a product message image
{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade

Page 1

Issue 71

Te Ara Moana Auckland’s new South East Kayak Trail

Marine Electronics Setting up a fish finder

Canal de las MontaĂąas The ultimate Patagonian kayak journeyd

South Stanislaus California Very few run white water like this

Proudly supported by:


For all your Sports Transportation Solutions

Proud Sponsors of the

www.thule.co.nz


www.kayaknz.co.nz

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

PAGE 3


Contents Sea Kayaking Te Ara Moana, sea-going pathway Canal de las Monta単as - The ultimate Patagonian kayak journey Nelson Lakes Trip Card - Matahina Trip Card - Whangamata (Otahu River)

6 12 30 42 43

Fishing Fishing Electronics

17

White Water High Water on the Hollyford South Stanislaus - California

22 48

First Aid Dehydration

36

Bush Craft Fire

37

Leader Profiles

21

New Products Viking Profish Reload

40

Products Gift Ideas

44

Kayaks - Kayak listings

46

Multisport Multisport: Save Time and Thrive

28

Technical Knots - Tying a Rolling Hitch

32

Regulars Health Paddle Off Winter Belly Fat in 15 Minutes

34

Puzzles Sudoku Quick Crossword Puzzle Solutions

33 35 41

PAGE 4

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Editorial Throughout the country Yakity Yak Kayak Club summer activities are ramping up. In these pages, and on www.yakityyak.co.nz, you’ll detect that thousands of days will be donated by keen leaders to provide you with paddling companions and adventures. Remember to thank them, as volunteers often feel that they are not appreciated: they are the backbone of this country and our club. This summer I find myself dragged away again from a summer exploring the waters and bush to the political ‘ground hog day’ of protecting coastal land being turned into urban housing. A large number of organisations and individuals are once again entering a battle concerning the hills above the Okura Estuary and Marine Reserve. For the last two decades developers have wanted to urbanise the last green belt on the northern fringe of Auckland’s North Shore. Two Environment Court Rulings maintained existing four hectare blocks, commenting on the need to protect this land from urbanisation. The current land owner has restarted the process. Many hours and large funds from individuals and volunteer groups will be required to keep this last coastal green space from intense housing. Okura’s situation is repeated around our coasts every year, slowly eating away coastal green spaces close to cities and towns. If developers lose this year, the land continues to value at a healthy rate in its current state so they’ll still make a great return on investment, subdivided or not. They just go on reapplying until ‘we minnows’ run out of funds and courage. A nationwide approach to developing coastal land is needed to preserve the back-drop to some of our lovely beaches and estuaries. I know many will say that it is the land owners right to do whatever they want within the rules and I don’t disagree. However the rules are set by our councils and change constantly from year to year as the Mayor, Councillors, Council Officers or Judges see

Issue 71 fit. They are persuaded by specialists that go head to head over the visual impact and all the other pros and cons of development and how the effects could be mitigated. The outcome is areas once thought protected from urbanisation are being converted to housing. These rules or zones are too important for them to be so fluid. We need our Prime Minister and MPs to formulate a plan so that future generations have some coastal green spaces left forever. It also needs to spell out a public access plan and a rating plan for owners of this land so they are not rated off their own land as values soars. If you feel that we should do something to prevent coastal ‘ribbon’ development, start talking with people about the issue and contact your local MP to ask for a plan to be formulated for the protection of our coastal land. Request of them a moratorium on development until the public have been heard and politicians have had a chance to discuss and plan. Cheers and happy Christmas and a safe adventure filled summer. Peter Townend

Copyright: The opinions expressed by contributors and the information stated in advertisements/articles are not necessarily agreed to by the editors or publisher of New Zealand Kayak Magazine. Pricing: At the time of printing the prices in this magazine were accurate. However they may change at any time. EDITOR: Peter Townend Ph: 0274 529 255 / (09) 476 7066 Email: pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz PUBLISHER: New Zealand Kayak Magazine is published four times per year by Canoe & Kayak Ltd. PRINTING: MHP Print DISTRIBUTION: MagMag SUBSCRIPTIONS: (see page 41) New Zealand – 4 Issues = $25 Overseas – 4 Issues = $40

CONTRIBUTORS: We welcome contributors’ articles and photos. Refer to www.canoeandkayak.co.nz/guide New Zealand Kayak Magazine ‘Contributors Guidelines’ for more details. ALL CONTRIBUTIONS TO: James Fitness Email: james@canoeandkayak.co.nz New Zealand Kayak Magazine Front Cover: Urupukapuka - Bay of Islands Photo by: Uta Machold Contents: Page - Kawau Island Photo by: Ruth E. Henderson

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

PAGE 5


Te Ara Moana, sea-going pathway:

By Ruth E. Henderson

Biting the cherry

PAGE 6

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

www.kayaknz.co.nz


In July a group of nine, predominantly from the North Shore Yakity Yak kayak club were determined to be amongst the first to trial the newly opened South East Auckland sea kayak trail. We soon found that there were many ways to bite this cherry, and we might need several bites. At a glance, it looks easy, a daisy picking meander along the coast: A jaunt from Omana Regional Park in the North to Waharau Regional Park in the South. And that’s how the Auckland Council planned it; a one way trip, with five days of between 8 – 14 km of paddling, with time to make camp and explore the different parks along the way. A total of 51 km, suitable for novices, ok for sit-on-tops. As ‘intrepid sea-kayakers’ the plan was to do the whole thing there and back in four days, averaging 25 km per day. The forecast was for two brilliant days bookending two crappy days of up to SW25 to 35 knots depending on which website you favoured. Obviously Plan A was not going to work. But this trail allows for plenty of flexibility, and has many potential Plan B’s which suits my ‘no cancellation policy’. So, advising the others to chuck in their boots, back pack and togs, just in case, we met at 8 am at Omana Beach boat ramp to discuss the weather and our options. We opted to paddle while we could; do a return day trip to Duder, then to retreat to Miranda Holiday Park and its enticing hot pools. It was a sparkling day and soon proved to be a latte day. First stop was Maraetai…some of us had after all been up since 5 am. Rounding Maraetai Pt we waved to some picnickers, then cruised past the marae and church at Umupuia Beach, past the flowering wattles and coral trees and around Whakekeiwhara Pt to Duder Regional Park. Standing proud, the blue and orange totem pole marked the spot of the newly opened campsite. We scrambled up the hill for the panoramic views back towards Omana, over to Waiheke Island and South East towards Kawakawa Bay. Gorgeous! It seemed impossible that the weather was predicted to change so dramatically. However, heeding advice and the mare’s tails, we retreated and headed back to our cars.

two days. The majority choose the Pinnacles Hut overnight tramp option. A couple of foodies, choose, well… food. Next morning, my creaking bones and I were inclined to switch, but, hey, I’d set out for a physical adventure…I was the leader, so how could I pike? Trekking up the stone staircase built in the 1920’s to make it easier for the packhorses weekly trip in to the kauri loggers bush camps, we reflected that in comparison to those days, we had it easy. Polypro, Icebreaker, Kathmandu, Gortex…and an 80 bed hut with gas hobs. The Kauaeranga Information Centre weather board had suggested a temperature of one degree and rain, and the fine print? Four to six degrees colder in the ranges. That bunk room was like a freezer and next morning there was ice in the puddles and cold, cold steel ladders at the rock face. Back at Thames wharf we had lovely HOT chips and at

We scrambled up the hill for the panoramic views back towards Omana, over to Waiheke Island and South East towards Kawakawa Bay. Gorgeous! Miranda, we wallowed in the hot pools and plotted our next adventure. The wind was still up, but it would be on our backs if we headed North! Frost on our tents was a good omen. A car shuttle later, we were at the Waharau Regional Park, in the sunshine and back on the water. Ali’s sail proved a magnet, and for a while we rafted up and relaxed. Kayaking, tramping and now sailing! The coloured totem pole

Miranda Holiday Park tourist flats and backpacker cabins, mid-winter, were surprise, surprise fully booked. Luckily we had tents, aye! We luxuriated in the hot pools and toasty kitchen planning our next

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Issue 70

Spring 2013

PAGE 7


the wind and www.windfinder.com for Kawakawa Bay had proved so accurate on the last trip and subsequent ones, I trusted it’s 15 to 20 knot call. A couple still vacillated, but a plan to start at Kawakawa Bay and base ourselves at Waitawa Bay only 3 km away from our cars synched it; it was game on. The car parking issue was solved by the friendly guy at the Beachcomber Motel, and the four of us launched from the beach opposite the motel. We cruised past the settlement, and once past Pawhetau Pt could easily spot that nights campsite and the adjoining building site and earthworks for Auckland Councils latest park due to be open this summer, Waitawa Regional Park. Soon we slipped under the jetty, and rounded Koherurahi Pt to meander along the coast line towards the Wairoa River mouth, the reeds and rushes along the foreshore and the beckoning Duder Regional Park. Back at Waitawa, we pulled our boats up high into the grass, pitched tents (and tarps) and set about making the cooking shelter into home. Clothes lines were soon strung, billies boiled, and once the plastic stool I had literally dug up at lunch time was put into service, along with the other’s collapsible, more portable ones, we were set. And spoilt, as Julie produced four wee puddings, with real whipped cream.

broadcast our arrival at the Waikaha Stream backcountry campsite of Tapapakanga Regional Park. This is up the hill a bit set behind some majestic mature native taraire trees. We opted to go the extra mile to lunch at the main beachfront camp, near to the historic Ashby 1900 homestead.

Dawn was calm, and as we packed up the wind stayed still, the rain waited; although we were satisfied we’d completed the trail, we could not go home yet, so set off to explore the nearby island of Karemurama. We mooched past the quarry, crossed to Pakihi Island and its grass and pine trees, spotted some interesting old machinery, but with an eye on the developing white caps, and the mare’s tails flicking above, it was time to make a sprint for the cars. As we hit the beach the skies opened and the wind would have hit 20 knots. Windfinder was spot on. This summer I trust it will deliver four days of sunshine and balmy breezes so we can do the trail in the pre-ordained order in consecutive days.

On the trail again, our next stop was the Tawhitokino Beach campsite. Next to a stream and set back a bit from the pohutukawa lined beach, this one has no road access, but otherwise the usual composting toilet, tap, plus a cooking shelter. It was a dinky wee campsite and got the vote as the most delightful spot so far. Now, all we had to do was round Raukura Pt to the boat ramp and car park at Kawakawa Bay. Neatly timed, we didn’t have to wheel or carry our kayaks too far; something you have to beware of on this coast. Joining the dots between Kawakawa Bay, Waitawa campsite and Duder would have to wait for another time. Take Two was an ‘invitation only’ trip, for keen members of the previous month’s group, to complete what we had originally set out to achieve. The tides were right, but that rain and wind continued to frustrate! It was a case of pick which forecast suited your half full or half empty philosophy - do you look at the predicted wind or the gusts? I look at PAGE 8

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

www.kayaknz.co.nz


There Is No Wrong Way To Do The Te Ara Moana but there are a few things you need to get right! The first thing to get right is the tide; otherwise you could find it discouraging at launching or have a long portage at the end of the day. It may not be wet sand, or boggy mud that is the curse but boulders or rocky shelves, making trolley use impossible. The second thing to get right is the wind. It may be hard to find a weather window of four or five days in a row without wind, but at least try to get it and your direction of travel compatible and get some assistance. Far nicer, less effort if you have tail wind compared to battling into it. This may mean starting at Waharau and heading to Omana. If starting at Waharau, doing a return journey and camping at Omana come around into Kelly’s Beach, preferably at high tide, and land before the walking bridge. As you start to portage up the gravel track turn left to enter the camping ground at the lower end as this equals less distance to portage than the alternative tar-sealed track.

