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FALL 2009

LIVE/WORK Northeastern University School of Architecture ARCH G691 Graduate Degree Project Studio


FALL 2009

LIVE/WORK Northeastern University School of Architecture ARCH G691 Graduate Degree Project Studio

JESSE CABRERA ROB CAYER JULIET CHUN NAWAZ KAMTHEWALA KATHRYN MOORE BEN-JOSEF STRACCO KAITLYN WOLK


Table of Contents A. Introduction History

6

B. Definitions Market Regulatory Code

10 12

C. Typical Live/Work S tudio Loft

20

H ome Office

32

G round Floor Workspace

44

C ommunity

56

D. New Ideas IDEO Flex House

70 72

E. Comparison Matrix

74


Introduction


What defines Live/Work?

Live/work spaces are appearing at an

Examining design approaches also

alarming rate throughout the country. Type these

furthers the difference between live/work projects

words into any internet search engine, and a

from solely residential or commercial programs.

plethora of interesting and innovating projects will

How the work space is utilized, the location of the

appear. But while many live/work projects have

work space in relationship to the living space, and

appeared throughout history, what defines these

what the boundary is between those two spaces is

spaces as live/work today?

different for each project according to their scale.

Our study is divided into three basic

Because of this, we analyze each unit

parts: definitions, an analysis of the sub-types, and

through a series of diagrams focusing on certain

the future of live/work.

design aspects of each space. The methods we

In the first section, we survey the various

chose for analysis are:

definitions of live/work, both in the market place

User access patterns

and in the state and city building and zoning codes.

Separation

Aspects like the required ratio of live/work, the type

Balance of live/work

of work permitted, and what goods are sold in the

Furthermore, we study any additional

unit, indicate the differences of live/work projects

features that are unique for each design as well as

from those that are purely residential or purely

precedents to show the distinction of each unit.

commercial.

In our third section, we look to the future

In the second section, we categorize all

of live/work. We analyze projects that reflect this

the examples we have identified into sub-types. In

new direction such as IDEO and the Flex House.

our research, we discovered that live/work is not a

This pattern book is not a how-to, but a

single building or unit type. Instead, it is a loosely

survey that illustrates everything that is called live/

connected series of strategies combining live and

work, cataloging all of the significant strategies that

work needs.

have been used. This book is aimed to further

Because there is no defined type, we separate each live/work project into four scales:

define live/work. It is intended for designers or anyone else interested in wanting to understand

Studio/loft

the code and market definitions along with different

Home office

design issues associated with a live/work project.

Ground floor workspace Community


History

The history of Live/Work has a long and complicated time line. The origins of Live/Work, if we

his home. This allows for an easier lifestyle and no commute to work.

want to get technical, can be traced back to the

The 1960’s saw the growth of the ‘Yuppie”

days of the cavemen. However, the first real homo-

type of community and the boom of artists. In

erectus application of Live/Work can be seen in the

search for a workspace, artists looked for the most

Colonial Farmhouse of the 18th and 19th

economic way to conduct their work. They found

Centuries. Specifically looking at the farmhouses

usefulness in old shipping containers and railroad

of Maine, these farmhouses had the living quarters

head cars that were abandoned after WWII. These

and the barn connected. With the harsh winters in

shipping containers allowed artists a space to do

Main, this connection between the work and live

work, and sleep if necessary. At the same time, art-

aspects of the farm gives hint to the concept of

ists found use in abandoned warehouses that were

Live/Work. However; for the purpose of this brief

used for weapon and aircraft storage production.

historical overview, the time frame from the 1950’s

These large warehouses allowed for large working

to the Present and Beyond will be used as it shows

spaces for multiple people artists at one time, cre-

the major progression of the concept of Live work.

ating a form of community.

The 1950’s saw the first popular work of a

Due to governmental pressures and sanctions

Live/Work type in a doctors office integrated into a

in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s, the artist com-

house. Designed by Le Corbusier, the Curutchet

munity was forced to leave their habitats in search

House starts to explore two different functions for

for new living and working arrangements. As they

the same person in one structure. The owner of

moved into the downtown area, they realized the

the house has his doctoral practice imbedded into

potential of living in a space that contained

< 1950

Curuchet House

1960

Containers / Warehouses

1970

SoHo


both space for their work, and for their sleeping

With the popularity of these new innovative spaces

quarters all wrapped up into one. This drive and the

design specifically for the artists, the advent of the

realization that these spaces would be affordable

first ground -up constructed Live/Work building

and practical led to the creation of Live/Work dis-

came to fruition in 1987.

tricts, most notably SOHO in New York.

The 1990’s brought the concept of com-

The new found affordability for artists in

munity back into perspective. Not only has Live/

the downtown area of major cities in the 1970’s,

Work boomed in the past decade, but it has now

accompanied by the business boom, led to the idea

spread to the rest of the culture to people asides

of the Sprawling City in the 1980’s. For those who

from artists. Communities are built up in a setting

could afford it at the time, they left the congestion of

that consists of big complexes that have living units

the city to the suburbs where they established resi-

and a large shared studio space. Communities are

dences. It was shortly realized that by sprawling to

also built up like the old SOHO district, with retail

the outskirts of the city that it started to cause an

and offices on the ground floor and living space for

issue with transportation towards downtown, and

the owner on the upper floors. With the growing

not to mention the cost of commuting. People

use of technology, the instability of the economy,

started to live and work from home with the advent

and the cost of commuting further rationalizes the

of technology such as the fax machine and later on

positive concepts for Live/Work

the computer.

As the new century rolls around, we look

The 1980’s also saw the start of sanctions

towards the future of Live/Work. We have seen the

being put on the concept of Live/Work, which

boom in popularity with this typology, and have

started the eviction of some artists from their loft

adjusted to its growing needs. It has been proven

spaces. Developers at the time started to take

that for many people, Live/Work has been a suc-

notice the popularity of the Live/Work concept, and

cessful lifestyle. With this knowledge, we look to

started to retrofit old mills to keep up with the new

the flexibility of the space. We can see houses be

sanctions. These mill conversions were designed

built with moveable partitions to adjust to specific

around the needs of the artists, with a place for liv-

functions, or extended stay hotel rooms that adapt

ing functions and a place for them to do their work,

as a flexible office or live space. From what was

all at an affordable price.

once nonexistent, to a narrow definition, to a now broad definition; we look towards the future of Live/ Work.

