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Issue 72

Summer Kayak Trips Central Otago Reaches

Running Rigs, Dispatch and Storage Dealing with your fish.

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Issue 72

Summer 2014

PAGE 3


Contents

Sea Kayaking Kayaking the Amalfi Coast and more in Italy

10

Fishing Arapuni River - Waikato Memories of Okataina Running Rigs, Dispatch and Storage

16 18 19

White Water Summer Kayak Trips - Central Otago Reaches Tyler Fox - Professional Kayaker

6 46

Multisport Race to the Midnight Sun

28

Technical Ants in your pants Knots - Tying a Rolling Hitch Trip Card - Lake Rotoma Trip Card - Trip Card - Bucklands Beach to Motuihi Island - return PAGE 4

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14 23 42 43

Summer 2014

Health Bad Posture = Poor kayaking Performance

34

Puzzles Quick Crossword Puzzle Solutions

33 36

First Aid Dislocations

38

Bush Craft Light my fire

40

Leader Profiles

9

Products Introducing the New Viking Kayaks Profish Reload™ Kayak Be safe, be seen – with RAILBLAZA!

24 37

Kayaks - Kayak listings

44

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Editorial

Issue 72

Lying on my back in the warm waters of our local estuary with the heavens twinkling overhead and phosphoresce lighting up my and the kids skins as we swim, is a thing of magical wonder. In the recent late evening high tides a plethora of people gathered at the water’s edge and launched into this wonderland. One of the highest tides this year in the Waitemata at 3.6m, with the moon thankfully absent, we had an ideal environment for a stunning show. My bow wave, wake and paddle splashes were augmented by skipping fish fleeing. These splashes and ripples left bright illuminated lines moving into the darkness with any flotsam they touch bursting into another light show. The peaceful night was shattered by shouts of ‘look at this’ and ‘look at me, I am covered in stars’ and ‘here is a great patch’ and the call of parents and kids checking on each other. My 11 year old yelled, ‘watch me’ as I tossed her in the air, to make the best splash and light show. This excitement and enthusiasm increases everyone’s amazement when venturing into night kayaking (and swimming). We just need a small spark of motivation and some training to venture out safely and to be absolutely stunned by the beauty of nature.

The summer is moving along and if you are still working every hour and have not yet had an adventure in your kayak or haven’t even started kayaking, then pick up the phone and call us to have an adventure you will long treasure. Don’t put off till tomorrow what you could/should do today. ‘You won’t see the lights that way’. Happy exploring. Peter Townend

Copyright: The opinions expressed by contributors and the information stated in advertisements/articles are not necessarily agreed to by the editors or publisher of New Zealand Kayak Magazine. Pricing: At the time of printing the prices in this magazine were accurate. However they may change at any time. EDITOR: Peter Townend Ph: 0274 529 255 / (09) 476 7066 Email: pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz PUBLISHER: New Zealand Kayak Magazine is published four times per year by Canoe & Kayak Ltd. PRINTING: MHP Print DISTRIBUTION: MagMag SUBSCRIPTIONS: (see page 36) New Zealand – 4 Issues = $25 Overseas – 4 Issues = $40

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CONTRIBUTORS: We welcome contributors’ articles and photos. Refer to www.canoeandkayak.co.nz/guide New Zealand Kayak Magazine ‘Contributors Guidelines’ for more details. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS TO: James Fitness Email: james@canoeandkayak.co.nz New Zealand Kayak Magazine Front cover and contents page: - Exploring the Dart River area. Photos by: Nathan Fa’avae

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Summer 2014

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Summer Kayak Trips - Central Otago Reaches By Nathan Fa’avae

Clutha Water water everywhere, that’s one of the things I love the most about our country, no matter where you are, you’re close to a lake, a river or the ocean. It is the paddle sport mecca as far as I’ve seen from my travels around the planet. I have an embarrassing flotilla of kayaks in my shed, and behind the shed, and next to the shed, but they all serve a specific purpose and get plenty of use. With the kids also enjoying getting on the water, the inflatable kayaks have become exceptionally popular and the basis of some truly wonderful experiences for the whole family. During the summer of 2012 and 2013, the summer sun drove us to the water like ducks as we explored some world class easy and enjoyable boating, Here are a few of the trips we can recommend for families and /or beginner to intermediate paddlers:

One of the mighty flows in the country that provides a fair chunk of hydro electricity. There are some great sections from the source at Lake Wanaka to the Pacific Ocean. Over New Year we did a serene overnight trip from Millars Flat, through Beaumont and down to Allangrange Road Bridge. The section has some fun grade two rapids but is essentially a big slow but steady moving current. Some excellent riverside campsites below Beaumont.

Hawea A short fast and frantic run of about 10 km. The river is controlled by Contact Energy so it needs some water to be a fun trip. Get in below Lake Hawea and at 80-200 cumecs it is a hoot of a trip. The Hawea Wave is a few km into the trip (check this out before you start), under Camp Hill Road Bridge. Beware of the trees on the river banks and don’t under estimate the speed; this river knows how to flow. Take out is at the camp ground river right, just before the Clutha confluence.

Join Us For A Kayaking Adventure - River Tours

River Tours

Mokau River

White Water Paddling

Waitara River Tours

Exploring beautiful estuaries. Enjoy a scenic trip with wildlife and wonderful views.

Enjoy this beautiful scenic river which winds through some of New Zealand’s lushest vegetation. Camping overnight and exploring some of New Zealand’s pioneering history. A true Kiwi experience.

Need some excitement? Take a kayak down a wicked Grade Two river run... this is a whole day of thrills and fantastic scenery down some of New Zealand’s best rivers.

For those who are slightly more adventurous at heart, this is a scenic trip with the excitement of Grade Two rapids. Midway down, we paddle under the historic Betran Road Bridge where we will stop for a snack.

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 0508 529 2569 for details

Phone Canoe & Kayak 06 769 5506

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 0508 529 2569 for details

Allow 2 hours paddle only. Priced at $85. Phone: 06 769 5506

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Kawarau More known for its big volume big rapids, the turbulent Roaring Meg and big waved Dog Leg, the Kawarau is a stunning river and has a lovely section from Lake Wakitipu, Kawarau Falls. It’s 15 km of scenic float boating to the Arrow River confluence take out, river right. Don’t miss the take out, Smith Falls is just around the corner!

Shotover The upper Shotover has to be one of the classiest grade two river runs in the South Island. The scenery and quality rapids are H20 heaven. Get in is just below Branches Station, or whenever you see a good spot to launch. Take out is at Deep Creek. The river is awesome, the drive in is breathtaking and the history is interesting, lots of gold mining remains and even a river diversion to paddle through. It rocks.

Dart Needs a Jet Boat drop off but a true wilderness day trip once at the drop off point; the Jet Boats can only take you so far. Huge mountains, lots of side trips and just a spectacular day out. About 20 km on river and take out at Paradise. Contact Dart River Safaris for a drop off.

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Matukituki West Branch Flowing into Lake Wanaka this is another brilliant afternoon on the river. Put in at Raspberry Flat road end, the trail head to Mount Aspiring National Park. We hiked up 2 km and ran through the little Grade three gorge as a warm up. You can paddle all the way to the lake if you wish, making it a two day trip, but there is an obvious and enjoyable half day on the water taking out at East Branch confluence; good after rain or fresh snow melt.

Lake Wakitipu This amazing body of water has a beauty of a paddle to Pigeon Island which has camping and hut options, good walks and is simply divine. Not suitable in high winds to cross to the Island though.

Lake Onslow There are also some unique paddle trips on the Central Otago lakes and reservoirs, something a little different shall we say. There is a lifetime of trips out there folks, whatever your craft, get out there and relish them.

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Leader Profiles

Leader Profiles Meet some of our awesome leaders. Without their support the club wouldn’t be what it is today.

Ruth with good friend Peter Alexander from Arapuni

Ruth E. Henderson (North Shore) Ruth has been a long standing and staunch supporter of the Yakity Yak Club. Her detailed planning of trips and events is an example to all of us. She spends a lot of time promoting all things kayaking, including KASK, writing for & proofing the New Zealand Kayak Magazine and most recently being involved with the Te Ara Moana kayak trail. And if there’s a fire in the campsite - don’t worry, Ruth is a member of the Kawau Island Volunteer Rural Fire Service! A lady with many talents. Thanks for all your hard work!

Renee Olivier (North Shore) Renee Olivier or Flower Power as she is more commonly known on the water, has got to be one of the keenest eskimo rollers I have ever met! In 2013 she signed up to the National Certificate in Sea Kayak Leadership and committed herself to mastering the roll in her beloved Shearwater. Now she follows Rob Howarth’s philosophy of getting wet at the end of every trip and proudly performs half a dozen rolls! Roll on Flower Power!

Glide 390: The facts Length // 390cm Width // 85cm Weight // 28kg Max Load // 230kg

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Summer 2014

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Kayaking the Amalfi Coast and more in Italy

Back in July Wellington club members Frances Martin and Mike Booker, and their two children Tom and Maggie, included two kayaking trips in their Italian adventure.

Ruggero was telling us that he didn’t like large groups on his kayaking trips.

homes called "monazzeri" or "living in solitude". It was other worldly - like being in a Star Wars set. Truly the most amazing place I’ve ever pushed off a kayak.

We were about to boost to 11 a group of seven kayakers who were circumnavigating Elba Island, joining them for the last three days - I thought Ruggero was talking about the difficulty keeping track of everyone. But no, his concern was “difficulties on the beaches”. We were about to find out that Italian beaches are not like ones back home.

The 24 km kayak, organised for us through the Amalfi-based Amalfi Kayaks, was unlike any paddle we’d ever experienced in New Zealand. Kayaking, but not as we know it.

Early on in our planning (thanks Google) for our family holiday in Italy, kayaking was on the agenda. For our household - my wife Frances, and children Tom (14) and Maggie(12) - the call of the water is strong, even in a destination like Italy where the enticements of land-based activities are not easily ignored.

