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SPRING 2010

ROWHOUSES Northeastern University School of Architecture ARCH 5110 Housing and Aggregation Studio


SPRING 2010

ROWHOUSES Northeastern University School of Architecture ARCH 5110 Housing and Aggregation Studio

EDITOR SAM CHOI STUDENT EDITORS JACKIE MOSSMAN SHAWN BOLANOS


SPRING 2010 ROWHOUSES ARCH 5110 HOUSING AND AGGREGATION STUDIO Northeastern University School of Architecture 360 Huntington Avenue 151 Ryder Hall Boston, MA 02115 617.373.8959 www.architecture.neu.edu Copyright © 2011 School of Architecture Northeastern University Designed by Paste in Place Printed by Lulu The work contained within this publication is drawn from the Spring 2010 Northeastern University School of Architecture ARCH 5110 Housing and Aggrega­ tion Studio. All work was produced by fifth year architecture students, for whom the focus of the semester was infill courtyard housing in metropolitan Boston. STUDIO COORDINATORS Tim Love and Sam Choi FACULTY Sam Choi, Michael Grogan, David Hacin, Alyson Tanguay STUDENTS Alexander Davis, Allison Browne, Ashley Hartshorn, Ashley Hopwood, Assia Belguedj, Benjamin Hochberg, Bryan Allen, Chris Freda, Dan Adams, Dan Artiges, Dan Belknap, Darien Fortier, Dennis Greenwood, Diana Lattari, Erica LeLievre, Julien Jalbert, Lindsey Deschenes, Lucas Carriere, Nicole Fichera, Pamela Andrade, Samuel Clement, Sara Laporte, Tim Loranger, Whitney Chicoine


TABLE OF CONTENTS 1

INTRODUCTION Nicole Fichera

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SPLIT ROWHOUSE Dan Belknap, Julien Jalbert, Pamela Andrade

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SKINNY ROWHOUSE Assia Belguedj, Dan Adams, Darien Fortier, Lucas Carriere, Bryan Allen

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PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE Chris Freda, Dan Artiges, Whitney Chicoine, Tim Loranger

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STACKED DUPLEXES Alexander Davis, Benjamin Hochberg, Sara Laporte

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2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT Ashley Hopwood, Dennis Greenwood, Erica LeLievre, Nicole Fichera, Samuel Clement

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INTERLOCKING ROWHOUSE Allison Browne, Diana Lattari


PUSH-PULL

THREE SKINNY

INTERLOCKING

TWO DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

SPLIT

STACKED DUPLEXES


INTRODUCTION NICOLE FICHERA Northeastern University School of Architecture housing studio focuses on a different type of housing every year, from courtyard housing to high-rise multi-family buildings. When our instructors told us that we’d be designing rowhouses, I was excited. As students in Boston, we know rowhouses: we have all lived in them, walked by them, partied in them, chatted on their stoops and relaxed on their rooftops. Architecture studios so often deal with big buildings and large-scale urban plans—this presented a chance to think on a smaller scale, something tangible and intimate. Design of housing focuses on something we all do every day: live. We all live, and we all want to live well. As students, this was our charge: to reinterpret the rowhouse for modern urban life.

At the onset of the semester, our instructors presented six basic diagrams for our rowhouse prototypes. Based on a parcel size of 20’ x 60’, the diagrams established a basic framework for interior spatial organization and the adjacent parcels in relation to one another. ‘Push/Pull’ required the deformation of the party wall between two parcels, allowing units to expand and contract laterally to create wider spaces. ‘Interlocking’ rowhouses broke down the

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initial parcel division almost completely, allowing interior spaces to

To begin design we first developed a prototype of adjacent

wrap around each other and create complex spatial sequences.

parcels forming a single component. We then aggregated

The ‘Split’ condition mandated a solution with spaces around

components across an alley as four parcels, developing a section

a central courtyard for light and air. The aptly named ‘Skinny’

that cut across a block from street front to street front, with a

rowhouse was formed from three narrowhouses sandwiched

service alley in between. Subsequently we repeated the long

into the width of two parcels.

sections to form an entire block, and invented corner conditions

The two following propositions seemed the most viable in the

for the idealized block created. At one point during the process

context of today’s market in that they pack three or four slightly

we exchanged units between peers, and aggregated both

smaller residences into the designated parcels. ‘Two Duplexes

sectional types together, first at the scale of a single block, then

over Flat’ proposed two vertical units sitting on top of one flat

as a nine-block grid. After designing these permutations in a

unit at street level, and ‘Stacked Duplex’ rowhouses were created

vacuum, we were ultimately asked to deploy our block strategy

by two duplex units stacked on top of each other, for a total of

on an actual site.

four units.

The site assigned was a large swath of underused, fragmented

Each of these organizing concepts presented challenges and

blocks along Melnea Cass Boulevard. As a fringe condition—

opportunities. Some prototypes were ingrained with spatial

surrounded by gentrified South End rowhouse neighborhoods,

richness; others adapted easily to retail and accessibility issues;

industrial mega-blocks, a fast moving multi-lane road, hospital

and many had strict space constraints that required rigorous

campus buildings, and low-income housing—the site was highly

planning and innovative thinking.

variable and required adaptive responses. Our urban strategies had to negotiate this varied context, while maintaining the spatial logic of our original two-parcel prototype. Our idealized block

We began the studio with an in-depth analysis of rowhouse

plans deformed, and spacious units were condensed to integrate

precedents, with examples ranging from the highly conceptual

ground level retail zones.

work of MVRDV in Amsterdam’s Borneo Sporenburg to high-end

Thus the work produced at the precinct scale, block scale, and

rowhouse residences both new and renovated. We looked at

unit scale was endlessly varied.

critical issues of core and stair placement, scale of living spaces,

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development of the entry sequence, and relationships with

Although the process was trying and unusual, this was an

parking and the street.