Soma

1980

Sprawling City / Mill Conversions

1990

Community Housing / Flex Spaces

2000 >


Definitions


The market definition focuses on how realtors define a live/work space. Words highlighted in the diagrams are terms that continued to re-appear frequently. As opposed to the regulatory definitions, the market definition illustrates the benefits of live/ work in a way that appeals to the public. The International Building Code defines live/ work in a quantitative way. It describes how the space should be built, designed, and what factors need to be taken into account in order for a project to be designated as live/work. The zoning code differs in each city. After researching various districts in different regions of the country, we focused on three main factors of each zoning code: the amount of work space required, whether signage is permitted, and whether parking is required. These three distinguishing factors reveals how the city considers live/ work and whether it is trying to keep certain areas more residential or commercial.


Centrally located

Amenities

Downtown living

Walkability

Shorter commutes Exposed brick

Separate entrances

Hardwood floors

Affordable

Layout fl exibility

High ceilings

appearing in the market descriptions. It is possible

Eco-friendly at low cost

to graphically evaluate common words and phrases

Deduct work from taxes

One mortgage

are extremely influential. The diagrams here attempt

Expense reduction

Since live work is still a relatively new concept the definitions imposed by the real estate market

Storefront

Artists

Old warehouse

Business & Personal needs

Customization

Market Definition

to conclude from these graphics that certain features are more attractive than others when considering design decisions and spatial layouts within live work units.

Reoccurring Themes

Financial Benefi ts

Materials/Features

Lifestyle Benefi ts


The reoccurring definitions of Live/Work units create a better understanding of the types of activities the units would foster. These words incite imagery in terms of a further definition of the Live/ Work type, as shown in the diagram.


Zoning Codes

SIGN

The diagram on the next page shows various cities and which of those six factors they

Today, cities are seeing a growth in the number of live/work units. For some, this has been seen as a natural growth with the rising costs

SIGN

chose to focus on in their zoning code. CitiesSIGN in gray indicate areas which had no live/work definition stated in their zoning code.

of rents and the loss of jobs. For others, this has been a coerced growth, using live/work units to

Many cities regulate what types of business

The barcode indicates cities that regulate

de-densify certain parts of the city or drawing

can occupy the work area in the live/work

what/how goods are sold in that space.

artists into areas, bringing with them the vibrancy

Some codes maintain that only items

and life that usually follows them. Many cities are defining live/work units in their zoning codes, allowing for land use

SIGN

produced in the that unit can be sold there,

limited what type of work is permitted such

while others allow a multitude of goods to

as an artist studio/loft and/or retail.

be sold there.

regulation and a further interpretation of the building code. Using a survey approach, we researched a variety of cities throughout the United States and their zoning codes. Through this study, we found six reoccurring factors that cities are using to define live/work. The bar graph on the next page

Some codes state that a limited amount of

Many cities specify a location of work within

non-residents are allowed to work in the

the unit. Many areas say that the work

work area or that a limited amount of

space must be on the ground floor if the

customers or clients are allowed to occupy

live/work unit is multiple stories. However,

the space at one time.

other codes simply state where the work space cannot be, such as the garage for

describes whether that city gave a minimum or maximum amount of square footage on the live or

SIGN

work portion of the unit. This is a way for cities to control what people are calling live/work units. For instance, with these minimums and maximums, one cannot take a commercial unit, add a bed, and call it live/work. Others also cannot simply put a computer in their residential unit an call that live/ work.

unit. This symbol indicates what cities have

SIGN

the city of Chicago

The zoning code oftentimes states whether

Sometimes supplemental parking is

signage is permitted or not. If signage is

required in addition to what the zoning code

permitted there are limitations as to the

is already asking for in that specified zone.

amount of signage allowed and how it can

This can create issues for those trying to

be presented - whether it must lay flat or

create live/work units in already dense

whether it can project off the facade.

areas.


seattle, wa SIGN

minneapolis, mn bismarck, nd

st. paul, mn

portland, or SIGN

lynn, ma

milwaukee, wi

boise, id

SIGN

detroit, mi chicago, il

denver, co

san francisco, ca

SIGN

SIGN

boston, ma

cleveland, oh SIGN

new york

SIGN

SIGN

las vegas, nv

kansas, city, mo

fairmont, wv

SIGN

louisville, ky

oklahoma city, ok

philadelphia, pa

los angeles, ca

washington dc albuquerque, nm

fort smith, ak

san diego, ca phoenix, az

SIGN

el paso, tx

raleigh, nc atlanta, ga

dallas, tx

SIGN

houston, tx new orleans, la

austin, tx

tampa, fl west palm beach, fl SIGN

100%

% of max live

% of max work

% of min live

phoenix

raleigh

cleveland

lynn

fort smith

atlanta

fairmont

st. paul

chicago

denver

las vegas

25%

san diego

50%

new york city

75%

% of min work


International Building Code (As of 2009)

419.1 General. A live/work unit is a dwelling unit

live/work unit is in compliance with Section 419.

419.3.4 Locks. Egress doors shall be permitted to

or sleeping unit in which a significant portion of the

High-hazard and storage occupancies shall not be

be locked in accordance with Exception 4 of

space includes a non-residential use that is oper-

permitted in a live/work unit. The aggregate area

Section 1008.1.9.3.

ated by the tenant and shall comply with sections

of storage in the nonresidential portion of the live/

419.1 through 419.8

work unit shall be limited to 10 percent of the

419.4 Vertical Openings. Floor openings between

space dedicated to nonresidential activities.

floor levels of a live/work unit are permitted without

Exception: Dwelling or sleeping units that include an office that is less than 10 percent of the

enclosure.

area of the dwelling unit shall not be classified as a

419.3 Means of Egress. Except as modified by

live/work unit.

this section, the provisions for Group R-2 occu-

419.5 Fire Protection. The live/work unit shall be

pancies in Chapter 10 shall apply to the entire live/

provided with a monitored fire alarm system where

work unit.

required by Section 907.2.9 and an automatic

419.1.1 Limitations. The following shall apply to all live/work areas:

sprinkler system in accordance with Section

1. The live/work unit is permitted to be a maxi-

419.3.1 Egress Capacity. The egress capacity for

mum of 3,000 square feet (279 m2);

each element of the live/work unit shall be based

2. The nonresidential area is permitted to be a

on the occupant load for the function served in

419.6 Structural. Floor loading for the areas

maximum of 50 percent of the area of each live/

accordance with Table 1004.1.1.

within a live/work unit shall be designed to con-

work unit;

903.2.8.

form to Table 1607.1 based on the function within

3. The nonresidential area function shall be lim-

419.3.2 Sliding Doors. Where doors in a means

ited to the first or main floor only of the live/work

of egress are of the horizontal-sliding type, the

unit; and

force to slide the door to its fully open position

419.7 Accessibility. Accessibility shall be

4. A maximum of five nonresidential workers or

shall not exceed 50 pounds (220 N) with a perpen-

designed in accordance with Chapter 11.

employees are allowed to occupy the nonresiden-

dicular force against the door of 50 pounds (220

tial area at any one time.