Once we were out on the water, the first things you noticed were: the heat (it was 30 plus degrees), the gentle swell (this is the Mediterranean, not the Pacific), the clarity and warmth of the water and the lack of wind which occasionally nudged up to a gentle breeze. Then you look up. The cliffs totally dominate your view with towns and

As it turned out, kayaking often allowed us to indulge ourselves on water and on land (thinking food and drink here). Our “warm up” for Elba was a day-long paddle on the Amalfi Coast. Our day started with a drive from our Sorrento hotel, across the Sorrentine Peninsula, to the famous Amalfi cliffs and towns. There’s a great selection of YouTube clips to help appreciate the astonishing views and the ‘heart-in-mouth’ road. Search “bus ride Amalfi Coast”. Our kayak trip started and finished at a surreal place called the Fjord at Furore, between the townships of Positano and Amalfi. The Fjord looks like someone had swung an axe into the cliffs, cleaving a narrow slit for the sea to enter. Clinging to the Fjord’s cliffs were restored fishermen PAGE 10

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houses clinging to the near vertical slopes. Antonio Junior, our guide, said the houses sold for around 10 million Euro (NZ$17 million) each.

shoes behind.) Once out of our kayaks we’d end up making ever faster runs to any sign of shade.

The other distraction was the sun bathers, latched on to any available flat(ish) space.

The return paddle was tough. Our lack of time on the water since the New Zealand summer began to tell.

Look the other way, out to sea, and you get further evidence this is a playground for the rich. Huge floating gin palaces were at anchor or sliding by on their way to their next champagne-fuelled rendezvous.

But the Fjord snuck up on us. I was looking at the next point thinking ‘that’s a long way away’ but then we were back.

Back in our plastic fantastics (two singles and a double) we were having a taste of how money rules on Italian beaches – the best and biggest are controlled by beach concession owners who charge to use the beach, their loungers, umbrellas right down to lilos. A day at the beach can set you back more than 30 Euro (NZ$50) per person.

Ruggero didn’t like big groups. His concern was “difficulties on the beaches”. We were about to find out that Italian beaches are not like ones back home.

So, we were left going ashore on the small public beaches – not a difficulty at this stage because we were only dealing with our kayaks, not setting up camp. And as these public beaches had poor (as in dangerous), or no access by land, we were not dealing with huge crowds. Tip – wear reef shoes. Most of the Italian beaches we landed on were rocky and once on the beach, the stones are hot enough to make bruschetta. (In our concern over our suitcase weights we’d left our reef

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You can’t see the Fjord until you are right on it which, in the past, apparently made it a favoured spot for bandits. Around a week later we were in the port of Piombino, which incidentally provides ugly proof that Italy is not all perfect tourist fodder, waiting to catch a one-hour ferry ride to Portoferraio, the main city of the island (isola) of Elba. Elba’s mainly famous for being Napoleon Bonaparte’s place of exile during 1814 and 1815, before he returned to the mainland for his Waterloo. After that, the authorities made sure he saw out his final days somewhere much less attractive. The island has been in Italian hands since 1860 when it became part of the new unified Kingdom of Italy. It is now in the Arcipelago Toscano National Park which includes all seven main islands of the Tuscan Archipelago. The park is the largest marine park in Europe - 56,766 hectares of sea and 17,887 hectares of land. At Portoferraio we were back with Italy at its touristic best side. Ruggero from Elba’s kayak company Il Viottolo (they also organise mountain biking and hiking) picked us up to take us westwards to Fono where we meet up with our kayaking companions for the next three days.

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Back on the Amalfi Coast Antonio Junior had told us that Italians don’t kayak, they’d rather lie on the beach.

experienced paddlers. Maggie had to have a tow for an hour or so one particularly hot afternoon after a jelly fish sting had put her off her stride.

Maybe it’s a southern Italy thing, but our group now consisted of six Italians (including our guide Vittorio), one Hungarian and four Kiwis. Thankfully, given our non-existent Italian (except for ordering food and drink) four, including Vittorio, spoke good(ish) English.

The highlight of day one was the campsite for the night – Sant’Andrea which was the most picturesque spot of our entire paddle. Because we arrived about 4 pm, our target campsite was still full of sun bathers making the most of the last couple of hours of sun light.

We started off with a short evening paddle across a bay to our campsite. The first choice was nabbed by a French kayaking group, so we pottered a short distance to another beach for the night.

We managed to squeeze our kayaks onto the beach and then had to wait till the sun disappeared for the day, along with (eventually) everyone else on the beach.

The upper beach was covered in a thick layer of a seaweed, like a bed of soft fettuccine – why did I carry my Exped bed half way around the world?

We used this opportunity to walk over to Sant’Andrea which is little more than a few houses and a ristorante/bar attached to the beach concession. At the bar, Frances and I sampled a local brew, a most excellent Elba EPA (Elba Pale Ale). The kids of course had cokes and gelato.

Appropriately we had pasta for dinner that night. The Italian food was one of the highlights of our trip and that nights meal did not disappoint. During our three-week stay in Italy we did not have one bad meal, including when we were, though a combination of heat exhaustion and hunger, sometimes forced to eat at the most unpromising-looking pizzerias and ristorantes. The next day (needless to say it was fine, windless and hot) we began our journey around the mountainous, western end of Elba with Elba’s highest mountain Mount Capanne (1,018 metres) often in our view. It was straight into the groove… a leisurely breakfast, break camp, into the kayaks, an early morning coffee stop at a village, a swim because it would already be around 30 deg, pick up some food for lunch which we’d eat at another beach along the way, then a mid-afternoon coffee and gellato stop and buying food for that night, another swim, before around 3 or 4pm calling it quits for the day. It’s 147 km around that island, so spread over seven days, there was no rush. Like on the Amalfi Coast it was constantly hot, with little breeze and only a gentle swell. Much of the paddling was along a coastline not too different to parts of the coastline between Pukerua Bay and Plimmerton on Wellington’s west coast – rugged cliffs dropped down straight to the sea or on to slim-line beaches. The big difference though was that the sea lapped against the land, not tried to smash it. The conditions were not too difficult for Tom and Maggie who are

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By the time we headed back to the campsite, the beach was half empty. Eventually we were able to cram our tents in, leaving space at one end of the beach for early rising sun bakers looking to catch the first rays of the new day. Here were the “difficulties on the beaches” Ruggero had mentioned – small beaches that had to shared with crowds of people with their beach loungers and umbrellas. For us Kiwis this was a bit of a novelty, but it’s easy to see territorial disputes erupting. The next day the landscape began to change as we paddled around the western-most, and drier, end of Elba. Trees made way for scrub, but there were eye-catching cliffs with layered hues of red, green and grey rocks, like a giant marble cake well passed its use-by date. There were not a lot of caves, but we were able pack all our kayaks into one, with Vittorio then taking those brave enough (that’d be Tom and Maggie) through a narrow water-filled passageway to see shrimps. At Pomonte we donned our snorkel gear and swam a couple of 100 metres offshore for a look at the wreck of the Elviscott, a 25-metre boat sunk in 1972 as it tried to enter the harbour. It is now a popular dive spot with the most fish we saw in the whole trip. In Pomonte we also visited the local butcher’s shop (the best on Elba according to Vittorio) for meat for that night’s barbeque. Later a few wines also had to be purchased for what would be everyone’s last night on the beaches.

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So, our adventure on Elba ended. It’s hard to snappily wrap up what it was all about: there was so much to see and do – for sure, great hospitality, a bit of adventure, an escape from the real world, relaxation, something different and of course great fun. Ciao.

Our campsite that night was on a long beach which looked (from the sea anyway) very isolated. But as per usual we initially had to share it with sun bathers who eventually packed up and walked off into the sunset. Our final day’s paddle (really a half day) took us to Cavoli where we were met by our van to drive us back to Portoferraio for our ferry back to the mainland. The rest of the group continued their paddle to their final destination Marina di Campo

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Ants in your pants, skink up your skirt. By Ruth E. Henderson

Photo by Tim Muhundan. A skink, minus its tail, investigates a Greenland T kayak.

As kayakers we are so lucky to have over 50 islands and five marine reserves in the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park to enjoy, explore or seek rest or refuge on. So too, do many of New Zealand’s most endangered species. We need to be alert to them and the dangers we can put them in when we visit. Recently the discovery of a skink in a friend’s kayak and his posting on Facebook pictures of its extraction, capture and release, lead to a flurry of good-natured jests. However, living on Kawau Island, one of Auckland’s “Treasure Islands” where right now we have an active eradication campaign for Rainbow skinks and Argentine ants I thought...how easy it would be for paddling friends to unwittingly; carelessly carry bad things to or from ‘my doorstep.’ How do we know what are good animals, invertebrates, insects or plants and how do we know which are the baddies? The conservation campaign “Treasure Islands” a joint venture between D.O.C and the Auckland Council seeks to protect the Hauraki Gulf from a range of predators and invasive pests and is attempting to educate us. Their website www.treasureislands. co.nz is worth looking at. In a kayak we are not likely to ship the larger pests such as stoats, ferrets, weasels, rats or even mice, but the Aussie Rainbow skink and the Argentine ant could easily hitch-hike. The Rainbow skink, a prolific breeder is widespread throughout the North Island where it competes with the native skinks. Unlike the native one which produces live young, the Rainbow lays clusters of oval white eggs making it easily transported in pot plants, gardening gear or building supplies. Although it likes moist areas, it is not restricted to vegetation in urban areas and is more likely than the native ones to come inside your house or kayak. It is smaller than the native species, is a brown or greyPAGE 14

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brown with a dark brown stripe and has a metallic sheen or is iridescent, rainbow-like in bright light. The Argentine ant is one of the most invasive, problematic ant species. We do not want it! It is aggressive, can climb trees, and although not poisonous it bites people. Only two to three millimetres long it’s honeybrown compared to most household black ants. Apparently, unlike other ant species they co-operate with each other and can combine into super-colonies.

What can you do? • Check your paddling gear and your boat. If you’ve left your hatch covers off to air, guess what could be in there? Invest in a cockpit cover – you do not want ants in your pants! • Clean dirty gear and footwear. Think tiny things, invisible things… ants, eggs, seeds and organisms. • Put all food in sealed containers. Take your rubbish home, even compostable things. •

Look for signs – droppings, gnawed bits.