Tui Excel A versatile, go anywhere kayak

Penguin A tried and true winner that delivers affordable excellence

Shearwater A proven design that just got better

Skua An exceptional performance sea kayak

Southern Endeavour

For all the kayak specs. and stockists, visit www.q-kayaks.co.nz or phone 06 326 8667 Skua - 1st Plastic Sea Kayak -Trans Taupo Race 2011 - Circumnavigation around the South Island. www.kayaknz.co.nz

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

PAGE 9


The third consideration is accommodation. Where to stop for the night is extremely well catered for. The Auckland Council has done a sterling job in this department with the addition of the campsite at Duder Regional Park and the latest park at Waitawa near Kawakawa. All bar Duder and Omana have a cooking shelter. All have taps and toilets. BYO tent and cooker. Waharau has hot showers! In winter the website will show most campsites to be ‘fully booked’. This is code for closed to motorists due to wet ground and potentially bogged campervans and cars messing up the grass and needing towing. When booking you will need to explain that you will be arriving and departing by kayak and will make less of an impression than a wheelbarrow.

your gear at the beachfront near the boat ramp or the toilet block. Auckland Council suggests you start and park at Kelly’s Beach, but I’d not want to leave my car there for several nights. If starting at Waharau, likewise I’d park by the Ranger’s office. So the rangers don’t call the cops thinking they have a missing person or stolen car, leave them a note with your name, car rego number and intentions. If starting in the middle at Kawakawa Bay there is a farmer who advertises parking 021 184 8260 and off-season ask at the Beachcomber Motel 09 2922815.

The fourth factor is transport and/or where to park your car. In the future, if enough folk do the trail, maybe an enterprising person will run a van and trailer unit to tote you and your kayak back to your car. Meanwhile you either need to get dropped off; do a car shuttle leaving at least one vehicle at your destination ready to take you back to the beginning; or paddle both ways. For the latter two options you need to confidently leave your car somewhere safe. If starting at Omana, I’d suggest you park in the car park near the Ranger’s office. Firstly unload PAGE 10

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Te Ara Moana, sea-going pathway: campsites heading in a South East direction

To book your campsite and/or to get an Auckland Council camping pass at $63 year phone 09 301 0101, to print out a map and details of the trail got to www.regionalparks.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz find the Te Ara Moana listing and in the first paragraph, click for Brochure.

Omana Regional Park Cliff top campground $13 adult 100 person max 7 nights max stay Long drop toilets, water taps outside toilets, camp fire site Distance to next Park 11km Portage 140m at high tide - 450m at low tide from Kelly’s Beach; 1360m from Omana ramp. Waitawa Regional Park Waitawa Bay $6 adult 20 person max 2 night max stay Long drop toilet Tap on tank, cooking shelter Distance to next Park 10km Portage 12–30m

Tapapakanga Regional Park Waikaha Stream $6 adult 20 person max 2 night max stay Long drop toilet, tap Cooking shelter Distance to next Park 8km Portage 20-40m

Waharau Regional Park Tainui campground $13 adult 60 person max 7 night max stay Flush toilets, showers, taps Cooking shelter Distance to next Park – end of kayak trail but if going North 8km, portage 470- 525m NB. This camp is fully booked every year from about 7 Dec to 7 Feb.

Other options: Alternative Accommodation:

Duder Regional Park Te Wharau (Malua Bay) $6 adult 20 person max 2 night max stay Long drop toilet Tap on hill by toilet Distance to next Park 14km Portage 5-6m

Tawhitokino Regional Park Tawhitokino $6 adult 20 person max 7 night max stay Long drop toilets, stream Cooking shelter Distance to next Park 8km Portage 22-60m

Tapapakanga Regional Park Beachfront campground $13 adult 40 person max 7 night max stay Toilets, taps outside toilets Distance to next Park 8km Portage 5-20m

Waharau Regional Park Blackberry Flat campground $13 adult 40 person max 7 night max stay Long drop toilets, taps. Distance to next Park - end of kayak trail but if going North 8km Portage 1200m

Miranda – useful if Waharau park sites full or unable to do the long portage. Miranda Holiday Park 07 867 3205

Kawakawa Bay – useful if starting or stopping in the middle of the kayak trail. Beachcomber Motel 09 2922815

Tourist apartments to backpacker style cabins even in winter are likely to be booked out on Saturday nights. Camping $23 all-weather sites, excellent kitchen, includes use of the landscaped hot pool.

Normal motel units, but extra friendly and helpful. Tony let us park our cars for free when we were not even staying there! Off season motel units $100/2 Peak $120/2.

Miranda Shorebird Centre 09 232 2781 Self-contained suite with kitchen and loo sleep 6 or 4, averages out to about $36 each or dormitory with shared facilities $25


Canal de las Monta単as The ultimate Patagonian kayak journey

It was February, late in the Patagonian summer, when four of us set off on a 9 day expedition near the Chilean town of Puerto Natales, to the remote area of the Cordillera Sarmiento. Although not high by Andean standards, only topping 1400m in a few places, the peaks were rugged, bare-rocked - many capped with permanent ice fields giving a spectacular backdrop for any water-borne expedition. The jewel in the crown, and our ultimate destination, was the Canal de las Monta単as, a 50 kilometre-long fjord fringed with five steeply sloping glaciers that slid down into the sea.

Our starting point was 30 kilometres west of Puerto Natales at the Estancia Mercedes, by the edge of our first channel, the Golfo Almirante Montt. We were ready to go by 7am; setting off westwards just as the first glimmer of daylight appeared, pink-fringed over the mountains ahead. The sea was glassy calm, with an almost oily sheen to it; the only waves to be seen were the wakes from the three kayaks: Andrea and I in singles, Greg and Tiffany in a double. The 12 kilometre crossing was straightforward and after a couple of hours we entered into the Canal Santa Maria, the first of the fjordic channels that would lead us to the Canal de las Monta単as. The day had now emerged into full light, the cloudless sky shone diamond blue and the sun was starting


to bring welcome warmth to our already aching muscles. The low land on either side was sparsely wooded, here and there stood the rotten remains of wooden cabins; their owners long since departed. The water was crystal clear and we glided over giant kelp fronds that looped up from the sandy bottom. After 5 kilometres, we approached a set of rocky islands, splitting the channel into a number of faster-running clifffaced passages. Here, we first smelled and then heard a colony of sea lions. Carving a sharp corner we came across them, a dozen or so large males posturing and bickering with each other on a small islet. After an early lunch, we followed the western shore as the channel slowly curved down to the south, new vistas opened up above us as we www.kayaknz.co.nz

headed towards our first camp site. In one small bay we watched a pod of Austral dolphins hunt in the shallows, herding and confusing their fish prey with a series of well-coordinated, stunningly fast attack runs. They were perfectly aware of our presence but carried on with their hunting beneath and around us. By mid-afternoon we set up camp on the bank of a small river that emerged from the dense forest. Just metres away, in the shallow river mouth, the dolphins re-appeared and spent the next hour chasing fish. The other attractions around us were the delicate, thrumming, humming birds that flitted in and out of the fuchsia bushes that surrounded the camp site. We were tired but pleased with our first full day on the water and succumbed to our sleeping bags before 9 pm. Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

PAGE 13


The night was silent, wind free and everyone slept well; not rising the following morning until after 8 am.

of Cerros las Paz, the so-called ‘false towers’; a reference to the muchvisited triple towers of Torres del Paine.

As we continued south, the vegetation grew very sparse on the upper flanks of the mountains as the rocky heights rose ever higher. Here the grey stone was edgy - scarred and bare - as though the violent carving from the last ice age had only just finished. Along the lower slopes, thick, impenetrable forests of southern beech interlocked with spiky, flowered shrubs grew right down to the high-water mark, making it very difficult to find places to go ashore. By mid-morning we were approaching the southern limit of the Canal Santa Maria. To our right, high above the ridge, rising tusk-like, emerged the three jagged spires

The southern end of the Canal Santa Maria is bisected by an east-west hewn fjord. Our route turned right taking us along the western portion, the Canal Morla Vicuña. This narrow, dark, 5.5 kilometre-long channel accessed us to the Canal de las Montañas. Half way along Morla Vicuña we chanced upon an unexpected camp site. In a shallow bay, above a beach and adjacent to a stream lay a small area of uneven, matted grass - with ample room for the tents. The cleft in the hill behind allowed the afternoon sun a single opportunity to highlight the shore. We stopped. That evening we watched the Puerto Natales-based icecruise ship - Skorpios III - slide slowly past our now-darkened camp site

A Comfortable Entry Level Sea Kayak • • • • • • • • •

Two Large Storage Compartments Two Large Hatches Comfortable Foam Padded Seat Easy to use Rudder System Stable and Comfortable to Paddle New Zealand Made with Top Quality UV Stabilized Plastic Orange Fade - A Stunning and Safe Colour Two Year Warranty Exclusive to Canoe & Kayak

All this at an affordable price

PAGE 14

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

www.kayaknz.co.nz


heading back to port. The Skorpios, one fishing boat and a navy patrol boat were the only ’human’ encounters that we had in our voyage. By the half light on the dawn of day four we silently paddled the remaining part of Canal Morla Vicuña; within 30 minutes a small red and white channel marker light signalled our emergence into the Canal de las Montañas. Turning north into the canal, the two kayaks to my right were black, silhouetted against the brightness of the mountains on the far side, the steady rhythmic dip and rise of the paddles took on a new urgency as we craned forward to catch our first full view. It took our breath away. Before us, the channel was ruler straight, stretching to the north as far as the eye could see, with mountains rising steeply on each side in a classic U-shaped glaciated valley form; the width of the channel was less than 2 kilometres across. All along the western tops were a constant procession of mini icecaps from which numerous hanging glaciers emerged; most stopping short far above the treeline. We couldn’t see them, yet but we knew that five of the glaciers made it down the hillsides to calve directly into the sea. The paddling was easy and progress was rapid. Our lunch break was at a small bay across the channel from the first glacier, Ventisquero Zamudio. From the mountain summit the snow pack slumped into the dip at the top of the glacier, then, becoming compressed, turned to wrinkled blue ice plunging down over 1000m to slide gracefully into the sea, the icy lumps of its discharge scattered out into the chill waters of the canal. We carried on further up the east side, eventually crossing the canal to camp in the moraine outwash below the second glacier, Ventisquero Bernal, on the western shore. This was a unique camp site. The ragged glacier snout sat flat on the bottom of the slope a couple of hundred yards from where we set up the tents on a lush, low-growing patch of vegetation. In front of us lay a series of small aquamarine-blue glacial streams running through silt bars of fine clay-like material, which were

interspersed with enormous, house-sized boulders - it felt like we were on another planet. The colours of the glacier’s ice were impossible to capture on our photographs. In the bright sunshine the ice appeared white but when the light dulled a little under an occasional wispy cloud, the ice took on a darker, deep blue hue. Through the night we were aware of the eerie sounds from the glacier as it creaked, grumbled and cracked, inching its way down the hillside – a seemingly live creature just letting us know that it was there. Juvenile Condor

HELP! NEW AGENCIES & EXISTING TERRITORIES AVAILABLE THROUGH OUT NEW ZEALAND

When disaster strikes who are you going to call when you are out of Cell Phone range?