important project as students learning about housing and


the ways in which cities struggle to move forward within the constraints of the past. In cities such as Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore, rowhouses are commonplace. Multiple generations of people love them. They make neighborhoods feel unified and urban, create a comfortable sense of human scale, and express the individuality of a single home. Historically rowhouses signified progress and momentum forward. In Boston’s Back Bay and South End neighborhoods, rowhouse builders were pioneers on land filled sea. Now antique facades seem solid, placid, full of untold stories from a genteel past. Rowhouses have been so often subdivided and readapted to modern living that their rhythmic, uniform facades hardly reflect their diverse and heterogeneous innards. But these neighborhood relics are not always perfectly preserved and have adapted to accommodate change over time. It is essential to acknowledge that diversity exists within rowhouses. Recognizing the natural evolution of living spaces could—and should—have major implications in the creation of new housing today. As an individual expression in a cohesive urban framework, the rowhouse gives us both a sense of collective and a place to call our own. In a city such as Boston, the reinterpretation of this multi-generational precedent results in the creation of new housing types, ones that are undeniably modern, but also intrinsically rooted in Boston.

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SPLIT ROWHOUSE DAN BELKNAP JULIEN JALBERT PAMELA ANDRADE

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DAN BELKNAP

The split rowhouse typology is a single family unit on a

INSTRUCTOR

single parcel, in which the indroduction of a courtyard defines

DAVID HACIN

the type. The principle organizational strategy involved a

SPLIT LIGHT HOUSE SPLIT ROWHOUSE

SPLIT LIGHT HOUSE tectonically solid base to house service program and garage, a heavily glazed public zone, and volume of private program suspended above. A strict agenda of light was maintained throughout the massing strategy.

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DAN BELKNAP INSTRUCTOR HACIN 8

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan

Fourth Floor Plan

Unit Section

Unit Section


SPLIT LIGHT HOUSE SPLIT ROWHOUSE Front Elevation

Street Elevation

Side Elevation

Side Elevation

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DAN BELKNAP INSTRUCTOR HACIN

Master Plan 10


SPLIT LIGHT HOUSE SPLIT ROWHOUSE

The precinct exists on a crucial point of connection between the transit hubs of Ruggles Station, Dudley Square, and Boston Medical Center. The amount of bus traffic on each road was heavily considered in the positioning of retail and scale of streets scapes.

Urban Transit Lines

Figure/Ground Diagram

Urban Scale Response

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DAN BELKNAP INSTRUCTOR HACIN 12

Interior View

Interior View

Corner Porch View

Natural Light Diagram


SPLIT LIGHT HOUSE SPLIT ROWHOUSE Perspective

Solid block apartment type presents

Split row house type is introduced.

Masses are staggered in section and

Vertical circulation is placed around

problems regarding natural light,

Natural light and ventilation is improved

rear mass is compressed. Light and

courtyard and slab cuts bring light

ventilation and urban scale in a row

for upper stories but courtyard is dark

ventilation is brought further into

further into building and basement.

house neighborhood.

and cold. Facade also remains massive

building and courtyard. Facade is

Visual and acoustic connections are

in scale.

broken and entry porch is articulated.

created sectionally. Typical Block Plan

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DAN BELKNAP INSTRUCTOR HACIN

Perspective

Site Section 14


SPLIT LIGHT HOUSE SPLIT ROWHOUSE Aerial Perspective

Site Section

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JULIEN JALBERT

Upon first designing a siteless rowhouse, this scheme placed

INSTRUCTOR

the public program towards the more active street, and the

ALYSON TANGUAY

private program towards the alley. An outdoor space was

ADAPTABLE LIVING SPLIT ROWHOUSE

ADAPTABLE LIVING placed in between the program, and the circulation was situated around the void created. Once a site was given, the overall parti of the design was modified to accommodate solar orientation, where north-facing units would reorient public program toward the rear. Public alley gardens were also placed adjacent to the north-facing units on the block, which also facilitated the reorientation of public vs. private program.

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JULIEN JALBERT INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY

The design looks to create open (green) spaces at three different scales that work in unison in order to create an engaging urban residential site. First, at the small scale of the unit, courtyards are either shared between units or individualized for the row house, allowing for more privatized exterior space for inhabitants. Second, at the intermediate public scale, contained gardens for each individual block, allows for a sense of community within the block. Lastly the large scale open space for the general public create liveliness within a urban setting.

Existing Urban Conditions and Zones

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Existing Green Space

Figure/Ground Diagram


ADAPTABLE LIVING SPLIT ROWHOUSE Aerial Perspective

Block Section

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JULIEN JALBERT INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY 20

Unit Section 1

Unit Section 2

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan


ADAPTABLE LIVING SPLIT ROWHOUSE Interior Perspective

Third Floor Plan

Interior Perspective

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PAMELA ANDRADE

The primary idea behind this design centered around

INSTRUCTOR

perceiving the cores as objects that one moves around once

SAM CHOI

inside. The cores attach themselves to a circulation bar

CORES AS OBJECTS SPLIT ROWHOUSE

CORES AS OBJECTS and float within three types of spaces: public, private, and courtyard. Material is used to call out the cores so they can be understood as a system within the rowhouse. The rooms therefore read as transparent layers with sufficient glass to emphasize this idea. The facade expresses the circulation bar in wood that then catches the projected bay, meant to read as the volume of the courtyard being pushed out to the street.

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PAMELA ANDRADE INSTRUCTOR CHOI Block Perspective

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Block Section Elevation


CORES AS OBJECTS SPLIT ROWHOUSE Block Perspective

Block Elevation

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At the urban scale, the blocks are designed as extenPAMELA ANDRADE INSTRUCTOR CHOI

sions of the existing fabric. The periphery green spaces function as buffers to heavy vehicular traffic. A central greenspace with plaza extends out to the other two block precincts in the form of green medians and landscaping to unify the entire site.