• Check your sleeping bag and camping gear – after storage and before your next trip unpack your gear at home first, not on your chosen island. • Report any sightings of pests on pest-free islands 0800 HOT DOC - 0800 362 468 or Auckland Biosecurity - 09 301 01 01

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© Jacqui Wairepo

Pest-free Islands Rangitoto Motutapu Motuihe Browns (Motukorea) Rakino Tiri Tiri Matangi The Noises Saddle (Te Haupa)

© Phil Lester

Beehive (Taungamaro)

Top: The eggs are one of the things that distinguish the rainbow from the native skinks who produce live young.

Mokohinau

Middle: The Argentine ant with the large Queen ant and lesser ants. Below: The Rainbow Skink

Broken Islands (Pig Islands) – Great Barrier Kaikoura (Selwyn) – Great Barrier Mokohaka – Great Barrier

Partly Pest-free Motuketekete Moturekareka Tawharanui Regional Park (a ‘Mainland Island’) Great Barrier © Jacqui Wairepo

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Lake Arapuni– Waikato By Marianne Goudswaard

The forecast was fantastic; I was anticipating a great weekend of paddling and fishing, so much so that I had to go on Friday night! Two of us started the weekend Friday night, staying at the Hamilton Anglers Club Lodge at Arohena Landing. It’s a great place to stay with no electricity, but everything you need including hot water and cooking facilities and lights. Unfortunately this weekend sent us a curve ball and the water was accidently off the whole weekend. But with an emergency phone call (drive right back up the hill for a signal) to Wendy who had not left yet, we arranged for copious water to be brought by other kayakers. A bit of fly fishing Friday night did not produce results (no pressure: Bill was watching). So some talking and drinking did the trick. Wendy, Stan, Jan, Erin and Geoff arrived on the Saturday. We had a bit of a late start, but it was a relaxed day so no-one seemed too troubled. After the usual preparations by the two trainee trip leaders, a paddle

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north was enjoyed by all. A stop on a grassy bank for lunch (Gavin the dog included) and a paddle up the stream at the north end for curiosity’s sake. As some needed to finish at 3 pm, we than headed back to the start, everyone handled the approx. 20 kms with no difficulty. We were warm at the end, so a few had a quick dip in the lake in our paddle gear. Conditions were fantastic, calm and sunny, the slightest breeze on our backs going home. Most were heading off for the day, but Stan, Wendy, Bill, Jan and I were staying for Sunday. A lovely BBQ dinner was enjoyed by all, sharing the food and drink, and sitting by the brazier outside (which had been expertly resurrected by Bill after he ran it over) I made the mistake of telling Bill that I would like an early fly-fish, so at 5.30 on the dot he was waking me up to go fishing. (I don’t do getting up well). I was glad he did as it was lovely in the early dawn mist fishing at the North Beach. There were fish moving, but again the pressure was too much and all I landed was one small fish which had to go back.

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Eventually after a large BBQ breakfast, all but me headed south down the lake for a gentle paddle following a bit of paddle stroke practice by Stan and Bill. I spin fished from the kayak near to base, to no avail. The last of us headed home after tidying up the lodge and locking up. As with every time I go there, I promised myself I would return more often. Thank you all for your great company. We are doing it again the same weekend next year, mark it in your diaries.

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Call Pete Townend pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz or phone 09 476 7066

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Memories of Okataina

By Marianne Goudswaard

December 2013, and we have a club trip to Lake Okataina underway. It’s a great day, with fantastic conditions and everyone has a good time paddling the length of the lake, also getting in a walk to look at Tarawera. This trip brings back fond memories of our club paddle February 2011 and my 8lb Rainbow trout landed, jigging from my Shearwater. Okataina is stunning with the water crystal clear and bush clad. Paddling this lake is rewarding enough but it also lends itself to great trout fishing with large trophy trout available. Sadly in 2013, I was to miss out on the big catch, January 2014 again I missed out on the fish, but I enjoy the challenge. It’s a place I want to go back to often, the anticipation of the catch is addictive.

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Running Rigs, Dispatch and Storage By Jason Walker

Setting up an anchor rig and how you will deal with your catch.

Anchoring and the Running Rig Anchoring on a kayak is very different to anchoring your normal runabout! On a boat you walk up to the front of the boat and throw out a big steel anchor, a long length of chain followed by however much rope you need to use for your depth. Anchoring a kayak is a little different, for a start you can't just walk to the front and throw the anchor over... So what you need to set up is something called an anchor running rig, this is in effect a rope of about 4 mm diameter that runs along the side of the kayak from the cockpit to the front, through a pulley, all the way to the rear of the kayak and back to the cockpit giving you in effect an endless loop. To attach your anchor to this running rig will depend on the fittings. The running rig will have either a stainless steel rig where the ends of the rope joins or it will be knotted in such a way that there is a tail of approximately one metre coming from the running rig with a clip or other attachment at the end. To anchor your kayak you then attach your chosen anchor to your style of running rig. It is now at this point that the running rig comes into it's own; from the comfort of the seat of your kayak you can choose to anchor from the front or the rear of the kayak just by moving your running rig between the pulleys. As with boats there are two anchor types at our disposal, the fixed anchor and the sea anchor or drogue, they are just smaller models on a kayak. For the fixed anchor you will be looking for an anchor in the weight range of 0.75 to 1.5 kilograms, and depending on the sea floor landscape you'll be wanting to use one of two fixed anchor types, a collapsible cast anchor or a wire grapnel anchor. The latter type of anchor should be used when www.kayaknz.co.nz

protect yourself from the elements For the full range go to

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anchoring in kelp or rocky sea beds as the grapnel prongs can be bent and pulled free if the grapnel gets stuck, where as the collapsible fixed anchor is great for anchoring in a sandy or muddy seabed. As with most kayak fishing accessories there has been a lot of thought put into how you package and use these accessories on a kayak. The fixed anchor has not been ignored, shown here is the kayak anchor system made by Tagit right here in New Zealand. They have used a 1.5 kg collapsible anchor, some short link chain, and approximately 30 metres of 4 mm rope, all wound on to a plastic winder that floats, this gives you the ability to disconnect from your anchor, if you need to go and chase a fish for example, the winder can be thrown in the water and will be floating on the surface when you return. The second anchor type used is the sea anchor or drogue. This is in effect a parachute that you cast over the side and as the wind blows you across the sea the anchor will drag through the water to slow you down. It won't stop you altogether like a fixed anchor will but nor is it meant to, it

is only designed to slow your drift to a manageable level so you can fish. Even though you are fishing from a very small vessel it doesn't necessarily translate to you needing a small sea anchor - when looking for a drogue type sea anchor you should be looking for a model between 75 to 100 cm (30 - 40 inches). Another important safety point when using a sea anchor is you must make sure it has either a float attached to it or an integrated flotation system, this is not to make it float on the surface for easy retrieval but to ensure the anchor does not sink, if it did sink and a large swell came through the anchor would pull your kayak down and/or roll your kayak and you'll end up in the water. Choosing whether to have your anchor running from the front or rear of your kayak will be determined by several factors. Fishing method is the first factor. If bait fishing is your method of choice you will normally be fishing with the current. i.e. you anchor up-current from your target fish and drift baits back to the fish using the current. If you have dropped a burley bomb into the water this will also make sure the burley is going in the same direction. For this method of fishing you want to use a fixed anchor with the running rig holding the anchor from the rear of the kayak. If drift fishing with soft baits, for example, is your preferred fishing method you will be using a sea anchor rather than a fixed heavy anchor as you don't want to be fixed in one spot. A sea anchor will control your movement in relation to the wind direction not the current, so where you set your anchor on your kayak will be a matter of your fishing style. Some people like to fish in front of the drift, i.e. cast ahead of the drift so you end up drifting over the bait when it is at it's lowest point and hopefully in the strike zone, this would see you setting the anchor so you have the wind on your back. Others prefer to fish the area they have drifted over already, sort of stray lining their soft bait through the water column, in this case you would want your anchor set so the wind is in your face.

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Swell and waves are another factor to take into consideration when deciding which way to anchor your kayak. You do not want to put yourself in a position where you will end up beam, or side on to the waves, especially if they are breaking. This is a very easy way to ensure you end up in the water. If I find myself fishing in less than ideal conditions due to a change in the weather or swell, then I will change my running rig so I have my bow facing the swell, this lowers the chance of being rolled out of my kayak by a wave and also allows me to see what is coming. If a wave is going to break over me then I can see it coming and prepare for it, whereas if I had my back to it I would not have time to react.

is not in a fully enclosed bag or bin then you will need to ensure it is attached to the kayak in case of a roll over. You don't want those fish to get away after

Dealing with your catch As with any fishing it's very important to look after your catch and not let it spoil; there is no point in taking fish from the sea if you are not going to make good use of it. Dealing with your catch on a kayak is very similar to the way you would deal with it on a bigger boat too. You need to dispatch it and store it, preferably in some sort of cooled storage, not just left on the deck in the sun. Catch it, kill it, chill it, cook it.

Stephen Tapp of Viking Kayaks demonstrates the loading of a Snapper into the rear of his Viking Profish 440

The Stringer There is one additional step you need to consider that is specific to kayaking – fish retention! Depending on what method of fish storage you decide to use, if you are storing your fish in the rear well of your kayak and it

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you've worked so hard to catch them do you? This is where the stringer comes into play. A stringer consists of a long stainless steel rod or needle attached to a length of rope or cord which in turn is attached to your kayak at the back of the rear well. When you have caught a fish that you intend to keep, before you unhook, or even dispatch it if you wish, you unclip the stringer from your kayak and slip the stringer in through the gills, out of the mouth of the fish, and reattach it to the kayak, your fish is now on the stringer and cannot be lost even if you drop it over the side. You can now unhook the fish, dispatch it,

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Insulated fish bag These have become very popular over the last 12-18 months. They started out as an extension of the insulated well covers with only the top insulated and the rest of the bag only a single layer of the PVC canvas. The manufacturer has now moved to make fully insulated bags. This means all sides of the bag are now the same construction as the top. This has led to a far better solution for keeping your catch fresh in an ice slurry as the bag not only slows down the melting of the ice but also keeps all the fishy liquid locked away so there is no need for bungs etc. These insulated bags from Tagit have been made for most of the current kayaks models on the market.

