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Issue 76

Surfers Guide Kayak Fishing

Tips and advice on kayak surfing

Equator

PADDLING THE

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The Perfect Morning Fishing Prepare for the big one

Dog Paddling Taking your best friend


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Issue 76 Summer 2015

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Contents Health Rescue Your Sore Kayak Back

40

16 20

Puzzles Soduku Quick Crossword Puzzle Solutions

34 34 46

47

Bush Craft Water - the Elixir of life

35

Sit-on-Top Surfing Dog Paddling

28 11

Book Reviews

38

Technical Trip Card - Kawau Island Circumnavigation Trip Card - Tutukaka

Kayaks Kayak listings

44

42 43

Sea Kayaking Paddling on the Equator Rising from the Ashes

6 24

Fishing Prepare for the Big One! The Perfect Morning Fishing White Water Touring Norway 2014


Editorial Well, what a summer so far. We got back from a white Christmas in Europe and the first thing we did was to jump in the sea, and what a lovely feeling it was. Everyone has told me of the stunning days and how the beaches have been packed all day and well into the evening. Isn’t it great how we kayakers can just leave the busy beaches and go and find a secluded spot to enjoy lunch and an afternoon nap in the shade of a pohutukawa. My trip to Campbell Island to do some volunteer work has been postponed till next summer, so it is now time to plan some adventures instead. First, a trip around the country to catch up with the Canoe & Kayak Team and hopefully a paddle or two along the way. Then a trip down the Whanganui is called for, then a trip north to paddle and play on the coast. Loads of fishing and surfing. That should round off the summer and autumn with lots of fun and memories to keep the fire burning through the winter. There is so much that the outdoors does for me and yet we seem to be constantly up against the mounting pressure that the internet and electronics put on us to spend more and more time in front of the screen. Our internet

EDITOR: Peter Townend Ph: 0274 529 255 Email: pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz PUBLISHER: New Zealand Kayak Magazine is published four times per year by Canoe & Kayak Ltd. PRINTING: MHP Print DISTRIBUTION: MagMag SUBSCRIPTIONS: (see page 46) New Zealand – 4 Issues = $25 Overseas – 4 Issues = $40

Issue 76 has been down since we got home and it is interesting that without the distraction of reading the news, checking the swell forecast, reading and replying to hundreds of emails, I have had time to sit down and enjoy some quality time with the kids, go surfing and swimming. I know the day of reckoning is coming and that as soon as the modem is blinking again I will have loads of replies to make. A couple of decades ago I would have spent a fraction of the time dealing with business correspondence and, much to my mother’s annoyance, nothing on family correspondence at all. But I would keep in touch of course when in town. So with this massive increase in communication have we seen a corresponding growth in people heading out to explore the great outdoors? I believe not. There is an increasing reliance on electronic correspondence to motivate activity and I believe most people need a personal invite to be comfortable to take on a new challenge. If it comes from someone they know then the chance of them participating increases dramatically. Heaps of great reading for you in this issue and as I write this I am looking forward to

heading up to Orewa in a few hours to get some photos for the surfing article later in the magazine. I hope it inspirers you to get out and enjoy the buzz I always get from surfing. A KASK newsletter stated that a recent survey announced there are 320,000 canoe and kayak users in New Zealand, wow. That is a large number of people who know the secret. Let’s see you out there enjoying our stunning summer. Cheers and safe paddling Peter Townend

Copyright: The opinions expressed by contributors and the information stated in advertisements/articles are not necessarily agreed to by the editors or publisher of New Zealand Kayak Magazine.

Front page: John McCarthy and Rowan Rose Townend having a whale of a time at Orewa. Photo by Peter Townend

CONTRIBUTORS: We welcome contributors’ articles and photos.

Contents page: Josh Neilson at the top of Hellesylt slide. Photo by Tim Pickering

Refer to www.canoeandkayak.co.nz/guide New Zealand Kayak Magazine ‘Contributors Guidelines’ for more details. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS TO: James Fitness Email: james@canoeandkayak.co.nz New Zealand Kayak Magazine

This page: Pete & Ben hard at work. What a way to spend an afternoon. Photo by James Fitness

Pricing: At the time of printing the prices in this magazine were accurate. However they may change at any time. www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 76 Summer 2015

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Paddling on the Equator

Ecuador is a unique country with it’s hugely diverse zones, the tropical coast, rain and cloud forest, Amazonian jungle and the massive Andean Range. Flowing from both sides of the Andes are scores of rivers that flow their way through spectacular gorges, canyons, valleys and jungles creating limitless breathtaking world class whitewater. Ecuador centrally located on the globe, holds the headwaters of the Amazon River, as a result the country has one of the highest concentrations of rivers per square mile in the world. Add to this, warm tropical waters, year-round flows, excellent accessibility and an opportunity to paddle in the Amazon jungle, and you have something exceptionally unique. Tena, the capital of the Napo Province, is a city in the Amazon rainforest. Known as the “cinnamon capital" of Ecuador, it is also getting a reputation as the “kayaking capital of Latin America”.

by Nathan Fa’avae

Leaving the city of Tena it is incredible how quickly you are in the wilderness of the jungle, which is largely protected by a number of large national parks in the area. When we got to the put in I was surprised to see how big the river was, it was full of big waves and pools. Listed as a grade three trip, I suspected there would be a couple of grade three rapids but mainly grade two. I asked our guide Alex how many grade three rapids there were, he said he didn’t know for sure but guessed about 20. I did wonder at that moment if we had chosen the most suitable trip, would it be too full on for the kids to enjoy it? But how many times in your life do you get to paddle a tributary to the Amazon? The river had extra significance for me as the headwaters of the Jatunyacu are found on the Cotopaxi volcano which I had climbed a few weeks earlier.

While travelling Ecuador for two months between October and December I couldn’t not go to Tena.

Normally a 27 km river run, our trip was 40 km in total as the guides offered to raft us back to our lodge further downstream, a real bonus for us.

I wanted to do some kayaking and a rafting trip with my family. We read up on the rivers available, and there are a lot of them, finally selecting the Jatunyacu River (meaning “big water” in Kichwa).

The river was topped up from previous night’s rain, making it good for rafting but it limited how far we could go up a canyoning side trip on the first day. The rafting though was excellent and the extra flow speed was helpful given we had three children on board.

We contacted a highly recommended rafting company ‘River People’ and set up a two day voyage, with children aged 8, 10 and 11, they were happy to run a private trip with us, and kindly put a safety kayaker on the water also. All up there were eight of us on our mini rafting expedition, including the guide and gear oar raft.

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Issue 76 Summer 2015

After an action packed morning of negotiating some large powerful rapids, which thankfully were mainly pressure waves and not nasty recirculating holes, we enjoyed a replenishing lunch on the river bank. Due to the river speed and also our canyoning trip being flooded out, we arrived at camp early and spent the afternoon relaxing on a glorious river www.kayaknz.co.nz


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beach, swimming and soaking up the sun. Amazon evenings are special and a bonfire on the beach enhanced the experience. I love going to sleep in the tropics, the warmth, scents and the cacophony of insect and bird life blended with the river ambiance produces a rich atmosphere. The guide kindly warned us that snakes and scorpions were often spotted around the camp. Before we boarded the rafts for our second day, a visit to the local village was a worthy excursion. At a Cocao plantation, where they also make chocolate, we spent an hour with the kids making chocolate and then hot chocolate, served with bananas roasted on the fire: we had the

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Issue 76 Summer 2015

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sustenance to tackle the awaiting rapids. We did find a stowaway scorpion on the raft as we were departing. With three adults and three children on the raft it was really exciting and engaging making our way safely downstream. Our guide took conservative lines but still ensured the kids got splashed and tossed about, we all knew flipping in a big hole was not going to be pretty, save that for the thrill seeking backpackers.

The morning was continuous rapids so we were kept busy with paddling commands, all forward, all back, left back, right back, all down and hold on! The afternoon was more sedate, we drifted, chatted and looked around us, “Wow, we’re in the Amazon” . It is an astounding place to be, very distinctive. Inside the Amazon is a boat load of world records. Spanning 6.7 million

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km2 (twice the size of India) the Amazon Biome is virtually unrivalled in scale, complexity and opportunity, and truly is a region distinguished by superlatives. Not only does the Amazon encompass the single largest remaining tropical rainforest in the world, it also houses at least 10% of the world’s known biodiversity, including endemic and endangered flora and fauna, and its river accounts for 16% of the world’s total river discharge into the oceans. You can feel it as you paddle along, you’re inside something very big. The Amazon River flows for more than 6,600 km, and with its hundreds of tributaries and streams contains the largest number of freshwater fish species in the world. It also has a huge amount of natural and cultural diversity. Equally impressive are the unfathomable numbers of mammals, birds, amphibians, and reptiles found across the biome. The Amazon is home to more than 30 million people living across a vast area. While we were only on the river for two days, aptly to the nature of jungle, it was a heartfelt journey. The only way it could have been better was more of it, we easily could have lived that expedition rafting life for a few more days. For more information contact: www.kayak-ecuador.com Hot Tip: Candiru Fish. This nasty creature, also called the toothpick fish, has been reported to swim up the urogenital tract of bathers and lodges itself therein. Removal by surgery is the only treatment. In nature, the pencil-shaped fish parasitise the waste ducts of aquatic animals, and apparently finds human orifices irresistible.

