NEST Magazine - Spring/Summer 2022

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NEST MAGAZINE | SPRING/SUMMER 2022 REALTY COURTESY OF NEST 1


PLAN TI N G GREEN ID EA S As we know, there are many things that we can do—small and large —to better protect and preserve our planet. So in this issue of NEST Magazine, we’re focusing on environmentally conscious approaches to our homes’ exteriors. We’re delving into landscaping, yards, gardening, and even a bit of urban farming. We’re sharing simple ideas like catching rainwater to water your flowers, all the way to entirely transforming your lawn into a community food source. Regardless of your yard size or balcony square footage, we hope we’ve included something for everyone. We’re planting green ideas to take root when you’re ready. Are there ways that you’re incorporating sustainable practices into your daily routine? We’d love to hear about it!

NEST REALTY



I N T H IS IS S UE SPR ING /SU MME R 2022

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34 spaces 8 HOUSE TOUR: Contemporary Coastal

A fresh approach to a Wilmington, NC, coastal home with scene-stealing views.

26 HOUSE TOUR: Modern Mountain

A southern Asheville, NC, home seamlessly blends interior and exterior living spaces.

38 CURB APPEAL: Cape Cod

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This Waynesboro, VA, charmer makes the perfect first impression.

40 NATURE-INSPIRED INTERIORS

Allowing your exterior surroundings to inspire your interior design.

in every issue 4 EDITOR’S NOTE We’re planting green ideas!

5 ASK A NESTER

discover 14 ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY

The agents and Brokers of Nest Realty tell us a bit about

LANDSCAPING

their own landscaping.

A look at what it means, and steps you can take to make your yard a place for good.

places 6 LOCAL LOVE

Our local roots run deep.

21 TREND ALERT

Our top picks for creating a sustainably crafted and stylish dining room.

22 BASICS OF BEEKEEPING Your intro to the beautiful and vital practice of

savor 25 WHICH ONION IS BEST?

beekeeping.

32 APPEALING ASTROTURF

An eco-conscious alternative to grass.

Your simple guide to choosing the right onion for the right recipe.

34 INTRO TO URBAN AGRICULTURE

The importance of urban gardening/farming in our communities.

46 LANDSCAPING INVESTMENT

How much should I invest in my landscaping?

48 FOOD WASTE One app’s mission to solve the national food waste crisis.


a letter f ro m th e ed itor “Leave a love letter to nature.” These six mailboxes are a collection of hand-painted mailboxes on display at the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden in Richmond, VA, where garden visitors are encouraged to leave love letters to nature. Unicia Buster (featured in top photo) is a seasonal resident artist at the garden, and curator of this collection. This issue of NEST Magazine is our own love letter to nature. As you flip through these pages, we hope these articles inspire you to rethink the status quo. Rethink your connection to your land, your water consumption, and your food sources. We all know that even small changes add up to lasting, impactful change—and often these opportunities are right in front of us, in our own homes and neighborhoods. There are now more than 40,000 households across the U.S. reading this magazine. Imagine if each of us made one small change—planted one pollinator friendly plant—that adds up to a lot of happy honey bees! We thank all of our local experts for taking the time to speak with us in preparation for this issue. These topics are important and hard to sum up in a few short words, so we encourage you to visit their websites, and delve deeper into the local environmental and food-based organizations that you can support and learn from. In this coming year, through a stronger connection to the Earth, may we each strive to better ourselves, our homes, and our communities.

JASMINE LISTOU BIBLE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF @nestrealty

Photos Courtesy of Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden


NEST MAGAZINE

Q &A

ASK A N EST ER : Pl a n t in g G reen Id ea s We asked the agents and Brokers of Nest Realty to share a bit about their own landscaping and eco-conscious efforts. Do you agree with our flock? How does your garden grow?

PUBLISHER Jonathan Kauffmann EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Jasmine Bible

LAWN MAKEUP 60% of our Nesters have a yard with just grass, with 19% adding in more robust landscaping,

MANAGING EDITOR

native grasses, and other eco-conscious efforts.

