend using a Beckson Thirsty Mate. Why? Because Beckson is a trusted brand, been around a long time and they pump alot of water (rated at 30 litres a min). Plus they last for ages.

protect yourself from the elements

Unrestricted opening allows for great pumping volume

For the full range go to

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Distributed by Great Stuff Ltd. For additional information, www.greatstuffltd.co.nz or email greatstuffltd@orcon.net.nz

Issue 77 Autumn 2015

BECKAD-Dec14

PAGE 25


“Estelle and Dave are great company. It's largely their great personalities and enthusiasm that make the club as awesome as it is. Looking forward to our next trip.” R. Moberly

“The Yakity Yak club have more group trips both day trips and multi-day trips than any other group in Auckland. Plus they are not competitive and cater for all skill levels. Everyone is there just to have a good time. If you like kayaking and the comfort and safety of paddling in a group you should join.” Ian

Discover Another World. We’ll show you how!

Find out more at yakityyak.co.nz, email info@yakityyak.co.nz or ask at your local Canoe & Kayak Centre.


“My first year sea kayaking, and what a great year it was. I discovered a passion for a new endeavour that satisfies, and challenges across a whole range of areas. The Yakity Yak Kayak Club has provided an opportunity for me to get involved with this great sport in an extremely safety conscious environment, and to see a lot of awesome natural areas of NZ I wouldn't have otherwise got to.� Martin

Join Join the the Yakity Yakity Yak Yak Kayak Kayak Club Club now, now, and and let let the the adventures adventures begin. begin. Yakity Yak Club Trip to Lake Rotoehu Photo by: Estelle Leyshon

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Maruia River : Accessible Wilderness Kayaking by Nathan Fa’avae

So many rivers, so little time, that’s what it feels like when you start to explore New Zealand’s rivers. My family has come to love summer kayaking trips, in many ways it’s like going tramping but you’re always close to a beauty swimming spot and carrying your gear is infinitely easier. The inflatable kayak technology means that there is a wide range of suitable craft for all rivers and all abilities. Each summer our family has a list of rivers to journey down, we watch the weather and water flows closely to determine what will be the most suitable. First up in the New Year was the Maruia River, located in the northwestern South Island. It is a major tributary of the Buller River, flowing for 80 km in total. The upper reaches are more for the thrill seeking creek boaters but a good 50 km is easy navigable Grade two, with a few splashes of Grade three. Luckily for us there was a few days rain before we planned to get on the water so it was nicely freshened up from typical low summer levels. What is unique about the Mariua River trip is that you enter wilderness area soon after launching. Whether you start at Boundary or Creighton Road, the river soon enters Victoria Forest Park and you’re swiftly away from it all. The wilderness aspect of the trip lasts about 20 km, the river twists and turns a lot with regular rapids with a couple of decent ones starting where Stags Head Creek joins. There are ample pulling over places for picnics and rests, plus multiple camping options, numerous grass terraces sited safely above the river. The water is cool, clean and clear, idyllic. The river is also home to fast PAGE 28

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swimming trout and lazy eels, regularly seen at different times of the day. Perhaps because the river is not frequently paddled, it’s not uncommon to see deer wandering about on the river banks when you drift around a bend. Most people take out when the river rejoins SH65 but there is still enjoyable kayaking all the way to the Buller River, just be acutely aware that downstream is the Maruia Falls, created by the 1929 Murchison earthquake when a slip blocked the original channel. At 10 metres high, while regularly kayaked by experienced paddlers, there are portage options for others. We had a superb trip down the Maruia, stopping regularly for swims, rock jumps and enjoying lunches in the sunshine. The sand flies can be overly welcoming but some repellant and a good tent solves that issue, it’s worth it. We did an overnight trip which was very comfortable. Most paddlers will do a day trip and some will spend three to four days on the river combining some hiking trips to the tops. While the river was fantastic, the camping was the highlight for me. Finding a campsite, seeking some shade in the beech forest (Maruia means sheltered or shady in Māori) and living simply in the serenity of nature is almost a priceless experience, one that I reckon needs to be repeated as often as possible. If you’re a bit chilly when you get off the river, a soak in the Maruia Springs would be on the cards, warm volcanic springs occur naturally on the north bank of the Maruia River, about 5 km west of Lewis Pass and piped to the hot pools.