N).

419.2 Occupancies. Live/work units shall be clas-

419.3.3 Spiral Stairways. Spiral stairways that

each area within the live/work unit for the function

sified as a Group R-2 occupancy. Separation

conform to the requirements of Section 1009.9

within that space.

requirements found in Sections 420 and 508 shall

shall be permitted.

the space.

419.8 Ventilation. The applicable requirements of the International Mechanical Code shall apply to

not apply within the live/work unit where the


Live Work


Work

Community Ground Home Studio

Live

Typical Live/Work


Live Studio Home Ground Community Work

In attempt to categorize live work we separated the projects into four scales. These four scales represent the most common occurrences of live work; Studio loft Home office Ground floor workspace Community In the following section we take a closer look at the different aspects of the space and design of live work, which are unique to the type. In addition to the analysis of the traditional live work unit we have included precedents with unique or unusual conditions. It is our hope that through these comprehensive analyses we paint a clearer picture of how these strategies connect to combine live work needs into a singular space.


Live Studio

Methods of Analysis User/Access Patterns works in the space travels through the unit as opposed to someone who lives there.

Work

Community

Ground

Home

These diagrams describe how the user enters the live/work space. It also differentiates how someone who

Separation As the scale becomes larger the separation between live and work becomes more defined. For certain projects, the separation may simply be a piece of furniture while others can be doors, walls, and floors. In small scales, the live and work spaces may not be separated by any physical object, but is instead separated by time. These issues are diagramed to show how different projects execute different methods of separating live and work.

Balance of Live & Work The ratios of live/work are studied through a series of diagrams that visually show the amount of live space in relationship to the amount of workspace. The larger the scale, the easier it is see this ratio. However, if the scale is small, like an artist studio/loft, the balance of live/work becomes harder to diagram because the same space is used for live and work.

Additional Features Each project has a set of characteristics that are unique to that scale. These diagrams delve into those distinct qualities to further understand how that unit works.

Precedents Because there is no distinct building or unit live/work type, precedents are shown to further illustrate the range of designs that can be considered a studio/loft, home office, ground floor workspace, and community.


Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

Live


Work

Community Ground Home Studio

Live

S tudio Loft


Live Studio Home Ground Community Work

The studio/loft is the smallest of the live/work sub-types. This space can be extremely simple with one room containing all of the programs: sleeping, eating, cooking, working, and relaxing or

of artists in cities who utilize these spaces, cities

slightly more complex with a lofted space contain-

have started to define artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; live/work studios in

ing the sleeping area. Whatever the case is, the

their zoning codes, specifying required ratios of

one significant characteristic of the studio/loft is

live/work, ceiling heights, ventilation requirements,

that there is no structural separation of the live/

and other characteristics specific to an artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

work areas. It is up to the user to define these

needs. Cities have also started employing incen-

spaces and to separate them according to the

tives for artists to move into these spaces and for

needs of the user. This creates a number of inter-

developers to build these studio/lofts in certain

esting ways to separate live and work whether it is

areas of town. As a result, artist studio/lofts have

a piece of furniture or something that is not tangi-

been growing at alarming rates. But because the

ble, like time.

space is so compact, it is important to understand

The most common user for these studio/loft spaces is the artist. Because of the high number

the design logic behind these units and the issues that may arise from such a small space.


Live Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

User/Access Patterns

Loft

Lower Level


Live Studio Home Ground Community Work

Seeing that the studio loft type has an ambiguity between the boundaries of live and work, the access depends on the time of the day. In the typical situation, the living quarters are located in a

so much on walking down hallways or entering

loft above the kitchen area. Because of this sepa-

through doors. In this type it is hard to remove

ration between the work regions, access to the liv-

oneself from work, for live and work are severely

ing zone is obtained via the stairs. In order for the

intertwined. These studio loft units are typically

user to access the work quarters he has to walk

not individual units but are in a mirrored situation

down his lofted stairs. The first level of the entire

in a larger building. Therefore access to each stu-

studio is dedicated to both living and working situ-

dio loft is separate and private. There does not

ations, with no strict separation. There is an

have to be any neighborhood camaraderie, as the

differentiation between the live and work. However,

ambiguous differentiation between what exactly is

tenants of the building never work together as they

the threshold between the two is created by the cir-

work and what is live. Therefore the access

do in the community situation, work and live both

culation of the stairs.

between the two depends on the furniture and not

occur in their single studio loft units.

Threshold

The studio loft unit type has an ambiguous


Live Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

Separation through Time

7 am

12 pm

7 pm

12 am


G

G

C

C

W

W

Live

H

Studio

H

Home

S

Ground

S

Community

L

Work

L

TYPICAL FLEXIBLE

Work Time

24 18

6

STUDIO LOFT

TYPICAL 12

FLEXIBLE

In the studio we are highlighting the typical hours that one would work in dark green, and the 24

uncommon hours in light green. There is no physiHOMEand OFFICE cal live work, therefore one 18 boundary between 6

can work at any hour during the day. This is why there is12 no white space in this diagram. The emphasis of this diagram shows that the work hours always occur and are more sporadic during the day.24

The separation within a studio loft unit is as fl exible as the provided space. These multipurpose spaces are used for various activities; they in turn determine the separation between the living and working spaces. In the morning, when the kitchen and eating area is used, the separation becomes the table and boundary it creates between the living and work space. However, when the open space is used for working, the kitchen and bathroom become amenities to support the work zone. The threshold then becomes the stair and upper level, creating a boundary to the sleeping area, which is the only live space at the time. As the day ends and the multi-use space becomes a living area, the work space is minimized to only the equipment, which creates the separation. When the user is sleeping, the fl oor is then the separation, as the lower level is signifi ed as the work space. This constant evolution of space is separated by various elements, whether a table or a fl oor, creating the threshold between live and work.

L

L

S

S

H

H

G

G

C

C

W

W


Live Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

Balance of Live/Work

7 am

12 pm

7 pm

12 am


G

G

C

C

W

W

The balance in a studio / loft unit is measured differently from the rest of our types. The boundaries are often undefined and converge with one

L

L

S

S

another. An estimated ratio of work space to live space would be 1:2. The lower level consists of all the amenities and services for the studio unit. These are a separated bathroom and a small kitchen open to the rest of the apartment. There is

H

H

also a need for a large storage closet typically tucked under the stairs up to the loft. The remain-

G

G

C

C

W

W

ing living space on the lower level is left open. The space is furnished with whatever furniture or apparatuses meet the occupants needs as an artist. Depending on the artist, studios usually house a small dinning table, comfortable chair and work desk. In the open space both live and work merge together to create a convenient flexible area to work and relax. The upper loft level typically holds a bed and is primarily used as an area of repose. Studio / loft units are built to hold as many as two occupants but hold one more conveniently.