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Issue 76 Summer 2015

www.kayaknz.co.nz 20/01/2014 11:29:57 a.m.


Dog Paddling

By Ruth E. Henderson

Photo by: John Crawford

Having a new high octane, high energy young dog that needed a decent walk at least twice a day was threatening to drastically reduce, even eliminate my kayaking time. If I took off for a couple of hours paddling in my sea kayak that left Pippa, high and dry – deserted and destructive. If I walked for one - two hours in the morning, then again in the afternoon…it felt like a chore, and I was the one aggrieved and distressed… Obviously we had to work out a way for us both to get our preferred exercise and stimulation, revitalisation for the day. The Cobra Explorer sit-on-top, a craft I called my ‘Ute’ and occasionally used for collecting pine cones or entertaining visiting nephews or grandkids was de-cobwebbed; a very small dog buoyancy aid was borrowed. And so, we embarked on a dog paddling regime. The learning curve is flattening out, the quest for the perfect sit-on-top continues, as does the look-out for dogfriendly destinations. Meanwhile here are suggestions if you too want to take your pooch paddling:

Baby steps Maybe start your dog off in a larger, more stable craft. Get it used to just being on the water, getting its balance, being splashed, and phew… safely arriving home again.

Scary stuff Be prepared to stop paddling for cuddle time. At first buoys, anchored yachts, diving gannets – unknown things encountered up close may be frightening things. If your fur-baby is unsure of what that thing on the water is and is afraid, it’s time for a reassuring cuddle. www.kayaknz.co.nz

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Paddle positions To start off, you the paddler will have to adopt some funny strokes. High when the pup wants to sit on your lap or between your legs. Low if they stand mid deck or are larger than my Manchester terrier and take up too much forward deck space.

The stance Anything goes at first, but I’d soon get your pup to stand, sit, where it doesn’t drastically affect your paddling or rock the boat too much. Pippa now knows her place is up front and immediately she jumps on board, goes and stands there front feet on the deck or forward hatch and rear feet in the foot well; and that is where I prefer to see her. That way I can readily adjust myself or brace to counteract her movement or leaning. However, you may prefer to have your dog stand or sit in the rear storage well.

Distance from shore This is directly proportional to how uneasy or distressed a puppy can get. Perceived swimming distance is good and for a puppy that is maybe only 50 - 100m. It seems anchored boats are ‘shore’ so when the harbour is full, you can explore further away from the coastline, and over time go further offshore.

Terra firma time Don’t expect a puppy to stand or sit still ‘forever’. After about 30 mins find somewhere for a leg stretch, some playtime and an opportunity to have a pee.

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Buoyancy Aids and unintentional swims The first time Pippa went for a ‘swim’ it was a king-tide and there were so many pohutukawa leaves on the water, she could be forgiven for thinking the sea was now land. Ducks, other birds get her teetering on the edge, but nowadays she rarely falls overboard. If she does I find rescue is simply a case of grabbing the handy handle on the back of her BA. Note one size does not fit all. The small jacket I had for Zac her predecessor, who weighed 10 kg is too large for Pippa weighing 8 kg. Just like a BA for a human, get one with adjustable straps so you can fit it to your dog’s configuration.

Disembarking Since Pippa is as fast as grease-lightening – I keep her on a lead and make sure I grab this before the bow hits the shore. She has been taught that I get off first, but if temptation like a wandering weka or a playful puppy is on the shore, I can’t guarantee she’ll do exactly as told.

Exercise? At first I was surprised at how tired the dog got with me doing all the work… All that balancing must be good exercise, use up nervous energy and all those exciting things out there must provide visual stimulation. Some days when Pippa is a bit grizzly I do wonder why I don’t just jump in my Southern Skua and head off by myself for some peace and quiet. But dog paddling adds another element, another dimension to kayaking. It is another ‘sport’. And although I have tried putting a dog behind me on a towel for traction, on my sea kayak, I believe if you are keen to take your dog paddling regularly, then you need another craft, a sit-on-top.

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Issue 76 Summer 2015

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What makes a kayak good for dog paddling? Comfort and space for your dog has to be top of any check list, and then depending on how far or for how long you want to paddle, your comfort! Manoeuvrability and weight, if you need to lift it alone, are also factors to consider. My quest for the perfect sit-on-top is not over yet, but it’s been fun trying out the following boats: Cobra Explorer - 3.4 m long 790 mm wide 18 kg – good flat front deck for the dog, good foot rest moulds for the human and a good flat area in between for dog feet, very stable, nice dry boat, but with the weight up front, it pushes a lot of water.

Mission Flow – 2.95 m 750 mm 19 kg - good front deck. Central console area not too wide, a small dog can stand on with one foot in the central drink bottle well. Very manoeuvrable, turns on a ‘sixpence’. Would be great for surfing… however Pippa is not a natural ‘water-dog’ so is unlikely to be into that. A wet boat as even if I plugged the seat drain holes, water could slop in the moulded lifting handles.

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Ocean Kayak Scupper Pro – 4.5 m 665 mm 27 kg - this boat does have a big front hatch and it may be possible to place a placid, disciplined dog that likes sitting in one place, in the open hatch. In case of capsize; to reduce the amount of water that gets into this front compartment, I’d have the empty forward space filled with a white water kayak airbag. The central console maybe a bit wide for a wee dog to straddle, adjustable footrests and rudder a bonus. Haven’t personally tried a Scupper Pro, but know two other dog paddlers who use them with their small dog sitting either between their legs or standing up front. Being longer than the other boats, it may be perfect for medium to large sized dogs like Badger my neighbours’ blue heeler. In a short boat their size does restrict ones paddle stroke! Viking Espri –3.4 m 790 mm 18 kg - rounded slightly raised front deck didn’t worry the dog, plenty of foot well space, foot moulds better than the Flow. Fairly manoeuvrable, tracks well and doesn’t push so much water. A good all-rounder. The ultimate SOT? I’m looking for one that is lighter, longer, and faster but still has deck space for a restless dog to move around a bit. Without the dog, I tried and liked the Tarpon 120 Ultralight (3.7 m 780 mm 20 kg) but the carry handles are on the outside of the hull and annoyingly, I kept catching my hands on them. I have tried the Barracuda SOT Fish Pro (4.2 m 680 mm 18 kg) but the central console is too high and wide for a small dog’s comfort. I do like having adjustable footrest pegs and a rudder. I’d like to try out the Tourer version.

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Issue 76 Summer 2015

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Prepare for the Big One!

While I was on a kayak fishing trip over at Great Barrier Island I was quietly fishing away casting soft baits around for snapper. I was landing a few nice pannies and generally having a very relaxed time. It was then that I noticed my fish finder light up with a huge school of fish directly under my kayak! One of the advantages of fishing at the Barrier is that the water is crystal clear and I could see down several metres under the kayak. When I looked over the side boy oh boy was I in for a treat, passing under me was the biggest school of kingfish I have ever seen from my kayak. These weren't small specimens either; they were just cruising under me without a care in the world, it was as if I wasn't even there. My soft bait set up wasn't ever going to stop them so I quickly reeled that in and grabbed the only other rod I had with me, a bait caster setup on which was a small Zest metal leaf jig I had been using for targeting snapper earlier in the day. Down it goes through the school and several of the fish change course and follow it down, here we go I think to myself, but nothing not even a tap. I start a mechanical jigging pattern with the little leaf jig, this is working better as I feel a couple of the fish knocking the leaf jig. Next thing bang we are all on and I have now got an angry kingfish hanging off my snapper jig set up: a Shimano Currado on a lightweight BackBone Elite rod. This is just not the right set up. Whilst some with a lot of patience and luck may manage a kingfish on this gear it wasn't working for me that day, the fish was too big and the drag simply wasn’t slowing the fish down. Within seconds the fish has sped off and I’m left looking at a very near empty spool, then just as I'm about to be completely taken to the cleaners the fish drops the jig and all the weight comes off. Slowly winding the line back on the reel my adrenaline is still pumping through my veins and although I didn’t manage to hold on to the fish for long and I have nothing to show for it I am still amped - what a thrill that was! PAGE 16

Issue 76 Summer 2015

By Jason Walker

That experience was so much fun I need to do it again but next time I'll be prepared, very prepared. I was never going to win that battle for many reasons so in this article I'm going to take you through my set up to chase the big ones. I will cover the gear, baits, and techniques that will hopefully turn into some landed big fish for all of us.

Rods If you were going off chasing big fish from a boat you'd immediately go for a good strong stiff rod that would easily put the hurt on the fish which is what you ultimately need to do. The rod will allow you to put the pressure on the fish and tire it out. However when a kayak is your work platform a stiff rod will put more pain on you than on the fish. In a kayak you are unable to brace yourself against the gunnels of the boat, nor can you strap on the gimbal belt and use your weight against your foe so a stiff rod is only going to act as a lever and finish with you possibly taking an early swim. From a kayak you need to look for a rod that is probably considered light for the target but it means that the rod will bend and act as a shock absorber between yourself and the fish. Looking at jigging rods I'd recommend at most a rod designed to be used with a 250 gm jig, this will be a good balance between flex and power. I've witnessed a 250 gm JigStar rod land a 37 kg kingfish off a kayak. My personal rods are a Tica RedBack 250 gm overhead and K-Labs 150-250 gm Jig rods in both overhead and spin in my arsenal.