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Puzzles

Quick Crossword Test your knowledge of kayaking and kayaking safety. 2

1 3 5

4

6 7 10

9

8

12

11

22. When a kayak is inadvertently filled with water by passing waves. 23. A waterproof bag kayakers use to protect the items they take with them. 25. A term is used to describe a hull form where the beam of the hull is in the front half of the vessel 26. This is the spot on the banks of a river or lake where you put in or take out.

Down

13 14 15

16

17 18 21

19 20 22 23

24

1. A section of river that flows between two large obstructions, compressing the water and causing a swift current. 2. An episode of disturbed brain function. 3. An extreme allergic reaction to an antigen to which the body has become hypersensitive. 4. To move at an angle to the wind or waves. 5. Another term for bouyancy aid. 6. A moulding in the cocpit to aid in boat control. 8. Used for self rescue. 9. Transitioning the kayak from shore into the water. 10. The distance between the waterline and the lowest point of the deck. 12. A material that gets cold quickly when wet. 14. A medical condition where body muscles contract and relax rapidly and repeatedly, resulting in an uncontrolled shaking of the body. 16. A shallow area in a body of water. 20. This term refers to a receding current. 21. Clasp used for towing, in rescues and for general fastening. 24. Any resistance to a kayak or other boat’s forward motion.

25

26

Across 7. The practice of transporting paddlers or equipment by road to the opposite end of a paddling trip. 11. A type of paddle on which the top side of the blade is longer than the bottom side. 13.Typically a visible boundary that separates the opposing currents in an eddy. 15. A type of pressure wave that tends to deflect boats and swimmers from the rocks that generated it. 17. A section of passable water between islands, reefs, shoals, and other obstructions. 18. Used to provide support and prevent the kayak from capsizing. 19. To deliberately put your boat underneath a wave or hydraulic.

Sudoku 6

2 4 4 7 2

9 7

8 2 8 3 5 9 PAGE 32

5 7

6 3 5

4 3

3 6 2

4

Issue 77 Autumn 2015

The objective is to fill the 9×9 grid with digits so that each column, each row, and each of the nine 3×3 sub-grids that compose the grid contains all of the digits from 1 to 9. Solution on page 46

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Bush Craft

Water Water Everywhere! By Andy Blake

Now it’s time to throw some words around that you may not use on an everyday basis. Words like turbidity, potability, solar disinfection, filtration, sterilisation and purification. So, turbidity is the cloudiness of a liquid caused by a large numbers of particles. Depending on the type and size will determine whether these quickly sink to the bottom or remain suspended. Potability is water that is deemed safe for humans to drink without causing any problems. Filtration is the physical process of separating liquids from solids. Depending on the type and nature of a filter will determine the outcome. A sock can be used to filter muddy water but it won’t filter out the bacteria, viruses and other microscopic nasties. They require a finer filter, like the filter you may have on your kitchen tap. Fancy portable water filters and straws are now available and take the risk out of having a drink from an unknown water source. If caught out in the bush or coast, you may not have your filter so an improvised filter can easily be made which should remove the cloudiness. Sterilization is the elimination of microbes and can be achieved with one or more of heat, chemicals, irradiation, high pressure, and sophisticated filtration. We benefit from this process every day when we drink pasteurised milk. Purification is the process of removing undesirable chemicals, biological

contaminants, suspended solids and gases from unsafe water. This can be achieved by filtration, sedimentation, distillation; using biologically active carbon; chemical processes such as chlorination and the use of electromagnetic radiation such as ultraviolet light.

Chemical water treatment When I was in the NZ Army, we were supplied with water purification tablets that we used whilst in the field, to kill microorganisms found in streams etc. We used one tablet per water bottle and waited about an hour before we drank the water. It did add a strange taste to the water but definitely better than the alternative - diarrhoea and vomiting! The tablets were small and great for peace of mind. Many different brands are available from your pharmacist and relatively inexpensive, a good thing to have in your survival kit. Four drops of household bleach or iodine per litre of water works just as well. Remember to wait about an hour before consumption of the water Water borne disease’s include cholera, typhoid and dysentery.

Solar Water Disinfection It turns out that one of the simplest ways to disinfect water is by using the sun. Sunlight — more accurately, ultraviolet radiation between the wavelengths of 320 and 400 nanometres, or UVA — destroys most pathogens. Solar Water Disinfection or SODIS for short is ideal to treat small quantities of water. Contaminated water is filled into transparent plastic bottles and exposed to full sunlight for six hours.