Figure/Ground Diagram

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Site Analysis


CORES AS OBJECTS SPLIT ROWHOUSE Aerial Perspective

Street Section

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PAMELA ANDRADE INSTRUCTOR CHOI 28

Interior Perspective - Kitchen

Interior Perspective - Bedroom

Building Section

Building Section


CORES AS OBJECTS SPLIT ROWHOUSE

Fourth Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

Programmatic Axon

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SKINNY ROWHOUSE ASSIA BELGUEDJ DAN ADAMS DARIEN FORTIER LUCAS CARRIERE BRYAN ALLEN

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ASSIA BELGUEDJ

The skinny row house type accommodates a single family in

INSTRUCTOR

a typical urban condition of the South End neighborhood in

DAVID HACIN

Boston, Massachusetts. Although a single unit is to function

COURTYARD VARIETY SKINNY ROWHOUSE

COURTYARD VARIETY as a single-family home, the typical unit type was designed around a central courtyard privatizing the discovery and experience of the living spaces towards the interior. Only at two specific living spaces, does the house connect directly with the public: on the roof courtyard and in the main living room space. The organization of the unit around a central courtyard allows for flexibility of unit types, where two units can easily be paired to create a large center courtyard while still maintaining an identity for a single unit type.

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ASSIA BELGUEDJ INSTRUCTOR HACIN 34

Unit Type A

Building Section

Unit Type B

Unit Type C

Building Section

Unit Type D


Second Floor Plan

COURTYARD VARIETY SKINNY ROWHOUSE

First Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan

Fourth Floor Plan

Roof Plan

Sectional Perspective

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Site analysis of the existing urban conditions of the neighborhood in regards to transportation (public and private), land use and distribution of green spaces gave for a particular aggregation strategy across ASSIA BELGUEDJ INSTRUCTOR HACIN

the entire site. The site is divided into three larger blocks containing smaller and more intimate blocks within them. The aggregation within the three blocks is to encourage a sense of community amongst the residents, with placement of public spaces for leisure and recreation across the many smaller blocks.

Site Diagrams

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Figure/Ground Diagram


COURTYARD VARIETY SKINNY ROWHOUSE Aerial Perspective

Block Sectional Perspective 37


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DAN ADAMS

The inspiration for this design came from the phenomena of

INSTRUCTOR

the suburban lifestyle. Freedom of the outdoors and access

MICHAEL GROGAN

to exterior living space lead to the question of how to make

URBAN SUBURB SKINNY ROWHOUSE

URBAN SUBURB this possible in an urban setting. The most logical answer was to utilize space on the roof which typically goes unused. Combining the “Skinny Rowhouse� typology with a centralized stair core and access to the roof resulted in a balanced programmatic distribution of space. The stair simultaneously maintains privacy along the vertical axis for the bedrooms on either side and brings guests to the public space on the top floors.

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The urban aggregation strategy is based upon two main goals—creating density and encouraging urban neighbors. By providing rooftop yards, residents will have the same opportunity to develop relationships DAN ADAMS INSTRUCTOR GORGAN

with neighbors just as residents do in a suburban context. This is made possible by providing a high level of dense aggregation.

The existing bike path remains to be used as a termination point for pedestrian walkways. Two formal green spaces were also added in order to balance density with open green spaces. Site Diagram - Major/Minor Axis

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Site Diagram - Green Space


URBAN SUBURB SKINNY ROWHOUSE Aerial Perspective

Street Elevation

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DAN ADAMS INSTRUCTOR GORGAN Street View Perspective

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Figure/Ground Diagram


Master Bedroom Perspective

Third Floor Plan

URBAN SUBURB SKINNY ROWHOUSE

Fourth Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

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DAN ADAMS INSTRUCTOR GORGAN 44

Zones

Building Section

Bedrooms/Private Space

Core Space

Building Section

Public Space


URBAN SUBURB SKINNY ROWHOUSE Interior Perspective

Interior Perspective - Living Space

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DARIEN FORTIER

The organization of the skinny rowhouse unit aims to address

INSTRUCTOR

the challenges of lighting the center of the unit and creating an

MICHAEL GROGAN

appropriate connection between exterior and interior. Therefore,

BLURRING BOUNDARIES SKINNY ROWHOUSE

BLURRING BOUNDARIES private bedrooms were placed into two boxes, both opening outward to enjoy light and views from either end of the unit. The negative space between the two boxes became the public space. Two unit variations resulted from flipping the orientation of the unit from back to front. One unit type had a 2 story street front while the other had a 3 story street front allowing for a distinction in composition between major and minor streets and streets bordering green spaces. The major streets were composed of the taller units repeated rhythmically with the facade designed in a way to excentuate the skinny quality and height of the unit. Minor streets and those bordering southern green spaces were arranged with an AB pattern that allows light to penetrate deeper into the site.

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DARIEN FORTIER INSTRUCTOR GROGAN

Aerial Perspective

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BLURRING BOUNDARIES SKINNY ROWHOUSE Street Perspective

Street Section

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DARIEN FORTIER INSTRUCTOR GROGAN Unit B Section

Concept Diagram

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Unit A Section


Unit B

Second Floor Plan

BLURRING BOUNDARIES SKINNY ROWHOUSE

Third Floor Plan

First Floor Plan Unit B Axonometric

Unit A Third Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

First Floor Plan Unit A Axonometric

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The overall site strategy was meant to extend the DARIEN FORTIER INSTRUCTOR GROGAN

South End quality into Roxbury and provide a buffer between the residents and the noise from Melnea Cass Ave. Therefore the block strategy of the south was repeated throughout the site, a green belt was enhanced bordering Melnea Cass, and the block oretation of the eastern end of the site was flipped to divert attention away from the large obtrusive existing buildings to the east, and instead create an axis that makes the hospital tower and new park focal points of

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Site Analysis

Figure/Ground Diagram


Site Plan

Street Elevation 53

BLURRING BOUNDARIES SKINNY ROWHOUSE


LUCAS CARRIERE

The Roxbury site, unique in both its typology and

INSTRUCTOR

socioeconomic class became an area of architectural and

ALYSON TANGUAY

cultural resolution in this proposed site planning strategy. The

MIXED INCOME SKINNY ROWHOUSE

MIXED INCOME presence of lower income/authority housing was addressed both at the level of the site plan and at the scale of the single unit. A varying number of units across the site, a mixture of “moderate” and “luxury”, as well as retail all conjoin in an appropriately buffered and scaled resolution, one that is architecturally conscience through a common facade and massing strategy. A landscape element (both greenery and hardscaping features) intersects the blocks at their highest density as an urban relief. At their smaller scale, these spaces become shared, uniting, private, and public elements.