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Spin or Overhead? When selecting a rod and reel set up there is the question of overhead or spin, which is best? Well, both will do the job although an overhead can be a little easier to use if you have a really big fish on as you can drop the rod down on to your thigh or even the kayak and still be able to wind the handle on the reel. With a spin setup you lose that ability but if that's what you have in your kit then don't be put off as it can still land fish you will just need to lean back to lift that rod clear of your knees so you can wind the line in.

Reels The reel is your key to being able to winch that fish to the kayak and this is the part where you should look at good quality gear. The tried and trusted applies to both overhead and spin setups. Reel strength is the key. Most jigging setups for example will have a lot of metal in their construction, solid alloy CNC machined frames, spools and handles are the main stay but don't dismiss some of the newer materials either such as CI4+ from Shimano which is a synthetic material reinforced with carbon fibre. These newer materials will give you huge strength without the weight, and best of all for us kayak anglers - no corrosion or rust! Personally I use a Shimano Talica 8 on my overhead and a Shimano Thunnus 12000 CI4 on my spin setup. Don't get too stressed out on having to spend a fortune on reels though, if budget is an issue look at the tried and trusted reels. The Shimano TLD range of reels have been used successfully including on the set up used to catch the big kingfish I spoke of before, so they have been proven to stand up to the task.

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Line The choice here is braid or mono and in many ways chosen by your fishing technique, i.e. if jigging or using lures then braid is the right option. If you are live or dead baiting then mono or braid will do just fine. One thing to keep in mind when fishing off a kayak though is your ability to bust off should your prey wrap you around a rock or other structure. On a boat you simply give it the big heave ho and bust it off but on a kayak you are much more unstable and do not have the leverage so it really comes down to brute strength to bust that line so you don't want to go too high. Most

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of us who are jigging off a kayak are using 50lb braid although there are a few using 80lb too. If you are fishing baits down deep for the likes of hapuku or kingfish then be sure to attach your sinker to the rig with a lighter mono, around 20lb is good, so if you get your sinker snagged on the bottom it is very easy to bust off and you're not trying to bust that 100lb leader you tied your rig with.

Terminal Tackle Everyone has their favourite rigs for the style of fishing they are doing so I'm not going to tell you how to suck eggs. I will just mention that if you are going chasing the big ones make sure all your rigs, hooks, swivels are all up to the task. Multi-hook rigs, as an example hapuku dropper rigs, commercially these are normally made up as two hook rigs, all well and good but if two baited hooks go down there is always a chance that both baits get snaffled up by two fish.

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Yes that sounds great till you realise that you now have to crank two big fish up from the depths. Think about cutting one of the hooks off or making up your own single hooks rigs.

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Techniques

Landing the fish

Big fish techniques are pretty much the same whether you are fishing from a boat or a kayak. Live baits and dead baits are fished the same. Jigging can be interesting from a kayak though, mechanical jigging is quite difficult when sitting down as you don't get the full range of motion but there are people out there that I have witnessed who seem to be able to pull it off. Personally I've tried it but I just look like an uncoordinated mess so I prefer to employ the old speed jigging method, it’s what we used all those years ago when the old Grim Reaper jigs first came out. So far it's working ok just fine, although I'm now using the knife jigs.

Playing the fish As touched on earlier there are a lot less assists on a kayak than on a boat as you can't brace yourself against the side of the kayak like you can a boat. Also on a boat you bring the fish to you but on a kayak there's not enough weight in the kayak to do that so what actually happens is you wind yourself to the fish rather than the fish to you. You end up directly above the fish, then you start putting the real pressure on the fish and bring it to you. Keep this in mind when you hook up as you want to keep the rod tip pointing towards the front of the kayak this way the kayak will be more stable and will travel through the water easier as you are being pulled along. If you have the rod sticking directly out to the side you risk the kayak being pulled sideways or worse still the kayak rolling and you ending up in the water. If you do need a bit more stability when playing a fish you can always drop your legs over the side of the kayak or even sit side saddle on your kayak with both feet over one side. I know one American kayak angler I've fished with who does this all the time when playing big fish as it also presents a greater drag to the fish if it's trying to pull you around.

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Big fish aren’t that much different to small fish but there are a couple of things you need to keep in mind. Big fish obviously weigh more so when you get that fish on board you may become a little more unstable. Big fish are also obviously physically bigger so you may have much less space to deal with your catch than you are used to. If you have managed to bring your catch to the kayak very quickly you may also find that the fish is still green (not worn out) and will be very unhappy about being dragged from its environment, it's going to express that unhappiness by thrashing about in your arms or on your lap! Be careful to keep your balance. I've been fishing with one angler who whilst dealing with his angry Kingfish ended up in the water with his catch - no he wasn't letting it go! This brings us to securing your catch, as with small fish if you want to keep your catch then make sure you secure it. A fish stringer comes into its own for this purpose, once the fish is on the stringer even if it does end up overboard then it's not going anywhere. Hopefully this has given you an insight into fishing for the big fish from your kayak, the gear you can use, methods, and what you need to do to get that big fish on board your kayak. Just remember that fishing for big fish from a boat is easy as you can drive for miles to the deep water structures and take a multitude of gear; fishing for big fish from your kayak is much more of a sport. Challenge yourself but be safe.

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The Perfect Morning Fishing! By Daniel Moses

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Over the Christmas/New Year break, like most families my family and I packed up the camping gear, shoved it in the car and headed off on a camping holiday. We went to the Coromandel Peninsula to a little place called Waikawau Bay. If you have been there before you will know how beautiful a place it really is, but for those that haven’t let me tell you a little bit about it. Waikawau is a beautiful bay with a sandy beach and a rocky coast line. It is surrounded by native bush and there is plenty of fun to be had in both the water and on land. The best part about this coast line is that it is scattered with plenty of good reefs for fishing and diving. So how do you get there…?

Waikawau Bay is about a 45 minute drive north of Coromandel township. You drive through Colville, after which the road becomes gravel, so it really feels like you are heading off the beaten track. You then drive over to the eastern side of the Coromandel Peninsula to Waikawau Bay. We stayed at the DOC campsite which is right on the beach and is an awesome camp ground if your into ‘REAL CAMPING’ with none of that fancy stuff like TV rooms, kitchens and hot showers. Once we set up camp, I just wanted to get out there fishing. I had been dreaming for weeks about catching big snapper and kingfish from the

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kayak. But of course I had to build up some brownie points with the wife first… So I made the most of it and while the wife had her sleep-ins, the kids and I had a few little adventures of our own, exploring the little creeks and the bush nearby. There is also a small lagoon that fills up at high tide right next to the campground, so I grabbed the double kayak chucked the buoyancy aids on and took the kids to explore the lagoon. It’s not a big lagoon, but there are still plenty of fun things to explore like tree and root formations and little fish to see. It was also an outstanding place for the kids to try their kayaking skills. Whilst we were there it served as a great place for my oldest boy Jack, who is six, to master is paddling skills, and it didn’t take long before he was paddling the double all by himself with his two younger siblings in front. After a day or two of having some fun with the kids, the weather window opened up and the next day was looking perfect. So I ask my wife very nicely if I could have a hall pass to head out fishing in the morning. She said YES! That night I prepped all my gear double checked every knot and rig,

loaded it all up into my Ultra 4.7 ready for the early start the next morning. As I lay in bed that night I couldn’t stop thinking of the potential big fish to be caught. Needless to say it felt like forever for 5 am to roll around! Finally it did but I had one last challenge to over come before I could get out fishing. That was to get up and out without waking up any of the kids, which is quite difficult when you have a two year old who sleeps like a feather and you’re in a tent! Finally I was on the beach with my kayak in tow looking out at a perfect sun rise and glassy blue water. YES – met. service got right this time! My dad and brother in law Johan then joined me. Once on the water we headed to the first potential spot about 1.5 km from the beach. It was a rocky out-crop with scattered reef surrounding it. We spent a bit of time there but unfortunately with not much luck, so we decided to head out deeper and try a little reef further off shore. On the way out there we came across a big pod of dolphins passing through. The morning couldn’t get much better. It’s always a bonus to see dolphins when out paddling and all we needed now was the fish to show up.

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For more info: PAGE 22

Issue 76 Summer 2015

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When we arrived at the reef we paddled around the structure scoping it out with the fish finder. There was plenty of signs, but after a few passes over the reef and not much luck Johan got impatient and decided to head back in a little closer off the point of Waikawau Bay. My dad and I decided to stay for a little longer hoping that the fish would come on the bite. We did a quick radio check before he headed off, because after all if he started to catch more fish than me then I wanted to hear about it! A bit of time went by and our hopes were fading when I heard a “Wahoo!”

adventure equipment

come over the radio from Johan bragging about the nice kahawai he just pulled in. Deliberating to myself whether we should stay or go to join him, I thought well I’m really after a nice snap. So after a short discussion with dad, we decided to stay out deep but to drift over the sand and see what happened. Not long after we drifted off the reef and onto the sand we started to get same hits on the soft bait. Being deep water I decided to rig my soft bait rod with a heavier jig head than normal and rigged it with a gulp nemesis. This seemed to work a treat and all of a sudden it was on. It seemed to be every second to third cast we were hooking up and it didn’t take long before something big took my line. With the rod bending and line screaming off the reel I knew it was the one I had come for. After a few minutes went by and a few big runs, the line all of a sudden went slack…. I cried out in disbelief winding in the slack and then hung my head in shame. I inspected my trace, knot and jig head trying to figure out what when wrong, only to find the rig was fine and it was just bad luck that the fish wasn’t well hooked.