Sunlight is treating the contaminated water through two mechanisms: Radiation in the spectrum of UV-A and increased water temperature. If the water temperature rises above 50°C, the disinfection process can be up to three times faster. There are obvious limitations to this method such as you need plenty of sunshine (ideally between latitude 35°N and 35°S), the water must be of reasonable quality to start with and you need some clear plastic bottles - luckily these are usually found in abundance above the high tide mark. Also it will not have an effect on the chemical content

of the water. As the turbidity should be quite low, filter the water first. How much sunlight is required? This varies from about 6 hours under bright sunlight or up to 50% cloudy sky or two consecutive days with 100% cloudy skies. Boiling water is probably the best method for purifying running water you gather from natural sources. It doesn’t require any chemicals, or expensive equipment - all you need is a large pot and a good fire or similar heat source.

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Most experts feel that if the water reaches a rolling boil it is safe whereas others believe 5 or 10 minutes, plus an extra minute for every 300m of elevation is required. The heat sensitivity of micro-organisms varies, at 70 °C (158 °F), Giardia species (causes Giardiasis) can take ten minutes for complete inactivation, most intestine affecting microbes and E. coli (gastroenteritis) take less than a minute; at boiling point, Vibrio cholerae (cholera) takes ten seconds and hepatitis A virus (causes the symptom of jaundice), one minute. Boiling does not ensure the elimination of all microorganisms; the bacterial spores Clostridium can survive at 100 °C (212 °F) but are not water-borne or intestine affecting. Boiling water does not affect its taste although it may taste a little “flat”. This can be improved by pouring the water from one container to another to increase the oxygen

content of the water.

Improvised field filtration An effective water filter can easily be made by filling a plastic bottle with alternating layers of charcoal and sand. Firstly remove the bottom of a plastic bottle and plug the narrow end with a clean piece of cloth or a toetoe flower head. Remember you may have a wettex cloth tablet in your survival kit that can be moistened and used. Invert the bottle and add a generous layer (4-5 cm) of sand or fine gravel. Now add a similar thickness layer of crushed charcoal from your fireplace. Only use the black charcoal and not the white coloured ash. Continue to repeat this alternate layering process until you fill the container. Now securely suspend this filter vertically and pour the questionable water into the top. Use another clean container to collect the water as it comes out the bottom. The water will filter down through the layers and you will be amazed at how clear the cloudy water becomes. It is wise to now purify this water with either boiling, SODIS or

Before & After

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Chemical treatment.

Boiling without pots Water can be brought up to the boil in a number of ways. There is applying heat to the bottom of a water carrying device (like a metal pot) or by applying heat to the water directly. Often if you are caught out in the bush you will not have the luxury of pots and pans and other such equipment, it is now you will have to use your improvisation to overcome this. Rocks can be heated up over the fire and then placed into a container of water. The heat from the stone will quickly heat up the water. Several changes of rocks may be required to get the liquid hot enough. I have made a 40º bath in the middle of Fiordland, in the middle of winter on the shores of Lake Hauroko using this technique. I had been in the bush for a couple of weeks and the smell was getting a bit much, even for me, and the Lake was freezing! Many plastics can withstand very high temperatures, glass even higher. If these aren’t available then maybe a receptacle made out of canvas, small depression in a rock (rock pool), carved out wooden bowl or even the base of the nikau palm frond. Use your knife and a sturdy short stick to cut around the bottom of the fronds base to form a large “pot”. Large paua shells could be used - try heating from below also. Also a waterproof tarp could be placed in a small depression for water collection or for boiling water using hot rocks.

Water Storage Water can be stored in containers made of shells, large leaves folded into a cone ( ie whau and rangiora) the base of nikau palm fronds, condom

from your survival kit contained in a sock (don’t puncture it), plastic containers and aluminium cans found in the inter tidal zone, plastic bags or a waterproof garment lining a small depression in the ground. If you are lucky enough to have a kayak , then water can be stored in an watertight hatch or a small amount can be stored in an upside down hatch lid. It is vital to continually think outside the square. I cannot overstate how important water is to us and even though New Zealanders all live on an “Island” surrounded by about 15,000 kms of coastline and are blessed with numerous lakes, rivers and estuaries everywhere we still often are not properly hydrated. Honestly there are no excuses - off you go - go and have a glass of clear pure New Zealand water!