Fish ice bin

and store it. The stringer will also help with this manoeuvre too, you can grab the cord now coming from the mouth of the fish and simply slide the fish down the line until it ends up in your rear well.

This is the latest and greatest advance in kayak fish storage, it is in effect a full on roto moulded chilly bin, and this one from Ocean Kayak has been designed to fit into their Prowler 4.7 Ultra and the latest Prowler 4.3 Ultra kayaks. They will keep your ice frozen and your fish in top condition all day. The other great advantage of these is when you are done fishing you simply unclip it from your kayak, lift it out and throw in into the back of the car for the trip home, no need to transfer the fish to another chilly bin for transportation. I expect we will see similar offerings from other kayak manufacturers in the future for their kayaks too.

The Dispatch The quickest, cleanest, and most accepted method of dispatching a fish is to iki it. Iki Jime is a method of paralysing and bleeding fish to maintain its quality. The technique originated in Japan but is now widely used. It involves the insertion of a spike quickly and directly into the hind brain thereby causing immediate brain death. A fish brain is usually located slightly behind and above the eye. When spiked correctly, the fish fins flare and the fish relaxes, immediately ceasing all motion. The blood contained in the fish flesh retracts to the gut cavity, which produces a better coloured and flavoured fillet. You can iki a fish using a knife but a better tool would be an iki spike.

Fish storage and keeping it cool Storing your catch on a kayak can be done in several ways. All fishing kayaks made today have been designed with a rear well for fish storage. However there are several options of how to store your fish in this well. The three main options I'll discuss here are an insulated cover, an insulated fish bag, and the recently introduced purpose designed fish ice bin. But before I cover the different options it is important to point out that whatever method you decide to use for storage you still need to ensure your catch is chilled or it will spoil. To do this put ice or better still make up a slurry of ice and salt water into your rear well/bag/bin. Salt ice is always going to be better but fresh ice with some saltwater thrown in is still better than nothing.

Insulated well cover This is the most basic of solutions; it is made from two pieces of PVC canvas with a piece of foam sandwiched in-between. It is then stretched over the entire well to protect your fish from the sun and heat. They also have a pocket sewn into the top for some additional storage. If you use this type of cover you will need to fit bungs into the scuppers of the rear well so that your ice or slurry does not simply drain away. If you choose to use this cover then the use of a stringer is essential in case of a rollover situation there will be nothing to keep your fish from being lost. You can find these covers for most kayaks on the market.

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Knots

Tying a Butterfly Knot The butterfly loop, also known as lineman’s loop, butterfly knot, alpine butterfly knot and lineman’s rider, is a knot used to form a fixed loop in the middle of a rope. Tied in the bight, it can be made in a rope without access to either of the ends

Bight

1.Fold the rope back on itself to form the bight. 2 & 3. Twist the bight to form a loop and repeat to form a figure 8.

4. Fold the top of the figure 8 under the standing part of the rope.

7. Pull the of tails and the bight in opposite directions to tighten.

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5 & 6. Pass the bight over the side of the standing part of the rope and through the centre hole.

8. Ready to receive the carabiner

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Promotional Feature Stephen Tapp with a deep water snapper found paddling out wide of Whangarei Heads.

g n i c u d o Intr the New Viking Kayaks Profish Reload™ Kayak

Stephen Tapp, New Zealand's most well-known and experienced kayak angler who has been writing NZ Fishing News since 2004 tell us why, after more than 30 years kayak fishing, he is as excited by the new Profish¬™ Reload as he was when he custom rigged his first ever fishing kayak… "It’s here, stable, sleek, and set to become top predator amongst the ocean waves. This is a fishing kayak I’ve long dreamed about finally becoming a reality. The Profish™ Reload is a combination of brilliant fishing features with a performance edge that will allow exploration of new horizons. It’s so exciting I’m finding it hard to sit still! In fact for me personally this is a large part of what joining the team here at Viking Kayaks has been about, the opportunity to help design what I believe is one of the finest blue water fishing kayaks it’s possible to own. I’ve been given the opportunity to put my 30-plus years of kayaking and fishing experience to good use and help build into the new Profish™ Reload the features that will define it: • Easy padding – designed and shaped from forward of the cockpit to side scallops beside the seat to give a magically comfortable paddle stroke. On a stable fishing kayak this is trickier than it sounds, but makes it so much easier to maintain your paddling rhythm when cruising out wide. • Stability and speed – the perfect combination of enough stability to comfortably target sport and game fish while allowing hull speeds ideal for trolling new generation lures. • Comfort – borrowing from what we learned with the Profish™ 400 the seat rake angles and cockpit layout have been taken to the next level; those long duration paddles will no longer be a pain in the butt! Combine this comfort with the Profish™ Reload’s paddling, speed, and stability characteristics, and you will have the ultimate endurance fishing kayak. • Blue water bow – here it is: bow shape and flare designed for fishing amongst the swells, and one that will also provide more lift to help when PAGE 24

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returning a longer kayak through surf zones. • Reload Tackle Pod™ – this world leading innovation incorporates sounder and transducer mounting along with tackle storage in one removable Tackle Pod™. Load-and-go, more than just a concept this is a system that makes setting up for each session so fast, so simple, and so convenient! • Large Front Hatch – expedition rated; by cleverly positioning a large front hatch Viking Kayaks have given the Profish™ Reload easy access into the bow for those looking to stow dry bags, trolleys, and other equipment. • Bait Wells – introduced with the Profish™ 440 kayak series, these scuppered wells just behind the seat have become a critical tool for anglers wanting to add bait to their arsenal of options. Simple and easy to reach from your seat, there’s no more mess in the cockpit. They can also be used as drink bottle holders or gear lockers. These are just some of the features of this new kayak. Others like the easily grasped rigid side handles and totally innovative “Kid Pod” that replaces the Tackle Pod™ with a seat (lets you take junior on the coolest possible introduction to kayaking) have come about by Viking’s willingness to listen to what their paddling customers are looking for. In fact the team approach has meant that even the latest innovations are already being looked at for their potential. We have both staff members and selected anglers looking at the “Kid Pod” as a “Flat Deck” for standing and sight casting to both fresh and salt water species! In my world there’s nothing cooler than being part of an innovative team that actually listens to what we as kayak anglers are looking for, then builds a craft that breaks new ground. Yes, I’m a Viking Kayaker, and pleased the new Profish™ Reload is here! www.kayaknz.co.nz


With the Kid Pod fitted, the console/cockpit becomes a flat surface ideal for standing and surface casting.

What the other Experts are saying about the Profish Reload™

Tim Taylor NZ Kayaker The Profish Reload has a welldesigned mix of speed, stability, and comfort, I think that it will become a favorite for kayakers of a range of ability levels. I know it already is a favorite for me. The integrated Tackle Pod™ is the standout feature of this kayak - this is the first ever kayak to be designed around a tackle storage system. Brad & Andrew NZ Blokes Fishtails Viking have outdone themselves. Not only have they taken some proven aspects and combined them with new features that really make life easy, they made it look good and go fast too. Shane & Bam Maniyaks We have been incredibly impressed with the new Viking Reload. The speed, the comfort and the ability to load and go has already proved its worth. Less time setting up and less time getting there means more time fishing. Before I’d taken my Reload out for a paddle I thought there was still a place for my Profish 400 I was wrong this machine is the best Viking yet. Jason Milne Paddle Guy The Profish Reload gets better with every adventure, great acceleration and comfortable seat position it is a real pleasure to paddle as much as fish from. Handles the rough water with ease and is a very practical fishing platform with so many

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Large oval hatch designed to take bigger items such as the C-Tug Trolley.

options for keeping your work area safe and tidy…the Pod system is just the icing on the cake and making these adventures so much more convenient and hassle free.

The removable Tackle Pod™.

Lyndon Cox “Mega Milkey” I had the pleasure of paddling it the other night in the surf and had a ball. I've paddled 4.5m kayaks in the surf before and expected a bit of a handful with this one. But the Reload was nimble, able to be spun around quickly to face oncoming surf and powered out through it easily. And then picking up the waves coming back in was really easy and surfed straight and fast until I decided to turn side on and brace to a stop. Not once did I feel like I was going to "turtle".

The stability of the Reload and comfort in the cockpit ensures everyone can relax and enjoy the ride.

Shelley Bradish Cooney I love the speed of the Reload, it accelerates better than the 400 making the surf transition less stressful. There is plenty of room to stow your gear, and with a forward hatch design there is even room to stow your C-Tug. This kayak was designed with plenty of buoyancy, so it will be fantastic for missions where you need to take plenty of gear. To the design team at Viking – well done. The Profish Reload is well thought out, and I would recommend this as a kayak for someone who just wanted “one kayak” to fish from or just to paddle.

The Reload working area has been designed so you have everything in its place when required.

Visit our website to find out more about the Viking Profish Reload™, and find a dealer in your area to arrange a demo.

Vikingkayaks.co.nz 0800 kayaker

The Kid Pod gives the kids a comfortable place to take in the adventure with Mum or Dad. Issue 72

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North Shore Auckland Manukau Waikato

Summer Enrolments Enrolments Open Now. Discover Another World. We’ll show you how!

Call into your local Canoe & Kayak Centre or have a look on-line. Find out more at canoeandkayak.co.nz, phone 0508 529256, or see the back page for a Canoe & Kayak Centre near you.


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Race to the Midnight Sun Greg Lloyd and Graham Sutherland, or ‘Team Yukiwis’, race 715 km down the Yukon River in just three grueling days.