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LUCAS CARRIERE INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY

Site Plan 56


Aerial View

Block Section 57

MIXED INCOME SKINNY ROWHOUSE


LUCAS CARRIERE INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY In the adjacent comparison between existing conditions and proposed conditions; both levels of the site strategy are illustrated. The site plan, coding the differing unit types, reinforces this strategy at the scale of the block and the individual housing unit.

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Site Concept Diagram

Figure/Ground Diagram


MIXED INCOME SKINNY ROWHOUSE Aerial Perspective

Proposed Green Space

Existing Row Houses

Existing Low Income

Proposed Housing

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LUCAS CARRIERE INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY Elevations (Moderate 1)

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Building Section (Luxury 3)

Elevations (Luxury 1)

Elevations (Luxury 3)

Building Section (Moderate 1)


Second Floor Plan

First Floor Plan (Moderate 1)

MIXED INCOME SKINNY ROWHOUSE

(Moderate 1)

Second Floor Plan (Luxury 3)

First Floor Plan (Luxury 3)

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BRYAN ALLEN

No two apartments are lived in the same way, but in a row-

INSTRUCTOR

house development an architect/urban planner must rely on

SAM CHOI

some amount of repetition. This scheme attempted to adapt

LIVING IN DIFFERENT WAYS SKINNY ROWHOUSE

LIVING IN DIFFERENT WAYS three identical "skinny" parcels for two types of residents singles and families. The "skinny" parcel were combined with a duplex to create a variety of unit types including flats, family duplex, family "skinny" and "bachlor/bachelorette. This project aims to develop units for different modes of living — “Flat”, “Family” and “Bachelor/Bachelorette.

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BRYAN ALLEN INSTRUCTOR CHOI First Floor Plans

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Unit Section


Alley Elevation

Street Elevation 65

LIVING IN DIFFERENT WAYS SKINNY ROWHOUSE


BRYAN ALLEN INSTRUCTOR CHOI Master Plan

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Sectional Elevation


LIVING IN DIFFERENT WAYS SKINNY ROWHOUSE

When we began to aggregate the units across the site, it was helpful to analyze the local area to determine important patterns and thoroughfares.

After the first version of the masterplan (top right), the second version begins to address the rift in the urban fabric created by Melnea Cass Blvd (see bottom left).

Urban Site Analysis

Figure Ground/Site Specific Analysis

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BRYAN ALLEN INSTRUCTOR CHOI Unit Interior View - Living Room

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Unit Interior View - From Bedroom to Living

Unit Interior View - in Stair-wall


Unit Axons

Block Study - Ground Plan 69

LIVING IN DIFFERENT WAYS SKINNY ROWHOUSE


BRYAN ALLEN INSTRUCTOR CHOI Block Study Perspective

Block Study Long Elevation

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Master Plan Aerial Perspective 71

LIVING IN DIFFERENT WAYS SKINNY ROWHOUSE


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PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE CHRIS FREDA DAN ARTIGES WHITNEY CHICOINE TIM LORANGER

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CHRIS FREDA

The interlocking rowhouse strategy provided me with an

INSTRUCTOR

opportunity to explore a different type of living experience.

DAVID HACIN

The nature of the interlocking typology allows units distinct advantages over the typical rowhouse typology. First, rowhouses are not bound to the typical front-to-back layout which minimizes facade exposure and limits floor plan layout. Interlocking units can push and pull in various ways to allow for

MAXIMUM EXPOSURE PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE

MAXIMUM EXPOSURE

a more comfortable living arrangment while maximizing facade exposure. Second, the interlocking strategy allows for units and their occupants to interact in ways otherwise not possible. The interlocking of units creates overlapping of volumes and opportunity for visual and physical access to shared spaces.

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CHRIS FREDA INSTRUCTOR HACIN

Aerial Perspective

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Block Plan

Street Elevation 77

MAXIMUM EXPOSURE PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE


The logic of shared space and interactivity from the interlocking townhouse unit was amplified and applied throughout the site. This presented many opportunities for different qualities and sizes of spaces utilized by residents of the units, blocks, development and city as a whole.

CHRIS FREDA INSTRUCTOR HACIN Site Traffic

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Concept Diagram

Mixed Use Units


MAXIMUM EXPOSURE PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE Block Perspective

Street Elevation

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CHRIS FREDA INSTRUCTOR HACIN 80

First Floor Plan

Section

Second Floor Plan


MAXIMUM EXPOSURE PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE

Third Floor Plan

Unit Section

Courtyard Elevation

Front Elevation

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DAN ARTIGES

The Push-Pull Unit is based on the lateral movement of the

INSTRUCTOR

party wall separating two parcels. The strategy for this design

SAM CHOI

began with two extended service cores. The party wall wraps around these cores creating large living spaces at the center of the parcels. The push of this volume is accentuated within the adjacent unit by negative space produced from the floor pulling away from the extending volume. Each unit in a pair of

PUSHED PARTY WALL PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE

PUSHED PARTY WALL

parcels is given a larger extended living space.

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DAN ARTIGES INSTRUCTOR CHOI

Concept Diagram

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The strategy for the site was to create a green envelope for the aggregated units that connects the two large park spaces while surrounding and separating the neighborhood of aggregated units from the major streets

PUSHED PARTY WALL PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE

surrounding the site.