Salt Water It must be noted - no amount of filtration will de-salinate sea water. This requires an osmotic membrane that operates under high pressure.

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NEW Removable Sounder & Transducer Mount Install or remove sounders without fuss with this great new product offering from RAILBLAZA. The NEW Kayak & Canoe Sounder & Transducer Mount has been developed for anglers needing an easy way to install and remove sounders. This kit offers a unique advantage for kayaks or canoes that have track or do not have a transducer scupper. Install and uninstall in a matter of seconds, no messy adhesives or excessive drilling of fittings required. With our extensive selection of mounts this kit can be adapted to fit any kayak or canoe. Kayak & Canoe Sounder & Transducer Mount (comprised of the following components) •

SwivelPort

Adjustable Knuckle joint (not available as a separate part)

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Issue 77 Autumn 2015

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First Aid

SEIZURES By Johanna Verheijen

Epilepsy is a brain disorder involving repeated seizures of any type. Seizures (‘fits’) are episodes of disturbed brain function that inflicts change in attention and/or behaviour. They are caused by abnormal electrical excitation in the brain. Seizures are sometimes related to a temporary condition, such as exposure to drugs, withdrawal from certain drugs, or abnormal levels of sodium or glucose in the blood. In such cases, repeated seizures may not recur once the underlying problem is corrected. In other cases, injury to the brain (e.g. stroke or head injury) causes brain tissue to be abnormally excitable. In some people, an inherited abnormality affects nerve cells in the brain, which leads to seizures. In other cases, no cause can be identified. Seizure disorders affect about 0.5% of the population. Approximately 1.5-5.0% of the population may have a seizure in their lifetime.

Some of the more common causes of seizures include: •

Idiopathic (no identifiable cause) »»

Usually begin between age 5 and 20

»»

Often a family history of epilepsy or seizures

Developmental or genetic conditions present at birth, or injuries near birth – in this case, the seizures usually begin in infancy or early childhood

Metabolic abnormalities »»

Diabetes complications

»»

Electrolyte imbalances

»»

Kidney failure, uraemia (toxic accumulation of wastes)

»»

Nutritional deficiencies

»»

Use of cocaine, amphetamines, alcohol or certain other

»»

recreational drugs

»»

Withdrawal from alcohol or drugs, particularly barbiturates and benzodiazepines

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• •

Brain injury »»

Seizures usually begin within 2 years after the injury

»»

Early seizures - within 2 weeks of injury do not necessarily indicate that chronic (ongoing) seizures (epilepsy) will develop

Tumours and brain lesions that occupy space (such a hematomas) Disorders affecting the blood vessels (such as stroke and TIA) »»

Degenerative disorders (senile dementia, Alzheimer type, or similar organic brain syndromes) »»

Most common cause of seizures after the age of 60

Mostly affect older people

Infections

Symptoms of Generalised Seizures Generalized seizures affect all or most of the brain. They include petit mal and grand mal seizures. www.kayaknz.co.nz

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Petit mal seizures •

Minimal or no movements (usually, except of ‘eye blinking’) – may appear like a blank stare

Brief sudden loss of awareness or conscious activity – may only last seconds

Recurs many times

Occurs most often during childhood

Decreased learning (child often thought to be day-dreaming)

Tonic-colonic (grand mal) seizures •

Whole body, violent muscle contractions

Rigid and stiff

Affects a major portion of the body

Loss of consciousness

Breathing stops temporarily, then ‘sighing’

Incontinence of urine

Tongue or cheek biting

Confusion following the seizure

Weakness following the seizure

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Symptoms The severity of symptoms can vary greatly from simple starting spells to loss of consciousness and violent convulsions. For many patients, the event is stereotyped (the same thing over and over) while some patients have many types of seizures that cause different symptoms each time. An aura consisting of a strange sensation (such as tingling, smell or emotional changes) occurs in some people prior to each seizure. The type of seizure a person experiences depends on a variety of factors; the part of the brain affected, the cause and the individual response.