Thinking to myself that I had blown my chances of landing the big one I cast my line out for another crack. A couple of casts later I was on to another good fish. This time I made sure the hook was set well and played it nicely. After a few big runs and about 20 minutes of fighting, the fish tired out and I wound in the big one I had longed for. As I tried to land it I realised that I was going to need a bigger landing net! Just managing to half fit it in the net, I flicked it on board and let out a big “WAHOO!” Finally I had the big Coromandel snapper I had come for. After bragging over the radio to Johan, we headed back in. We had plenty for a feed and my curfew of 12 pm was fast approaching so we started paddling back. It took a bit of patience but in the end it turned out to be a perfect morning fish. Once back at the campsite I trolleyed my kayak back through camp with my head held high with dinner in the back. The one thing I forgot to bring with me though was a way to weigh or measure my big snapper. So I won’t speculate too much, but all I can say is it was over the 60 cm mark. Take a look at the photo, I’ll leave the rest up to you.

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Rising from the Ashes

A piece of maritime history has been given a new lease of life by a group of enterprising yachties and Kawau Island residents. When the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron closed the Kawau Island Yacht Club in April 2014 an important asset in the Hauraki Gulf for boaties was lost. The club and its amenities were the only facilities for the boating public on an island in the Hauraki Gulf which were operated by a Club and which offered all weather shelter.

The club is very inclusive and welcomes not only the island residents, but the boating fraternity and day trippers. Having another attraction in addition to the historic Mansion House and the Mansion House cafĂŠ will increase passenger numbers on the ferries and increase freight being bought to the island, ensuring year round services between Kawau Island and the mainland. The club provides fuel, water, showers, limited stores and now has cafĂŠ and bar facilities.

Originally started by Kawau Island yachties, the clubhouse was built in 1954 but struggling with the financial cost of maintaining the rooms, RNZYS decided to close its doors.

The menu is reasonably priced bar food, including gourmet burgers, salads, chips and nachos to name a few. What could be more enjoyable than sitting on the terrace looking over Bon Accord Harbour enjoying the sun and food?

Since then Kawau Islanders have been in need of a community centre to house various clubs including the book club, fishing club and the residents and ratepayers association.

To get free showers and discounted bar and fuel prices, join the club. (See www.kawauboatingclub.nz)

Newly named Kawau Boating Club Inc, it opened its doors to everyone at Labour Weekend.

Next time you are paddling out at Kawau, why not take the time to visit this piece of history and enjoy the atmosphere and surroundings? Photo by Lin Pardey

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www.kayaknz.co.nz


Ask for a Beckson Pump Most kayakers only ever buy one pump. Make it the best kayaker’s bilge pump. Ask other kayakers and checkout what the professionals use. Chances are they will recommend using a Beckson Thirsty Mate. Why? Because Beckson is a trusted brand, been around a long time and they pump alot of water (rated at 30 litres a min). Plus they last for ages.

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Unrestricted opening allows for great pumping volume

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Distributed by Great Stuff Ltd. For additional information, www.greatstuffltd.co.nz or email greatstuffltd@orcon.net.nz

Issue 76 Summer 2015

BECKAD-Dec14

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Summer Enrolments Enrolments Open Now.

Discover Another World. We’ll show you how!

Find out more at yakityyak.co.nz, email info@yakityyak.co.nz or ask at your local Canoe & Kayak Centre.


Join Join the the Yakity Yakity Yak Yak Kayak Kayak Club Club now, now, and and let let the the adventures adventures begin. begin. Lynda Langridge on Lake Waikaremoana Photo by: Uta Machold

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SurfingSurfing - Wow What a Blast! Kayak Essentials By Peter Townend

Ben Fitness - the smile says it all. PAGE 28

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www.kayaknz.co.nz


Kayak Surfing is one of my most enjoyable pastimes, it has speed and adrenaline. Through the use of your kayak, paddle, skills and knowledge you become part of the wave and are totally immersed in the power of nature. It leaves me thoroughly invigorated, rejuvenated and ready to take on life at full speed.

your mates. Sit-on-tops, especially doubles, with a few friends can make you laugh your head off with fast acceleration and loads of team work. Playing spins on single sit-on-tops is great fun. When surfing you lift your feet off the boat, do a reverse paddle stroke and spin on the kayak. You’ll end up sitting backwards. You then repeat the exercise using a forward sweep and your feet spin back to the front. It looks really stupid but who cares, it’s a blast.

Surfing has been around in one form or another forever. Its more advanced skill sets may have started in kayaks, as I can imagine in freezing climates it would have been essential to get back to dry land, safely after hunting a seal or two.

So how do you get started with your kayak surfing? First, ensure you have well developed skills on flat water.

My favourite surf beach is Orewa, north of Auckland, only 15 minutes drive from home. It is a very flat beach, which at low tide will leave approximately 150 metres of beach exposed. At high tide the rock retaining wall can be a bit intimidating and the rip emptying and filling the estuary at the south end needs to be respected and understood. But when the swell is coming from the east and the wind is light it is such a cool spot to play and learn.

Paddle skills; forward power (gets the boat moving forward), sweep (turning stroke) low brace (support stroke) stern rudder (steering while moving).

In over 35 years of surfing, I have surfed surf boards to open canoes (don’t try open canoes - it really hurts). I currently really enjoy sea kayaks as they can catch a wave and ride it forever. White water kayaks are always fun if you want to throw some fast turns and play dodgems with

These would include;

Skills that allow you to lift a side of your kayak up and still retain your balance. You will need to develop the ability to use these strokes with a fluid transition from stroke to stroke. E.g. While the wave is building behind you, use your forward power stroke to get your kayak moving at the same speed as the wave, you may need a sweep stroke or two to keep the kayak going in the direction you wish. Once the bow (front) of the kayak drops the kayak is now running on the wave and being propelled towards the beach. Now you need the stern rudder to be applied quickly from side to side to control the direction you choose on the wave. At some point your kayak will want to broach, this is when the speed of the wave and the angle of the kayak become such that the stern (back) wants to overtake the bow. Most new kayakers at this point fall towards the beach as the boat suddenly spins its bow one way or the other. It takes a bit of time to read this. Use your low brace on the wave side for support, raise the beach side of the kayak just

Catching the green wave is the easiest. (Kite not required)

Paddle hard to get out through the waves.

Getting wet is part of the fun!

www.kayaknz.co.nz

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enough to allow the water the wave is pushing you across to slide under the kayak and not catch and capsize you. Raising the beach side can be done on sit-on-tops by just lifting your beach side buttock off the kayak a little or if you have thigh braces then it is the same as an enclosed kayak and you can use your knees to lift the beach side. The fit in the kayak needs to be firm for situations where you want optimum control. This is achieved through the use of thigh straps on sit -on-tops and a good fit in any sit in kayak. A simple comparison is walking in jandals on easy contoured land, is fine, but sneakers are better on rough ground especially if you are running. So on flat water your fit in or on a kayak is not an issue, but in any rough water it is essential to have a good fit to be able to control the kayak. So talk to your instructor or sales person about fitting out your craft to make the most of the waves.

Boat design for surf come down to a couple of basics: If it is long it will catch the wave easily. You can accelerate the kayak to the wave speed with little effort. Once on the wave, control has to be very precise as the speed of the kayak will very quickly put you into a broach and the spin will be fast. Your low brace and control of the beach side of the kayak will have to be very fast to prevent capsize. If your kayak is short it is harder to catch a wave early, when it is green. This forces you to catch steep faced waves which makes everything happen very quickly. You accelerate quickly and your responses to deploy the correct stroke to keep control has to happen in a vastly reduced time frame.

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If you watch the hotshots, you’ll see them staying on the green part of the wave, not the white area. This is because on the green water your kayak will have plenty of forward speed and the hulls shape assists in fast turns and tricks. The white areas of a wave is so aerated that it slows the boat down and reduces your control. So I believe it much easier to start surfing in a longer craft catching smaller greener waves. There are many tricks to leave the beach and head out through the surf. The basic one is paddle hard through the wave. However the best outcome is when you take the time to understand the beach, the frequency and size of the sets coming through, then use a few tricks to make it easier. If you watch an experienced paddler do this they make it look easy, so there is lots to learn. www.kayaknz.co.nz


When teaching surf skills we help you develop a feeling of control and achievement so you have the confidence to head out to your favourite beach for a play whenever time and conditions align. On these pages are pictures of our customers, staff and Yakity Yak Members surfing a variety of crafts. Now before you start, stop and think. I like the five “P’s” Prior – preparation - prevents - poor - performance.