Live

H

Studio

H

Home

S

Ground

S

Community

L

Work

L


Live Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

Special Considerations

The Studio/Loft typology of Live/Work

proofing between units can help mitigate the issue

has a lot of unique features. However, there are

between different types of artists. In addition, it is

some things that should be taken into consider-

good to individualize each unit with respect to

ation when thinking about designing a Studio /Loft

lighting and ventilation. Depending on the type of

unit. These items, although deemed as important

activity in each unit should determine how much

elements, have not been discussed through the

ventilation or lighting is needed. Often times art-

general typology.

ists will need a stronger ventilation system than

As seen through the typical Studio/Loft

writers, or musicians will need more light than writ-

unit, these units are usually always seen in a ware-

ers. In any case, the ability to have control over

house or complex style. As a result, careful con-

light and ventilation usage in a per unit setting is a

sideration should be taken for each unit type. With

good way to make each unit type flexible for differ-

the wide variety of renters from writer, musicians,

ent artists.

dancers, artists, etc, each person has a need to

Storage is one of the biggest complaints

customize their space to their specific needs. In

amongst artist in live/work units today. The

the case of the writer, it is essential for their unit to

International Building Code calls for no more than

be quiet. This means that their unit should most

10% of unit area to be storage. Developers and

likely not be located near a musicians unit. Or in

architects should try to utilize the full potential of

the case of the dancer, a special type of floor

the 10%. Artists of all types can utilize storage,

should be considered for dancing purposes.

and is a welcomed addition into their units.

With the wide variety of user types, developers should often consider elements to really individualize each unit. The usage of sound


G

G

C

C

W

W

L

L

S

S

H

H

G

G

C

C

W

W

Live

H

Studio

H

Home

S

Ground

S

Community

L

Work

L

Loft

Lower Level


Live

Precedents

Studio

Lila Studio This tiny 240 square foot live/work studio houses all of its program in one tiny room. In order

Home

needed for adaptability is the sofa bed. During the

Work

Community

to fit in the corner, so as not to take up too much

Ground

to make the space work, Lila built a custom desk room. The other piece of furniture that is day, it is used as couch and at night, it is reconfigured to become her bed. The sofa bed shows the temporal separation that occurs in this live/work studio. It is the time of day that transforms the that piece of furniture from daytime couch use to nighttime bed use.


Live

Precedents Located in a 1935 heritage condominium, this newly renovated space combined two

Studio

Apartment 4D, Ottawa, Ontario

To achieve this flexibility, the apartment is designed with rolling storage cabinets, each holding a specific set of items: coats, files, refrigerator, and television. These cabinets can be moved to create intimate spaces within the loft, or moved to the side for a loft-like open space. Other flexible furniture include the rolling desk, which can become an extension of the kitchen counter for entertainment or a work space, depending on the needs of that time.

Ground

seasonal changes.

Community

modate the ever-evolving life, work, social, and

Work

flexible unit. This live/work space would accom-

Home

600 square foot apartments into one large, highly


Work

Community Ground Home Studio

Live

H ome Office


Live Studio Home Ground Community Work

The home office is the classic live/work space. One of the advantages to having this, aside from the fact that one can work from home,

ber of interesting design spaces. Now, designers

is that unlike the studio/loft, the home office is

and architects are beginning to designate certain

actually separated from the rest of the home.

areas of the house with the specific use as an

Although sometimes the space can be small, peo-

office type. This has caused the threshold

ple who do not need many non-resident users to

between live and work to also evolve. Before, the

utilize the office can find this space to be the per-

door between the office and the rest of the home

fect size. Oftentimes, there is no separate

was the only separation between live and work.

entrance into the workspace and the kitchen and

However, today, numerous designs have led to

bathroom is shared between the live and work

innovating ways for users to cross that threshold.

functions. But, because the resident is also the

In certain projects, that separation is a glass

worker, this is usually not a problem.

bridge or even an outdoor patio. Whatever the

For many years, people have been using

case may be, the home office is progressing from

extra bedrooms and converting them into offices.

simply a room with a desk and computer to new

Once just a room, it has now evolved into a num-

and creative directions.


Live Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

User/Access Patterns

Second Floor

Ground Floor


Live Studio Home Ground Community Work

The home office is a unique type as there is only one means of access, the interior door. When the user is in the home, they simply walk into the home office for access. This room is similar to a spare bedroom as it has a door separating it from the rest of the house. This door is the only means of access into the home office. The door Threshold

also doubles as the separation of the home office from the remainder of the home. The home office does not have itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own kitchen area or bathrooms,

The work space in the home office unit type

for it is simply an extra room in the house and uses

uses the elements of the stair and corridor to cre-

all the amenities of the home. This also allows for

ate a threshold when accessed from the living

flexibility as the home office can be used in the

area. However, the secondary circulation, when

future for a spare bedroom or living area, it is not

living amenities are used, blur the boundary of this

under strict guidelines on what makes a home

threshold.

office a specific work zone.


Live Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

Separation

Second Floor

Ground Floor


Live Studio Home Ground

the home office. The only division of space comes

FLEXIBLE

from partition walls and the small floor area above the office unit, as most home offices are found on the ground floor. In the case of some new homes,

24 18

which are designed for live/work, there is a sepa6

rate entrance into the office from the exterior in

STUDIO LOFT

addition to the main entry, but this is unusual. The hallway from the office to the main space is con-

12

sidered part of the separation as it creates a buffer zone between strictly live functions and the work Work Time

24 18

functions of the office. Not only do the walls and physical elements create separation but time is

6

also a boundary for the space. The home office is

HOME OFFICE

TYPICAL 12

FLEXIBLE

White is introduced in the home office illus-

used during regular business hours but considering its close proximity to living elements its very likely that the space is used before or after the standard nine to five work day. Since the design of

trating when it is unlikely that one would work.

a home office is so standardized almost any room

The dark green emphasizes when work normally

in a house can be transformed, thus reducing the

occurs and the6light green emphasizes when it 18

number or unique features the area can possess.

could be used, but not as typical as the dark

In a new unit accessories like customizable stor-

green. 12 The light green at noon also shows the typ-

age will thicken the separation increasing the

ical lunch break a worker would take.

acoustic qualities of the boundaries.