Site Plan

Sectional Model

85


Parti-walls and cores

DAN ARTIGES INSTRUCTOR CHOI 86

Building Section

First Floor

Second Floor

Facade


Second Floor Plan

PUSHED PARTY WALL PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE

Third Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

87


WHITNEY CHICOINE

The nature of the push-pull rowhouse type allows for the

INSTRUCTOR

designer to take advantage of a flexible party wall. In my

ALYSON TANGUAY

design, there is a shared zone between two row houses where the party wall undulates back and forth. This provides the opportunity for certain rooms to get larger where they need to, and for the circulation space to take up less space in the individual units, by sharing one zone. It also provides an

FLEXIBLE PARTI-WALL PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE

FLEXIBLE PARTYWALL

opportunity for a shared light well to bring natural daylight into the center of the units. The party wall is thus semi-transparent at points to allow for natural light to penetrate into both units, from above and from the front and rear facades, while maintaining proper privacy between the units.

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WHITNEY CHICOINE INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY 90

Concept Diagram

Basement Floor Plan

First Floor Plan


FLEXIBLE PARTI-WALL PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE

Building Section

Second Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan

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The site design is centered around the two main streets, Washington Street and Harrison Avenue. These streets are treated separately, Washington representing the commercial center of the area, and Harrison as a greenway-type boulevard. The bike path is spread through the site, and various parks widen the path.

WHITNEY CHICOINE INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY Site Plan

92

Block Elevation

Site Diagram


Typical Block Plan

Street Section 93

FLEXIBLE PARTI-WALL PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE


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TIM LORANGER

The push/pull typology allows the designer to create unusually

INSTRUCTOR

large rooms for a rowhouse by having the ability to shift and

SAM CHOI

abstract the normally straight parti wall. In doing so this unit became volumetrically symmetrical. The living room was on the front for one unit, while on the back for the other and so forth for each room in the unit. The only aspect which was not symetrical was the entry sequence. Each unit had a main

DOUBLE FRONT BLOCK PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE

DOUBLE FRONT BLOCK

entry in the front with a car port in the rear. Because of this double front situation the ally was widened and turned into a pedestrian pathway with a large island running the length of each block in the middle of the parking lanes. This creates a figure ground contrary to that of the existing street condition on the opposite side of the proposed line of the rowhouse.

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TIM LORANGER INSTRUCTOR CHOI 96

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan

Fourth Floor Plan


DOUBLE FRONT BLOCK PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE Push/Pull Back Elevation

Block A Street Section

Push/Pull Front Elevation

Skinny Elevation

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TIM LORANGER INSTRUCTOR CHOI

Master Plan 98


Washington Street is the primary retail center on the site and this was continued with the placement of most retail units along Washington. Harrison is a less traveled resedential street which becomes a spine for the residential streets to branch off of. The park was DOUBLE FRONT BLOCK PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE

moved from one end of the site to the other so that it was closer to the exisiting school and the bulk of the resedential units on site.

Site Analysis

Site Analysis

Site Analysis

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TIM LORANGER INSTRUCTOR CHOI 100

Model Perspective

Model Perspective

Model Perspective

Model Perspective


Perspective

Block B Elevation 101

DOUBLE FRONT BLOCK PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE


TIM LORANGER INSTRUCTOR CHOI Terrace (Roof) Perspective

102

Block A Section


DOUBLE FRONT BLOCK PUSH-PULL ROWHOUSE Street Perspective

Block B Section

103


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STACKED DUPLEXES ALEXANDER DAVIS BENJAMIN HOCHBERG SARA LAPORTE

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DEVIANT ROWHOUSE ALEXANDER DAVIS

What is a Rowhouse?

INSTRUCTOR Does it repeat over and over again? Does it share a constant parti wall? Does it keep a constant street edge? Throughout the development of this project, at both unit and site scales, there was a constant idea to test the boundaries of what a neighborhood of rowhouses should and can be. Although the design scale varies throughout, the concept remains the same. At both unit and site scales, the pedestrian

DEVIANT ROWHOUSE STACKED DUPLEXES

MICHAEL GROGAN

travels along a threading circulation path that stitches spaces together (apartments or blocks). This resulting corridor ends in either an exterior terrace or large recreational area. The resulting design, although deviant from normal Rowhouse design, explores the possibilities of the rowhouse archetype.

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At the site scale, the varying blocks are treated very similar to the various apartment units at the unit scale. A pedestrian corridor threads its way through the site much like the main staircase threads through each rowhouse. This pedestrian corridor meanders through the site connecting each block with important existing buildings, proposed commercial space and large recreational areas. As this corridor passes through blocks, open spaces are created that allow for various social and recreational activities to take place.

ALEXANDER DAVIS INSTRUCTOR GROGAN 108


DEVIANT ROWHOUSE STACKED DUPLEXES

Site Plan

Street Perspective

Street Perspective

109


Section Model with Pedestrian Corridor

ALEXANDER DAVIS INSTRUCTOR GROGAN 110

Street Section


DEVIANT ROWHOUSE STACKED DUPLEXES

Block Plan

Stitched Open Space

Threaded Pedestrian Corridor

Automobile Traffic Hierarchy

111


Unit Section 2

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

ALEXANDER DAVIS INSTRUCTOR GROGAN

Unit Section 1

112


Unit Section 4

Third Floor Plan

Fourth Floor Plan

DEVIANT ROWHOUSE STACKED DUPLEXES

Unit Section 3

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PENETRATING MASS BENJAMIN HOCHBERG

The row house is designed for the mass to interact with

INSTRUCTOR

exterior space. The mass is penetrated by exterior spaces to

ALYSON TANGUAY

allow both the ground floor and upper floor apartments their own “front door” and access from both the alley and the

Portions of the building volume protrude to allow for private exterior spaces. When these spaces interact with their environment on the building’s facade, it results in shadow. Futhermore, when they interact with street level, they create a mediating zone between the sidewalk and the semi-private

PENETRATING MASS STACKED DUPLEXES

street.

entry.