Symptoms of Generalised Seizures There are many different types of seizure, the three most common being: Absence – no medical attention needed Complex Partial – reassure and stay with the patient until they are aware of their environment. No medical help needed

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Tonic - Clonic Symptoms: They may utter a cry before falling unconscious to the ground Their body stiffens briefly, then muscle contractions cause jerky convulsive movements There may be bubbly saliva, possibly red if the mouth was bitten Breathing may stop for up to 30 seconds and the lips and face go blue Bowel and bladder control may be lost The seizure may last up to 4-5 minutes, then the person may be deeply unconscious for several minutes They steadily improve and within one hour should be fully recovered – being easily roused, but still very sleepy and may have a headache.

The Recovery Position

Treatment: •

Stay calm and reassure bystanders

Protect the person from danger

Put something soft under the head and remove glasses

Loosen any clothing that may restrict breathing

Don’t put anything in the mouth. It may cause damage or choking

Don’t try to restrain the person

If appropriate move bystanders away for privacy

After the seizure stops, put the person in the recovery position, insulated from the ground until they regain consciousness

Don’t be alarmed if the breathing is laboured and erratic. It takes a while for the brain to settle back into a normal rhythm

Offer assistance, understanding and privacy, if bladder and bowel control was lost

Watch for signs and symptoms of a possible head injury that may have occurred during the seizure

Allow the person to sleep and rest until fully recovered

Urgent help is necessary if: •

The seizure lasted more than 5 minutes

One seizure follows another

The person does not recover, i.e. is not easily roused within one hour

The seizure occurred in water, causing possible damage to lungs and subsequent breathing problems

This is the first seizure

If in any doubt, medical help is the wisest course of action Johanna Verheijen First Training Ltd Diploma Outdoor Recreation Leadership Bachelor Sport and Recreation

Kiwi Association of Sea Kayakers N.Z. Inc. (KASK) Annual subscription is $35.00.

Kask PO Box 23, Runanga 7841, West Coast

www.kask.co.nz

www.kayaknz.co.nz

KASK is a network of sea kayakers throughout New Zealand

KASK publishes a bi-monthly newsletter containing trip reports, events, book reviews, technique/ equipment reviews and a ‘bugger’ file. KASK holds national sea kayaking forums. Issue 77 Autumn 2015

PAGE 41


Trip Card # 023 Orakei - Korako

Geothermals at Orakei - Korako

Orakei - Korako Route card No. 0023 Skill level: Beginner Distance: 16 or 22 Km

Map no: BF36/37 Tidal Port: N/A

Start point:

Tutukau Bridge, Tutukau Road

Finish Point:

Orakei - Korako Cafè or Tutukau Bridge

Emergency contact: Comms coverage:

Dial 111 Cellphone coverage in gorges is unreliable – may need to climb a hill, and then need to ring a landline.

Introduction: Begin the adventure at the Tutukau Bridge. You’ll paddle through the remarkable landscapes and natural beauty of the gorge and past the hidden valley (Orakei - Korako, geothermal park) where you can see gushing geysers, silica terraces and boiling mud pools from sitting in your kayak. There is a charge to vist the site if you wish to land. Description: Paddle downstream to the Orakei-Korako thermal area; continue on to sample the hot water at Waihunuhunu stream. Then return to do the ‘squeeze’ and soak in a hot pool, before a coffee at the café at Orakei-Korako, and the return car shuttle.(16km) Or paddle back to put in. (22km total). Alternatively, for those wanting a longer paddle, get dropped off & launch from the Mihi Bridge. (extra 13km).

Access/parking – From Taupo, drive North on SH 1 to Tutukau Rd turn right immediately after the first bridge. Organise a shuttle, leaving only one car at OrakeiKorako café. Hazards: • Avoid duck shooting season early May • Power boats, water skiers, wake-boarders. Keep to the sides of lake where possible - Keep a good lookout.

Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: May 2015


Trip Card # 024 Otamure Bay

Otamure Bay

Otamure Bay Route card No. 024 Skill level: Intermediate Distance: Varies Start point: Finish Point: Emergency contact: Comms coverage:

Chart: NZ521 Tidal Port: Opua

Otamure Bay Otamure Bay VHF channel 85 & 16 Cellphone coverage is unreliable.