24

GROUND FLR WORK SPACE

Community

TYPICAL

Work

The separation of space is important in all live/work units, especially in a condition such as


Live Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

Balance of Live/Work

Second Floor

Ground Floor


Live Studio Home Ground Community Work

In a home office the radio of work to live is dramatically smaller than many of the other types. Depending on the size of the residential unit the ratio may vary. Using our typical condition the ratio of work space to live space would read 1:8. The home office is often just one room in a larger multi bedroom residential unit. Typically the only occupants allowed to work in a home office have to be a resident of the unit the home office resides. Our condition shows the home office on the lower level accessible to the living area, bathroom and other common amenities of the house hold. It is not uncommon to see these offices on the second level adjacent to the bedrooms. One of the benefits of having a home office is convenience. Many young families incorporate these into the design of there households in order to spend more time with the family. It allows for more flexible hours and it eliminates routine work related transportation costs.


Live Ground

Home

Studio

Special Considerations

Work

Community

The Home Office typology of Live/Work

ists, but more business orientated developments

has a lot of the same characteristics that any typi-

such as architecture firms, engineering firms,

cal home has. However, what distinguishes the

accounting, etc. Due to the more business orien-

regular home from a home that contains a Home

tated development, there becomes less of a need

Office is the balance between the usage of home

for a separation between ventilation and lighting.

functions throughout the day. For instance, the

In most cases, the lighting and ventilation systems

home will function as a living mechanism by night,

are ties into the system that carries the load for the

and as an office by day. This becomes more prev-

rest of the house. This can said as well for sound-

alent when more than one person works at the

proofing. When the working activity takes place

Home Office.

within the house, the living aspects tend to cease

With this in mind, there are a few con-

to exist. The exception to this concept can be

cepts that should be taken into consideration when

when the work involves some sought of music, or

designing for a Home Office. The first one is the

if family members spend most of their day in the

size of the space. In most occasions, the Home

house during working hours.

Office is designed as a single room for a single

The last thing that should be taken into

user. The room is often such a size that can pos-

consideration is storage. In a business setting,

sibly be converted later into an additional bed-

the idea of a storage closet is crucial. The loca-

room, if the inhabitants decide to sell their home.

tion of this closet should be located within the

If the home owner decides to expand the office

workspace of the Home Office and should be

beyond the single individual, there should be a

somehow separated from the rest of the house. In

consideration of enlarging the room, or possible

a home that has kids, it is pertinent to keep this

joining multiple rooms depending on the office

room under observation as it will most likely have

usage.

items in which could be of interest to the kids, and The Home Office in most cases is

designed with the idea of a business in mind. This usually limits the activities to not necessarily art-

pose as a potential danger.


Second Floor

Ground Floor

Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

Live


Live

Precedents

Studio

Project, Pittsburgh This new reinterpretation of a Pittsburgh row house was built between two 19th century

Home

town homes as a live/work unit for architects. The design incorporates an open floor plan along with a two-story skylight volume that connects both

Ground

floors visually. The first floor contains the kitchen and

Community

living spaces, while the second level contains the workspace. Both of these areas are connected by a glass bridge, which visually and materially separates the most public space with the most private

Work

space. This architectural element uses the material to make users aware of the difference in materiality when walking along the floor, which is wood in the office and glass on the bridge.

Roof Terrace

Second Floor

Ground Floor


Live

Precedents Ma House, Charlottesville

Studio

Christopher Hays and Allison Ewing designed a two-part live/work structure that com-

Home

bines and separates the live/work spaces. The overall design connects the building with the landscape and incorporates the ideas of

Ground

sustainability, Japanese architecture and modern design.

Community

The living areas are contained on the first floor and the bedrooms are on the second. Their work area, an architecture office is also on the first floor. The separation between live and work is an

Work

exterior space, which is bridged together by the raised porch space and enclosed by cypress louvered doors. This example of the home office is different from the typical because of the separate entrance into the space.

Second Floor

Ground Floor


Work

Community Ground Home Studio

Live

G round Floor Workspace


Live Studio Home Ground

York back in the 1970’s, specifi cally built and

trend in our country today. With the poor econ-

used by the “yuppie” generation. Nowadays, it

omy and the rising gas prices, it has become

has expanded to all types of people, and just not

more economically applicable to travel as little

‘yuppies”.

as possible to work. For those who own their

The design of the Ground Floor

own offi ce or retail business, the concept of

Workspace is relatively basic and self explana-

“Zero-Commute Housing” has caught the atten-

tory. With the fi rst fl oor being dedicated to either

tion of many people.

offi ce or retail, there are typically two or three

What has helped the ability of “Zero-

fl oors of live space, depending on the size of the

Commute Housing” is the concept of urban

development and the family. In this case, a two

sprawl. In an attempted to live the busy down-

fl oor confi guration is ideal for up to a three per-

town cities to fi nd more affordable cheap hous-

son family. The second fl oor of the building con-

ing, people started moving to the suburbs, and

sists of an open fl oor plan for more public

decided to commute farther to work. As we all

encounters. It contains a full kitchen, dining

know, time and money is essential in a poor

area, half bathroom and living space. There is

economy. So the most effi cient way to alleviate

also an associated deck overlooking the back of

this problem is to bring work closer to the home.

the row house.

Now there are self suffi cient cities that consists of

The third fl oor encompasses the more

multiple Live/Work typologies, especially that of

private functions of the house. It consists of two

the Ground Floor workspace.

bedrooms with their own private bathroom and

The Ground Floor Workspace typology allows for the owner of the store or offi ce to live directly above his workspace. This concept was

walk-in closets. All these functions are connected by a small hallway.

Community

fi rst come to fruition in the SOHO district of New

Work

The Ground Floor Workspace type of Live/Work has by far been the biggest growing


Live Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

User/Access Patterns

Third Floor

Second Floor

Ground Floor


Live

ceeding through the entry to the work area.

most cases, a Ground Floor Workspace Live/ Work unit is set up in a row house condition. Typically, there are two separate entrances, one for direct access to the workspace on the ground fl oor, and another entrance that specifi cally gains access to the living unit above. However, there is a door that connects the ground fl oor workspace to the stairs leading to the living unit. This allows for the owner access to his offi ce / store without having to go outside. This also allows for a bit of fl exibility. If in the future the owner wants to rent out either the ground fl oor workspace, or the living unit above, the interior door can be locked and blocked off, and each unit type can still have a dedicated entrance. With the fi rst fl oor being dedicated to either offi ce or retail, there are typically two or three fl oors of live space, depending on the size of the development and the family. To maximize the fl oor plan space, a stair located along the party wall works best. Not only does the stair increase a noise buffer between adjacent units, but also helps to create a effi cient link to the exterior as well as the workspace below. For design guidelines having to do with accessibility of a living unit, please refer to the International Building Code as well as city Zoning Laws.