I still remember sitting around an evening camp with our mates Dave and Pete at Little Port Cooper listening to them talking about having a crack at the Yukon River Quest. The beers were flowing so I just assumed it was the usual bluster - 715 kms in three days, paddling all day and all night with just two compulsory stops. Down the legendary Yukon River from Whitehorse, to Dawson City. Crazy! The next day paddling to Little Akaloa we had plenty of time to discuss it and as with many things, the more you talk about it the more achievable it seems. Dave and Pete didn’t get there for a variety of reasons but it remained on the collective radar and so a few years later when my mate Greg Lloyd said he was looking for a new challenge, I floated the idea. Next thing I realise, we are in Whitehorse, Canada, standing amongst 62 other teams at the start, feeling a little nervous. The YRQ is a canoe and kayak race, open to big canoe teams of six or more paddlers, tandems and solos. It is downstream so you get a good push from the current - most of the time. The one major exception is the notorious 50 km-long Lake LaBerge. The race is also called the “Race to the Midnight Sun” because it never gets dark and you can paddle all through the night. As Dave, who was a great supporter, constantly reminded us, we would be the first New Zealand team to do the race. We were team “Yukiwis”, with Greg’s partner Celia Jenkins being our fantastic support crew. We had a somewhat inauspicious race start. We were very relaxed and laid-back, not getting caught in the hype and taking off too fast. However, in hindsight we took too long to get under way, putting on our sprayskirts PAGE 28

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when we were to hardly use them at all during the race. When we finally paddled off I discovered that I hadn’t taken off the rudder tie-down. We had to head back to the river bank and ask onlookers to assist - noting much laughter and good-natured shaking of heads. The result of this lapse was that we were now paddling alone at the tail of the field, enjoying our own special applause and well-wishing from all the locals and supporters lined up along the river. The race started at midday on the last Wednesday in June and it’s a lovely beginning, paddling for about three hours down the river before we hit the lake. At first, the lake is daunting. It is huge and you cannot see the end, only the first of many points to round. There was no longer any current, just our paddling, but we were blessed with favourable conditions – the water was smooth with a slight tail/cross wind blowing and we were still fresh enough to enjoy the stunning landscape passing by. We had planned to get out frequently for short breaks, but soon realised that doing so wasn't always easy. On the lake for example, we were always a fair distance from shore so stopping would cost valuable time and effort. We did the 7½ hour crossing without getting out and our first ‘midnight sun’ run was down the swift Thirty Mile section, where we went another seven hours without stopping. The midnight sun is misleading, because although it doesn't get dark, it's like dusk for about four to five hours with the sun just below the horizon. Reading the currents, many boils and eddies was challenging through this section and we were pleased when the sun did finally come back up. That feeling didn't last long however as we began to feel its bite. The price we were to pay for the good conditions on the lake was high temperatures throughout the long middle section to the first compulsory seven-hour stop at Carmacks - it was around 34 degrees Celsius when we got there on Thursday afternoon, about 27 hours after the start. www.kayaknz.co.nz


Celia was waiting for us at Carmacks and got us organised, fed, cleaned and into bed. Sadly though, due to the heat, noise and dehydration, neither of us got much sleep. We left Carmacks around 10.45pm Thursday night and from then on, staying awake became our main challenge. As the race wore on we realised that physically we were going well but mentally we were suffering from sleep deprivation and it would have been possible to fall asleep while still paddling. Paddling becomes so metronomic that you have to stay focused and constantly talk to yourself and each other to stay awake. Then the hallucinations start. We both had them but Greg got it worst and sitting behind him I could sometimes tell when he was seeing his ‘friends’ in the trees. His hallucinations were very creative and entertaining, which provided a few good laughs when he reported them. Despite the creeping challenge of sleep deprivation, the few hours after Carmacks was some of our best paddling. We really got into our work and being around midnight the temperatures finally cooled a bit. The infamous Five Fingers Rapids was looming and we were rehearsing how to hit the right line. As we approached we also prepared for a possible dumping, securing loose gear, particularly since our cockpits had become a mishmash of stuff as the race progressed. As the rapids approached we could hear them but it was hard to make out the fingers in the low light. We just kept right as briefed and they soon revealed themselves. We talked about our plans for when we hit the standing waves, how to paddle through them and what to do if we dumped. Our approach was good despite there being two big eddies near the top of the channel and we managed to hold a good line into the V of the rapid. There didn't seem to be one big standing wave but a number of cross waves that we rode through pretty smoothly

and before long we were out and looking for the wicked eddies at the bottom, that we managed to avoid. It was a nice feeling to be through and a sense of another milestone achieved.

I could sometimes tell when he was seeing his ‘friends’ in the trees. His hallucinations were very creative and entertaining, which provided a few good laughs when he reported them.

Thunderstorms became a factor in this section and we were to hear later that lightning strikes started a forest fire in this area earlier. One storm erupted over us around Minto, complete with forked lightning striking in the vicinity of the river. After a couple of close strikes we decided to get off the river. We noticed others had done so too, so were satisfied with our decision despite it costing us time. After a while we carried on under steady rain and were very wet when we hit the historic Fort Selkirk checkpoint a while later, so we stopped. We spent a long time here - there was a welcome fire, hot drinks, a chance to change clothes and we got 20 minutes sleep. After the oppressive heat of the previous sections it was strange to then be cold, wet and appreciating a fire. The increased stops however, meant we could see our target time of 55 hours slipping away and our sleep-deprived brains slipped into “just get to the finish” mode. We were heartened though because we were starting to see evidence of how the race and lack of sleep was affecting so many other teams in

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different ways, passing one struggling team that pulled out not long after and another team that capsized while trying to stop for a rest. We certainly weren’t struggling alone. Despite the strong desire to stop, we soon realised the value of staying in your boat on the water. A number of canoe teams that we passed earlier eventually went past us. It dawned on us that canoes have the considerable advantage of the paddlers being able to move around and stretch and therefore not feel the same pressure to stop as those being stuck in a cockpit. At one stage we decided we needed to stop simply for a power nap lest one of us fall asleep and tip us out. We found a safe place to beach, no easy feat, got out, unwrapped our emergency bags and lay down on the river bank for 15 minutes’ sleep amid a frenzied buzzing of mosquitoes desperately trying to penetrate the foil. It's amazing what value we got from that snooze; I know for me it's what got me all the way to the second compulsory stop at Kirkmans Creek four hours later. We got to Kirkmans Creek about 11.00 pm Friday night where the small local community welcomed teams enthusiastically but again we both struggled to sleep, the mozzies were horrendous, even with bug spray,

and it was noisy and still muggy. We probably got about an hour’s sleep. We had talked about how the last leg from Kirkmans Creek to Dawson would be easy to motivate for and maintain focus given it was the last leg to the finish. We weren’t complacent but that last leg was still 10-12 hours of paddling and needed to be taken with respect. It included one of the most challenging parts where the river becomes very braided and quite massive in scale, just after the White River confluence. It's a kind of confusion of churning, messy water and navigation becomes very challenging, particularly on sleep-deprived minds. We left Kirkmans Creek at 1.00 am Saturday morning and really struggled through this section, making some poor channel selections and seemed to spend a lot of energy avoiding being sucked towards log piles - our most dreaded hazard. The weather also deteriorated with mist and rain setting in. We simply kept paddling and after a while we came across a tandem canoe team who were in seemingly worse shape than us, admitting to being “a bit discombobulated” which provided a welcome chuckle and perfectly captured the condition of those of us still battling to the finish. They asked us where we thought the Sixty Mile River checkpoint was and we invited them to follow us as we had regained our bearings at that point. I think

Congratulations to all who started the Speight’s Coast to Coast this year. It’s a long road and half the battle is just getting there. Now looking to next year...

Grade Two certification and brush up courses run through out the year. Contact your nearest Canoe & Kayak Centre for details.

Will you be there in 2015?

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being needed to provide some small assistance to another team spurred us on. It's funny, because that previous section was probably our toughest mentally but somehow the renewed energy inspired us to push hard to Sixty Mile and we decided with surprising resolve to carry on to Dawson, despite the lure of a rest and sleep at the checkpoint. So paddle on we did and went well until a heavy rainstorm hit and drastically reduced visibility. It really pelted down and I couldn't help but think there's no way I'd kayak in these conditions under normal circumstances. I guess there was nothing normal about what we were doing. Despite a few navigational setbacks and the poor visibility, we got through the last section in good spirits and in reasonable physical shape, pleased to still be able to turn over the paddles after so many hours of

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paddling. We started seeing the first signs of Dawson, then hearing the cheers ringing out and it was a special feeling seeing Celia encouraging us to the finish line. Crossing the line was great but I didn't do the triumphant paddle raise I thought I might, we were too focused on where exactly the finishing area was, bearing in mind we were still at the mercy of an unforgiving river and paddling back to a missed docking area wouldn't be cool. We swung in successfully and how wonderful it felt to get out of the boat for the last time, both of us achieving this with surprising grace and dignity for two mid-forties blokes who had just paddled 715 kms in three days on about 3-4 hours’ sleep.

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We finished at 1.17pm on Saturday and our official time was 63 hours, 17 minutes; slower than our target but we were proud of our achievement, especially being the first team from New Zealand to complete the YRQ. The famous Yukon beer that night was some of the best I’ve tasted and I couldn’t help but reflect on how it all began over a beer or two, many years before.

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Crossword

Quick Crossword Test your knowledge of kayaking and kayaking safety.

Across 4.

8. 12. 13. 18. 19. 20. 21. 23. 24.

27. 28. 30.

Certificate required to compete in multisport events The event of the longest day This is what landlubbers call a rope Before you rest, you’ll need to cross this Causes raining fish Extreme tides The area of the paddle that transfers the energy Area sheltered from the wind Type of plastic used in the manufactur of kayaks Light weight but strong material used in kayak construction and clothing Team that competed in the Yukon River Quest Excessive water over the top Safety wear

Down 1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7.

Slide down a wave and bury yourself in the next A paddle with no apparent blade Competition paddle Essential river rescue gear also useful at sea Longer is faster Equal to one degree in latitude

9. 10. 11. 14. 15. 16. 17. 22.

Keeping your weight back in surf prevents this Keep your catch fresh Protective gear worn in canoe polo Beware of these birds eggs when on high tide mark The area between hull and deck In aid to be seen you need to be …. coloured Affected by centre of gravity Any good waterproof will have double sealed …

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Taupo Maori Carvings Half day guided trip to the rock carvings, Lake Taupo... only accessible by boat. A leisurely paddle of about 3 km to the rock carvings. The largest is over 10 m high and from below in a kayak it is imposing.