Sara Belkowitz

5% have grass, but find it to be too much work and are considering a change.

DESIGN DIRECTOR Paigelee Chancellor SENIOR DESIGNERS Taylor Ahn Megan Chandler GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Liz Eure Brandon Quintin Cece Rooney

URBAN AGRICULTURE 7% of Nesters have an urban

SPRINKLER SYSTEMS

garden that helps nourish

Of the Nesters that have grass, 12% have a sprinkler system, and 26% wish they did. 22% water by hand, and 40% say they let Mother Earth naturally water the grass with no supplemental watering.

their communities, while 80% of Nesters are interested in learning more about urban gardening and farming.

HIGH PERFORMING YARDS

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

A majority of Nesters polled say they wish

Aaron H. Bible Lauren Brooks Barbour Taylor Titus

that their yard was higher performing— this could include a garden, fruit trees, bee hives, pollinator plants and native

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS/ VIDEOGRAPHERS Graeme Jenvey Tom Daly

HOME GARDENS 9% of Nesters have a large garden where they grow a portion of their own food. 33% have small but mighty gardens, and 33% aspire to someday have their own garden.

Published Twice Annually in Charlottesville, Virginia 126 GARRETT STREET, SUITE D CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22902 (800) 325-6378

NestRealty.com/magazine

edible species.

BEES KNEES 7% of Nesters have their own bee hives, while 30% have bee-friendly pollinator perennial flowers.

GOLDILOCKS AND THE THREE YARD SIZES 15% of Nesters wish their yard was larger, 10% wish their yard was smaller, and 33% find their yard size to be juuuuust right.

The majority of Nesters have spent between

COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE

$1,000 - $5,000 on their landscaping since

65% of Nesters either have a seasonal

purchasing their home, while 20% have

subscription to a local CSA, or plan to

invested upwards of $10,000.

sign up this coming season.

LANDSCAPING INVESTMENT



O U R L O C AL ROOTS R U N DE E P By nurturing local non-profits, grassroots efforts, and green businesses, we are investing in our homes and our future from the ground up. As you’ve heard before, these efforts—these passions—start at home. We invite you to explore what is blooming and growing down the street, in your neighborhood, and in our greater community. We look forward to working with you throughout this year of change and growth for all of us.

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CONTEMPORARY

Coastal HOUSE TOUR

When the views and the landscaping are this exquisite…how does one decorate the inside? The owners of this home in Wilmington, NC, once again turned to Sally Williams of Colorful Concepts Interior Design, to bring their vision to

life. Having previously worked with Williams in Raleigh, NC, they knew her

impeccable design eye and attention to detail was paramount to the completion

of this new construction home. Enlisting Williams early on in the project allowed her to help develop the lighting plan, advise on flooring transitions, and choose everything from trim selections to the stairway banister.

The result is a luxurious yet inviting home that feels both serene and inspiring.

Muted hues, repeating patterns, and custom furnishings throughout are carefully selected, never competing with the views just beyond the floor-to-ceiling Designer: Sally Williams Firm: Colorful Concepts Interior Design Project Location: Wilmington, North Carolina Instagram: @colorfulconceptsinteriordesign Website: colorfulconceptsinteriordesign.com

windows. “Everything was about embracing the views,” shares Williams, “low-level furnishings were executed in light and neutral finishes.”

When it comes to colors and patterns, Williams was cautious to use them

sparingly, saving them mostly for the custom area rugs. “It adds interest without interrupting your sight line,” explains Williams. In the dining room, a circular rug and table were chosen partly due to the unique angles of the rooms and

flooring. The angles are beautiful architecturally, but need to be designed around in a clever way—had she chosen square or rectangular objects, they could have

felt misaligned to the walls, windows, or flooring. The swirling base of the resin

and wood table feels unexpected and bold. Hovering above, a faceted glass fixture by Hamerton draws the eye upwards to the blue tray ceilings. A complimentary fixture by Hamerton soars in the adjacent stairwell.