Call Pete Townend pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz or phone 09 476 7066

*36 )ORDWV 7RXJK 5HOLDEOH :DWHUSURRI

)DVWÀQG3/% IURP\RXU&DQRH .D\DN&HQWUH

Your position is transmitted to the Rescue Co-ordination Centre within a few minutes and the search area is narrowed down to a few square metres. Peace of mind for loved ones and so small it fits in a pocket! Distributed by Bright Ideas ELB Ltd Ph: 0800 713 656 www.brightideas.co.nz

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

PAGE 15


Heading north on our second day in the canal, we were again in seventh heaven as each of the next three successive glaciers came into view. In a way they were all very similar but as each one appeared through dark-shadowed gaps in the hillside it was hard not to gasp afresh at the majesty and power of the icy cascades. We finally reached the most northerly glacier, Ventisquero Peredes, and although the upper slopes of the glacier were visible, fractured and layered with dust, the lower recesses were hidden behind a narrow kink in the cliffs. The densely-packed ice field was impenetrable preventing us from reaching the snout. Occasionally we heard a loud report from the gorge and watched as the ice pack undulated in response to the newly calved ice. Just north of the glacier the fjord turned slightly to the west and terminated below the headwall of the valley, we could paddle no further. It was with great reticence that we turned the boats south to leave this stunning place; it was time to head back. The long paddle back down the west side of the channel was superb. We watched the sun sparkle on the fresh snow on the summits of the false towers, which were now on our left side, and counted back each glacier in turn until we got the southern and last one, before crossing the channel to camp on the east side at a location only 10 kilometres from the start of Canal Morla Vicuña. Later that next morning as we were paddling south, we passed below a dead tree sticking out over the edge of the channel when I realised that the top part of the tree was moving - it was a large grey-black juvenile condor. Before I managed to take the first photo, the bird vomited all over the front of the kayak. When condors get a chance to feed they will eat as much as they can; often they are then so heavy that they can’t take off. If they have to fly they have to shed weight – this time over my kayak. After some quick photos we left it to contemplate its next meal; now it would be hungry again.

If you ever get the chance to paddle in Patagonia then the Canal de las Montañas must be one of the must-do destinations for any experienced paddler; the scenery, glaciers and wildlife are hard to beat, anywhere in the world.

We were very happy as we sat in the camp site that evening; we had seen the Canal de las Montañas at its very best. With a glass of wine after the meal we watched the sun dip, then vanish very suddenly behind the peaks on the far side of the steepsided channel. There was no half-light and it grew dark almost immediately; the temperature plummeting in the clear skies to produce a frost next morning, the first of the autumn. The good weather remained with us as we took our time paddling east again on the four-day return journey. It had been a memorable trip, not least from the amazing weather conditions. PAGE 16

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Fishing Electronics

Adding some electronic help to your fishing kayak.

By Jason Walker

In this article I am going to cover the why’s and how’s of installing a fish finder on your kayak with the aim of enhancing your fishing experience and hopefully success in catching fish. Fish finders are great for understanding what is under your kayak, the depth, the terrain, and maybe even the fish. Safety First: Fitting your fish finders involves messing around with electricity and whenever your do this you need to make sure you know what you are doing and how to do it safely. If you are in ANY doubt you should play it safe and seek professional help. The last thing you want is an electrical fault which damages your expensive electronics or turns your kayak into a puddle of molten plastic on the floor of your garage. So what is available? Almost any fish finder that has been designed to use on a runabout boat is suitable for use on a kayak. These units are small sealed fish finders that come in various sizes with a huge range of features. You can start off with a basic fish finder with a black and white, small, low resolution screen that will show you the depth, the bottom structure, and hopefully some fish. Or you could go the whole hog and get a high end fish finder that will offer you much much more; an easier to read high resolution colour screen, the bottom structure, the water column in various different ways, the standard 2D, down imaging, and even what’s out to the sides with side imagining technology. Some units also contain GPS and charting

e m ty ti n fe ra Li ar W

everyone

Kayaks for all activities

Family & Kids

Diving

Coromandel Kayak Adventures

Coromandel Kayak Adventures

PROUDLY MADE IN NZ - SOLD AROUND THE WORLD

Fishing

Surfing

Touring & Fitness

Double

AWESOME FUN - PRICELESS MEMORIES For more information and to find your local dealer visit: Facebook: Ocean Kayak NZ www.kayaknz.co.nz

www.oceankayak.co.nz Head Office (09) 427 5234

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

PAGE 17


functions which are great for being able to chart your drift so you can paddle back and re-drift along that same line you just picked up those fish on, or use the chart to find the drop offs and features. Of course as with everything the more you spend the more functions you will get on your unit.

Left: Using the chart plotter to trck your drift. Below: High resolution images of the sea bed, below and to the left & right of you.

Positioning Where you mount your fish finder will be influenced by several factors; the biggest being the type of kayak you paddle. The latest kayaks all sport centre tackle storage so you can mount your fish finders on the storage covers; older kayaks will most likely have some flat area or areas for you to choose from. Another factor to take into consideration is whether the installed unit is close enough to reach should you wish to make any changes to the settings on your unit whilst you are fishing. Mount it too far away and it may become a matter of having to shuffle forward each time, this is going to quickly become a chore and potentially unsafe. Also make sure it’s easy to see, don’t be tempted to tuck it away somewhere thinking it will be protected then find you have to crank your neck to see it every time. Also think about how the unit may interfere with your working space: is it going to get in the way of rigging you gear, your bait, or even how you land and deal with your fish, also if you choose to mount your fish finder on the side of your kayak be sure it will not interfere with your paddle stroke. Waterproof The most important thing when selecting electronics for use on your kayak is that they are waterproof; you should check that they carry a waterproof rating of IP67 or above. IP stands for “Ingress Protection”, the two numbers relate to the level of protection against solids and liquids. A rating of 6 means “Totally protected against dust” and the 7 equals “Protected against water ingress when submerged to a depth of one metre for thirty minutes”. So if your electronics are rated to IP67 you should be safe but note it is only a submersion rating, it doesn’t mean you can blast it with a high pressure hose when you are cleaning down at the end of the day and getting rolled in the surf may exert more than 1m of pressure, so it always pays to put your electronics safely away before heading back in through the surf.

charger as this will damage your SLA battery very quickly. Another easy way to damage an SLA battery is to completely discharge it; always avoid flattening your battery completely. Battery Storage You should, wherever possible, put your battery inside your kayak. You need to keep your battery away from saltwater as it can short out the battery if submerged and the saltwater has a nasty habit of corroding the battery terminals very quickly until they are unusable. Your battery can be secured inside you kayak by using a specifically designed battery tray or a foam block. S imply cut a foam block about twice the size of your battery and cut a hole in the centre to hold the battery then glue the block into the hull of your kayak to keep it secure.

Power Source Without the ability to simply plug your electronics into the nearest power socket means you need to carry your own power source with you, a battery, specifically an SLA (Sealed Lead Acid) battery. This type of battery operates on the same chemical reaction principals as your car battery but with the safety of the acid being sealed inside the battery’s plastic case making it ideal for use in your kayak as there is no chance of the acid being spilt as the kayak rocks and rolls at sea. So what size battery? The size will really depend on the current draw of your electronics. Have a look at the specifications and you should find something labelled “current draw” or something similar, it’s normally measured in milliamps (mA) - a thousandth of an amp, 1000mA = 1A. For example an average level fish finder will have a current drain of around 250mA so once you know this you can now look at the battery size you will require. Battery capacity is measured in Ampere Hours (Ah); an Ah is one amp for one hour so a 12Ah battery is capable of supplying 12 amps for one hour, 1 amp for 12 hours, or anything in between. So using our example of the 250mA fish finder it needs one quarter of an amp and if we planned on fishing for six hours then we would need at least a 1.5Ah battery. SLA batteries come in many different sizes but the most common sizes are 7, 12, and 18Ah with 7Ah being the most common and would be more than adequate for our example fish finder. You can normally find a 7Ah SLA battery for around $30-40. Note: you will also need a special charger for an SLA battery, DO NOT use your normal car battery PAGE 18

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

protect yourself from the elements For the full range go to

www.sharkskin.co.nz

ÉÉÉ¢n8ObF‘‘†¢O‘¢Îº+}8²†µ†€¢ noO€8‡

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Wiring

Fuses

Wiring up you fish finder is fairly simple, all you should need to do is run the wire from your battery to your fish finder to power it. If you need to extend the power cable at all use a marine rated cable, head down to your local marine chandlers and they should be able to help you out. Wherever possible, solder connections for a better connection, rather than crimping them, and as with everything on the kayak you want to seal, seal, seal, to keep that salt water out. On all your connections make sure you do not leave any exposed cable joints. Give them a quick coat of protectant and cover with some heat shrink to keep the moisture

You should protect your valuable electronics with a fuse, the fuse should be placed in the positive line of your wiring. The correct size fuse should be specified by the manufacturer so have a look into your manual, the most common size is 3 Amp. Also think about putting a spare in your fishing kit just in case. Transducers The transducer is the part of the kit that scans the water under your kayak. It needs an uninterrupted view of the water and again the newer kiwi

Pictured: A soldered connection First line of defence - heat shrink on each cable Second line of defence- final heat shrink over both cables.

out. For the plugs and sockets make sure you protect those too with a protectant. Personally I have been using Lanocote from CRC with great success. Without some form of protection you will find very quickly that electrolysis will eat up the pins in your plugs rendering your unit useless and in need of a service.

Transducer mounted in the transducer scupper hole.

Whizz

Fun in the sun and surf for the whole family

Escapee Versatile - go anywhere, do anything

Escapade Multipurpose - suitable for ďŹ shing, touring and fun in the waves

Escapade II

User friendly double for the whole family

w wSitwon. ktopa 11-11.indd y a k n z . 1c o . n z

Is s u e 71

12:06:33 S u m m e r 2 0 1 3 /28/11/2012 14 P A G Ep.m.1 9


designed kayaks have taken this into consideration with their design; they have specially designed transducer scuppers. These are scupper holes that have been enlarged on the bottom to accommodate your transducer which means your transducer will actually be in the water – giving you by far the best view – talk to your kayak dealer as most will supply a transducer fitting kit as an accessory to make the job very simple. On older kayaks you may not have a transducer scupper so you will need to look at another method, the most common tried and tested method is to put your transducer inside the hull of the kayak. You have two options, the first is to stick your transducer to the inside hull of your kayak: the “glue” to use is “Selleys All Clear”, place a large blob of it on the hull and push your transducer into it, the key is to get no air bubbles under the transducer as these will interfere with the signal. The second method is a “wet mount” with this you need to make a well to hold your transducer; the well is then filled with a liquid before you insert the transducer.

water over the unit, this will have the same effect of removing the salt and is better if you are unsure about submerging your unit. Once the salt has been removed put the fish finder to one side to dry. When the unit is dry, place it in a dry environment; I place mine inside a dry box. Please avoid keeping your unit in the hot water cupboard. This environment is not ideal for your fish finder; the warm air will be moist which is not great for your unit or its connections. A dry box is simply an air tight box with a drying system in it, a mini dehumidifier or silica gel; all your electronics such as your fish finder, VHF, EPIRB, camera, etc can be stored in it between trips.

After Care As with everything you take on your kayak, it’s going to get exposed to salt water during the day, so when you get home you need to remove what will probably now be a crusty layer of salt all over your fish finder as soon as possible. The easiest way to do this is with some tepid fresh water. The method I use is to half fill the kitchen sink with tepid water and gently bathe my fish finder in the freshwater for a couple of minutes, this is all that’s needed to dissolve the salt. Another method is to simply sponge the tepid

PAGE 20

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Leader Profiles

Leader Profiles Meet some of our awesome leaders. Without their support the club wouldn’t be what it is today.

Richard Saysell (North Shore) Richard has been on the scene with North Shore for a long time but his enthusiasm for leading kayaking adventures has never waned! In fact it continues to grow and as he is about to retire one can imagine that his legendary night paddles will be accompanied by a few more day paddles! If you would like to join Richard on his regular Wednesday night paddle during daylight saving then jump onto www.yakityyak.co.nz/northshore to find out more. Thanks for all your support over the years Ricardo :-)

Rob Brown [North Shore) It is great to have some new blood coming through the North Shore Sea Kayak Leadership ranks and Rob Brown is one of those newbies! His enthusiasm for the sport is fantastic to see, when he isn’t working his socks off at New World in Orewa he is either planning new trips or out there doing it. Rob is also working hard to achieve his National Certificate in Sea Kayak Leadership - the benchmark for new leaders. Keep up the good work Rob!