115


The site has three conditions of street: a long busy street that acts as a barrier, main South End streets, Stacked Duplexes

and smaller interior streets. The three types of buildings respond to each of these conditions. Tying them together and uniting the new development with the urban fabric is a border park.

Duplex Over Retail Flat

BENJAMIN HOCHBERG INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY 116

Live/work Duplex Over Retail

Public Space

Building Types Diagram

Urban Concept Diagram - Two sides joined with a pin


PENETRATING MASS STACKED DUPLEXES Detail Block Plan

Street Elevation

117


Street Section BENJAMIN HOCHBERG INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY 118

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan


PENETRATING MASS STACKED DUPLEXES

Street Elevation

Third Floor Plan

Fourth Floor Plan

119


"L" SECTION SARA LAPORTE

The stacked duplex unit type incorporates four distinct units

INSTRUCTOR

over a 40’ x 60’ parcel. While typically the units are stacked

SAM CHOI

above one another, this design takes advantage of an “L-shaped” section to accommodate circulation requirements and organize program spaces within the unit. To reach the top both the circulation for each unit as well as the service spaces, and modulates the living spaces for each unit. Upon entering each unit one arrives in an “informal” living area, and passes through the kitchen and dining areas to reach the “formal” living area on an upper level. The bedrooms are located on the

"L" SECTION STACKED DUPLEXES

units one enters through a thick central core. This zone houses

upper floors.

121


SARA LAPORTE INSTRUCTOR CHOI 122

Site Plan

Sectional Perspective


Block Perspective Elevation

"L" SECTION STACKED DUPLEXES

Typical Block Plan

123


As the site lies at the intersection of several programmatic zones— including a residential zone to the north, institutional to the east, and primarily industrial to the south and southwest— the question of edges was important. A landscaped buffer was placed along Melnea Cass, while the typical block plan was altered to avoid creating additional Existing Green Space

Proposed Green Space

intersections along Melnea Cass. Because of its location, the site is also surrounded by irregular geometries. Where these geometries are reconciled, “pocket parks” are placed that relate to the neighborhood on a smaller scale, while the existing park to the north relates to the larger community.

SARA LAPORTE INSTRUCTOR CHOI

Stacked duplexes are placed along the main thoroughfares, while interlocking units are placed along the north to south connecting one way streets. To help keep traffic off of these streets, a two way Existing Vehicular Circulation

Proposed Vehicular Circulation

north-south connector is located on the eastern end of the site. Commercial program fills the southern most blocks to relate to their industrial and commercial context.

124

Figure/Ground Diagram


AGGREGATION UNIT TYPES

STACKED DUPLEX: TYPICAL UNIT: 4 UNITS

STACKED DUPLEX:

EXISTING BUILDINGS INTERLOCKING:

TYPICAL UNIT: 2 UNITS

STACKED DUPLEX: ONE PARCEL: 2 UNITS

"L" SECTION STACKED DUPLEXES

RETAIL UNIT: 3 UNITS / RETAIL

Unit Aggregation Diagram

Sectional Perspective

125


Programmatic Diagram

Unit Concept Diagram

SARA LAPORTE INSTRUCTOR CHOI 126

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan


Unit Circulation and Spatial Separation

"L" SECTION STACKED DUPLEXES

Unit Perspectives

Fourth Floor Plan

Fifth Floor Plan

Unit Perspectives

127


128


2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT ASHLEY HOPWOOD DENNIS GREENWOOD ERICA LELIEVRE NICOLE FICHERA SAMUEL CLEMENT

129


BLENDING TYPES ASHLEY HOPWOOD

The idea for my unit and master plan is to blend families

INSTRUCTOR

and working singles. The unit plan, while balanced in square

ALYSON TANGUAY

footage, has more bedrooms with less living space for the working singles, and fewer bedrooms and more living space for the families. The blocks on the North edge of the site feature the family units, blocks on the South edge of the site feature multi-tenant Live work units line the blocks along Melnea Cass. The green space on the site is a combination of two large parks, one for families and one for working singles, and a buffer zone between housing and the busy Melnea Cass Boulevard.

BLENDING TYPES 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

units, and the blocks in between feature combination units.

131


ASHLEY HOPWOOD INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY

Aerial Perspective 132


BLENDING TYPES 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Perspective - Family Park

View From Second Floor Balcony

View From Third Floor Balcony

133


The master plan is arranged according to major thoroughfares and existing neighborhoods. Family housing is close to the housing developments in the Northwest edge of the site while multi-tenant housing is close to the major businesses and commercial areas lining the site. Major pedestrian roads respond to the parks and retail areas of the site.

ASHLEY HOPWOOD INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY 134

Family Units

Multi-tenant Units

Concept Diagram - Housing Types

Live Work Units


BLENDING TYPES 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Perspective of Multi-Tenant Park

Site Analysis - Vehicular Traffic

Site Analysis - Pedestrian Traffic

135


First Floor Plan

ASHLEY HOPWOOD INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY 136

Section through Alley

Second Floor Plan


BLENDING TYPES 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Third Floor Plan

Street Perspective from Melnea Cass Boulevard.

137


VOID + WEDGE DENNIS GREENWOOD

The project explores the typology of the rowhouse (specifically

INSTRUCTOR

duplexes over a flat) by removing party walls, a typically

ALLYSON TANGUAY

defining characteristic. A void replaces the party wall and becomes an exterior zone of pushing and pulling private spaces. This creates a reciprocal relationship between the units while allowing light and ventilation to reach the flat below. This “void� space then becomes a flexible zone in the geometries. A wedge shaped variation of the design allows a strip of rowhouses to curve along the block. In a similar approach, wedge shaped greenspaces are used on the larger urban scale to regulate city block geometries.