TEXT BY JASMINE BIBLE + PHOTOGRAPHY BY DUSTIN PECK PHOTOGRAPHY

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Photo by Justin Adams

In the living room, the same blue color was used on the ceiling, and feels as though it’s almost a

reflection of the water outside. The gas fireplace is faced in a sleek porcelain material, grounding the room without commanding too much attention. Connecting the living room to the kitchen are the

“Everything about the design was centered on embracing the views.”

bronze bar stools. “The golden bronze tone adds warmth to the room,” says Williams. They are at once

modern, dramatic, and just the right amount of glam. The built-in refrigerator, induction cook top, and

nearly invisible hood vent feel sleek, modern, and utilitarian, while the water-hued glass backsplash and warm wood cabinets keep it from veering into starkness.

For the primary bedroom, the owners requested a restful retreat. Using soft, muted tones and luxe

fabrics, Williams achieved just that. Draperies and motorized shades by the Shade Store allow the owners to drift to sleep to the subtle glittering of the reflecting water, and rise with the sun when

they choose, or peacefully sleep in. Assuring that the light from a television was never a distraction, Williams created an entry lounge area complete with a comfortable sofa and built-in cabinetry to

display assorted decorative objects in varying blue tones. Behind the bed, the palm print wallpaper by Phillip Jeffries, “brings some visual texture, along with a bit of fun and color,” offers Williams.

The home feels light, airy, and inviting. Follow Williams’ lead by pairing sleek, modern lines with warm

colors and materials. Establish a focal point in each room, whether that’s the view, a fireplace, windows, or one incredible piece of furniture. Then choose pieces that will compliment and elevate that focal point, instead of competing.

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TEXT BY JASMINE BIBLE

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M a k i ng your yard a place for good.

What is environmentally friendly landscaping? Eco-friendly landscaping, also known as green or sustainable landscaping, is a way of creating and maintaining your land to save time, money, and valuable natural resources while simultaneously being kind to the earth.

indigenous wildlife. Completely omitting the use of synthetic and toxic chemicals helps to reduce the amount of harmful chemicals entering the atmosphere, groundwater, and food chain. By using hand held tools, it reduces air pollution caused by gas-powered tools.

Traditional landscaping methods require substantial upkeep

Simply put, eco-friendly landscaping is a healthier way of

In contrast, sustainable landscapes are designed to exist in

terms, flip to page 20.

and the use of precious resources (water, energy, fossil fuels). beautiful harmony with the local landscape and nurture

maintaining your yard. For a glossary of commonly used

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Why does it matter? The exterior of our homes are an extension of

the inside, and in some regards an extension of

ourselves and our sensibilities. It is the first thing

that friends see when they visit, and the last space you see as you drive away.

It’s a place of pride for many. The hours spent

carefully mowing the lawn, whacking weeds, and

planting the most vibrant flowers. But what if that effort could be done in harmony with the planet, instead of fighting against it? What if we used

only hand tools, refrained from any chemicals, and planted only native seeds and flowers? Would our

piece of land thrive and in return produce healthy, nourishing food and flowers? Yes. It’s really that

simple. A slower, simpler, more natural approach

can yield healthier results. A place where you will want to spend time, invite others to convene, and share the knowledge you’re gaining.

Whether your acreage is vast or small, our yards

are a place where we can connect with nature. We

can take off our shoes, plant our feet directly on the

earth, and for a moment, be still. Go ahead, get your hands dirty. Make friends with the creepy crawly

critters, quiet your pace long enough for a butterfly to land nearby.

If you live in a condo, you don’t have to miss out

on the meditative aspects of gardening. Seek out a

community garden and plant herbs in pots on your balcony or window sill. Basil, rosemary, and thyme

are easy to grow, and the aroma wafting from your window sill is hard to beat.