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

PAGE 21


High Water on the Hollyford By Nathan Fa’avae

PAGE 22

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Some places, some rivers have a mythical reputation and appeal. Fiordland holds that appeal for me even though I have only ventured to the perimeter on a few occasions (adventures). One of those places is the Hollyford, mainly reputable for its hiking trail, the name also holds meaning to the kayak community. The upper reaches of the Hollyford offer a couple of grade three - four white water kayaking runs, tight, challenging technical rapids. As the river drops in elevation from up near the Homer Tunnel, it starts to mellow out below the historical Gunns Camp. Most advanced sea kayakers will be aware of or have done the trip from below Gunns Camp (the Hollyford road end) 30 km down the river, 20 km along Lake McKerrow to Martins Bay. From Martins Bay in good conditions it’s two days open ocean paddling heading south along the coast and into Milford Sound, making it an exceptionally unique kayak trip of river, lake and sea. I have always wanted to do this trip, still do, more than ever. In early October my wife and three children went in search of some wilderness. The ski field was closed and the snow was transforming into river water. It was time to go boating. Sitting waiting were our new Incept inflatable kayaks. We’ve spent much time paddling IK’s now and over winter decided on what would serve our needs best for the approaching summer. We opted to get a 4-person Wanganui but get it converted to a

3-seat configuration plus a 3-person “Whakapapa” converted to 2-seat, custom designed for a family of five. Keeping in mind my children are 7, 9 and 11, we decided the open water section of this tantialising trip wouldn’t be sensible, that will have to wait a few more years, but we conferred that the river and lake sections were feasible. This added excitement for the kids as it meant a helicopter extraction from Martin’s Bay to Milford Sound on completion. Based in Queenstown for 2013, it didn’t take us long to drive to Te Anau and onwards to the Hollyford road end. The forecast wasn’t great but wasn’t bad either, some rain topping up the cold rivers but no heavy rain warning mentioned. Our plan was to camp at the road end and make an early start on the river, aiming to cover the 30 km to Lake McKerrow and the lakeside DOC hut.

Fast and furious, we had an action packed morning speeding down the Hollyford, the Incept boats clearly in their element. A locked gate and a 20-ton digger had different ideas. A major slip had shut the road and the road staff informed us it wouldn’t be open until midday the following day at best. Eager to get some air into our boats and on the water we waited. By 2 pm the road still wasn’t open but the road contractor felt sorry for us and allowed us through. By 3 pm we were loaded and off.

Join Us For A Kayaking Adventure - River Tours

River Tours

Mokau River

White Water Paddling

Waitara River Tours

Exploring beautiful estuaries. Enjoy a scenic trip with wildlife and wonderful views.

Enjoy this beautiful scenic river which winds through some of New Zealand’s lushest vegetation. Camping overnight and exploring some of New Zealand’s pioneering history. A true Kiwi experience.

Need some excitement? Take a kayak down a wicked Grade Two river run... this is a whole day of thrills and fantastic scenery down some of New Zealand’s best rivers.

For those who are slightly more adventurous at heart, this is a scenic trip with the excitement of Grade Two rapids. Midway down, we paddle under the historic Betran Road Bridge where we will stop for a snack.

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 0508 529 2569 for details

Phone Canoe & Kayak 06 769 5506

Phone Canoe & Kayak on 0508 529 2569 for details

Allow 2 hours paddle only. Priced at $70. Phone: 06 769 5506

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

PAGE 23


With some fresh snow melt and recent rain the water was glacier blue, lush green forest with cloud and mist floating above it: an enhancing atmosphere. Immediately we felt we were in the wilderness, in the modern era of instant gratification, this was instant isolation, just how we like it. The river was flowing steady with the main obstacles being trees scattered through the flow, on a couple of occasions we had some close calls, nothing too serious but enough to puncture a boat if we weren’t more careful. The temperature was fairly mild but passing showers meant the kids started to cool down. After a few hours making good progress we had to decide what to do. Despite our late launch it was still possible to reach Lake McKerrow before dark - just - but there was a

Glide 390: The facts Length // 390cm Width // 85cm Weight // 28kg Max Load // 230kg

PAGE 24

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

www.kayaknz.co.nz


large unknown between us and the fire at the hut. A few kilometres downstream was Little Homer Rapid. We’d heard conflicting information about it, some saying it was a grade two boulder garden, others claiming it to be impassible grade six. We did know that on river right was a portage channel through the forest that Jet Boaters used to winch their boats through. We guessed it would take us an hour to portage if the rapid was not possible. Then it started to rain and rain hard. We had a tent and all the gear to camp anywhere but as the water poured out of the swarming black clouds the tent was losing popularity. At that point we were passing Hidden Falls hut; it was too good to pass. After a warm dry night listening to the torrential rain hammering the hut like a jammed nail gun, we suspected we could be stuck there until the river subsided. Sure enough we inspected it to find it big and brown, probably four to five times the size of the previous day, likely about 300-cumecs. We put a marker in the river and went back to the hut for breakfast, deciding that we wouldn’t get on the water until it started dropping, plus a morning coffee does wonders for my confidence. Amazingly, an hour later it started to drop so we packed and [nervously] boarded. Fast and furious, we had an action packed morning speeding down the Hollyford, the Incept boats clearly in their element. Little Homer Rapid from what I could see,

was about 250-metres long and in the region of grade four. I suspect at lower flows it’d be down to grade two. We opted to portage and keep moving. Stopping at McKerrow hut for lunch it was then quite a relief to be on the lake. We spent the afternoon cruising down the lake, the later part into a head wind to arrive at Martins Bay. We then spent a few days exploring the area whilst staying at a friends batch, catching whitebait, sliding down sand dunes, observing the seal and penguin colony, bush walks and eel feeding: it was a grand adventure for the kids and brilliant escape for the adults. Then the helicopter landed.

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

PAGE 25


North Shore Auckland Manukau Waikato

Summer Enrolments Enrolments Open Now. Discover Another World. We’ll show you how!

Call into your local Canoe & Kayak Centre or have a look on-line. Find out more at canoeandkayak.co.nz, phone 0508 529256, or see the back page for a Canoe & Kayak Centre near you.


Bay of Plenty Taupo Taranaki Wellington

Join Join the the Yakity Yakity Yak Yak Kayak Kayak Club Club now, now, and and let let the the adventures adventures begin. begin. Urupukapuka - Bay of Islands Photo by: Uta Machold

Proudly supported by:


Multisport: Save Time and - don’t just survive this season Thrive By Chris Stagg

There is more to being an effective, fun living multisporter and endurance kayaker than simply “getting more time in the boat”. As coaches, we hear our clients spin this term on a daily basis. At the end of the day nothing beats experience(1), but there are many more factors that need to be considered to have a great time this racing season.

the Coast to Coast is not a steady flow, it’s an interval performance race by nature. It consists of extended flat sections (often more than desired) followed by a shorter torrent, and then back to flat.

Whether you are a seasoned weekend warrior, or leading up to the dream of completing the Speight’s Coast to Coast for the first (and hopefully not the last) time, the tips below will assist you to make your multisport an experience and not a survival regime.

Training is just a cultural social event in the lifestyle that you have chosen, and doing it with others at a similar level to yourself will drive you to train hard and make it a pleasure while you’re at it. (2)

Elements of Training ‘Training’ for some is fun, for others it’s the regret of knowing you should do more, and then some of you may be wondering why you aren’t getting results and find it a bore. Inevitably, whatever you do you have to gain from the hard work you put in. Work hard, play hard… at the same time. The majority of the experience of competing and completing a particular event is not held up in the race itself, but the journey getting there.

Effective training - boring laps on the lake is history There has been bucket loads of research showing that interval and variance training are more effective than a steady constant effort for hours on end. In an endurance event there are very few times that you can stick to this strategy. For example, the Waimakariri river section of

Grab a buddy…or 10

Save at least 20 minutes on race day Keeping your white water skills current and effective are key to surviving the longest paddle you’ve ever done. Every swim will cost you approximately 20 minutes spent landing your boat, emptying it, getting back in, warm up and into your rhythm again. There are three things you can do to prepare: Low brace - A natural reaction of a low brace can save you losing too much time. Learn to roll – learning and practising your role at the end of every training paddle will get you set. (3) Paddle - every stroke lifts your boat, and remember: “If in doubt, paddle hard out”.

Over 800 competitors will vie for places in the the world’s premier multi-sport event, the Speight’s Coast to Coast race on February 14th and 15th 2014.

Grade Two certification and brush up courses run through out the year. Contact your nearest Canoe & Kayak Centre for details.

Will you be there? - 2014 entries now open.

Coast to Coast 2014 v1.indd 1

19/03/2013 9:29:35 a.m.


Supporting your support crew

I hope you have a great racing season, enjoy it, perform, and we’ll see you out there. Keep an eye out for us in yellow.

Support crew are designed to make your day smooth and successful, but very rarely will you meet someone who hasn’t had a support crew mishap. The best thing you can do is train your support crew to know what to expect: transition training, how to manage your gear, your nutritional requirements, and specifically with kayaking – loading, unloading, and caring for your boat through transitions. (4)

Chris Stagg Multisport Kayaking Coach Canoe & Kayak North Shore Call us for more details or email chris.stagg@canoeandkayak.co.nz

Be prepared Many of you are training and preparing for the premier multisport race, the Speight’s Coast to Coast. So here’s some tips for you to accompany what has already been mentioned above. Nutrition – whatever you plan to race with, train with. Whether you plan to use gels, electrolyte powders, liquidised food or even the trending organic training - your body must adapt. Many people have had race mishaps because they aren’t conditioned with the products they are using or haven’t balanced their intake. This is a conversation for another time but talk to your coach for some tips. Know your gear – during training you’ll find what rubs, what needs altering, how to best carry gear and nutrition. Get these factors sorted before the big day and tell your support crew all of your needs as well.

(1) Extra river time on the Mohaka in December and Waimakariri Guided trips January 10-18th 2014 (2) Kayaking coaching pod sessions with Chris on Lake Pupuke Tuesday 6-7am, Thursday 6-7am & 6-7pm. (3) Rolling lessons – Call your local Canoe & Kayak branch for more details (4) Speight’s Coast to Coast Support Crew Info Night at Canoe & Kayak North Shore December 18th from 7pm – bring your support crew and all your questions. For more multisport info email us to get on the mailing list of upcoming events, join us on facebook.

COMPETITIVE / COMFORTABLE / A TRUE CONTENDER

Ruahine Kayaks Designers and Manufacturers of Multisport & Adventure Racing Kayaks Phone: 021 273 0550

kevin@ruahinekayaks.co.nz www.ruahinekayaks.co.nz Ruahine 11-07 V1.indd 1

25/07/2011 10:23:11 a.m.