Introduction: This is some of the best beaches and kayaking in New Zealand. The rough coastline is dotted with beautiful sandy beaches. Camp in a beach-front setting with large pōhutukawa trees for shade. Relax on the beach or walk along the coast. You’ll need to pick your weather as a sizeable swell is common in this area. Description: There is so much to do in this area without paddling too far. Rock gardening, fishing and diving off the numerous rocks and islands. If you would like a full days paddle, you can head across Whangaruru Bay to Whangaruru Harbour approximately 12 km north. For campsite details see http://www.doc. govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/places-to-stay/ conservation-campsites-by-region/northland/ whangarei-area/otamure-bay-whananaki/

Getting there: Go past Hikurangi on SH1. Turn off SH1 at Whananaki North Road. Travel 27 km. Campsite is 2 km past the village on Rockell Road.

Hazards: • Ocean swells • Wearing helmets when rock gardening in any swell is recommended. Camping

Bird and wildlife watching

Toilets

Fishing

Showers

Diving and snorkelling

Parking Boat ramp

Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: May 2015


Kayaks

White Water

Matariki

4.50

620

26

$1699

Q-Kayaks

Kiwi Excel Kiwi Lite Skua Skua Lite Shearwater Shearwater Lite Tasman Express Tasman Express Lite Tasman Express Elite Foveaux Express Southern Skua

3.75 3.75 5.20 5.20 480 480 5.30 5.30 5.30 5.00 5.40

740 740 600 600 610 610 620 620 600 600 600

23 18 27 24 26.5 23 29 25 22 19 22

$1660 $1970 $2890 $3140 $2650 $2900 $2890 $3140 $4590 $4460 $4590

Contour 450 Contour 480 Eco Bezhig

4.50 4.80 5.40

620 620 590

26 27 27

$2549 $2849 $3099

Necky

Manitou 13 Looksha 14

3.90 4.30

630 625

20.5 26

$1299 $2199

4.90

600

17

$3240

Canoe & Kayak

Beachcomber Ultralite Beachcomber Ultralite Plus Barracuda Beachcomber Ultralite Pro Interface

4.90

600

18.2

$3441

4.90

600

19

$3555

5.20

575

$3440

Riot

Price

Liquid Logic

Weight (kg)

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Magnum 72 Magnum 80 Thunder 65 Thunder 76

2.41 2.54 2.34 2.44

660 254 650 660

18 67 18.5 29.5

$1595 $1595 $1895 $1895

Remix 59 Remix 69 Remix 79 Jefe Jefe Grande Stomper 80 Stomper 90 Flying Squirrel 85 Flying Squirrel 95

2.57 2.64 2.72 2.49 2.59 2.49 2.57 2.66 2.73

640 650 670 670 680 650 680 650 670

19 20 21 20 23 21 22 22 23

$2049 $2049 $2049 $2099 $2099 $2049 $2049 $2049 $2049

2.60

610

16

$1160

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Twist 1

2.60

790

6

$1095

Twist 2

3.60

830

9

$1395

Helios 1

3.10

710

13.5

$1595

Helios 2

3.80

750

17

$1895

Sunny

3.80

800

16

$1895

Tasman K40

4.40

670

15

$3036

Pacific K50

5.35

670

20

$4048

Q-Kayaks Stealth

Inflatables

Gumotex

Width (mm)

Incept

Length (m)

Mission

Sea Kayaks Single

Sea Kayaks Double Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Q-Kayaks

Southern Endeavour

5.60

800

46

$3540

Mission

Contour 490 Eco Niizh 545 COM

4.90 5.65

800 770

35 55

$3499 $4999

Necky

Amaruk

5.40

725

41.3

$3499

5.90

720

30

$4500

Barracuda Beachcomber AR Duo

Great Advice / Great Brands / Great Service


Sit-on-Top Single Starting Price

Fire Fly

2.40

700

16

$535

Whizz

2.50

770

22

$750

Escapee

3.30

740

23

$775

Escapade

3.50

750

27

$975

Play

3.10

710

18

$549

Escape

3.20

790

17

$649

Explorer

3.40

790

18.20

$749

Navigator

3.80

790

22

$849

Length (m)

Cobra

Weight (kg)

Ocean Kayak

Width (mm)