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What can I do right now? This season? We know this can all feel overwhelming. Don’t try to take on too much at first, instead star the items that will work well for you right now. Start this season with 3-4 items from this list, then incorporate a handful more each season. Soon you’ll be on your way to an environmentally conscious yard that nourishes your body and soul.

Reduce your grass/lawn size.

Introduce ladybugs.

Water wisely.

Whether it’s 10%, 20%, or 50%, the impact

These natural, noninvasive predators will

For your grass areas, install a sprinkler

into a garden, add pathways, groundcover,

You can order a legion (group) of ladybugs

don’t water and let nature take its course).

is measurable. Turn a portion of your yard drought-resistant grasses, plant trees, or

replace with artificial grass (flip to page 32 for more info on lawn alternatives). Leave the clippings. For the portion of grass that you do keep,

leave the grass clippings after you mow in the spring and summer. They will release

up to 30% of the lawn’s needed nutrients. Remove in the early spring and fall when

devour huge quantities of pesky aphids.

through the mail. Dusk is the best time to release them into your garden.

Incorporate rainscaping features. Set up rain gardens, bioswales, and rock

trees that are appropriate for your zone. Not only will they nourish you, they provide

Skip the hose.

Compost.

use a broom or electric blower.

visually appealing container options now

Opt for electric.

available.

mowers as needed) instead of gas-powered

Capture rainwater. Use a rain barrel to capture rainwater to

Avoid chemicals.

While larger cistern systems may need

synthetic chemicals, toxic fertilizers, sprays, or genetically engineered seeds.

To clean your driveway, deck, or walkways,

rich food for your soil. There are many

your plants’ stems and leaves until then.

Refrain from using any pesticides,

dams to manage stormwater.

needed shade and shelter for wildlife.

Let your garden sleep in.

50 degrees. Pollinators are still sleeping in

drip irrigation system.

Configure your landscaping and plant fruit

Turn your kitchen scraps into nutrient-

until the temperatures have reached above

For your garden and flower beds, install a

Create shade.

decomposition is slower.

In the spring, wait to tidy up your garden

system that has rain sensors (or better yet,

Use electric powered tools (blowers,

appliances that produce more pollutants. Or even better, just use hand tools!

water your flower and vegetable gardens.

Pull weeds by hand.

to adhere to certain local requirements,

fossil fuel consumption.

rain barrels (up to 55 gallons) are typically

It’s less damaging to the soil, and saves on

approved and unregulated (except for in Colorado, where they are regulated).

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Add a beehive.

Add mulch.

Flip to page 22 for your intro into this

Beyond looking lovely, mulch helps

may seem!

drying out too quickly, and creates a barrier

important practice. It’s not as scary as it

Add pollinator plants. If bees simply aren’t an option, planting

improve soil moisture, prevents plants from from the heat and cold. It also helps reduce soil erosion and soil compaction.

pollen and nectar yielding plants will help

Use natural materials.

most nectar? Spring vegetation, including:

landscaping. They are durable, reusable, and

save the bees. Which plants produce the

When possible, use natural rocks for

hazel, snowdrops, primroses, saffron,

look beautiful. You can choose sizes and

willow, helleborine, heather, wild cherry, and dandelion.

colors that fit the aesthetic of your home. Plant marigolds as

Build raised beds.

companion plants.

If the soil in your zone is less than ideal,

Marigolds not only add vibrant color

veggies. The soil stays warmer in the cooler

a natural pest deterrent, and enhance

raised beds are a great idea for growing

months, you can start with a nutrient dense soil, and drainage is better with proper

setup. It’s also physically easier to tend to

your garden instead of bending down, and

to your landscape, they can also provide the growth of basil, broccoli, cabbage, cucumbers, eggplant, gourds, kale, potatoes, squash, and tomatoes.

it helps to keep pets out! Surround the

Subscribe to a CSA.

grass. It will keep the weeds down, give you

(Community Supported Agriculture)

perimeter with pea gravel or dirt instead of

Enroll in a seasonal subscription to a CSA

a place to walk and work on your veggies,

program. You pay ahead for a season’s worth

and requires no watering.