Nelson Lakes

Stunning reflections, haute cuisine in back country huts and a big earthquake! By Chris Mercer Hooray another ferry trip to the South Island! It’s only Cook Strait but the crossing takes one to a different world. Actually, we didn’t see much of this world as the trans-world ferry was delayed and the whole journey was in the dark! Our accommodation at St Arnaud was the Alpine Lodge backpacker’s building which has been improved in the last year mercifully allowing more space for paddlers and their gear. In the morning we could see the snow on the mountain tops - and the ice on the kayaks! - but that soon melted in the morning sun. Actually, we had sun every day and no wind to speak of, but more of that later. A 20 minute drive on Friday morning took us to the ramp at Lake Rotoroa. After a change of clothes and a repack of kayaks, off we set, the sun warming us and dissolving the mist. The mist produced a rainbow complete with a reflection - it was fun to try and frame a friend’s kayak in the double arch! We headed southwest towards the snow-capped Mahanga and Travers Ranges together with their spectacular reflections in the flat-calm water - these reflections became a feature of the trip. The stunning beauty around us, and the need for photography stops, made for a really slow traverse of Lake Rotoroa, but it’s all about the journey not the destination! We all had cameras but two of the party, Nigel and Dave, were skilled and keen amateur photographers who produced some great shots including time-lapse cover of dawn and dusk as well as natural light shots at night using the moon light. A dominant memory of this expedition was the lack of urgency - we were focused when we had to be and could paddle for kilometres, but distances were not challenging with lake lengths of 13 and 7 km. After a morning tea stop on a sunny beach, we decided to paddle on and have a late lunch at Sabine hut, our destination. Finished eating, we walked to the Sabine Gorge, a visually dramatic grotto complete

PAGE 30

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

with a feeding trout. The bush track was littered with debris from above as storms had been through recently. We noticed here and at other places, how big and beautiful the beech trees were. There was lots of black fungus from the honey dew insect but we didn’t see any of the associated European wasps. Sabine hut sleeps 32 and is a roomy, clean place. Two trampers turned up in the evening but elected to use a tent as they hadn’t washed for days! Fine with us. The evening meal was underway at dusk and we were soon reminded that trip leader Andy has been a chef. He catered for himself to a high professional standard by eating on the first night, a fillet steak with mushrooms and fresh vegetables. Dessert was a jelly cooled in the lake, and hot custard - a big challenge on a camping stove. Generously, Andy had baked two cakes at home and took them to the huts where he iced and decorated them. We didn’t believe that he had made the chocolate lace icing in the hut so he picked up the icing funnel and wrote Tracey’s name on her hand! The carrot cake with almond flakes was my favourite. Our hut meal times were always a party as we all got on really well. Saturday morning saw a misty start but this soon burnt off and we paddled away on a calm surface. It was so warm at the morning tea break that Nigel swam and Andy rolled! Back at the lodge, we showered then dined in the restaurant. Oh, the luxury of clean clothes and clean hair! We were well looked after by host Leighton and family. On Sunday morning, we had planned to make fools of ourselves in front of the Lake Rotoiti webcam so that those joining us vicariously from home could have a laugh. The camera takes an image every 10 minutes but we only had to pose on the trailer for a short time as we had feedback from a spouse at home on the computer. More laughs were to come as we met the Marlborough Camera Club on the beach with more kit than my house is worth. They had fun snapping us as we packed up then they insisted that we raft up for a final YYKC portrait shot.

www.kayaknz.co.nz


We headed west to start paddling past the start of the Buller river then south to the Whisky Falls. This beauty spot is abot 150 m from the landing beach and was another excuse for a walk in the forest. Further south we stopped for the day at Coldwater Hut, which, like the Sabine hut, is on the lake edge giving fine views through the trees of the water beyond. The hut has been out of firewood for the last two winter visits by the Wellington YYKC so we took coal and kindling. However, the storm had brought down so much dead wood that it was easy for DOC to fill the storage with wood making our Palmerston North-purchased coal look foolish. Never mind, we were prepared.

their shop and home damage in Sunday’s earthquake. Chris bought the Stuart Trueman book describing his 2010 circumnavigation of Australia and spent the ferry journey dreaming of future expeditions!

Kayaking Essentials

Relaxation stopped suddenly at 5:09 pm with a rolling-motion earthquake. Crikey! We checked for changed lake levels or waves but we were safe - we were then amazed to see bubbles coming to the surface all around as the shake had released trapped methane from the lake-bed debris. In retrospect, I might have tested the gas composition with a match. I checked all the stoat traps around and found a rat in one which I took for eel bait. Not wanting to affect the data collection on pests, I left a note for the official trap checker. “Don’t do that” said Tracey, “The next rat might read it and run away!” The eels entertained us by stripping away all the rat flesh leaving just the leg tied to the string. On our evening walk to Lakehead Hut, I saw for the first time, the self-resetting traps, one of several measures in this “mainland island” contributing to the abundant birdlife.

Multisport PFD now in Red & Pink. Are you man enough to wear Pink? RRP $295.95

Be Seen, Be Safe, Be Legal NZTA size approved Flags. RRP $19.50

On Monday morning, we paddled up the Travers River a wee way from the mouth to play with eddy - he didn’t mind at all. These river mouth experiences were quite a contrast to last year when the rivers were flooded and pushing huge rafts of debris out onto the lakes. We had lunch on another sunny beach in sight of the smoke from the St. Arnaud chimneys. There was a sad air to our last wilderness meal as most of us wanted to keep on paddling and living the dream. Recreation for me is doing beautiful things in beautiful places and this trip absolutely ticked those boxes. Furthermore, the company on this expedition lifted it to a special level we would be lucky to find again - thanks everyone. On the way back to the ferry, we heard from Blenheim shopkeepers about

www.rasdex.co.nz 03 967 3040

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Is s u e 71 Rasdex 1312.indd 1

Summer is here, comfortable and flexible Neoprene Shorts are a must for your kit. RRP $102.95

Summer 2013/14

PAGE 31 26/11/2013 10:29:41 a.m.


Knots

Tying a Rolling Hitch

This knot is the preferred knot when attaching a rope to another rope.The first two turns create an awning hitch − a temporary hitch used by riggers when adjusting tent lines.

1.

2. Desired direction of pull O 1,2 & 3. Begin by taking a turn around the line that is transferring the load. Bring the end over the standing part working back up the line.

Standing part of rope O

3.

4.

5.

6.

4. Make a second and third turn that exactly follows the first, and hence also bringing the end over the standing part working back up the line, away from the direction of pull. This is what gives the knot extra grip when made around another rope.

7. 5, 6 & 7. Finish with a half hitch, moving around the line in the same direction as the first turns, as for a clove hitch.

8.

8. Dress by snugging the hitch around the line before applying load.

Load O


Sudoku

Sudoku The objective is to fill the 9Ă—9 grid with digits so that each column, each row, and each of the nine 3Ă—3 sub-grids that compose the grid contains all of the digits from 1 to 9. Solution on page 41

5 9

8

6

2 6

3 4 2 4 6

8

3 8 5

6 3

5

8 6 3 4

8

7 4

7

5 3 4 2

2

Photo of the Nelson Lakes supplied by Chris Mercer.

adventure equipment

Adventure Touring Cag Kurve Touring PFD

RFD New Zealand Limited 0800 777 009 Auckland Wellington Nelson Christchurch Filename: SURVITECpos_PMS.eps Colourway:

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Is s u e 71

&

100% Pantone PMS 158c

&

100% Process Black

Summer 2013/14

PAGE 33


Health

Paddle Off Winter Belly Fat in 15 Minutes Summer is here and the long winter days drift away into the crevasses of our mind. Those long cold winter days invited thick heavy food to keep us warm and cosy for the winter and with it attached an extra layer of fat. Now it’s swim suit time and you will no doubt need to trim off some of the belly fat. Why not do your trim up in the environment you love, yes your kayak! It’s fun, challenging, and will only take 15 minutes to get your body burning fat for 24 hours. It’s “Cardio” but not what you usually do. Normal cardio does little to burn fat and long duration cardio actually stimulates the ageing process due to how it increases “free radicals” into your blood stream (free radicals are like criminals that steal good things from your cells). This amazing work-out not only burns fat for 24 hours, it speeds up metabolism, activates more brain cells, boosts your immune system, assists digestion and fills you with vitality! Drum Roll Please… This work out is called HIT for short. It stands for High Intensity Training; I’ve been teaching it and practicing it with amazing success for several years now in “My Body’s GPS” program. Here is the method, it goes like this: One minute warm up at an easy normal pace, next minute go as hard as you can – next minute back to moderate pace – next minute is hard out again with more intensity. Continue this minute on / minute off for the next 12 minutes then warm down and paddle at a normal pace. You must

increase the intensity at each interval - this is your key feature to kick your fat burning into gear! The key to knowing you are at a good intensity is if you cannot talk and you are getting a sweat up. So get comfortable with “uncomfortable”. HIT should be done 3 x a week for effective fat burning and all the other huge benefits I mentioned above. If you’re not able to get into your kayak three times a week, you can plug this HIT into any exercise program you already do. Or if you are lost for ideas go to my website and download my custom made HIT training program… I’ve designed this fat blaster program myself to incorporate strength, stretch, joint stability patterns, spinal support and specialized stretches. Simply follow along with me and my cool tunes and get burning fat instantly! One Body-One You for Life Dr. Theresa Dobson My Body’s GPS - www.drtheresadobson. com I’m here as your Holistic Lifestyle Doctor. Diabetes and fat burning specialist as well as spinal and joint health practitioner and a public presenter . Join my blogs for “30 Second WOW tips” on having a vital fat burning body.

Super Latitude Dry Bags The most feature packed dry bag available in New Zealand Opens along the length of the bag - no more losing things in the bottom of the bag. Constructed of light weight urethane coated diamond RIP-STOP - flexible, strong and allows easy sliding into hatches. Hands free AUTOPURGE valve - compress the air out and the bag will stay compressed, allowing the bag to more easily fit tight spaces. Phone your closest kayak retailer or for further information email Great Stuff Ltd Distributed by Great Stuff Ltd. www.greatstuffltd.co.nz or email greatstuffltd@xtra.co.nz

PAGE 34

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

SeattleAD-Nov13

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Crossword

Quick Crossword Test your knowledge of kayaking and kayaking safety.

4 4

7. 12. 13.

18.

5

6 6

99

88 10 10

11 11 12 12

14 14

15 15

A supportive stroke characterized by a side to side movement of the paddle using quick changes of power face angles. An outgoing current created by a falling tide. 22 This is what landlubbers call a rope. A section of passable water between 24 islands, reefs, shoals, and other obstructions. A paddle stroke used to move the 28 kayak sideways. To move at an angle to the wind or waves. This helps to maintain speed and 31 minimizes the chances of the bow or stern getting pushed below the surface in 32 rough water. Using a reverse stroke to paddle backward or slow the forward motion of a kayak. Riding a steep wave front; to be avoided by beginner kayakers. To get pushed off course so that the kayak is unfavourably oriented broadside to waves, currents, or an obstacle. The face of a paddle blade that pushes against the water. A calm area behind an object that blocks the wind. Exiting a capsized kayak when rolling is not an option. A sharp turn executed while remaining in one place on the water. Typically a visible boundary that separates the opposing currents on a river. Great for families with children. Adventure racing teams prefer them as they are the fastest of all sea kayaks. The summit of a wave, opposite of the trough. Paddle blades oriented at different angles to minimize drag created by head winds.

13 13

16 16

17 17

18 18

19 19

21 21

20 20

23 23

22

24

14.

33

5

7 7

Across 4.

2 2

1 1

26 26

25 25

27 27

28

29 29 30 30

31

33 33

32

19.

EclipseCrossword.com

20. 22. 24. 26. 27. 28. 29. 31. 32. 33.

Down 1. 2. 3. 5. 6.

8. 9. 10.

11. 15. 16. 17. 19.

20.

The direction from which the wind blows. Measurement of speed equal to 1.852 kilometres per hour. A company that supplies kayaking equipment. The opening in the kayak deck in which the paddler sits. To move a kayak across a moving body of water by angling the bow into the current so as to minimize drifting down current.

21. 23.

25.

30.

A stroke used to provide support and keep the kayak stable. A wave that remains stationary, often found in “tide rips�. A navigational method popular in sea kayaking. Determining position by taking into account such factors as currents, wind speed, and your projected course and speed. An incoming current created by a rising tide. Toward the rear, or stern, of a kayak. A brief period of stillness (or slower currents) that occurs when at the transition from ebb to flood or back again. The direction in which a kayak is pointing at a given moment. A partition inside the kayak that creates a separate watertight compartment for gear stowage and safety buoyancy. A shallow area in a body of water, often formed by a sandbar or reef. Waves that overtake a kayak from astern. To look for visual clues that reveal current nuances, eddies, and other factors that increase efficiency and/or decrease risks while kayaking. A pedal-like foot rest that provides leverage for an efficient paddle stroke, improves stability in rough seas, and in many cases controls the rudder for steering. A map for marine navigation.