On a double many things can happen at once. Here two strokes are being used. Ben with a stern rudder and James starting a low brace. www.kayaknz.co.nz

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Ben & James in control... almost!

Trying to get airborne Have you got the skills to deal with the conditions? Double check yourself here. Have you been taught and know you can perform the skills needed well enough to deal with the conditions? Or are you just being brave and believing it should be easy because others can do it? The standard rule of thumb should always be: “Am I happy swimming where I plan to go surfing?“ If the answer is NO - then don’t go!

Grade Two certification and brush up courses run through out the year. Contact your nearest Canoe & Kayak Centre for details.

It’s a long road. Half the battle is getting there. P ACoast G E to3Coast 2 2015 I s v1.indd s u e 71 6 S u m m e r 2 0 1 5

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Martin Morris enjoying a great ride.

Preferably never go surfing by yourself! Do you know the road code for surfing as well as the surfers do? They don’t like being run over. CAN YOU RESCUE YOURSELF AND ASSIST OTHERS IN NEED? Go to www.canoeandkayak.co.nz/surf to see when a kayak course is available or call one of the local Canoe & Kayak Centres and have a chat about what is the next step for you.

Are you well equipped? Helmet, suitable craft with maximum floatation and a well-fitting PFD (Personal Flotation Device) and grab handles in case of a swim. Spray deck for enclosed craft and rescue equipment and waterproof coms. A helmet to protect your head. Is your clothing going to keep you warm in all circumstances? Is your paddle a reasonably strong one (if it was cheap, it won’t like surfing)? Do you know the hazards that are in the area and can you deal with them in, on or out of your craft? Does someone know where you are going and when you are expected back? www.kayaknz.co.nz

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Puzzles

Quick Crossword Test your knowledge of kayaking and kayaking safety. 1 2

3 4

6

5

7 8 9

10 11 12 13 15

14

16

17

18

19

20

21 22

23

24

Across 6. To move a kayak across a moving body of water by angling the bow into the current so as to minimize drifting down current. 7. Any resistance to a kayak or other boat’s forward motion. 9. The face of a paddle blade that pushes against the water. 10. Sharp turn executed while remaining in one place on the water. 11. The amount of air trapped inside a boat. 12. An area of turbulent water. 13. A shallow area created by a submerged ridge of rocks or coral. 14. To slide or drop into the water while seated in the boat and holding the paddle. 16. An outgoing current created by a falling tide.

18. To move at an angle to the wind or waves. 23. Waves that overtake a kayak from from astern. 24. The inch wide line along the gunnels of a fiberglass kayak where the deck and hull are joined together. Down 1. A wave that remains stationary, often found in “tide rips”. 2. A variety of paddling movements used to control the speed and direction of a kayak. 3. The device used to propel a kayak through the water. 4. A section of passable water between islands, reefs, shoals, and other obstructions. 5. Paddling backward as a means of slowing or reversing the forward motion of a kayak. 8. The depression between two wave crests. 15. The direction in which a kayak is pointing at a given moment. 17. To empty water from a kayak by scooping it out with a scoop or pumping it out with a bilge pump. 19. A type of sailing rig with a boomlike support at the top of the sail as well as the bottom. 20. Weight in the kayak such as paddlers and gear increases kayak stability. 21. A nautical mile per hour. 22. Similar to a canoe but equipped with a deck for greater seaworthiness.

HELP! When disaster strikes who are you going to call when you are out of Cell Phone range?

Sudoku 2

9 1 6 4

4

5

3

4

6 8

1 6 1 8 2 7 4 PAGE 34

3 9 6 7

1

2

7 4 6 5

5 7

Issue 76 Summer 2015

The objective is to fill the 9×9 grid with digits so that each column, each row, and each of the nine 3×3 sub-grids that compose the grid contains all of the digits from 1 to 9. Solution on page 46

*36 )ORDWV 7RXJK 5HOLDEOH :DWHUSURRI

)DVWÀQG3/% IURP\RXU&DQRH .D\DN&HQWUH

Your position is transmitted to the Rescue Co-ordination Centre within a few minutes and the search area is narrowed down to a few square metres. Peace of mind for loved ones and so small it fits in a pocket! Distributed by Bright Ideas ELB Ltd Ph: 0800 713 656 www.brightideas.co.nz

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Water - the Elixir of life

Water is so vitally important for everyday life. Even though every cell in the body requires it, many of us live our lives in a constant state of dehydration - even when we have ready access to plenty of potable water. It has been estimated that an adult can lose up to a litre of water a day just by breathing (have you ever breathed heavily onto a window), even more through perspiration. Death from dehydration can sometimes occur in only 3 - 4 days, so prioritizing hydration is very important if you have to spend an unexpected stay out in the wilds. If you are very active then you may require as much as 3 - 4 litres per day and obviously the more you sweat - the more you need to drink. This includes even during the cooler months, when you must force yourself to drink. A 1% level of dehydration can equate to about 10 % reduction of output. When we start to feel thirsty, we are already about 2 % dehydrated. Unless your parents were camels, humans are not able to store very much water so all excess water is excreted from the body . If water is in short supply then drink enough to remain well hydrated without having to go to the loo every five minutes. Learn to identify the signs and symptoms of dehydration which include headaches, nausea, reduced cognitive function, irritability and weakness. As dehydration continues our tongue may swell and our vision can be impaired - sounds like a hard night on the turps! If your urine is darker than clear and a little bit smelly, then you are becoming dehydrated and you would benefit from drinking more. In the New Zealand wilderness we often suffer from too much rainfall so often there is no excuse for not drinking enough. Fiordland can have up to 9 metres of rainfall a year and upwards of 250 wet days a year - often in this sort of area, having too much rain is the problem. If water is plentiful then fill your stomach, it may also help with your feeling of hunger. If you locate a good water source after being very dehydrated, take small sips of water to avoid vomiting.

Bush Craft By Andy Blake

Secondly, you need to drink more than you think because inadequate hydration contributes to hypothermia. I live in a home without mains water supply and rely fully on what rain falls out of the sky - the threat of having to buy water if we run out has taught me to be very frugal with water. I have been known to get a bit “twitchy” if a visitor runs the tap for too long! Digestion requires a lot of water, so if water is scarce, you should avoid eating until you have secured yourself a reliable water source. Proteins require much more water than carbohydrates to digest. So if you need to eat, you should first eat your carbohydrate food (sugar and starches). The main foods you will gather from the ocean (fish and seaweed) are rich in proteins and should be avoided if you don’t have enough water. Obviously, do not eat any dehydrated food if short on water. Over a long period, you should eat so as not to suffer from additional weakness and health problems due to malnutrition. Fish and other marine animals contain a little amount of water, but only when they are eaten immediately (fresh and preferably raw – sashimi).

Water Collection Observation, awareness and common sense are what is required to find water in the NZ wilderness. In dry areas, look for areas with green vegetation, rushes or reeds and also natural depressions. Animal tracks often lead to or from water and croaking frogs at night is also a good indicator. There are many ways to procure water, here are some.

Rain from the sky This is an effective way of collecting pure water - but only if it rains. A tarp, poncho, survival blanket or your kayak can collect a lot of water in a very short period of time - have you ever marvelled at how much water ends up in your kayak cockpit after it has rained, that’s why cockpit covers were invented! Any water collected, even if it appears dirty can be filtered and treated to be made potable - more on that in the next issue of this magazine.


Seeping out of rocks Water flows downhill so check out naturally seeping water in cracks and crevices. Use a “wick “of some sort (a clean strip of cloth like a cotton hankerchief is perfect) to direct the water into a container or use the straw in your survival kit (or make one out of a piece of grass or toe toe). Water seeping out of rocky areas is naturally filtered and should not need any further treatment. If in doubt boil water for a minute.

Streams Sometimes streams are not only above the ground but also can be found under dried up river beds. Dig down to locate moist ground, water may eventually seep into this depression.

Caves Limestone caves are formed by water and often have water dripping from the ceiling. This is pure and safe to drink.

Solar Still Water that is contaminated, present in the ground, or is present in vegetation , can be converted into safe drinking water. Simply dig a hole, (o30 - 60 cm deep) and place a cup or similar in the centre. Surround this with chopped up vegetation or any waste water including urine. Cover this hole with a sheet of plastic (poncho from survival kit), preferably clear plastic and then seal around the edge with soil. Place a small stone in the centre to depress the plastic into a inverted cone. As the moisture in the hole evaporates, it forms as condensation on the underside of the plastic. It then runs down the inverted plastic cone and drips into the cup .If you have a tube you can collect the fresh water without disturbing the plastic sheet. It is advisable to site this still in full sunshine. This is not going to produce huge amounts of water but every little bit helps.

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Trees draw moisture from great depths below ground; this can be tapped into by the process of condensation and transpiration. Tie a plastic bag over a healthy leafy branch with a corner of the bag hanging down. Get as much larger leaved branches into the bags as possible and ensure you do not rip the bag. Condensation will form and collect in the corner of

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Phone your closest kayak retailer or for further information email Great Stuff Ltd Distributed by Great Stuff Ltd. www.greatstuffltd.co.nz or email greatstuffltd@xtra.co.nz

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GSAD-Mar14

www.kayaknz.co.nz


the bag. It won’t produce litres of water but it all helps if you have none. During the day, pour off this water about every two hours.