$95 per person (bookings essential). Phone 0800 KAYAKN for details.

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Waikato River Discovery Glow Worm Kayak Tour

2 hour guided kayak trip. Experience the magnificent upper reaches of the mighty Waikato River - Soak in the geothermal hot springs - Take in the stunning environment... a perfect trip for all the family...

Adult $49, Children $29 Special group and family rates. Call 0800 KAYAKN for details.

Join us for a picturesque paddle on Lake McLaren to view glow worms by night or beautiful waterfalls by day. This trip takes about 1.5-2hours and is suitable for paddlers with no experience. All gear, hot drinks and nibbles are supplied. Price $99 per person.

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Sugar Loaf Island From Ngamutu Beach harbour we head out on the open sea to Sugar Loaf Island Marine Reserve. View the scenic & rugged Taranaki coastline as we draw closer to the Islands. Enjoy the seal colony and experience the thrill of close up views of these fascinating marine mammals. Allow 3 hours subject to weather. $95.00 per person. Phone 06 769 5506

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Health

Bad Posture = Poor Kayaking Performance Bad Posture slows your thinking and hinders your kayaking performance. It will also slow down your healing time! It also affects your brain, organ, joint and immune health and puts your body in a state of stress which makes you store fat! For these reasons it is now considered a new health crisis! Kayakers often fall victim to bad posture as they slump in their kayaks due to their tight hamstrings! Modern day living also takes its toll with cell phones, hours of work on a computer, ipads/pods, flat desks and hours of driving in a car. All this forces our head down and begins the creation of your “Gorilla Posture”! Posture affects everything from your head to your toes, here is why:

Gravity Rules The minute you stood up on two legs, gravity began to push and pull on every joint and organ in your body. Standing upright with your head balanced over your shoulders creates no harm, however, the early introduction of computers, cell phones, ipads and flat desks forces you to drop you head forward and down which alters your posture dramatically! When your head drops forward, your posture breaks down and the domino effect begins … uneven loading to your joints, compression to

your organs, slow blood flow to your brain and spinal compression! Pain, sickness, weight gain and injury follow close behind. Here is why: A minimal drop of the chin forward, a mere 2 cm, equates to your normal 0-3 kilo head weight ( in neutral posture ) becoming a whopping 17+ kilos for your neck and shoulder muscles to carry. What a waste of energy! As your head drops forward your back slumps into gorilla posture - , compressing the arteries that carry the blood to your vital organs and brain. Many kayakers slump which limits rotation which then shuts off your core strength and compromises your low back.

A clue to bad posture: Your feet are full of clues! They reveal the secrets to how you stack upwards! Posture begins from the ground up; your feet are the last place your body can adapt to gravity before it hits solid ground. You confront major challenges in today lifestyle that compress your head and body downward, as we previously mentioned: computers, etc... a forward contracted posture gives gravity momentum creating excessive load down to your feet.

Make loading kayaks easy Easy quick mounting and dismounting boat roller. No need for a heavy permanently mounted system that effects handling and fuel consumption. 2 mounting positions to fit most vehicles. Just apply to clean glass or paintwork when needed. Then use roller to roll kayak onto your vehicle.

Phone your closest kayak retailer or for further information email Great Stuff Ltd Distributed by Great Stuff Ltd. www.greatstuffltd.co.nz or email greatstuffltd@xtra.co.nz

PAGE 34

Issue 72

Summer 2014

SeattleAD-Jan14

www.kayaknz.co.nz


HOT TIPS: 1. Use clipboards to write on and read from as you can lift it to eye level and avoid dropping your head forward. 2. Bring light objects to eye level such as magazines, books and cell phones.

adventure equipment

3. Use your eyes not your head to look down while on computer, reading and cooking etc.. this is also great for your eye muscles 4. Laptops are villians! Do not put your laptop in your lap – it forces you to drop your head. Sit at a desk with laptop on top of a few books and get an external keyboard. 5. Stretch your hamstrings- tight hamstrings prevent you from sitting upright in your kayak forcing “gorilla posture” and putting excessive pressure on your lower back.

So if you have drop arches, flat feet, ankle/foot pain, or have foot problems, it is highly likely you have a postural problem.

Other indicators of bad posture: Headaches, sore neck and shoulders, back pain, indigestion, belly fat, slow healing, anxiety or poor sleep.

Adventure Touring Cag

Management is crucial:

Kurve Touring PFD

Cell phones, all forms of technology and driving are not going to go away and we all love them for their amazing uses, so you must add management into your daily schedule. I’ve put together a few hot tips to get you started: If you can tick a few of those above indicators it’s time for you to get your posture assessed and corrected. Simple exercises can help you unravel your bad posture before it becomes a major health crisis. The rewards and benefits will last a lifetime. Contact our office for assistance or appointments to get your posture “back on track”.

Igneous Touring Boot

For your continual free wealth of 30 seconds hot health tips sign up for my blog at www.drtheresadobson.com Strobe Ladies Cag

Let’s get you back on track! Dr Theresa Dobson info@activecare.co.nz 09 415 9399 www.drtheresadobson.com

RFD New Zealand Limited 0800 777 009 Auckland Wellington Nelson Christchurch Filename: SURVITECpos_PMS.eps Colourway:

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Please note a change in date previously advertised (27 - 31 March) Held at Outward Bound, Queen Charlotte Sound near Picton. This is a great opportunity for Sea Kayakers of all levels to participate with others at this great location, with guest speakers, training and paddling opportunities. w wAnakiwa w . k a2014 y a kv2.indd n z . c1o . n z

For more information see www.kask.org.nz and go to the events page or contact Tim or Shawn at kaskforum@live.com

Issue 72

S u m m e r 2 0 122/11/2013 4 P2:24:13 A G Ep.m. 35


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Issue 72

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Summer 2014 26/11/2012 8:26:19 a.m.


Product Focus

Be safe, be seen – with RAILBLAZA! We all know that the more visible you are on the water, the safer you are, especially in rough conditions or in shipping lanes. Now you can buy everything in one kit to give day and night visibility when on the water in your kayak or canoe. The Visibility kit consists of our popular Telepole (extends from 550 mm to 1050 mm), Florescent orange flag which clips to the Telepole & NEW RAILBLAZA NaviLux 360 light which plugs into the TelePole.  The NaviLux 360 is 200 mm in length which will take your total height above the deck to 1250 mm when the TelePole is fully extended. The NaviLux 360 comes with a directional light shield to avoid effecting night vision especially when repositioned to other StarPort mounts in your cockpit area.

For more information, and a list of RAILBLAZA dealers go to www.railblaza.com or see RAILBLAZA in use on youtube.com/railblaza. Made in New Zealand

The TelePole can also be retasked to carry a GoPro camera or similar during daylight hours.

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 72

Summer 2014

PAGE 37


First Aid

Dislocations Dislocations can cause significant pain and often causes damage to the joint capsule and surrounding ligaments and tissues, and maybe associated with fractures of nearby bones. Therefore we need to treat as though there is a fracture as well as a dislocation. A dislocated shoulder occurs when the humerus separates from the scapula at the glenohumeral joint. The shoulder joint has the greatest range of motion of any joint in the body and as a result is particularly susceptible to dislocation. Other areas that are easy to dislocate are fingers, and knees. Dislocations of the shoulders are common in white water kayaking or kayak surfing, when that brace has not gone well. I have even dislocated my jaw, (no, not from too much talking for those that know me, just eating a giant sandwich for lunch). It was very painful and put a stop to all chewing and talking until it was repositioned a few days later when I arrived back in civilisation. It wasn’t a lot of fun! The Signs and Symptoms are: A dislocated joint will show: • • • • •

Pain Tenderness Swelling Impaired movement Deformity

Management: • • • • • • •

Johanna Verheijen First Training Ltd Diploma Outdoor Recreation Leadership Bachelor Sport and Recreation.

Reference: Emergency Care for First Responders: NZ Resuscitation Council.

PAGE 38

Issue 72

Summer 2014

Danger!

A

DO NOT attempt to re-locate the bones Support the joint in the injured position using a soft pillow for padding. Use ice pack to help reduce swelling Immobilise the limb. Check for circulation below the injury site Treat for shock Call for medical assistance 111 or set off personal locator beacon if in a remote area.

B

Danger!

C

EXTREME Danger! www.kayaknz.co.nz


General Knowledge 1. Should we try to relocate a dislocated shoulder? No. We could cause further damage to the joint or cause further damage if there is a fracture. 2. How should we attempt to immobilise a dislocated shoulder? Immobilise either with padding under the limb for support or a sling to support the arm. 3. How can you determine that a shoulder has been dislocated? MOI (mechanism of injury), compare one side with the injured side, there will be deformity, pain and swelling. 4. If you are in a remote location does a dislocation warrant setting off the personal locator beacon? Yes. We need urgent medical help as the dislocation and swelling can cause immense pain and lack of circulation beyond the injury site.

7. Should we check for any other injuries? Yes. The force to cause a dislocation of a shoulder or knee can cause other injuries, especially fractures. 8. What information should we gather from our patient while waiting for help to arrive to pass on to the medical team? Here are some SAMPLE questions you could ask: •

Signs and symptoms?

Allergies?

Medical conditions, medications, medic alert?

Past medical history?

Last time they had something to eat or drink?

Events leading up to injury or illness?

5. Should we try to relocate a dislocated finger or thumb? Seek medical advice if possible. Again we could cause further damage to the joint or cause further damage if there is a fracture. 6. How should you treat for shock? Keep the person warm, and give lots of reassurance. Position the patient in a way that is most comfortable for them.

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 72

Summer 2014

PAGE 39


Bush Craft

Light My Fire The final installment where Andy Blake explains how to prepare a great camp fire.

In this last part of our fire section, we look at some of the interesting facets of fire-lighting. These are: which trees are best to burn, how to light a fire in the rain and how to make your fire last all night.