KASK FORUM - ANAKIWA 4th - 7th April 2014 Please note a change in date previously advertised (27 - 31 March) Held at Outward Bound, Queen Charlotte Sound near Picton. This is a great opportunity for Sea Kayakers of all levels to participate with others at this great location, with guest speakers, training and paddling opportunities. w wAnakiwa w . k a2014 y a kv2.indd n z . c1o . n z

For more information see www.kask.org.nz and go to the events page or contact Tim or Shawn at kaskforum@live.com

Is s u e 71

S u m m e r 2 0 1 3 / 122/11/2013 4 P2:24:13 A G Ep.m. 35


First Aid

Dehydration And Playing In The Outdoors…

By Susan Lott. First Training Facilitator and AUT paramedic student.

Dehydration is often considered a mild state of thirst following exercise or exposure to a hot environment, remedied by simply drinking fresh water. In medical terms, dehydration is the state of excessive loss of body fluid and in extreme cases can be a life-threatening condition, so it is important to monitor fluid intake before, during and after prolonged exercise (or illness), to avoid a serious outcome. Around 90% of the body fluid is water, and the body water content to weight ratio is on average around 60%, dependent on age and body fat. An average 70 kg person has around 42 litres of water in their body. The very young have a high water ratio and the elderly generally have a decreased ratio. People with higher than average body fat to skeletal muscle ratio have a lower total body water content. Water is essential for normal functioning of all body systems, including energy production, transport of gases (oxygen and carbon-dioxide), transport of nutrients, digestion, and waste elimination. Generally, the body systems are able to regulate fluid balance by increasing water reabsorption or reducing urine output to compensate for excess loss of water. Our daily fluid intake from food and water is supplemented by water produced by body metabolic processes, and usually equals our fluid output, so maintaining normal levels. In prolonged or intense exercise over an extended period, the fluid loss may be unable to be compensated for by the body. Dehydration results from excessive sweating and increased vapour loss through a rapid respiration rate. In hot climates, this may be exacerbated with heat exhaustion. It is also important to be aware that gastrointestinal disorders (vomiting and diarrhoea) may cause severe dehydration, so if someone on a trip succumbs to a tummy bug, rehydration is critical. Interestingly, dehydration can also occur as a result of exercise in cold climates, due to a decreased thirst trigger and reduced hydration. You probably remember sweating under layers of clothing as you paddle in a cold environment. Remember to drink! Water that is, not wine! Dehydration usually involves not just water loss but also loss of essential electrolytes, especially sodium, and also potassium and magnesium. Dehydration with electrolyte depletion may contribute to muscle cramps. In extreme cases of excessive fluid loss remedied by drinking just plain water, the concentration of salts in the body fluids is lowered, a condition called hyponatremia (low sodium). It is important to rehydrate with an electrolyte solution to restore balances in the body. Common signs of mild dehydration: •

Headaches

fatigue

More severe symptoms are: •

confusion

nausea

vomiting

PAGE 36

and in worse cases: •

vision problems

convulsions

Tests for dehydration include pinching a fold of skin to see if it quickly returns to normal formation, and testing capillary refill at a nail-bed (this should be less than two seconds). All in all, dehydration is not a pretty picture, so when embarking on an adventure or even a small excursion, remember to hydrate before you go, as well as regularly en route. Do not wait until you feel thirsty! Use of sunhats and sun-protective, breathable clothing will reduce skin exposure to heat. Monitor hydration of children and older members who may not have the same thirst triggers and may need reminding to drink water. If any symptoms of dehydration are evident, remedy with water intake, rest, shade and electrolyte replacement. As always, be prepared and be aware of environmental conditions on the day, degree of energy being expended, and any particular medical conditions of group members.

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

www.kayaknz.co.nz


Bush Craft

Light My Fire Andy Blake continues with preparing a great camp fire. Last magazine issue, we discussed the collection of dry fire lighting material, now we will continue with our fascination and pursuit of a great fire. Where and how to light your fire Find an area which is sheltered from the wind or rain to give the match or lighter (or whatever you use) the maximum chance of quickly lighting the tinder. Out in the open your fire may be fanned by the wind to make it roar but it will also make the fire burn down more quickly. If the ground is wet or frozen then build your fire on a platform of rocks, bark or wood to reduce the chances of moisture being drawn upwards. It is a good idea to lay sticks on the ground in the same direction of any wind; this will allow the wind to force air up into the fire. Build your fire close to your shelter so the heat can be radiated into it but do watch out for sparks from the fire igniting your shelter. Always look above your intended fireplace and ensure there is no overhanging trees that may catch alight. No forest fires please. Position your fire close to a good supply of firewood. Lugging loads of firewood loses its appeal rather quickly. When you do come to light your tinder, light it at the bottom of the pile and do so in multiple places to supercharge your fire. Remember that the flame and the heat will rise, so ensure it is working for you by igniting and drying other sticks above. Designs Tee pee fire - The most common type of fire is the tee pee fire. Pyramidal in shape, the fine fluffy tinder is on the bottom with small twigs arranged like an Indian tee pee of ascending thickness. Larger sticks should be kept on hand to carefully place on the tee pee when the fire gets going. This fire produces a lot of light although its heat dissipates in all directions. Modification enables the heat to reflect towards you by banking up solid logs or rocks on the far side. Due to its shape, it is easy to cook with from all sides although

this fire can sometimes topple over if there is too much firewood added. Star or Indian fire This design is simply made by scooping out a shallow depression in the ground then placing a small tee pee style fire in the centre. Arrange larger sticks like the spokes of a wagon wheel so they lay along the surface of the ground and extend into the fire. Light the tee pee fire and as the “wagon-wheel” sticks catch alight, keep on pushing them into the fire as they burn down. This is a fire which is ideal in calm conditions, produces average light and heat, doesn’t burn out of control or ‘fall over’, and is good as a cooking fire. Dakota fire pit - This is not a well-known fire but is probably my favourite. It is made by digging two small holes in the ground each about the size of a rugby ball. These holes are about 150 mm apart and are connected by digging a tunnel between the two holes. The fire is lit in one hole and the air is dragged in from the other. This is an efficient fire which produces an easily controlled heat with very little CO gas and very little smoke. It is a well-known tactical fire which is used by the military as it produces very little light and is ideal in windy and wet conditions. It is also easily used as a cooking fire with very little chance of it getting out of control – fantastic for toasting marshmallows. It is possible to place a couple of flat stones above the fire to prevent sparks from setting your shelter alight.


Bush Craft Different methods of ignition

Matches – Coat the heads of some ordinary safety matches with molten wax and then lay them on a piece of aluminium foil to set. Glue a piece of the striker from the original matchbox and place this on the underside of the lid in a waterproof film container. Place the matches head end down at the bottom of the canister to prevent ruining all the matches in case you reach into the canister with slightly wet fingers as well as avoiding accidental ignition. Run a piece of tape around the lid just to ensure it has a waterproof seal. Pack as many as you can fit inside without making it physically impossible to remove just one match. Peel off the majority of the wax covering with your nail before striking. POW’s in the Second World War could take a razor blade and divide a match into 6 thin slithers and get fires going with just one – could you? There is a right way and a wrong way to strike a match. Hold the box vertically in one hand, avoiding touching the striker. Hold the match in your other hand so it is well supported along its length to avoid breaking it into two as you strike the striker, i.e. don’t just hold the match

at its end with two fingers. With the match at an angle of about 45°, downward strike the striker. As the match ignites, keep the match at this angle so the flame travels upwards along its length towards your fingers – light your tinder, candle or piece of rubber tubing; the match should burn for about 20 seconds. Try this sometime – give some friends one match and one striker and get them to light a fire, you may be very disappointed with their success rate. Lighter – There are a few pros and cons with disposable lighters. The good points are they are cheap, very reliable and anyone can use them. The average disposable lighter is apparently good for about 3000 cigarette lights depending on how long you depress the button for and how much fuel is left. The flint wheel can also be used to ignite very fine tinder even after you run out of fuel. They are quick to get a fire going thus saving valuable survival time. Some disadvantages are that they are only good if the flint wheel stays dry, so store it in a waterproof container or bag. They also have a finite life, so replace well before they run out of fuel otherwise the flint wheel refuses to work. If you are using matches or a lighter, a candle or a small square of rubber inner tubing can be lit from this match to give you even longer time to light your tinder.

Sale Tahe Kayaks $500 to $1000 off most models

Your chance to own a carbon composite European performance sea kayak at a price unlikely to be repeated. Available only on present stock, limited numbers, limited colours Phone your closest kayak retailer or for further info email Great Stuff Ltd

www.tahemarine.com

Yes, there are numerous fire starting methods – friction, chemicals that can cause spontaneous combustion, magnification of the sun’s rays, utilising electricity and even firearms can be used to make fire - but these are all too much trouble for the average ‘Joe Blogs’. My top three are matches, lighters and fire steel. Due to my paranoia, I will usually have more than just one of these fire starters – never put too many eggs in one basket.

Distributed by Great Stuff Ltd. www.greatstuffltd.co.nz or email greatstuffltd@xtra.co.nz

TAHEAD-Nov13


Swedish Fire steel – These were originally made for the Swedish Military and are surprisingly easy to use. By drawing the steel down the fire steel shaft, 3000°C sparks can be created; great for starting gas cookers, stoves, BBQs and for lighting fires. The scout model lasts 3000 strikes while the Army model should last about 12000 strikes. Inexpensive, easy to use, works when wet, unaffected by altitude and dependability has already made it a favourite amongst outdoor enthusiasts. Their only limitation is that salt water will corrode them so keep in a waterproof dry bag – available from your local specialty kayak shop.

Photos on previous page: Top - Waxing a match head. Bottom - Correct striking of a match. This page: Above: Burning an innertube to prolong the ignition flame. Below - A swedish fire steel in action.


New Product Due for release December 2013 From $2299 Features you’ll enjoy: •

The Profish Reload combines the very best features of the Profish 400 lite and the Profish 440. Add the innovative new features and it provides the kayak angler with the finest fishing kayak available. *Fast, stable, and easy to manage on and off the water, this is the kayak of choice for anglers seeking touring endurance combined with the stability to land record class fish! *The Reload Tackle Pod™ system offers a worldwide first: a fully integrated and removable sounder, battery, and transducer setup combined with a large tackle storage space. It’s now quick and easy to remove or reload your valuable sounder, transducer, and tackle - the ultimate in convenience. *With the Tackle Pod™ removed for transporting the Profish Reload is much lighter and easier to load onto your roof rack.

PAGE 40

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

The fastest fishing kayak in Vikings fleet making trolling lures easy and exploring those far off uncharted grounds an exciting adventure • Superior stability provides you with the confidence to target big fish • The Reload Tackle Pod™ system offers the ease and speed of ‘Load and Go’ • A Large front hatch offers storage for additional gear such as kayak trolleys and dry bags • The nifty Kid Pod™ system enables you to share the fun and excitement of kayak fishing with your kids. It also provides a flat, stable surface for fresh water anglers to stand and sight cast to unsuspecting fish • Scalloped sides for improved paddle strokes • The handy bait wells behind the seat can also be used as a convenient place for drink bottles • Large recessed side handles make lifting and loading the Reload so much easier • The nicely flared bow diverts water in choppy conditions • The innovative ‘Rod Slots’ along the bow allow you to securely lay down your fishing rods - ideal when coming and going through surf. Specifications: Length – 4.5 m Width – 74 cm Weight – 29 kg

www.kayaknz.co.nz


o

t e b i r c s Sub &

to your d e r e v i l de

door

4 issues for $25, saving $5.00 off the news-stand price, delivered free in NZ. Overseas subscription $NZ40 including postage.

have it

Send form to: New Zealand Kayak Magazine. PO Box 35123, Browns Bay, Auckland, 0753. Or phone 0508 529 2569 Or email: info@canoeandkayak.co.nz Or buy on-line at canoeandkayak.co.nz/subscribe

Payment Details Visa/ Mastercard Name on Card:

Cheque (payable to Canoe & Kayak.)