Andy squeezes out the collected dew from a cloth.

Dew Collection Dew is recently condensed, distilled water that unless the plant has recently been sprayed (unlikely in the bush) is pure and safe to drink unfiltered. Dew is simply collected by using any absorbent material. These include your clean cotton hankerchief, handful of nontoxic grass or moss. The Wettex cloth towelettes in your survival kit are excellent at collecting water wiped over wet foliage or rocks. Sponges found in the tidal zone, or in your kayak make this job easy as well, just wring this liquid out into a container or directly into your mouth. Obviously dew collection is an early morning exercise as it doesn’t stay around for long. Store enough for the whole day.

Tree trunk Collector When rain drips down the trunk of a tree, use a length of thin rope or fashion a wick to channel the water into a container. Large leaves such as the Rangiora (bushman’s friend) Whau etc can be formed into a cone and laid in a small depression in the ground . Other leaves can be used to funnel rainwater into your container. Small wooden pegs can be used to hold a large leaf into the shape of a bowl.

An example o fthe Tree trunk collector

Water from flax plants During the summer months, the Tui will collect nectar from the flax plant; collect this sugar rich liquid by emptying the contents into a container. Sometimes in windy conditions, this fluid can be seen being blown from the flowerheads.

Above High Tide Mark Dig above the high tide mark to form a depression in the ground. Dig deep enough until water starts to collect in the bottom. The fresh water will float on top of the sea water, which can be collected with a Paua or Scallop shell. This fresh water floating on top of sea water can be experienced in Milford Sound where it is quite possible to taste this fresh water whilst paddling on the Sound! In the next article I will look at the filtering and purification of water. Test yourself by trying to find different fresh water sources in areas where you kayak.

Join Us For A Kayaking Adventure - River Tours

River Tours

Mokau River

White Water Paddling

Waitara River Tours

Exploring beautiful estuaries. Enjoy a scenic trip with wildlife and wonderful views.

Enjoy this beautiful scenic river which winds through some of New Zealand’s lushest vegetation. Camping overnight and exploring some of New Zealand’s pioneering history. A true Kiwi experience.

Need some excitement? Take a kayak down a wicked Grade Two river run... this is a whole day of thrills and fantastic scenery down some of New Zealand’s best rivers.

For those who are slightly more adventurous at heart, this is a scenic trip with the excitement of Grade Two rapids. Midway down, we paddle under the historic Betran Road Bridge where we will stop for a snack.

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 09 476 7066 for details

Phone Canoe & Kayak 06 769 5506

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 07 378 1003 for details

Allow 2 hours paddle only. Priced at $85. Phone: 06 769 5506

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 76 Summer 2015

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Book Review

Sticking With It A sea kayak odyssey around Britain Author: Rowland Woollven Published: 2013 Publisher: Matador Contents: 230 pp, maps, b&w photos, two colour plate sections Cover: softcover Size: 130 x 198 mm (A5) Price: £11.99 ISBN: 978 1 78036 227 0 Availability: Fishpond $23.99; The Nile $27.99 Review: Paul Caffyn

Despite a few niggles re the writing style and layout, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. After a 35 year career in the British Army, Rowland planned to paddle around mainland Britain, partly to see the coastline of his country and partly a desire to get inside the ‘top 20’ of paddlers to circumnavigate the ‘olde country’. As commander of the Joint Service Mountain Training Centre, in which kayaking was included, his previous experience included kayaking expeditions to Alaska and British Columbia. At a gathering of paddlers in Wales, he talked about those previous trips and his aim after leaving the army. He said he didn’t mind if it was solo, accompanied, self supporting or a mix of those. Rowland was approached by an outdoor instructor, Cath Tanner, who said she would be interested in doing the trip. They settled on an early summer 2008 start from Ilfracombe in North Devon. Surprisingly, with no previous paddling experience together, Cath and Rowland made a good team but there was an edge – Rowland had an AF condition, a heart problem when the top chambers of the heart go out of sync with the bottom ones. He had been cleared for the paddle by his cardiologist and GP, was on medication which generally controlled it, and made sure Cath was aware of the condition. The first two chapters provide the ‘genesis’ and ‘preparations’ for the trip, then the narrative follows the daily grind of early morning starts, rotten weather and long stretches of tidal flats to shore in the evening. Rowland touches on a bit of history, and mostly the good side of meeting locals on the way. At Cape Wrath, after over-exerting himself running up to Cape Wrath to check on sea conditions, he had an AF event which required a helicopter medevac to hospital in Inverness. A night of drugs, needles and sleep effected recovery. It took six days to progress three miles on that northern coast of Scotland. A rotten run of weather marked 2008. By 13 September, Rowland and Cath had notched up 1527 nautical miles but had only reached East Anglia, still well north of the Thames Estuary on the east coast of Britain. The forecast for the next five days was terrible, so after tears and talk, they pulled the pin. There is a telling photo of Rowland sitting against a concrete sea wall, chin in hand, looking morose, with a caption, ‘The end of a dream…’. Rowland went through a bleak post-expedition period, not helped by the criticism of some paddlers of an unfinished circumnavigation. Was his expedition a success or a failure? He considered giving up paddling and PAGE 38

Issue 76 Summer 2015

selling all his kayaking kit, but two mates encouraged him back into a kayak and he began to think about resuming the circumnavigation. In 2011 Rowland teamed up with a paddling mate Barry, to return to Ilfracombe from East Anglia but the weather was terrible again. They managed only 287 miles in 20 paddling days, for an average of only 14 miles per day. Still determined to complete the circumnavigation, Rowland teamed up again with Barry in late April 2012, this time with Barry’s wife Wendy. Despite more wretched weather and numerous nasty wet landings, they rounded Lands End, the SW tip of Britain, and with what must have been considerable relief, they reached Ilfracombe – for Rowland, this was after 224 days and 2118 nautical miles. Considering I did this wee paddle back in 1980 with youngster Nigel Denis in only 85 days, I have nothing but admiration for Rowland in his determination and dogged persistence. Even though there was some doubling back to link in with previous paddling marks, not to mention the time taken, this was a remarkable paddle. At 58 years old he became the oldest and was the 19th person to achieve the circumnavigation, and the first to use a stick (Greenland) paddle. The story is well told, but the paragraphs are way too long. Some taking up most of a page. The maps are very basic with bugger all detail, but to scale. There are black and white photos pages, but mostly drowned in a sea of white with the paper quality losing definition. The choice of colour plates in two sections is good, but they are also drowned in a sea of white – they should have been bled out to the paper margin. www.kayaknz.co.nz


Book Review

A Winter’s Paddle A Kayak Journey Around the South Island of New Zealand

Author: Tara Mulvany Published: September 2014 Publisher: Craig Potton Publishing Contents: 143 pp, maps, colour plate section Cover: softcover Size: 152 x 236 mm Price: $34.95 ISBN: 978 1927213 18 6 Availability: NZ bookstores Review: Karen Grant In her book ‘A Winter’s Paddle’ Tara Mulvany tells the story of her winter circumnavigation of the South Island of New Zealand. Tara sets out on this epic five month journey with her boyfriend Sim. What do they have to look forward to? After paddling each day, they must land on an unfamiliar beach, at times battling through hair-raising, dumping surf in darkness, before they can set up camp in total exhaustion. When each morning comes, they then have to scrape themselves out of bed to set off again, and possibly battle out through more dumping waves. This is a story with adventure, danger, mishaps and the tension of the changing relationship between the Tara and Sim. I found Tara’s style of telling her story most engaging. She draws you quickly into her tale in the opening pages when she vividly recounts the excitement and frustrations of an earlier storm-ravaged excursion to Fiordland. It was this experience that sparked Tara’s plan to circumnavigate the South Island, and the winter timing was to fit in with her summer guiding work. Through Tara’s descriptive writing you can almost feel the bite of the cold winter wind, hear the crunch of ice under foot on a cold clear morning, and should I mention the urgency to pee? Even the potential for destruction by ‘dumpers’ is palpable, as is the sense of relief at making it safely to shore for the evening, or safely back through big waves for the next stretch of paddling. Through her story you enter her world. This plucky young woman battled through storms, glandular fever and persistent sea-sickness to pursue and achieve her goal; to give up would be unthinkable. Tara chronicles the story of her journey, its hardships and beauty with great skill and it is a good read.

28 Essendon Place, RD 4 Rotorua - www.daytwo.co.nz  Phone +64 (0) 7 345 7647 or 021 898 942

Sporting an attractive cover with a selfie of Tara, I was disappointed that a low quality paper had been used for the content. The silky cover is a delight to feel in the hands but turning the page is not so appealing. I would also have preferred to see the text neatly justified to both left and right margins. This is Tara’s first book. Since writing this enjoyable account of her South Island journey, she has completed circumnavigations of the North Island and of Stewart Island. I now look forward to reading her future books.