VOID + WEDGE 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

rowhouse as it can be manipulated to adjust to site

139


DENNIS GREENWOOD INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY

Aerial Perspective 140


Street Perspective

VOID + WEDGE 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Block Section

141


The site seeks to bridge the divide created by Washington Street while providing a buffer from the Melnea Cass thoroughfare. First floor retail units line pedestrian friendly Washington Street and a bike path and row of streetside trees skirt Melnea Cass. Rowhouse variations were created to satisfy the needs of the site and the principles of the design. The greenspaces are designed to regulate the city blocks, while creating a focal point within the site.

Commercial Approx. 200,000 SF

Retail Residential DENNIS GREENWOOD INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY

53 Mixed Units

Residential (3 Units per Parcel)

Site Diagram

142


Wedge Shaped Unit Variation

Street Perspective

Street Perspective

VOID + WEDGE 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Concept Diagram

143


Street Perspective

DENNIS GREENWOOD INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY 144

Block Section


Block Elevation

VOID + WEDGE 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Street Perspective

145


Unit Section 1

DENNIS GREENWOOD INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY 146

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan


Sectional Diagram

Unit Elevation

VOID + WEDGE 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Unit Section 2

Third Floor Plan

147


DOUBLE WIDE ERICA LELIEVRE

The ground floor unit is a flat that takes up two parcels, and

INSTRUCTOR

so becomes 40 foot wide. Above it are two duplexes, each

MICHAEL GROGAN

20’ wide. These three units share a 14’ wide central core that holds all of the bathrooms, kitchens, and closet spaces. The residual spaces on either side hold the living spaces, such as

DOUBLE WIDE 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

the bedrooms and living rooms.

149


ERICA LELIEVRE INSTRUCTOR GROGAN

150


Block Elevation

DOUBLE WIDE 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Section Model

151


The site is split into three different zones, each of which has its own interior community open space.

Retail space is spread throughout the site in two different ways. The first, which can be seen along Washington street, is the “exterior facing” retail meant for the general public. Here the retail would be located on the first floor with duplexes above. The second type of retail is the “interior facing” retail which is located inside each of the zones. This would be community space for the people who live in the area. This interior facing retail has two different unit types. In the first type the retail is on the ground floor with the duplex units above. In the second type, seen on the corners, community space happens on all three floors.

Zoning Diagram

ERICA LELIEVRE INSTRUCTOR GROGAN 152

Figure Ground Diagram

Unit Types Diagram


The interior-facing retail space has a large buffer zone between the street and the open space that becomes a walking arcade. This connects all of the retail space and also becomes a part of the pathways that connect the corner community spaces.

DOUBLE WIDE 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Street Section

Street Perspective

Street Perspective

153


The open spaces inside the zones also become program. In this example the playground is sunken into the ground, eliminating the need for fencing.

Perspective

ERICA LELIEVRE INSTRUCTOR GROGAN 154

Section Type 1

Section Type 2


Section Type 1

Block Diagram or Unit Diagram

Section Type 2

DOUBLE WIDE 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Perspective

155


Longitudinal Section

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

ERICA LELIEVRE INSTRUCTOR GROGAN

Lateral Section

156


Front Elevation

Third Floor Plan

Interior Perspective

DOUBLE WIDE 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Corner Elevation

157


THICK ZONE CORE NICOLE FICHERA

This project is based on a basic unit type of two duplexes

INSTRUCTOR

over a flat. The main concept is the expansion of the party

SAM CHOI

wall between the two vertical duplex units into a thick zone, which contains all of the closed poche functions for the entire building: primarily circulation, bathrooms, kitchens, closets, laundry, et cetera. Attached to the thick zone on each side are closed bedroom the units (service and sleeping) occur in the closed volumes of the bedrooms and the thick central core. The public living spaces (kitchens, dining rooms and living rooms) are then formed by the open interstitial spaces between these closed elements.

THICK ZONE CORE 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

‘boxes,’ offset at split levels. Thus, all of the private functions of

159


The diagram at right depicts the unit concept as applied to the block. The central thick zone within the unit is conceived as something which is experiential—you are required at all times to interact with it and pass through it to get from space to space. By applying that concept to the front of the aggregated block, a thick facade zone is formed which mediates between the private world of the unit interior and the public life of the street.

The elevation is conceived in terms of the block as a Edge Block Elevation Axonometric

series of carved layers and frames with a projecting living room volume. The layers make the thick zone inhabitable in the same way as the core. On a larger scale, the concept of a thick zone is used to form a plan based on superblocks. The size of the blocks responds to the character of the site. It

NICOLE FICHERA INSTRUCTOR CHOI

is a part of the South End, which has a fine-grained rowhouse texture, but it is additionaly a fringe condition, surrounded by strips of industrial and medical buildings. Thus, a modified version of the block elevation incorporates a block-size unifying frame element, and has less projections (which serve to break down scale). Thus, the edge walls of the super-block are unified and read as larger scale, and Thick Zone Applied to Block Facade

160

the interiors of the blocks respond to the residential, individual rowhouses.


THICK ZONE CORE 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Site Plan

Street Perspective

Block Elevation

161


LIV

I SP NG AC E

Section Option 1: SPLIT LEVEL increased spatial complexity and depth, diagonal relationship of public and private

BE

DR

OO

M

CO

RE

Section Option 2: PACKED CENTRAL CORE thickened party wall containing poche spaces [wet + dry], leaving side spaces as public rooms

NICOLE FICHERA INSTRUCTOR CHOI HYBRID RESULT thickened party wall containing poche spaces; private 162

Organizational Concept Diagram

and public spaces offset


Axonometric Diagram 163

THICK ZONE CORE 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT


The inhabitable core is modified by a series of additive and subtractive operations. Spaces are carved out of the thick zone for spaces such as bathrooms, kitchens, and circulation. In other cases, the core expands, sticking out into the room with balconies and fireplaces. The nature of a rowhouse is to have long, narrow spaces; by making the core inhabitable and letting it divide spaces by pushing out, the rooms can be divided into more appropriate proportional dimensions. In the flat unit, the core breaks off into smaller pieces, allowing a kitchen space in the center. In all three units, the user constantly moves in and out of the core, using it as circulation and inhabitable space. Gaps in the third floor allow the core to read as an uninterrupted wall rising through the space. The separation of the bedroom volumes on each end creates a dramatic open vertical space above the dining room, Unit Section

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Plan

NICOLE FICHERA INSTRUCTOR CHOI

bringing light into the middle of the unit with a skylight.