Signature:

Expiry date:

Card No:

Verification Code:

Yes - I’d like to subscribe to New Zealand Kayak Magazine at the addres below. Gift Subscription - Please send New Zealand Kayak Magazine as a gift to the person below.

OR:

First Name: Surname: Email: Address: Post Code: Phone:

Crossword Solution From page 35

Sudoku Solution

1

4

I

From page 33

1 9 3 5 8 4 7 2 6

2

W 5

S C U L L I O

N

5 8 6 9 7 2 1 3 4 4 6 7 2 5 3 8 9 1

3 5 9 8 6 1 7 4 2

8 6 1 3 4 7 9 5 2

7 2 9 6 1 5 3 4 8

5 3 4 2 9 8 1 7 6

C

W

K

15

O

T

F L I

L

T

A

F

R

I

R

I N

D

C

G

B A C K P A D D L E

K

W

I

O

A

N G

N

V

R

I

E

E

N

L E E

A

G

O

D

U

W

L

20

21

S U R F I H

O

H

O

L

P O W E R F A C E

A

O

A

L

O

D

25

H

E

L N G

27

V O T 29

E D D Y L I

W E T E X I

T

I

H 30

C

W

S

H

A

E

A

T

F E A T H E R

E

T

R

P L E K A Y A K C

W A V E C R E S T

E

N E G

32

23

G

26

R T R I

A

C H A N N E L

19

B

T

E

E

K

31

A

S

D

13

G 17

A

T

9 10

D

E

Q U A R T E R I

B R O A C H

P I

R

Y

18

22

28

8

E B B

R

K

R

F

D

D

C

24

7

T

16

D R A W S T R O K E F

6

T

N E

O

I

R 14

U

11 12

O

N G T

P

A

4 2 7 6 1 3 9 8 5

2 1 8 4 7 9 6 3 5

D

3

K

33

EclipseCrossword.com

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

PAGE 41


/2012

Trip Card # 003 Lake Matahina

New Zealand Topographic Map - topomap.co.nz

opomap.co.nz Images Sour ced fr om LINZ Topogr aphic Maps. Cr own Copyr ight Reser ved.

Lake Matahina Route card No. 003 Skill level: Beginner/Intermediate Distance: 18 Km Start/ finish point: At the boat ramp at the dam on the lake Comms coverage: Communication coverage is poor

Introduction: Lake Matahina? Where’s that I hear you say? It’s somewhere quite special with unexpected features that make it one of the most interesting man-made lakes in New Zealand. If you want stunning cliffs and rock formations, overhanging waterfalls, hidden waterfalls, forests and bush then Lake Matahina is for you.

topomap.co.nz/Print?sw=16236,6309&ne=16242,6313&z=14&t=99&s=A 4&o=Portrait

Description: Lake Matahina is roughly between Rotorua and Whakatane, on Galatea Road from Te Teko heading towards Murapara from State Highway 30. As you head up the road you’ll see the dam. Pull off to the left at the bend of the road on the dam, onto the gravel parking area with toilet. From here there is a shingle beach perfect as a launching site. Once on the water paddle along the left hand side, hugging the shoreline. Travel up the lake away from the dam, in a southerly directly. Across the other side of the lake you’ll see a waterfall cascading over the cliffs. You’ll pay that a visit on the way back. As you head up the lake you’ll discover a large island in the middle. If the lake level is high enough you can go to the left of it through a narrow channel, otherwise head round it to the right. Continue heading up the lake for another few km’s and you’ll hear a waterfall to your left. You won’t see it but you will hear it. Pull up your kayak on the bank by the outlet stream from the waterfall (the right of the stream has more solid ground). You should see a small, rough track that’s a bit overgrown heading

Map no: BE39

in to the bush towards the sound of the waterfall. About 80 metres in to the bush, you’ll come across a stunning, stepped waterfall that glimmers in the sunlight. Stop here on on the shore for lunch before heading back down the lake. This time hug the left shoreline, shortening the return journey by cutting through the narrow channel to the right of the island. After the island head down the left shoreline, along the columned rocky cliffs until you reach the overhanging waterfall. You can paddle right underneath it to have a shower if you want to cool off before heading back to the car on the other side of the lake. Hazards: • Jet Boat runs up and down the lake • The dam if it’s releasing water - steer clear A siren sounds as a warning. • Some individuals are keen to syphen diesel from vehicles here - so take precautions and take spare fuel if necessary. Report any suspicious activities to the police. Parking Toilets

Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: November 2013


Trip Card # 005 Whangamata (Otahu River)

N ew Zealand Topographic M ap - topomap.co.nz

ced fr om LINZ Topogr aphic Maps. Cr own Copyr ight Reser ved.

Whangamata (Otahu River) Route card No. 005 Skill level: Beginner Distance: 10 - 12 Km

389,12726&ne=32394,12729&z=15&t=119&s=A 4&o=P ortrait

Start/ finish point: Coastguard: Comms coverage:

Map no: BB36

Pohutakawa Crescent on Southern end of Whangamata Channel 84 (16 for emergencies) Communication coverage is intermitent with VHF & phone

Introduction: Whangamata is one of those sleepy places that has a myriad of kayaking opportunities no matter what your ability. The town is in an excellent location, bounded by quiet estuaries, a Pacific Ocean surf beach and bush covered hills. Bush and beach exist side by side here so marine and landbased recreational opportunities are legendary. Discovering the Otahu River is just one of them: it’s a great place to start and ideal for all, including families wanting a generally sheltered, flat water, scenic paddle.

have accessible provisions for a drink/snack on the water if necessary. On return, ensure you exit the river before the estuary mouth as here the tidal flow is stronger and more turbulent as the river meets the sea. Hazards: • Other watercraft • Tidal currents, especially at the river mouth. • Muddy banks

Description: Drive to the southern end of Whangamata to Pohutakawa Crescent where there is parking & toilets. From here you can view out to the ocean and the mouth of the Otahu River. Carry your kayaks across the dunes to the sandy beach on the river side of the small estuary. From here it is a gentle launch on to the river. Intial cliffs and bush clad shores give way to flax lined banks. Head as far up the river as you wish although the further you head upstream the narrower it gets and the more flow there is. The river winds its way up towards the hills and alongside the highway.Once you feel you’ve seen enough turn round and head back downstream, ideally using an outgoing tide to aid you. There are a few areas you can stop for lunch but the banks further upstream can be very muddy and steep when the tide goes out so ensure you Please note; Every care has been taken to ensure the information contained in this Trip Card is correct at the time of publication, but things change and you will need to confirm the information provided. You will also need to get further information to ensure a safe trip, this will include an up to date, relevant weather forecast and the ability to understand its implications for the area and talking to locals in the area to garner new information on any hazards in the area. It is also expected that an appropriate level of knowledge, skills and equipment are required to safely complete the trip. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you are unsure of any information or you find the Trip Card needs updating. Cheers Peter Townend,Yakity Yak Kayak Club. Updated: November 2013


Products

Summer Gift Ideas

Grit-it Anchor Winder$25.00

Condor 345c DF Fish Finder - $615.00 Insulated Tank Bags From $139.00

Profish Chill Pod™$369.00

Mc Murdo Personal Locator Beacon (PLB) - $599.00

Anchor Kit From $109.99

Profish Tackle Pod™ - $299.00 Ocean Kayak Ice Box $299.00

Condor 242 DCPF Portable Fish Finder - $295.00 Mission Thigh Braces - $69.00

Great Stuff Trolley - $129.00 Canoe & Kayak Light Weight Stainless Steel Trolley - $203.00

Latitude Stuff Sacks 10 Litre - $59.90 21 Litre - $73.90 51 Litre - $87.90

Micro 1.5 L Dry Bag $45.90

C-Tug Trolley $179.95

Omni Dry Bags 10 Litre - $31.95 21 Litre - $34.95 41 Litre - $44.95

Cobra Budget $79.99 Kudo Delux Seat - $109.90

Omni Dry Pack 140 Litre - $99.90

VHF Case - $49.95

Phone Case - $49.95 PAGE 44

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

1 L Dry Bag - $14.99 www.kayaknz.co.nz


Shop online at canoeandkayak.co.nz Starport Rod Holder Kit $54.90

Starport Navlight 360 White $94.55

Starport Rotating Platform - $25.40

Starport Camera Boom 600 $94.95

Starport Mobi - $49.95

Starport Sockets -$35.10

Starport Adjustable Platform Kits - $43.60 Starport Track Port Dash 350 - $90.30

Starport Flag Whip - $37.50

Starport Wall Sling- $74.85 Starport Sideport -$17.55

Starport Telepole 1000 $49.95

Predator Half Cut - $132.00 Predator Full Cut - $132.00

Predator Lee $189.00

Chaos Helmet$119.90 Tie downs 5 metre - $49.90

Deck Compass Seattle - $79.90 Paddle Float Seattle - $86.90

Great Stuff Paddle Leash - $26.90 Seattle Paddle Leash $35.90

Great Stuff Safety Flag - $59.90

Compact Throwbag 20 m - Hf - $99.95

Safety Light Teklite - $49.99 Kudo Rod Holder $37.90 Ocean Pro 10 m Towline Palm - $128.00

Bilge Pump Seattle - $49.90

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Deck Bag Seattle - $119.90 Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

PAGE 45


Kayaks

Recreational Price

4.50

620

26

$1699

Greenland T Wind Solo Reval Wind 585 Sea Spirit Reval Mini

5.45 5.05 5.50 5.85 5.20 5.20

530 540 540 540 560 540

23-24 23-25 24-26 25-27 26-28 24-26

$3495 $3195 $3495 $3495 $3290 $4150

Kiwi Kiwi Excel Kiwi Lite Skua Skua Lite Shearwater Shearwater Lite Tasman Express Tasman Express Lite Tasman Express Elite Foveaux Express Southern Skua

3.75 3.75 3.75 5.20 5.20 480 480 5.30 5.30 5.30 5.00 5.40

740 740 740 600 600 610 610 620 620 600 600 600

20 23 18 27 24 26.5 23 29 25 22 19 22

$1365 $1660 $1970 $2890 $3140 $2650 $2900 $2890 $3140 $4590 $4460 $4590

Contour 450 Contour 480 Eco Bezhig

4.50 4.80 5.40

620 620 590

26 27 27

$2499 $2779 $2999

Manitou 13 Looksha 14 Eskia

3.90 4.30 4.90

630 625 635

20.5 26 27

$1299 $2199 $2499

Kekeno SeaBear Waitoa SeaBear Waitoa Kevlar BreakSea BreakSea Kevlar

4.00 5.50 5.50 5.20 5.20

630 600 600 540 540

21.5 26 24 22.5 21

$3595 $4545 $5195 $4495 $4995

4.90

600

17

$3100

Barracuda Beachcomber

Sea Kayaks Double Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Q-Kayaks

Southern Endeavour

5.60

800

46

$3540

Mission

Contour 490 Eco Niizh

4.90 5.65

800 770

35 45

$3499 $4569

5.40

725

41.3

$3499

5.90

850

40

$5995

28

$4300

Necky Amaruk Paddling SeaBear II Packhorse Perfection Barracuda Beachcomber Duo

5.80 700

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Sprite 1

3.00

700

19

$850

Sprite 2

4.50

820

32

$1410

Access 280

2.80

730

18

$989

Access 400

4.00

840

32

$1399

Manitou 13

3.90

630

20.5

$1299

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Price

Riot

Weight (kg)