Ground

access patterns for Ground Floor Workspace. In

Community

There are many different types of

elements of the stairs and corridor, and finally pro-

Work

The ground floor workspace is accessible by a progression through the threshold created by the

Home

Studio

Threshold


Live Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

Separation

Third Floor

Second Floor

Ground Floor


Live Studio Home

TYPICAL

Ground

FLEXIBLE

18

6

Community

24 STUDIO LOFT

Work

12

24 18

6

HOME OFFICE

In Live/Work units, the boundary of the

12

space is the biggest distinction for what is live and what is work. In the case of the Ground Work Time

24 18

6

GROUND FLR WORK SPACE

TYPICAL 12

FLEXIBLE

Because the ground floor workspace has typical business hours the white space increases and 24

Floor Workspace confi guration, there is one major boundary to be considered; the fl oor. With

space to the stair vestibule. As stated on the pre-

the fi rst fl oor solely dedicated to a workspace,

vious page, not only does this allow for a private

and the two above fl oors to a live space, the fl oor

separation from one type to another, but the wall

(whether made of wood or steel) is seen as the

also acts as a defi ning moment on the ground

sound, smoke, and fi re barrier between the two

fl oor of the exact boundary of the workspace.

different functions. What also distinguishes this Live/Work

Asides from the fl oor element and wall element as discussed, there is no further separa-

the light green decreases. The dark green shows

type is the separation by a stair and a wall on the

tion needed between the workspace and lives

the hours leaving an hour leeway 18 normal business 6 COMMUNITY

fi rst fl oor. The stair acts as a separator, or con-

pace (as diagramed below).

if one comes early or leaves late from work. The

nector, to that of the workspace and live space. It

For design guidelines having to do with

12 is removed as light green because a lunch hour

is the only object that penetrates the fl oor barrier.

fi re separation of a living unit, please refer to the

store/office would need to be open all hours of a

At the same time, an additional separation is

International Building Code as well as city Zoning

typical workday.

seen by a wall on the fi rst fl oor from the work-

Laws.


Live Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

Balance of Live/Work

Third Floor

Second Floor

Ground Floor


Live Studio Home Ground Community Work

In order to design an efficient Live/Work unit, the ratio of work to live space must be greatly considered. For the most part, this ratio is differ-

below), the possibility of reaching the 50% is a

ent in all cities according to each individual zoning

hard task. Not to mention that the ground floor

law. For the case of this ground floor workspace

workspace has to be handicap accessible as well,

typology, the ratio will be roughly 1:3, that is the

which eliminates the idea of being able to extend

lives pace will be approximately double that of the

the office or retail space to a second floor.

workspace The International Building Code states

It is important to keep in mind that when choosing the size of space, that the type of space

that a Live/Work space is allowed to have a maxi-

you want to create will have a driving factor. Sizes

mum of 50% and a minimum of 10% size area for

of furniture, display cases, handicap accessibility

a work space. Obviously in order to maximize effi -

will all have a hand on how big your space will

ciency of a retail or office space the 50% limit will

need to be.

be pushed to the maximum. However, when

For design guidelines having to do with

designing a complex of Live/Work units, they will

workspace to live space floor area ration, please

be in some sought of row house design. With the

refer to the International Building Code as well as

need to stack elements (as seen in the plans

city Zoning Laws.


Live Community

Ground

Home

Studio

Special Considerations

Work

The Ground Floor Workspace typology of Live/Work has certain unique features that separates it from all the other types. Asides from the typical derived in this typology, there are some things that should be considered when designing this type. Often design as part of a complex, this Live/Work type utilizes a party-wall condition

and work, the separation of these elements acts

between units. This condition often acts as a fire

as a cost saving measure. The separation is also

separation, as well as acoustic separation

utilized because often the type and need of light-

between units. The fire separation is required by

ing, ventilation, and other HVAC components differ

code, but the acoustic separation is optional, but is

from those needed in the living unit.

often applied depending on the type of working conditions in adjacent units. If adjacent units con-

With the Ground Floor Workspace utilizing the different typologies of retail and office

sists of solely office space, then acoustic separa-

space, accessibility becomes a key issue. In

tion might not be necessary. However, if there is

opening the first floor up to customers or cowork-

retail adjacent to an office, then this concept

ers, the first floor by code has to be accessible.

should be applied.

Although the Ground Floor Workspace has to be

In keeping in mind the idea of separation

accessible, there is no requirement for the entire

of Live/Work within a unit via a stair, electric, venti-

unit to be accessible. This typology is usually

lation, and HVAC components are often separated

designed for a small family, different from the

between the live and work portions of the unit.

other Live/Work types which usually caters to a

Due to the physical floor separation between live

specific individual.


Live Studio Home Ground Community Work

Third Floor

Second Floor

Ground Floor


Live

Precedents Project, Antwerpen

Studio

This live/work space sits between two existing exterior walls and uses its wooden floors to sepa-

Home

rate the program. The first floor contains an architecture office, the second is has the dining area, the third is for the living space, and the fourth floor The facade uses colored lights to show the differences in the program for each floor to the public, inciting interest among the residents. Roof Terrace

Work

Community

Ground

has the sleeping area.

Fourth Floor

Third Floor

Second Floor

Ground Floor


Live

Precedents Home Cooking, East Lawrence

Studio

For chefs Robert and Molly Krause, cooking at home as a whole new meaning to it. Buying an existing stone house in Kansas, the

Home

Krauses renovated the house and added new structures around it. The existing building houses

Ground

their living spaces, while the new addition contains a two-level apartment for Mollyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother and a glass pavilion for their restaurant.

Community

The use of glass and steel for the additions contrasted against the original limestone home, which strengthened the presence of the

Work

older house. The program of this live/work space required a special-use permit and shows the wide range of programs that can be in a live/work space.

Second Floor

Ground Floor


Work

Community Ground Home Studio

Live

C ommunity


Live Studio Home

Live/Work space residents can benefit from a private living space but still have the community feel when they are in the shared work space with other residents. This is a good option for people who want to decrease their commute to work but still enjoy a separation of their live space and work space. The communal work space is usually located centrally on a lower floor with living spaces located on the floors above. The work space stays open during normal business hours and generally open to the public. In the past these community live/work spaces have been occupied primarily by artists. They have used their work spaces to invite the public into exhibitions displaying artist work. These communal work spaces offer a good environment for residents to collaborate with other residents to complete projects together. These spaces are often very open and have loose boundaries between individual work spaces. This openness is done to promote the collaboration between the residents.