164


THICK ZONE CORE 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Exploded Axon

Third Floor Plan

Fourth Floor Plan

165


THE MISSING LINK SAMUEL CLEMENT

The goal of the housing project was to create an ultra

INSTRUCTOR

pedestrian friendly master plan that would draw pedestrians

ALYSON TANGUAY

from the Boston Medical Center west of the site as well as pedestrians from the apartment complexes to the north. In order to do this a hierarchy of open spaces is arranged to tempt public use. To draw users from the apartments a baseball/recreational field was placed at the Northern most edge of the site. Likewise a vast stretch of landscape tempts the site. These open spaces are attached to a single road going through the site about which smaller open spaces are arranged to encourage travel to the commercial center along Harrison Ave.

THE MISSING LINK 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

the Mass Ave travelers to enter the south west portion of

167


SAMUEL CLEMENT INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY

Aerial Perspective 168


THE MISSING LINK 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Block Plan

Block Elevation 169


Building Section

SAMUEL CLEMENT INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY 170

Building Section

Unit Concept Diagram


Third Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

THE MISSING LINK 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Second Floor Plan

171


The pedestrians paths of movement along the center road and the bike path along Melnea Cass draw travelers to rows of commercial development (grey) along Washington St. and Harrison Ave. Staggered blocks are generated to widen the alley as a second row house type (Gate Unit, in black) negotiates this shift.

SAMUEL CLEMENT INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY 172

Concept Diagram

Building Types Diagram


Street Section THE MISSING LINK 2 DUPLEXES OVER FLAT

Street Perspective

173


174


INTERLOCKING ROWHOUSE ALLISON BROWNE DIANA LATTARI

175


GREEN CORRIDORS ALLISON BROWNE

At the unit scale the architecture take the attitude that one

INSTRUCTOR

can design with specific lifestyles in mind. At the block scale

ALYSON TANGUAY

yards are defined by sectional variation in order to create thresholds into the different apartments. Raised green space is given over to the street creating more private outdoor spaces behind. At the scale of the city three green corridors are main throughfares and retail is introduced to respond to specific

GREEN CORRIDORS INTERLOCKING ROWHOUSE

conditions on the site, such as the institutions surrounding it.

177


ALLISON BROWNE INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY

Block Elevation 178

Site Plan


Concept Diagram 179

GREEN CORRIDORS INTERLOCKING ROWHOUSE


Our site sits on a transitionary area in the urban fabric. It is bordered by Melnea Cass Boulevard which acts as a division between regular and irregular road types. It is also at a place where many different types of zoning come together.

Site Analysis - Land Use Zoning and Regulating Lines

ALLISON BROWNE INSTRUCTOR TANGUAY 180

Building Section

Building Section


Fourth Floor Plan

Third Floor Plan

First Floor Plan

GREEN CORRIDORS INTERLOCKING ROWHOUSE

Second Floor Plan

181


182


TWO WIDE DIANA LATTARI

The interlocking prototype of row housing consists of two

INSTRUCTOR

units that share one parcel. The units interlock volumetrically,

SAM CHOI

wrapping around each other across the parcel and each consisting of three volumes. The dynamic shift in shape and size of the volumes changes in response to the parcel dimensions. The top volume holds private program, the middle public, and the ground a mix of both. All circulation through the units is located in the center of the parcel along the party wall that separates the two units. Additionally, each unit has an entrance from the street as well as access to a back alley,

TWO WIDE INTERLOCKING ROWHOUSE

which also accomodates parking for each unit.

183


Second Floor Plan

Fourth Floor Plan

PLAN

Third Floor Plan

Unit Section 1

Unit Section 2

DIANA LATTARI INSTRUCTOR CHOI

First Floor Plan

184


Corner Unit Front Elevation

Corner Unit Side Elevation

TWO WIDE INTERLOCKING ROWHOUSE

Typical Unit Front Elevation

Sectional Model Through Typical Interlocking Units

185


Street Perspective

DIANA LATTARI INSTRUCTOR CHOI 186

Typical Block Parti Diagram


The site is bound by prominent existing roads. By extending these roads through the site, I was able to create a grid, broken into three zones, within which I placed the city blocks. The size and shape of these blocks picks up on nearby existing urban fabric patterning. A belt of greenspace acts as a buffer along Melnea Cass Boulevard in each of the zones.

TWO WIDE INTERLOCKING ROWHOUSE

Site Analysis: Major and Minor Streets

Figure/Ground Diagram

Site Analysis: Hierarchy of Greenspace

187


There are two different unit types included in my aggregation: the interlocking unit type (below) and the stacked duplex unit type (right). These types yielded multiple unit variations, some accomodating retail space on the ground floor or adjusting to meet a block corner condition. The varying unit types were then used to create patterning in the block schemes as well as the overall site aggregation.

DIANA LATTARI INSTRUCTOR CHOI 188


In addition to identifying each different unit used in the aggregation, these diagrams also discuss the

public and private areas, with green representing the most private of spaces and yellow representing the most public.

TWO WIDE INTERLOCKING ROWHOUSE

program of each layout as well as

189


Block Plan

DIANA LATTARI INSTRUCTOR CHOI 190

Site Section Through Typical Interlocking Units


TWO WIDE INTERLOCKING ROWHOUSE Site Section Through Corner Interlocking Units

191


192


ROWHOUSES ARCH 5110 HOUSING AND AGGREGATION SPRING 2010 The projects in this volume were designed as prototypical residential types and city block plans by fourth-year students in the undergradu足ate architecture program at Northeastern University in Boston.

Rowhouses  

The projects in this volume were designed as prototypical residential types and city block plans by fourth-year students in the undergraduat...

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