780

28

3.80

915

28

$899

Tourer

4.60

710

23

$1799

Trident 13 inc seat

4.10

710

28

$1799

Tetra 12 Angler inc seat

3.70

710

24.5

$1499

Trident Ultra 4.1 inc comfort seat

4.10

710

28.5

$2099

Trident Ultra 4.3 inc zone seat

4.30

740

32.5

$2499

Trident Ultra 4.7 inc zone seat

4.70

740

35

$2649

17

$499

19

$949

Glide 390 inc rudder

3.90

850

28

$1249

Xstream 420

4.20

730

28

$1349

Prowler Big Game II

3.90

865

32

$2499

Frenzy

2.75

790

19.5

$749

Line 280

2.80

730

18

$1299

Mysto inc seat

2.95

790

21

$849

Catch 290

2.95

750

19

$1049

3.90

850

29

$1649

Scrambler 11 inc seat

3.60

750

23

$1099

Catch 390 inc rudder Line 400

4.0

840

32

$1599

Tetra 12 inc seat

3.70

710

24

$1349

Catch 420 inc rudder

4.20

730

28

$2049

Ozzie inc paddle

2.7

790

17

$599

800

22

$1149

3.2

790

20

$799

Espri Angler inc delux seat & paddle

3.6

Nemo inc seat & paddle Espri inc paddle

3.4

790

18.2

$999

4.1

780

24

$1699

Replay inc kid pod

3.6

820

24

$1299

Profish 400 inc delux seat & paddle Profish 440 inc delux seat & paddle

4.4

770

29

$1999

Profish GT inc delux seat & paddle

3.6

820

24

$1899

Profish Reload inc delux seat & paddle

4.5

750

29

$2499

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Mission

760

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

3.50

750

26

$900

4.00

830

32

$1295

Tandem

3.80

799

26

$799

Long Reach

4.40

910

36

$999

Surge

3.90

850

28

$1149

Malibu 2

3.65

870

27

$1099

Kayak

Malibu 2 XL inc 2 x seats

4.10

86

33

$1499

Viking Kayaks

Viking 2 + 1 inc seats & paddles

3.9

810

27

$1299

Point 65

Tequila! Modular

4.2

750

35

$1999

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Multisport Length (m) Q- Kayaks

4.30

Fish n’ Dive

750

Escapade II

Ocean

$1699

Marauder

2.70

Delta

Mission

Starting Price

2.95

Length (m)

Cobra

Weight (kg)

Squirt

Sit-on-Top Double

Q- Kayaks

Width (mm)

Flow

Viking Kayaks

Viking Kayaks

Ocean Kayak

Mission

Cobra

Q-Kayaks

Length (m)

Fishing Singles

Hurricane (kevlar)

5.90

490

12

$3170

Maximus (kevlar)

6.40

510

16

$3890

Recreational Length (m)

Q- Kayaks

Strike

3.1

750

20

$920

Strike Excel

3.1

750

21

$1495

Sprite 1

3.00

700

19

$850

Kiwi

3.75

740

20

$1365

Sprite 2

4.50

820

32

$1410

Access 280

2.80

730

18

$1049

Mission

Access 400

4.00

840

32

$1399

Ocean Kayak

Manitou 13

3.90

630

20.5

$1299


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PAGE 46

Issue 77 Autumn 2015

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Not For The Faint Hearted

The day started like most others on a Norwegian kayaking road trip. Wet kayaking gear strewn across a roadside parking lot with tired and bruised bodies consuming strong coffee as the plans for the day were discussed. It was decided that we would head to the Upper Jori for a quick run down before heading toward the Sjoa region. After the Jori we regrouped at a gas station to transfer footage as I would be leaving the tour the next day to head to another festival. After all footage was transferred we loaded up the vans and headed toward Sjoa having had word that Matzes Drop was in good flow. I had seen this drop in videos and it looked like a lot of fun. A small volume creek drops through a narrow crack in the earth in a double stage waterfall into a small pool below. We got there about mid-afternoon and for the first time in three weeks it was raining. Although it usually rains a lot in Norway we were a little surprised we would have to scout in the rain. We stood there at the lip for about 20 minutes discussing the flow and different lines.

By Josh Neilson

The verdict was “it’s good to go”. Back at the car, the rain had not let up and it almost curbed our enthusiasm, but not quite. Of the 10 in our crew, eight boats were walked to the drop and we began to set up safety, cameras and to scout the drop one last time. Anton lead the way followed by Sam, Jamie, Barny Jared and Adrian. All had good lines and were all stoked at the bottom. I was next. I turned on my Gopro, lifted my thumb high into the air and with a matched signal from the cameras at the lip I pulled into the flow. I made my way through the small waves at the top and could spot where I needed to be at the top of the drop. Time started to slow down as I got closer. As I rolled off the lip I was satisfied with my line and started to lean forward. At the reconnect of the first stage of the drop I noticed the nose of my kayak lifting up higher than expected. I started to launch into the air and I knew this was not ideal.