Which wood to burn Green or living wood contains about 60 % water so is not suitable to use for getting a fire going as the fire wastes valuable heat energy drying the wood out. It is better to use wood that is found above the ground as this will be a lot dryer than the wood which has been able to absorb ground moisture. Good dry firewood, when broken in half, makes a loud “crack”. If it is “springy” it is generally too wet. Wood that is very light in weight, like decayed or rotten wood, is also unsuitable as it doesn’t produce a very hot flame. Soft woods are good for use as tinder as they are easier to ignite to get the fire started. This is because they often contain very flammable resins. These burn quickly but don’t produce very hot coals. These include, kawakawa, broadleaf, wineberry – usually the larger leaved plants. New Zealand hardwoods tend to be slower growing and thus produce a more dense wood. This makes them harder to ignite, but once the fire is established they produce high heat that will burn for a long time and produce good coals for cooking – great to use for an overnight fire. Hard woods usually have small leaves and include trees like, totara, beech species, manuka, kahikatea, kanuka, tawa, miro, matai and rimu.

Lighting a fire in the rain Anyone (well hopefully) can light a fire during a fine day, but have you ever tried to get a fire going while it’s raining or even at night while it was raining! Obviously this would be a bit harder but definitely not impossible. Numerous times I have impressed and surprised others by doing this. Preparation is more important than ever. Things I consider or act upon are: 1. Location of the fireplace - away from the driving rain in amongst the bush somewhere, some place where the fire can be contained. 2. Provide additional protection by making a small shelter over the fire using fern, flat bark or a high tarp (not too close).

3. Collect all of the materials for the fire and store them so they don’t get any wetter than they already are. Collect tinder last and store in a dry pocket or plastic bag. 4. Shake all of the materials to remove any excess water and shave off any outer wood if wet. 5. Lay a network of sticks or rocks down on the ground so moisture is not drawn up from the ground by the fire. This also ensures that plenty of air reaches the fire to light that tinder.


Bush Craft the centre of your fire. Now place some more hardwood logs on top of these. These may burst into flames or possibly just smoulder away all night. In the morning, hopefully you will be able to rake through the embers to find them still glowing and able to be used to ignite some saved tinder. The alternative is when you are fortunate enough to be not on your own but with a companion or two. Remember you should never kayak alone so you can have a roster system that enables one person to sleep while another one tends to the fire and other fascinating tasks like drying clothes, carving bowls or utensils or making nets etc. The use of hardwoods like kanuka, manuka, rimu, matai or miro helps the fire to burn hotter and slower.

Take the time to monitor your fire to either have it become bigger or at least to maintain its size and not to slowly go out!

Making the fire last all night If you are on your own and you wish to sleep through the night and wake up in the morning to still burning coals, there are a few things which may increase your chances. Firstly you should ensure that your fireplace is well surrounded by rocks and is not being fanned by the wind. It is imperative not to run the risk of a forest fire during the night just because you wanted to wake up in the morning with warm buns. Start by getting a good size fire going, choosing to burn hardwoods that are quite large in size. You need to produce large embers. These should be piled up into a heap in

And just one last point on how big to make your fire There is an old Indian saying – White man makes large fire and sits far away - Indian lights small fire and sits close …. Makes sense doesn’t it? Happy safe fire lighting

Sale Tahe Kayaks $500 to $1000 off most models

Your chance to own a carbon composite European performance sea kayak at a price unlikely to be repeated. Available only on present stock, limited numbers, limited colours Phone your closest kayak retailer or for further info email Great Stuff Ltd

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I have spent over an hour during the night, whilst raining, to get a roaring fire going just as the sun was coming up. And then it stopped raining. Oh well, at least I got a hot cuppa for brekkie.

Fire lighting in adverse conditions is not just morale boosting but potentially could be lifesaving - bush skills can be read in a book but must be practised in the field. Just like primitive people the world over who learn and continue to hone primitive life skills to survive, we may not always have the luxury of being able to “flick on a switch”.

Distributed by Great Stuff Ltd. www.greatstuffltd.co.nz or email greatstuffltd@xtra.co.nz

TAHEAD-Nov13


N ew Zealand Topographic M ap - topomap.co.nz

Trip Card # 004 Lake Rotoma

co.nz Images Sour ced fr om LINZ Topogr aphic Maps. Cr own Copyr ight Reser ved.

Lake Rotoma Route card No. 004 Skill level: Beginner Distance: 10 - 12 Km

Map no: BE38

Start/ finish point:

Boat Ramp on State Highway 30 by Whangaroa Inlet

Comms coverage:

Communication coverage is intermitent with VHF & phone

.co.nz/P rint?sw =16225,6314&ne=16232,6319&z=14&t=85&s=A 4&o=P ortrait

Introduction: If you’re wanting peace and tranquility and a chance to explore one of the smaller and less intimidating lakes of Rotorua then look no further. Lake Rotoma is quieter than many of the others and offers it’s own character. This is a scenic lake paddle with a few hidden surprises. On first appearances the lake seems just like many others but depending on the lake level you will discover a few treats Description: Lake Rotoma, which is is the fourth largest lake of the 11 lakes in the Rotorua Lakes district, or the Hot Lakes district as it was known in the early decades of the 20th century. Lake Rotoma is the easternmost in the chain of three lakes to the northeast of Lake Rotorua The other two are Lake Rotoiti and Lake Rotoehu. Rotoma is located half-way between the city of Rotorua and town of Whakatane. From the boat ramp head across the lake to the other side (north east) and hug the shoreline. Keep you’re eyes peeled for a small opening in the manuka. When the lake level is high there is an opportunity to paddle straight in to the hidden lagoons on the north eastern side of the lake. However, when levels are lower you may have to portage through some bush before being able to access Te Onewhero and Whakarewa Lagoons. Just north of the lagoons is a small beach in Otumarokura Bay just perfect for a picnic lunch, with stunning views back over the lake. Continue anti-clockwise

around the lake following the shoreline, if you wish to shorten your trip just cut out exploring Te Rotoiti Bay and go from one peninsula to the other. Heading back round the lake you’ll start to see some secluded baches nestled in the bush. Keep your eye open for the white sculpture in the water, which is best seen when lake levels are mid to low. Heading back towards the boat ramp you can explore up the Whangaroa Outlet before exiting the lake. Fishing on the lake is permitted and there are good trout to be had but you do need to get a permit from D.O.C. Hazards: • Other Vessels on the Water • Lots of sandflies in summer Local tourist attractions: Hells Gate

hellsgate.co.nz

Local eateries: Superette in Rotoma

Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: February 2014


Trip Card # 002 Bucklands Beach to Motuihe Island - Return

es. Soundings in metres. Copyright © Crown Copyright Reserved. Sourced from Land Information New Zealand data. NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION (Maritime Rules, Part 25)

www.memory-map.com

Bucklands Beach to Motuihe Island - Return Route card No. 002 Skill level: Intermediate Distance: 16 Km

Chart no: NZ5324 Tidal Port: Auckland

Start point:

Eastern Beach boat ramp or Bucklands Beach

Finish Point: HW/ LW: Tidal times/ notes:

Start point Eastern Beach is extremly shallow from half tide. If leaving from Eastern Beach, you’ll need to leave between half to full tide. From Eastern Beach - there are strong tides up and down the Tamaki River.

Coastguard contact: Comms coverage:

Auckland (09) 303 1303 Mobile:*500 VHF Channel 80 VHF coverage is excellent and cell phones work well.

Introduction: This is a great paddle to one of the closer Islands. There is a lovely walk on the island and a brilliant beach. Very popular with boaties on a summers day.

to Browns Island for another explore. Two: Leave the bay and head across to Browns Island without using the channel. Three: Head back to the mainland directly.

Description: A nice easy open water paddle for the intermediate/confident beginner looking to increase their skill level. Paddle along the coast line to Music Point then head directly across to Waiaorangatahi Bay. Once at the island there are lovely native trees, the old naval training base and a grave yard to see. There are a few options to get home. One: A portage to the other side of the island ( about 50 m ) and follow the channel back

Hazards: • Strong currents run on Tamaki River. • The Waiheke ferry leaves from Halfmoon Bay. • Busy boating area.

Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: February 2014


Kayaks

White Water

Matariki

4.50

620

26

$1699

Tahe

Greenland T Wind Solo Reval Wind 585 Sea Spirit Reval Mini

5.45 5.05 5.50 5.85 5.20 5.20

530 540 540 540 560 540

23-24 23-25 24-26 25-27 26-28 24-26

$3495 $3195 $3495 $3495 $3290 $4150

Kiwi Excel Kiwi Lite Skua Skua Lite Shearwater Shearwater Lite Tasman Express Tasman Express Lite Tasman Express Elite Foveaux Express Southern Skua

3.75 3.75 5.20 5.20 480 480 5.30 5.30 5.30 5.00 5.40

740 740 600 600 610 610 620 620 600 600 600

23 18 27 24 26.5 23 29 25 22 19 22

$1660 $1970 $2890 $3140 $2650 $2900 $2890 $3140 $4590 $4460 $4590

Contour 450 Contour 480 Eco Bezhig

4.50 4.80 5.40

620 620 590

26 27 27

$2499 $2779 $2999

Manitou 13 Looksha 14 Eskia

3.90 4.30 4.90

630 625 635

20.5 26 27

$1299 $2199 $2499

4.90

600

17

$3100

Necky Mission

Canoe & Kayak

Barracuda Beachcomber

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Riot

Price

Astro 58 Magnum 72 Magnum 80 Thunder 65 Thunder 76

1.93 2.41 2.54 2.34 2.44

650 660 254 650 660

15.5 18 67 18.5 29.5

$1725 $1595 $1595 $1895 $1895

Liquid Logic

Weight (kg)

Remix 59 Remix 69 Remix 79 Freeride 57 Freeride 67 Stomper 80 Stomper 90

2.57 2.64 2.72 1.98 2.06 2.49 2.57

640 650 670 650 660 650 680

19 20 21 14.5 15 21 22

$2199 $2199 $2199 $1999 $1999 $2249 $2249

2.60

610

16

$1160

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Twist 1

2.60

790

6

$1095

Twist 2

3.60

830

9

$1395

Helios 1

3.10

710

13.5

$1595

Helios 2

3.80

750

17

$1895

Sunny

3.80

800

16

$1895

Tasman K40

4.40

670

15

$3036

Pacific K50

5.35

670

20

$3680

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Q-Kayaks Stealth

Inflatables

Gumotex

Width (mm)