Astro 58 Magnum 72 Magnum 80 Thunder 65 Thunder 76

1.93 2.41 2.54 2.34 2.44

650 660 254 650 660

15.5 18 67 18.5 29.5

$1725 $1595 $1595 $1895 $1895

Remix 59 Remix 69 Remix 79 Freeride 57 Freeride 67 Stomper 80 Stomper 90

2.57 2.64 2.72 1.98 2.06 2.49 2.57

640 650 670 650 660 650 680

19 20 21 14.5 15 21 22

$2099 $2099 $2099 $2099 $2099 $2099 $2099

Length (m)

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Twist 1

2.60

790

6

$1095

Twist 2

3.60

830

9

$1395

Helios 1

3.10

710

13.5

$1595

Helios 2

3.80

750

17

$1895

Sunny

3.80

800

16

$1895

Tasman K40

4.40

670

15

$3036

Pacific K50

5.35

670

20

$3680

Q- Kayaks

Mission

Ocean Kayak

Starting Price

White Water

Inflatables

Gumotex

Matariki

Width (mm)

Incept

Paddling Perfection

Necky Mission

Q-Kayaks

Tahe

Canoe & Kayak

Length (m)

Liquid Logic

Sea Kayaks Single


Fishing Singles

Sit-on-Top Single Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Fire Fly

2.40

700

16

$535

Escapee

3.30

740

23

$775

Escapade

3.50

750

27

$975

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

3.50

750

32

$875 $1599

Marauder

4.30

780

28

Fish n’ Dive

3.80

915

28

$899

Tourer

4.60

710

23

$1699

Prowler 13 inc seat

4.10

710

28

$1399

Tetra 12 Angler inc seat

3.70

710

24.5

$1499

Prowler Ultra 4.1 inc comfort seat

4.10

710

28.5

$1699

Prowler Ultra 4.3 inc zone seat

4.30

740

32.5

$1999

Prowler Elite 4.5 inc comfort seat

4.50

710

31

$1599

710

18

$499

790

17

$649

Explorer

3.40

790

18.20

$749

Navigator

3.80

790

22

$799

Squirt

2.70

760

17

$499

Flow

2.95

750

19

$899

Glide 390 inc rudder

3.90

850

28

$1199

Xstream 420

4.20

730

28

$1299

Frenzy

2.75

790

19.5

$699

Mysto inc seat

2.95

790

21

$799

Prowler Ultra 4.7 inc zone seat

4.70

740

35

$2249

Venus 11 inc seat

3.30

725

21

$999

Torque

4.20

735

32.2

$3499

Line 280

2.80

730

18

$1229

Scrambler 11 inc seat

3.60

750

23

$999

Catch 290

2.95

750

19

$999

Tetra 12 inc seat

3.70

710

24

$1299

Catch 390 inc rudder

3.90

850

28

$1599

Pacer XS

2.7

780

16

$599

Line 400

4.0

840

32

$1599

Ozzie

2.7

790

17

$699

Catch 420 (inc rudder)

4.20

730

28

$1999

Nemo

3.2

790

20

$799

Espri Angler

3.6

800

22

$1149

Espri

3.4

790

18.2

$999

Profish 400

4.1

780

24

$1699

4.20

680

18

$2800

Profish 440

4.4

770

29

$1999

Profish 400 Diamond

4.1

780

25

$2999

Profish Reload

4.5

740

29

$2299

SoT Fish Pro

4.20

680

18

$3500

Width (mm)

Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Viking Kayaks

Mission

Ocean Kayak

3.10 3.20

Barracuda Weight (kg)

Starting Price

Escapade II

3.50

750

26

$900

Tandem

3.80

799

26

$799

Long Reach

4.40

910

36

$999

Surge

3.90

850

28

$1099

Malibu 2

3.65

870

27

$999

Malibu 2 XL inc 2 x seats

4.10

86

33

$1449

Cabo

4.97

76.5

33

$1699

Viking 2 + 1

3.9

810

27

$1299

Great Advice Great Brands Great Service

Multisport Length (m) Q- Kayaks

Ruahine

Width (mm)

Ocean Kayak

Length (m)

Mission

Viking Kayaks

Width (mm)

Play

Sit-on-Top Double

Cobra

Escapade F

Length (m)

Escape

Barracuda SoT Tourer

Q- Kayaks

Q- Kayaks

Cobra

Width (mm)

Paddling Perfection

Viking Kayaks

Ocean Kayak

Mission

Cobra

Q-Kayaks

Length (m)

Hurricane (kevlar)

5.90

490

12

$3170

Maximus (kevlar)

6.40

510

16

$3890

Intrigue (kevlar)

4.95

540

12

$2900

Swallow (kevlar)

5.40

480

12

$3000

Firebolt (kevlar)

5.90

450

12.5

$3250

Rebel (kevlar)

5.65

450

11

$3200

Gladiator (kevlar)

5.90

530

13.5

$320 0

F1 (kevlar)

6.20

350

13.5

$3350

Ocean X (kevlar)

6.40

500

16.5

$3750

Duet (kevlar)

7.00

550

26

$5760

Excalibur (kevlar)

5.70

550

15

$2945

Saracen

5.2

520

13

$3150

Saracen X

6.0

600

15

$3195


South Stanislaus California

By Josh Neilson

In true Californian adventure style we set off with a rough plan for a possible overnighter, with a dicey flow report, a potential storm coming in and a run that no one knew but a crew of character’s fit for such a challenge. The only beta I had for this run was that the other crew that had run it hiked in from above on river right. We however, were going to paddle across the lake at the bottom and hike up on river left. It seemed plausible when described by the group leader, who had used all the key tactics to gather a crew to run a river like this. As we paddled across the lake, a young guy working on the sail boat rental jetty was frantically yelling… “Are y’all fixin to paddle up there in the gorge?” To avoid getting stopped we politely replied with some kiwi slang to confuse them “Yeah, yeah, nah, yeah it’s all good bro, Sweet” With a confused look on his face he called out “All I know is if you don’t have a Red Bull helmet and a helicopter then you got no place being up there.” With a little chuckle we smiled, waved and kept paddling. After a short paddle we started hiking on a basic trail, but within minutes we were lost. About an hour later we regrouped at the base of a huge cascading waterfall and rock pile called Cleopatra’s Bath. From here the trail would get steep and a lot harder to follow. In the hope of making it to the put in we kept our hiking pace up but we were cliffed out in a few places, requiring the boats to be roped to the top. Finally we dropped our kayaks at the top of Cleo’s bath and after a quick scout decided that we would continue in the morning. With the rain coming in and the lack of good shelter we back tracked a few hundred metres to a cave we had found on the way up. A perfect spot to see out the storm and get a good night sleep. Day two started with some coffee and breakfast before getting back on the trail. A few kilometres up the river we came to another huge unrunnable waterfall, so we put in here and ran what we could back to the lake.

After a good scout we realised that to run any of the top drops you had to run them all. The first was a slide into a navigable bolder sieve. From there you had about 20 metres, then it was a shallow ski jump rock that dropped four metres onto a shallow ledge and then exiting down a big fast slide. With all these lines cemented in my brain I decided I wanted to give it a go. My only challenge was to not get hung up on the shallow lip of the ski jump and go over the handlebars onto my head on the shallow ledge. The entry went well and I started to get speed up to hit the ski jump. It was all over pretty quickly, but I managed to keep my speed and came out the bottom of the big slide feeling fired up for more. The rest of the crew put in here and we carried on to the next rapid. This was another puzzle piece that would take some scouting. The line was hard left all the way on the first drop then centre down a tight slide. We all had sweet lines here and it was all coming together to be a great new run. From here we had a few small drops which led into the last drop above the must portage on Cleo’s Bath. Double drop was the one rapid we had seen the night before and although it looked nice and easy then, we now had the reality of being in kayaking gear and having to run it. An easy slide into a boat width three metre drop into another three metre boof with some nice caves to keep you honest. One after another we got to the bottom and found it so much fun we had a few extra runs at it. We knew we could make it back easily, so we had left our over night gear in the cave to be picked up on the way past. An hour later we had portaged down to river level and had some lunch while everyone arrived at the riverside. Because we had followed the trail up this part, we had no idea what to expect in the bottom section. Things were nice and calm with a few tough ones to keep us on our toes. At the footbridge 100 metres from the lake we saw some trampers and they waved us in. Not a good decision.

Tired after all that walking, we were happy to rest our legs and get the boats moving downstream. There was not much of a warm up before a nice little drop marked the start of the crux.

ASTRAL GREENJACKET

Distributor of:

www.performance paddling.co.nz


The first of our crew dropped in and found it was a bit trickier than expected. The rest either scouted from here or portaged round to avoid the undercut wall at the bottom. All relatively unscathed, we regrouped and headed out to the lake. It was a nice paddle back across to the cars to finish the few days out in the wilderness. Sadly, our friendly boat hire guy was not around to see we had made it out without the helicopter and energy drinks. We did however joke that we possibly deserved one now that we had accomplished such an adventure, but settled for an ice cream at the campground instead. Another successful run in the Californian sun completed and time for the mission to head further north to Norway for Extreme Sports Week. Cheers to all for a good mission! Josh


Josh, Nick & Jamie on Double drop Photo by Ryan Mac

Photo by Tyler Fox PAGE 50

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

www.kayaknz.co.nz


We can ямБt a rack to almost anything!

Ski Racks Hitch Mount Carriers Third Bar Options Roof Boxes

Bike Racks Boat Loaders Professional Racks & Accessories

0508 529 256

roofrackcentre.co.nz

BAY OF PLENTY [ TAUPO [ WELLINGTON [ TARANAKI [ MANUKAU [ WAIKATO [ AUCKLAND [ NORTH SHORE


Canoe & Kayak Auckland

Canoe & Kayak Bay of Plenty

Canoe & Kayak North Shore

Canoe & Kayak Taranaki

6/ 631 Devon Road Waiwhakaiho, New Plymouth, 4312 06 769 5506 taranaki@canoeandkayak.co.nz

Unit F 2 Centennial Highway Ngauranga, Wellington, 6035 04 477 6911 wellington@canoeandkayak.co.nz

Canoe & Kayak Manukau

Canoe & Kayak Taupo

Canoe & Kayak Christchurch

502 Sandringham Rd, Sandringham, Auckland 1025 09 815 2073 auckland@canoeandkayak.co.nz 2/20 Constellation Drive Mairangi Bay, Auckland, 0632 09 479 1002 northshore@canoeandkayak.co.nz 605A Great South Road Manukau, 2104 09 262 0209 manukau@canoeandkayak.co.nz

3/5 MacDonald St, Mount Maunganui, Tauranga, 3116 07 574 7415 bop@canoeandkayak.co.nz

54 Spa Road Taupo, 3330 07 378 1003 taupo@canoeandkayak.co.nz

Discover Another World New & existing territories available throughout New Zealand. Call Peter Townend pete@canoeandkayak.co.nz or phone 09 476 7066

PAGE 52

Is s u e 71

Summer 2013/14

Canoe & Kayak Waikato

545 Te Rapa Road Hamilton, 3200 07 850 1002 waikato@canoeandkayak.co.nz

Canoe & Kayak Wellington

(Agency) 03 377 6161 027 376 6161 chch@canoeandkayak.co.nz

canoeandkayak.co.nz roofrackcentre.co.nz yakityyak.co.nz kayaknz.co.nz

www.kayaknz.co.nz

Profile for Canoe & Kayak

Issue 71  

New Zealand Kayak Magazine

Issue 71  

New Zealand Kayak Magazine