Josh Neilson takes on Matzes Drop Photo by: Dean Treml www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 77 Autumn 2015

PAGE 47


Years of landing from different waterfalls flashed through my mind and I knew I needed to get all my weight forward and brace for impact. Time continued to pass in slow motion as I waited for impact. Crack. There it was. The thing I had prepared for was now a reality. In a matter of a split second I had sent a signal from my brain down to my feet to wiggle and the message was sent back to say “yep I can still move” then I went into survival mode. Uncontrollable screams leapt from my lungs and the crew acted accordingly. In a matter of seconds Jamie and Anton were by my side supporting me. I stayed as still as possible and let them do their thing. If there was ever a moment I was stoked with my crew it was now. I knew I was in good hands and I just needed to focus on staying calm. By now a couple of minutes had passed and I had been taken from my kayak and laid on the ground in the only flat spot deep in the gorge. Breathing was becoming an issue and the muscle spasms were only just bearable. With minimal cell reception Anton managed to scrape together a few words to describe the incident and the rescue helicopter was on its way. By now I knew all I had to do was last 20 minutes with intense pain and then the morphine would be delivered and that helped my mind a lot. With a bunch of good mates by my side they kept my spirits up joking about a few things every now and then and before we knew it the helicopter was hovering above. The idea was that they would stretcher me up to the top of the gorge and fly out from there but the pilot had other ideas. He manoeuvred the aircraft sideways, down and spun it on a dime and was soon perched on a rock in the gorge about 10m from where I lay. Within a few minutes the crew were on the ground and I was loaded onto a stretcher. During this process the paramedic asks me “did you run that waterfall?”. “Yes” I said, waiting for a lecture about being safe. To which he replied “when we did the first descent of this river we walked around that one”. The look in his eye was not of disapproval, but more a feeling of support and that set the scene for a good flight to hospital. I said goodbye to the guys and we flew off into the distance toward Lillehammer Hospital. About an hour later I was handed off to the triage crew and I felt a little lonely. My gear was swiftly cut off me and the X-rays and scans happened in quick succession. Although every word yelled across the room was in Norwegian, every few moments the person holding my head would translate everything, so I knew what was happening. As a coping mechanism I kept filming everything on my Gopro and it helped me to keep my mind off what the doctors were inevitably going to tell me. Back in ICU the guys turned up and that definitely lightened the mood before the surgeon came in. Although I was already certain I had broken my back, to what extent I was unsure. His words were “Josh you are very lucky but it’s also not great”. I had an unstable burst fracture to my L1 and it needed surgery to stabilise it. Although it didn’t sound great at least we had an answer and we could move forward from there. The next day I was transferred to Elverum hospital for surgery and recovery. I was stoked to hear that this was the best place to get sent for surgery in Norway! Fast forward 10 days and my dad was helping me into the plane in Oslo headed to NZ. After the initial break that day, July 7th 2014, everything fell into place and everyone involved were incredibly helpful. I suggest to all paddlers traveling the world to ensure you get travel insurance and if you are looking to be covered for Grade five kayaking look at World Nomads. They offered the best customer service I have ever come across and supported me and my family the whole way through this accident.

PAGE 48

Issue 77 Autumn 2015

Skipping forward eight months and I am glad to be back on my home river at the Kaituna gaining strength back on every run and looking forward to a good future back on the river. Thanks to everyone who helped me through this and I look forward to seeing you all on the river again soon! www.kayaknz.co.nz


Josh Neilson - Matzes Drop Photo by: Sam Sutton www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 77 Autumn 2015

PAGE 49


Josh’s rescue Photo by: Dean Treml

Anton PAGE 5 0 Immler I s s- uBugdelva e 77 Autumn 2015 Photo Josh Neilson

www.kayaknz.co.nz


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Issue 77  

New Zealand Kayak Magazine Issue 77 featuring the Maruia River, Back Country Pit Stops and Kayak Fishing

Issue 77  

New Zealand Kayak Magazine Issue 77 featuring the Maruia River, Back Country Pit Stops and Kayak Fishing