Incept

Length (m)

Q-Kayaks

Sea Kayaks Single

Multisport

Sea Kayaks Double Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Q-Kayaks

Southern Endeavour

5.60

800

46

$3540

Mission

Contour 490 Eco Niizh

4.90 5.65

800 770

35 45

$3499 $4569

Necky

Amaruk

5.40

725

41.3

$3499

5.80

700

28

$4300

Barracuda Beachcomber Duo

Great Advice Great Brands Great Service

Length (m) Q- Kayaks

Ruahine

Length (m)

Hurricane (kevlar)

5.90

490

12

$3170

Maximus (kevlar)

6.40

510

16

$3890

Intrigue (kevlar)

4.95

540

12

$2900

Swallow (kevlar)

5.40

480

12

$3000

Firebolt (kevlar)

5.90

450

12.5

$3250

Rebel (kevlar)

5.65

450

11

$3200

Gladiator (kevlar)

5.90

530

13.5

$320 0

F1 (kevlar)

6.20

350

13.5

$3350

Ocean X (kevlar)

6.40

500

16.5

$3750

Duet (kevlar)

7.00

550

26

$5760


Fishing Singles

Sit-on-Top Single

Point 65

Fire Fly

2.40

700

16

$535

Whizz

2.50

770

22

$750

Escapee

3.30

740

23

$775

Escapade

3.50

750

27

$975

Play

3.10

710

18

$499

Escape

3.20

790

17

$649

Explorer

3.40

790

18.20

$749

Navigator

3.80

790

22

$799

Squirt

2.70

760

17

$499

Flow

2.95

750

19

$899

Glide 390 inc rudder

3.90

850

28

$1199

Xstream 420

4.20

730

28

$1299

Frenzy

2.75

790

19.5

$699

Mysto inc seat

2.95

790

21

$799

Starting Price $1599

Marauder

4.30

780

28

Fish n’ Dive

3.80

915

28

$899

Tourer

4.60

710

23

$1699

Prowler 13 inc seat

4.10

710

28

$1399

Tetra 12 Angler inc seat

3.70

710

24.5

$1499

Prowler Ultra 4.1 inc comfort seat

4.10

710

28.5

$1699

Prowler Ultra 4.3 inc zone seat

4.30

740

32.5

$1999

Prowler Elite 4.5 inc comfort seat

4.50

710

31

$1599

Prowler Ultra 4.7 inc zone seat

4.70

740

35

$2249

Torque

4.20

735

32.2

$3499

2.80

730

18

$1229

2.95

750

19

$999

Catch 390 inc rudder

3.90

850

28

$1599

Line 400

4.0

840

32

$1599

$1299

Catch 420 inc rudder

4.20

730

28

$1999

Espri Angler inc delux seat & paddle

3.6

800

22

$1149

Profish 400 inc delux seat & paddle

4.1

780

24

$1699

Profish 440 inc delux seat & paddle

4.4

770

29

$1999

Profish 400 Diamond inc delux seat & paddle

4.1

780

25

$2999

Profish Reload inc delux seat & paddle

4.5

740

29

$2299

SoT Fish Pro

4.20

680

18

$3500

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

3.00

700

19

$850

Kiwi

3.75

740

20

$1365

Sprite 2

4.50

820

32

$1410

725

21

$999

Scrambler 11 inc seat

3.60

750

23

$999

Tetra 12 inc seat

3.70

Pacer XS inc paddle

2.7

780

16

$599

Ozzie inc paddle

2.7

790

17

$699

Nemo inc paddle

3.2

790

20

$799

Espri inc paddle

3.4

790

18.2

$999

Tequila! Modular

3.0

750

21

$1299

4.20

680

18

$2800

Barracuda SoT Tourer

Weight (kg)

Catch 290

3.30

24

Width (mm)

Line 280

Venus 11 inc seat

710

Length (m)

Cobra

Starting Price

Ocean Kayak

Weight (kg)

Mission

Width (mm)

Viking Kayaks

Viking Kayaks

Ocean Kayak

Mission

Cobra

Q-Kayaks

Length (m)

Barracuda

Sit-on-Top Double Length (m) Q- Kayaks

Cobra

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Escapade II

3.50

750

26

$900

Delta

4.00

830

32

$1295

Tandem

3.80

799

26

$799

Long Reach

4.40

910

36

$999

Surge

3.90

850

28

$1099

Recreational

Sprite 1 Q- Kayaks

Ocean Kayak

Mission

Width (mm)

Malibu 2

3.65

870

27

$999

Malibu 2 XL inc 2 x seats

4.10

86

33

$1449

Mission

Cabo

4.97

76.5

33

$1699

Viking Kayaks

Viking 2 + 1 inc seats & paddles

3.9

810

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Manitou 13

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630

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Martini Modular Single

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700

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Martini Modular Double

4.2

700

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Tyler Fox Professional Kayaker

Interview by Josh Neilson

Over the past seven years I have been writing articles for this magazine from my kayaking adventures around the world. The stories have taken you along on the ride down rivers in USA, Europe, Africa, Asia and here in New Zealand. One thing I have found is that to survive on 6 month

his year living in the kayaking grounds of Okere Falls. I met Tyler one day at the Wairoa Extreme Race with a bunch of his fellow Canadian crew. They were travelling around NZ in a beat up old truck and we shared a few beers at the party, but due to the lack of Facebook in those days, we said “see ya later” and that was that.

are going to get to know them a little better.

In the Canadian Spring we met again on Ottawa River where he is from. He took us in to sleep on his floor during the World Cup for Freestyle Kayaking and plans were soon made for further kayaking trips. Seven years later we have paddled numerous rivers in different countries and had the best time doing it. Here are some things you might have not have known about Tyler.

I am going to start with Tyler Fox, a Canadian who has spent the last seven years on kayaking trips with me and who spends six months of

As I write this Tyler is putting the jug on for one of our many cups of tea we have during the day.

kayaking trips, it’s very important to have a good crew. Over these past articles and other kayaking stories, you may have become familiar with the names like Louise Urwin, Tyler Fox, Mike Dawson to name a few. So over the next few issues we


So Tyler, first things first, how did you start kayaking? I didn’t start kayaking till my last year of High School. I took an Outdoor Ed course and was introduced to it there. The summer after I finished school I took a job as a raft guide on the Ottawa River, so that I could be closer to the white water and kayak in my time off.

How did you end up in New Zealand back in 2005, when we first met? I pretty much ended up in NZ because you speak English here (or at least a form of it). It was a toss-up between NZ and Mexico and at that point my Spanish was non-existent, so I chose the easier option. Plus the fact that this being one of the world’s best kayaking destinations definitely helped.

You have been to many other countries. What would you describe as one of your favourite places to go kayaking? Damn that is a hard question. I feel that if I thought about it too much my head would explode, so off the top I am going to have to go with California. There really isn’t anything better than paddling amazing white water on a sunny day, and California has both in excess!

www.kayaknz.co.nz

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Quite early in your kayaking career you decided to call Okere Falls home for six months a year. What was it that kept you here? Community. It is what usually pulls me back to any place I have spent a lot of time in. And not only do you get to hang out with so many awesome people, you get to do it while taking part in any number of fun activities. For a start; the kayaking is everyday - all day (with the occasional moonlight paddle thrown in the mix), but we are also less than 25 mins from world class mountain biking and some real nice surf. Throw in some hot pools and a couple of beautiful lakes and it’s a hard not to keep coming back.

New Zealand schools have such good outdoor education programs teaching kayaking so after starting NZ Outdoor Guides with Louise Urwin it made it a lot easier to come back each summer to a steady stream of instruction work too.

Not only do you kayak most days on the river and own a kayak instruction company here in NZ but you are also a Volunteer Fire Fighter here in Okere Falls. Tell us about that. After being here for a while I just wanted to do my part for the community I love to live in. I feel it fits the mindset of a kayaker quite well. The rush of getting a call out is fairly comparable to kayaking a large rapid or completing a challenging river. It brings the community together in a different setting with good friends and new things to learn.

Over the past issues I have written about our kayaking trips you have pretty much been in all of them. Which of those stands out as a highlight trip. They have definitely all been amazing. I would have to say our second trip into Quebec has been one of my alltime favourites. We were going pretty hard and covered a huge amount of previously un-explored river. It was the kind of trip that you can feel really good about at the end, like you did something a little more than the standard tourist kayaking trip hitting up all the classics.

Not only have you excelled in expedition kayaking but you also enjoy some extreme racing too. What is it that attracts you to this discipline and where is your favourite race? I love the feeling of looking at a section of white water, piecing it all together, ripping down it as fast as you can possibly go, and getting to the bottom feeling like you did the best you could. I would have to say my favourite race is the Wairoa Extreme Race, it always seems to be the right combination of competitiveness and fun, held on a great section of water.

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When you are teaching with NZ Outdoor Guides with school students and you see someone who is keen to follow on with kayaking. What advise do you give them? Keep on keeping on! The only way to get better at kayaking is to keep doing it. This is usually followed up with information of a kayak club or group of kayakers in their area that they can connect with to help them along their journey.

Organizing and competing in the NZ Extreme Race series is right up there on the start of my list. From there I am travelling back to Ottawa, where I am hoping to have a spot in the White Water Grand Prix in Quebec. I am currently sitting as the first alternate, so only time will tell. Either way the Canadian Spring is always guaranteed to be a good time. Sometime after that, I am hoping to get back to Norway, before work in July/Aug takes me back to the Ottawa. A sneaky month of surfing somewhere in Central America is always in the back of my mind, but I feel like I have already exhausted my ability to plan that far ahead.

Finally, I know we have some good plans ahead Cheers Tyler, it’s been an awesome seven years for 2014. Can you give us a bit of a run down on on the river and being able to share our missions what might go down this year? with the New Zealand Kayak Magazine. Looking forward to more.

ASTRAL GREENJACKET

Distributor of:

www.performance paddling.co.nz www.kayaknz.co.nz

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Photo by Josh Neilson PAGE 50

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New Zealand Kayaking Magazine