Community

Ground

typical Live/Work studio lofts. In the Community

Work

Community Live/Work spaces are the best solution for people who dislike the seclusion of


Live Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

User/Access Patterns

Second Floor

(exhibit)

office/support

flex workspace

Ground Floor


Live Studio Home Ground Community Work

There are two main different types of access patterns in the community type; the more private interior stairwells and the direct exterior entrance.

the hours of the community space are open, they

In these community buildings the first floor is com-

have to use their key to get into the space. The

posed as an open work with units of apartments

other entry is accessed via an exterior door.

on the levels above. These units above are

However, the people living in the building are the

strictly live units as work does not take place here.

people using the workspace so the interior stair-

Work always happens on the first level in the com-

wells is the most common means of access. This

munity space. When one is in their respected unit

is also more convenient for the user, so he/she

of residence and wants to access their working

does not have to go outside to access the work-

from the living unit to the workspace is a progres-

space they have to exit their unit and walk down

space. While working there is easy access to rest-

sion through a number of elements that create a

the interior hallway to the interior stairs and finally

rooms and a small kitchen area, which is also

threshold. This threshold between live and work is

to the first level of the building. The workspace on

located on the same level. This provides for a bet-

created by the elements of the corridor, stair, entry

this level is opened during certain hours, encour-

ter work environment, as the worker does not have

of workspace and the navigation through the com-

aging the residents of the building to form a work-

to exit the floor and enter their individual living

munal space toward the personal work space.

ing community together. If one wants to work after

units for these amenities.

Threshold

Within the Community type, the circulation


Live Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

Separation

Second Floor

Ground Floor


Live

TYPICAL

Studio

FLEXIBLE

24 6

STUDIO LOFT

Home

18

Ground

12

18

6

Community

24 HOME OFFICE

Work

12

24 18

6

GROUND FLR WORK SPACE

12

Work Time

24

In a community live/work situation the separation of space is very different from that of the

boundaries of space. Generally in a situation

other types presented here. The units of live and

where work spaces are all together and live

work are not enclosed in the same space therefore

spaces well separated extra characteristics are

any means of circulation between the live unit and

integrated into the design. These include acoustic

work space creates a boundary. In most cases this

barriers, thicker floor slabs, higher ceilings, sup-

consists of hallways, staircases, building cores,

plemental ventilation, extra storage, and separate

space hours which it would be open therefore this

and the floor slab. In a few rare cases the live units

electrical services. All of these features are bene-

entire time is dark green in the diagram. The white

are contained in a different building but still within

fits of being able to physically separate the spaces

illustrates nighttime, when the space is locked.

close proximity, usually a five to fifteen minute

to a higher degree than any other type previously

The light green spaces disappear, as there are no

walk away. In a community where separate build-

mentioned. They also diversify the types of work

in-between work hours; the community workspace

ings house different functions the streets, alley-

that can be done within the building and the addi-

is either open or closed.

ways, and building exteriors create additional

tional features add market appeal to the units.

18

6

COMMUNITY

TYPICAL 12

FLEXIBLE

The community workspace has typical work-


Live Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

Balance of Live/Work

Second Floor

Ground Floor


Live Studio Home

to the ground floor work units. There are two floors of live units above and a communal work floor located on ground level or in the basement. The ratio is skewed because in some cases people living in the vicinity of the live work building are allowed to use the work space as well. Another difference are the units above, they are often single story studio units housing one to two occupants. These factors may change the ratio to read closer to 1:1. Meaning every occupant of the building has a small live space above and a large shared space to work on the lower level. In some cases the lower work level is parceled out into individual work areas. Methods of division include marked tape on the ground, curtains on tracks and movable solid partitions. On a busy day the lower work level can become a lively space encouraging creativity, community interaction and collaboration between residents. In some cases there are special amenities offered such as cocktail bars, gallery spaces, and lounge areas.

Community

Ground

community Live / work units are organized similar

Work

The scale of the community live work unit is significantly larger than the rest of the types. The


Live Work

Community

Ground

Home

Studio

Special Considerations

The Community typology of Live/Work

Since artists are allowed to move into

has the interesting concept between an entire sep-

the community space freely, some type of security

aration between live and work. As seen in the typ-

measures should be taken to make sure each per-

ical and precedents, the community typology has

sons stuff is not damaged or stolen. This issue

the distinction of having to travel a greater dis-

can be alleviated with the institution of security

tance between the living unit to the workspace,

cameras, swipe card access, or the typical secu-

whether it being having to travel through the exte-

rity guard that can be on duty 24 hours a day. Of

rior conditions, or having to travel through a build-

course there are benefits and disadvantages to

ing complex. Like the Studio/Loft, the community

each, but it is up to the discretion of the developer,

is often arranged in a warehouse or complex envi-

architect, or building supervisor to institute these

ronment. Due to multiple people of different art-

measures.

ists types coming together into an individual large

The lighting and HVAC components of a

â&#x20AC;&#x153;communityâ&#x20AC;? space, there are some additional

community space differs most dramatically from

things to consider.

the other typologies. With a large open space, as

In a community space, many people

well as increased ceiling heights, the need of an

come together and utilize a specific area of an

extensive HVAC system in correlation to multiple

open floor plan. This open floor plan arrangement

lighting types become prevalent. In putting multi-

is in most cases divided by moveable partitions,

ple artists types in a large open space, the entire

that can be arranged depending on the size of

space has to be considered in terms of the com-

space needed for each artists. It is not uncommon

munity and not the individual artists. The devel-

to see a grouping of certain artists types in partic-

oper, architect, and building manager has to tackle

ular areas, such as the musicians inhabiting a cor-

this issue as it arises based on its occupants.

ner of the open floor plan, and artists

Often times the large space ends up being divided

encompassing the opposite corner of the room.

into artists type rooms to control lighting and

Due to the open floor plan arrangement, this type

HVAC components more accurately based on

of setup is not necessarily ideal for writers.

need.


Live Studio Home Ground Community Work

Second Floor

(exhibit)

office/support

flex workspace

Ground Floor


Live

Precedents

Studio

Falcon Art Community, Portland The Falcon Art Community is depicted more along the lines of the Live/Work Typical for

Work

Community

Ground

Home

Community. The building itself consists of fourstories total, with three stories above ground being living units, and the basement solely dedicated to space for artists. The artists spaces in the basement are divided into individual units for privacy. The fact that the live space is separated from the work space in a single complex is what makes this a Community. This Precedent is slightly different from the typical in the way of the Community layout. The Typical relates the workspace as an more open community interactive element, as opposed to the Falcon Art Community which is designed for more privacy of works paces.