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 76 Summer 2015

PAGE 39


Health

Rescue Your Sore Kayak Back with this Exercise Trifecta

Kayaking involves bending, reaching, twisting and pulling, all which rotate around your spine making you prone to injury as most people work sedentary jobs at desks 8+ hours a day. To keep your body kayak fit, you must strengthen and stretch the muscles on demand. The easiest way I find to do this is an ancient technique called Yoga. I will teach you one key posture for a healthy kayak back, but I recommend you attend a class at least once a week. This ancient practice originated in India, yet now stands centre stage in western cultures. There are great reasons for this, and kayakers should pay close attention! Several things make yoga unique. It includes the trifecta of strength, stretch and 3D movements (unstable curved movement patterns like when you’re in your kayak, not flat planes like in a gym). It’s risky business getting all these three in balance in the stressful 2000’s, yet yoga ticks all three! Like me, yoga multi- tasks and that is a big draw card as time these days is “gold” currency! You’ll frequently find me in the yoga studio as I have sifted through multiple exercise regimes and yoga seems to be the most effective in managing my bodies needs to keep me pain free in my kayak. So what makes yoga so effective and popular? As a health practitioner dealing with thousands of symptoms and injuries a year, I see a common

thread looping its way through your daily life... stress and sitting. Sitting leads to bad posture which poses a threat to you that is as serious as smoking. Sitting creates “Gorilla” posture which compresses your organs, spine, and joints and adversely affects your brain and immune system. Do you find yourself sitting on flat surfaces (2D) and walking on flat surfaces all day? This puts you at high risk for most disease processes. 70% of the modern world sits 8+ hrs a day. Our playful 3D bodies were not meant to do this! Stress compromises your immune and digestive system and puts your muscles in lock down due to your bodies’ release of cortisol when threat is interpreted via your thoughts. Most of my patients claim stress dominates most of their days. You keen kayakers jump in your kayaks to de-stress only to find yourselves with a sore back! So if you want to stay kayak fit management is the key! Herein platforms the magic of yoga, thru stretch and strength postures it escorts blood, oxygen and space into your cramped stressed joints, organs and muscles so they can heal and thrive for yet another day. Each posture is fuelled through breath, reducing cortisol and stress hormones. The Trifecta posture Down dog is a master pose in yoga, it combines the trifecta of strength, stretch and 3D movement. It is a demanding posture and can become “home base” for rescuing your sore back!

Join Us For A Kayaking Adventure - Specialty Tours

Taupo Maori Carvings Half day guided trip to the rock carvings, Lake Taupo... only accessible by boat. A leisurely paddle of about 3 km to the rock carvings. The largest is over 10 m high and from below in a kayak it is imposing.

$95 per person (bookings essential). Phone 07 378 1003 for details.

PAGE 40

Waikato River Discovery Glow Waitara River Tours Worm Kayak Tour

2 hour guided kayak trip. Experience the magnificent upper reaches of the mighty Waikato River - Soak in the geothermal hot springs - Take in the stunning environment... a perfect trip for all the family...

Adult $49, Children $29 Special group and family rates. Call 07 378 1003 for details.

Issue 76 Summer 2015

For those who are slightly more adventurous at heart, this is a scenic trip with the excitement of Grade Two rapids. Midway down, we paddle under the historic Betran Road Bridge where we will stop for a snack .

Allow 2 hours paddle only. Priced at $85. Phone: 06 769 5506

Sugar Loaf Island From Ngamutu Beach harbour we head out on the open sea to Sugar Loaf Island Marine Reserve. View the scenic & rugged Taranaki coastline as we draw closer to the Islands. Enjoy the seal colony and experience the thrill of close up views of these fascinating marine mammals.

Allow 3 hours subject to weather. $95.00 per person. Phone 06 769 5506

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Let’s explore its many benefits: •

spinal traction

organ oxygenation

• increased flexibility to your hamstrings, calves, feet, hips, shoulders, spine and wrists • reverse gravity benefitting sinuses, organs, thyroid, lungs and bladder I recommend you do this posture three times a week working up to 21 repetitions – lower your knees to the ground between each Down Dog, then lift back up into the posture. Common errors: • Letting the base of your index finger curl off the matt causing compression into your outer wrist - i.e. keep your hands flat on the matt. • Straightening your legs before your hamstrings are flexible putting your back at risk- i.e. Keep a soft bend in your knees/heels up until your hamstrings feel easy to lengthen.

Natural Medicine Centre, Orewa

• Looking up compressing your neck - i.e. keep you head and neck in alignment with your spine. Just like any workout though, there are critical do’s and don’ts to avoid injury. Down Dog requires that you support and hold your own body weight against gravity, so at times the load can be up to 40+kgs!

09 421 1155 info@naturalmedicinecentre.co.nz Homeopath Kate Fitness

Let’s go over some common mistakes: •

Moving too fast, you should move like you’re in a honey jar!

• Collapsing into the posture instead of lifting out of each joint, it should feel like you have a hydraulic lift in every joint that separates and lifts your joints. .

Herbalist Aromatherapist Advisor Debbie Crane

This posture if practiced on a regular basis (three times a week / 21 repetitions ) will keep you kayak fit even if your day job has you sitting all day, Plus you will also receive its many other benefits! I invite you to sign up for my weekly – “30 Second Healthy Habit” at: www.drtheresadobson.com One Body – One You for Life! Dr Theresa Dobson Take your free “Warrant of Wellness “ test on line at : www.drtheresadobson.com

Shop Online - naturalmedicinecentre.co.nz 19 Cammish Lane, Orewa (Behind Countdown)

Kiwi Association of Sea Kayakers N.Z. Inc. (KASK) Annual subscription is $35.00.

Kask PO Box 23, Runanga 7841, West Coast

www.kask.co.nz

www.kayaknz.co.nz

KASK is a network of sea kayakers throughout New Zealand

KASK publishes a bi-monthly newsletter containing trip reports, events, book reviews, technique/ equipment reviews and a ‘bugger’ file. KASK holds national sea kayaking forums. Issue 76 Summer 2015

PAGE 41


Trip Card # 021 Kawau Island Circumnavigation

Mansion House, Kawau Island

Kawau Island Circumnavigation Route card No. 021 Skill level: Intermediate Distance: 30km

Chart no:5227 Tidal Port: Auckland

Start point: Finish Point:

Martins Bay Martins Bay

Coastguard contact: Comms coverage: Transport:

Dial 111 VHF Channel 82 or 16 Nowcasting 21 Good coverage for VHF & Cell phone through out. Kawau Cruises Taxi 0800 111 616 or Johnies Taxi 021 422 173

Introduction: A nice picturesque but challenging paddle in terms of distance covered. Exploration of the rugged eastern side of the island and the beautiful beaches on the north and south side.

the South also have good landing spots. There is lots of rock gardening to be done.

Description: Leaving from Martins Bay gives you the option of which direction to circumnavigate the island. Aim to paddle with the tide through North Channel past Maori Rock.

Hazards: • Strong currents in North Channel • Maori Rock & Fairchild Reef - avoid in moderate swells.

On the North Eastern corner is Fairchild Reef, just out from Slip Island. There is good fishing here although some care is required if there is a swell running. Fishing is good all around Kawau.

Beehive Island is stunning with beautiful white sands.

Beehive Island

There are two lunch stops along the Eastern coastline (Burgess Bay & Sandy Bay), but many have rocky shorelines, especially at low tide. Vivian Bay to the North and Bostaquet Bay to Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: February 2015


Trip Card # 022 Tutukaka

Whale Bay, North of Tutukaka

Tutukaka Route card No. 022 Skill level: Intermediate Distance: Varies

Chart no: 521 Tidal Port: Whangarei

Start point: Finish Point:

Tutukaka Tutukaka

Coastguard contact: Comms coverage:

Dial 111 VHF Channel 85 or 16 Nowcasting 21 Generally good coverage for VHF & Cell phone.

Introduction: There are a number of day trips from Tutukaka. Plenty of excellent rockgardening along the coast in both directions and long sandy beaches. Optional extra is a day trip to the Poor Knights Islands

Description: Option 1. Paddle north from the Tutukaka Harbour, and head up along the rocky coastline exploring the caves, archways and inlets, stopping for lunch at Matapouri Bay or Whale Bay if time and conditions allow. Catch some surf at Matapouri Bay if conditions oblige. The round trip will be around 24 kms.

Hazards: • Large swells can develop at the entrance to Tutukaka harbour. • Pleasure craft and charter boats leaving and entering the harbour are restricted in their ability to manoeuvre. • Take care at Ngunguru Bar and Matapouri Bay if there is any swell as surf can be challenging. Avoid or play depending on conditions and ability of the group. Ensure participants have appropriate skills. Manage the landing if necessary.

Option 2. Paddle south along the rocky coastline, past Rahomaunu Island and in to Ngunguru Inlet or on past Whangaumu Bay with its stunning long white sandy beach to Goat Island. Return trip from Ngunguru is around 12 km.