Live

Precedents Hunterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Point Shipyard, San Francisco

Studio

Hunters Point Shipyard was designed as a community living area for artists. The site is

Home

organized within a compound that entails buildings that are designated for living, with a community building for the creation of artists work. The layout

Ground

of buildings and the separation of activities creates a sense of community. With its location in San

Community

Francisco, the fact of having to move from one building to another by experiencing the outdoor elements does not play as much of a factor as if it was located in a colder climate.

Work

This precedent provides an example that a Community Live/Work development does not necessarily have to be housed within the same complex. With taking into consideration location, it is feasible to create a Community that is detached from different program pieces.

125

116

115

PARKING

117

103

104

110

101 PARKING

GATE


New Ideas


As with most architectural types there are always a few designers trying to push the boundaries. In this section, titled New Ideas, we are exploring two new directions that hold potential for live/work. Both ideas are bases on different market demands that have become very influential. The first concept is that of a temporary live/work hotel suite. The working professional traveling for business is a user group, which has been almost entirely ignored. This concept takes their needs into consideration and explores the extents of hotel room design. The second building discussed in this section takes the idea of adaptability and stretches it to the limits. It allows for three different scenarios: live, live/work, and work. As the sustainable lifestyle becomes more and more apparent in home design, more cases of highly adaptable building types such as the Flex House will increase tremendously. These featured projects are just the starting point and only hint at the potential concealed in the live/work framework, only time will tell where the boundaries lie within this type.


IDEO Marriott Towneplace Suites

The concept behind IDEO’s project for a Marriott Townhouse Suite might be the next big thing for those business people always on the go. This concept takes into consideration the need for a mobile offi ce. These suites are designed as a live/work space, with more emphasis on the work aspect. The room, designed to be part of a hotel and for extended stay usage, has the minimum necessities for living in an extended stay environment, with also providing for an offi ce style workspace. This concept of the mobile, extended stay live/work unit type has started becoming popular all over the world. Also known as “PODS” in other areas, this concept helps to alleviate business travel issues as our society today becomes more mobile and always on the go.


Flex House

Appropriately named the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flex Houseâ&#x20AC;?, this conceptual living environment expands on the idea of adaptability. The Flex House is designed to incorporate moveable partitions that can create space. With the service core located to one side of the house, the rest of the fl oor area can be manipulated based on the user. The owner could option the house to be entirely work, removing all the partitions, or the owner can elect to transform the space into live/work, or just live depending on the insertion of partitions. The exterior of the building was also designed to be fl exible. A trellis like structure surrounds the building. At certain points, the owner can option to open parts of the trellis or keep them closed depending on the needs of the occupant. In most cases, if the building is dedicated to an offi ce then parts of the trellis will be open. If it is dedicated to live, then privacy will be sought after.


Comparison

TYPICAL

Work Time

FLEXIBLE

Threshold

TYPICAL

24

The concept of Separation is a crucial element when describing Live/Work units. As seen in the In looking at the typical presented in this

typical of the book, separation of live and work is

book, it is important to discover the major differ-

in most cases designated by a wall or fl oor sepa-

ences between each Live/Work typology. In a

ration. The one exception to this rule is the

broad sense, many factors play into the unique

Studio/Loft which defi nes separation by furniture,

development of each type such as codes, devel-

rather than a more solid separation of a wall or

opers and architects initiatives, type of users, and

ceiling.

site location. This pattern book not only strives to

In looking at the Balance of Live/Work, there

take these ideas into consideration, but also tries

becomes a noticeable distinction between each

to draw upon conclusions made through research

typical. The community Live/Work for instance

to derive at each typical Live/Work unit in respect

has an overwhelming amount of work space com-

to User/Access Patterns, Separation, and

pared to the size of the individual unit. However,

Balance of Live/Work.

the entire balance of Live/Work as derived by the

User/Access Patterns are different for everyone. The different Live/Work typicals prove how

Studio Loft

18

respect to the one open workspace. The rest of the typical Live/Work units have the majority of

meshes the live and work together, providing the

their space as live. The work portion is usually

user with a short distance of travel between live

imbedded into the living with the exception of the

in work. This distance becomes further as you

Ground Floor Workspace, whose purpose is to be

go from the Home Offi ce typical, to the Ground

relatively separate from the living space due to

Floor Workspace typical, and eventually the

the option of retail activities.

Community typical which has the longest dis-

Overall, each Live/Work typology takes into con-

tance of travel. The concept of User/Access

sideration the same concepts, but tweaks them

Patterns is usually dependent upon the prefer-

slightly to make their typologies unique. The

ence of the user. Some people appreciate the

matrix to the right helps give the reader an overall

integration of Live/Work, whereas others try to

understanding of the major differences of typolo-

separate their living and working activities as

gies presented in this book with respect to the

much as possible while keeping the distance

major concepts of User/Access Patters,

within the realm of Live/Work.

Separation, and Balance of Live/Work.

STUDIO LOFT

TYPICAL

18

FLEXIBLE

6

24 12 24

STUDIO LOFT

TYPICAL FLEXIBLE

18

6

18

6

HOME OFFICE STUDIO LOFT

12 24 12 24

Home Office

18

6

18

6

18

24 12 24 12

18

6 6

HOME OFFICE STUDIO LOFT

GROUND FLR WORK SPACE HOME OFFICE

12 24 12 24 18

whole, with all units taken into consideration with

modes of living. For instance, the Studio/Loft unit

6

12 24

code take into consideration the building as a

different set ups are able to adjust to different

FLEXIBLE

18

Ground Floor Workspace

18

6

24 12 24

12

18

6

6 6

GROUND FLR WORK SPACE HOME OFFICE

COMMUNITY GROUND FLR WORK SPACE

12 24 12 24 18

6

18

6

COMMUNITY GROUND FLR WORK SPACE

12 24 12 18

6

COMMUNITY

6

COMMUNITY

12 24

Community

18

12


Circulation

Separation

Balance of Live/Work

(sequence)

(sequence)


Live/Work Team

Jesse Cabrera

Rob Cayer

Juliet Chun

Nawaz Kamthewala

code-r

historicist

zone-ster

graphic guru


Kathryn Moore

Ben Stracco

Kaitlyn Wolk

Matthew Littell

diagram diva

logo-master

circ. chick

Prof. graphicizer


LIVE/WORK ARCH G691 GRADUATE DEGREE PROJECT STUDIO FALL 2009 This publication has been prepared as part of a five week graduate thesis studio assignment in the Northeastern University School of Architecture for the Fall 2009 Architecture G691 course. Other publications in this series include urban retail, office, and parking garage typologies, all produced by graduate students in the Northeastern University architecture program.


Live/Work