Sunrise at Tutukaka Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: February 2015


Kayaks

White Water Price

Matariki

4.50

620

26

$1699

Kiwi Excel Kiwi Lite Skua Skua Lite Shearwater Shearwater Lite Tasman Express Tasman Express Lite Tasman Express Elite Foveaux Express Southern Skua

3.75 3.75 5.20 5.20 480 480 5.30 5.30 5.30 5.00 5.40

740 740 600 600 610 610 620 620 600 600 600

23 18 27 24 26.5 23 29 25 22 19 22

$1660 $1970 $2890 $3140 $2650 $2900 $2890 $3140 $4590 $4460 $4590

Contour 450 Contour 480 Eco Bezhig

4.50 4.80 5.40

620 620 590

26 27 27

$2549 $2849 $3099

Manitou 13 Looksha 14 Eskia

3.90 4.30 4.90

630 625 635

20.5 26 27

$1299 $2199 $2499

4.90

600

17

$3240

4.90

600

18.2

$3441

Beachcomber Ultralite Beachcomber Ultralite Plus Barracuda Beachcomber Ultralite Pro Interface

4.90

600

5.20

575

19

$3555 $3440

Liquid Logic

Weight (kg)

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Magnum 72 Magnum 80 Thunder 65 Thunder 76

2.41 2.54 2.34 2.44

660 254 650 660

18 67 18.5 29.5

$1595 $1595 $1895 $1895

Remix 59 Remix 69 Remix 79 Freeride 57 Freeride 67 Stomper 80 Stomper 90 Flying Squirrel 85 Flying Squirrel 95

2.57 2.64 2.72 1.98 2.06 2.49 2.57 2.66 2.73

640 650 670 650 660 650 680 650 670

19 20 21 14.5 15 21 22 22 23

$1999 $1999 $1999 $1899 $1899 $2049 $2049 $2049 $2049

2.60

610

16

$1160

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Twist 1

2.60

790

6

$1095

Twist 2

3.60

830

9

$1395

Helios 1

3.10

710

13.5

$1595

Helios 2

3.80

750

17

$1895

Sunny

3.80

800

16

$1895

Tasman K40

4.40

670

15

$3036

Pacific K50

5.35

670

20

$3680

Q-Kayaks Stealth

Inflatables

Gumotex

Width (mm)

Incept

Necky Mission

Q-Kayaks

Canoe & Kayak

Length (m)

Riot

Sea Kayaks Single

Sea Kayaks Double Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Q-Kayaks

Southern Endeavour

5.60

800

46

$3540

Mission

Contour 490 Eco Niizh 545 COM

4.90 5.65

800 770

35 55

$3499 $4999

Necky

Amaruk

5.40

725

41.3

$3499

5.80

700

28

$4300

Barracuda Beachcomber Duo

Great Advice / Great Brands / Great Service


Sit-on-Top Single Starting Price

Fire Fly

2.40

700

16

$535

Whizz

2.50

770

22

$750

Escapee

3.30

740

23

$775

Escapade

3.50

750

27

$975

Play

3.10

710

18

$549

Escape

3.20

790

17

$649

Explorer

3.40

790

18.20

$749

Navigator

3.80

790

22

$849

Length (m)

Cobra

Weight (kg)

Ocean Kayak

Width (mm)

780

28

3.80

915

28

$899

Tourer

4.60

710

23

$1799

Trident 13 inc seat

4.10

710

28

$1799

Tetra 12 Angler inc seat

3.70

710

24.5

$1499

Trident Ultra 4.1 inc comfort seat

4.10

710

28.5

$2099

Trident Ultra 4.3 inc zone seat

4.30

740

32.5

$2499

Trident Ultra 4.7 inc zone seat

4.70

740

35

$2649

17

$499

19

$949

Glide 390 inc rudder

3.90

850

28

$1249

Xstream 420

4.20

730

28

$1349

Prowler Big Game II

3.90

865

32

$2499

Frenzy

2.75

790

19.5

$749

Line 280

2.80

730

18

$1299

Mysto inc seat

2.95

790

21

$849

Catch 290

2.95

750

19

$1049

3.90

850

28

$1649

Scrambler 11 inc seat

3.60

750

23

$1099

Catch 390 inc rudder Line 400

4.0

840

32

$1599

Tetra 12 inc seat

3.70

710

24

$1349

Catch 420 inc rudder

4.20

730

28

$2049

Ozzie inc paddle

2.7

790

17

$599

800

22

$1149

3.2

790

20

$749

Espri Angler inc delux seat & paddle

3.6

Nemo inc seat & paddle Espri inc paddle

3.4

790

18.2

$999

4.1

780

24

$1699

Replay inc kid pod

3.6

820

24

$1299

Profish 400 inc delux seat & paddle

4.20

680

18

$2800

Profish 440 inc delux seat & paddle

4.4

770

29

$1999

Profish GT inc delux seat & paddle

3.6

820

24

$1899

Profish Reload inc delux seat & paddle

4.5

740

29

$2499

SoT Fish Pro

4.20

680

18

$3500

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Mission

760

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Escapade II

3.50

750

26

$900

Delta

4.00

830

32

$1295

Tandem

3.80

799

26

$799

Long Reach

4.40

910

36

$999

Surge

3.90

850

28

$1149

Malibu 2

3.65

870

27

$1099

Kayak

Malibu 2 XL inc 2 x seats

4.10

86

33

$1499

Viking Kayaks

Viking 2 + 1 inc seats & paddles

3.9

810

27

$1299

Point 65

Tequila! Modular

4.2

750

35

$1999

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Multisport Length (m) Q- Kayaks

4.30

Fish n’ Dive

750

Width (mm)

Ocean

$1699

Marauder

2.70

Length (m)

Mission

Starting Price

2.95

Sit-on-Top Double

Cobra

Weight (kg)

Squirt

Barracuda SoT Tourer

Q- Kayaks

Width (mm)

Flow

Viking Kayaks

Viking Kayaks

Ocean Kayak

Mission

Cobra

Q-Kayaks

Length (m)

Fishing Singles

Hurricane (kevlar)

5.90

490

12

$3170

Maximus (kevlar)

6.40

510

16

$3890

Barracuda

Recreational Length (m)

Q- Kayaks

Strike

3.1

750

20

$920

Strike Excel

3.1

750

21

$1495

Sprite 1

3.00

700

19

$850

Kiwi

3.75

740

20

$1365

Sprite 2

4.50

820

32

$1895

Access 280

2.80

730

18

$1049

Mission

Access 400

4.00

840

32

$1399

Ocean Kayak

Manitou 13

3.90

630

20.5

$1299


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Issue 76 Summer 2015

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Touring Norway 2014

By Josh Neilson

Norway 2014, After a few weeks play boating in Quebec it was on to the cold waters of Norway.With Ekstremsportveko looming, Tyler Fox and I boarded another series of planes bound for the small town of Voss. With our kayaks safely stored in the roof of a 300 year old barn and a few plastic bottles of Canada’s finest cheap whiskey through customs we were excited for the weeks ahead. Extreme Sport Week or Ekstremsportveko is the largest extreme sport festival of its kind and well worth the journey north. We set off daily, kayaking as much as possible while allowing enough time to make a short film, eat some food and get to the festival for the nightly parties and amazing music.

Josh Neilson - Bugdelvi Photo Sam Sutton

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 76 Summer 2015

PAGE 47


Tim Pickering - Fl책m drop Photo Josh Neilson PAGE 48 Issue 76 Summer 2015

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By Thursday we were starting to get tired but the first kayak race brought people back to full energy. The following three days were full on racing on some of Norway’s best sections of river. After a busy week of kayaking and concerts it was nice to wind down and head somewhere on a more relaxed mission. We packed up the van and headed north for some camping and to explore some new runs. First up we paddled a cool double stage drop in the Flåm valley. The sun was out and we had a crew of about 10 ready to paddle. I was undecided, but after seeing a few different lines that could be taken, was confident I would have a good time. After driving through hundreds of tunnels and valleys we got to a sweet camp spot near the Fjord. Next up was a river called the Bugdelva where we found a cool grade four run to paddle laps on through the afternoon. With tight technical slots and some bigger slides this road side run was keeping us on our toes. On our way to the Bugdelva we passed a rapid we had seen in a photos known as the Hellesylt slide. As the river nears the Fjord it drops its final 100 m at a 45 degree angle down to the town and into the sea. At first I was not keen but with closer inspection it looked good to go. From the top in the eddy all you can see are the tops of the buildings in the town below which seemed like a long way away. Out of the eddy and you drop off a 20 footer and push right at the top of the main slide. From here it’s a wild ride down to town and into the Fjord. This became the highlight of the trip so far and everyone was in high spirits at camp that night. With only a few days left before the crew went their separate ways we decided to head to the Rauma Valley and on to Sjoa. The lower section of the Rauma has been on my list of rivers I wanted to paddle ever since I had heard about it, but with a rising flow I decided it was best to keep it on the list and wait for a more suitable flow. A few of the crew headed down with varying degrees of success. It can be a really tough decision to be that far away from home, on the bank of a river you have always wanted to run only to decide to give it a miss, knowing quite well you may not get the chance to be there again any time soon. But I was confident that I would be back some day and I was happy to watch from the side. From here we headed east to Sjoa as we heard the Ula was in and a few excited people wanted to check out Matzes drop. Check out the next issue of KAYAK magazine for the full story about when my kayaking tour took a turn for the worse and I end up in hospital with a broken back.

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Issue 76 Summer 2015

PAGE 49


Anton PAGE 5 0 Immler I s s- uBugdelva e 76 Summer 2015 Photo Josh Neilson

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Issue 76  

New Zealands foremost specialist kayaking magazine.

Issue 76  

New Zealands foremost specialist kayaking magazine.