Begin with organic seeds. To grow the healthiest food you can, it’s vital to start with organic seeds sourced

ethically. Look for an organic certification, avoid hybrid seeds, and look for a local

of produce, picked up weekly or bi-weekly. Supporting local farms is a way to have

a direct positive financial impact on your

community, allowing farms to plan, employ, and invest in the longevity of their farms.

Make friends with your neighbors.

seed swap.

Walk around your neighborhood, taking

Grow native species.

enthusiasts are planting. What is

Grow plants, veggies, flowers, and trees that are native to your area and will thrive in

your zone. Your local garden center can help you choose which varieties will work best

note of what your fellow gardening-

thriving? Strike up a conversation and ask for advice. Food can be a beautiful place of common ground.

for your sun positioning, shade, elevation, and climate.

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Glossary of Eco- L ands caping Te rm s Eco-Friendly / Sustainable Landscaping Landscaping that involves planting native plants that will thrive in their local soil type. These plants generally require less watering, and use no synthetic fertilziers or pesticides. This also restores native plants to their rightful areas, and creates healthy habitats for local wildlife. Xeriscaping The practice of designing landscapes to reduce or eliminate the need for irrigation. This means xeriscaped landscapes need little or no water beyond what the natural climate provides. Xeriscaping often means replacing grassy lawns with soil, rocks, mulch, and drought-tolerant native plant species. In desert areas like Phoenix, AZ, xeriscaping can include beautiful native shrubs like the ocotillo. Native Plants / Grasses / Species A native plant species is one “that occurs naturally in a particular region, state, ecosystem, and habitat without direct or indirect human actions” according to the Federal Native Plant Conservation Committee. Bee-Friendly Pollinator Plants While there are many, here is a short list of flowers that bees love: Alyssum, Agastache (anise hyssop), Asclepias (butterfly weed), Aster, Echinacea (coneflower), Geranium (cranesbill), Monarda (bee balm), Papaver (poppies), Rudbeckia (black-eyed Susan), and Trifolium (clover). Rainscaping Any combination of plantings, water features, catch basins, permeable pavement and other activities that manage stormwater as close as possible to where it falls, rather than moving it someplace else. In addition to rain gardens and bioswales, a diverse landscape that includes trees, shrubs, perennials, mulch, and amended soils that intercept and disperse rain as it falls, and allows more water absorption into the soil and by plants. CSA Subscription Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) consists of a community of individuals who pledge support to a farm operation. By paying in advance for a seasonal subscription, farms are able to better plan, employ, and plant seeds for the entire growing season.

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Biological Permaculture The philosophy of working with, rather than against nature. Thoughtful observation rather than thoughtless labor. Looking at plants and animals in all their functions, rather than treating any area as a single product system. Goat Weed Management Goats will eat almost any vegetation and have a capacity to digest even plants with stickers and thorns. They do require variety in their diet, so farmers are careful to rotate them through crop rotation. No Till Seeding No-till farming (also known as zero tillage or direct drilling) is an agricultural technique for growing crops or pasture without disturbing the soil through tillage. No-till farming decreases the amount of soil erosion tillage causes in certain soils, especially in sandy and dry soils on sloping terrain. Companion Planting Companion planting is when two plants are grown close together for the benefit of one or both of those plants (the benefit could go one way or be mutual). This can be growing nectar-rich flowers among crops to attract pollinators, or two vegetables grown side by side to confuse or repel pests. Regenerative agriculture According to non-profit Farmer’s Footprint, regenerative agriculture focuses on rebuilding organic matter and living biodiversity in soil, which produces increasingly nutrient-dense food year after year—while rapidly sequestering excess atmospheric carbon underground to reverse climate change. Regenerative agricultural practices include: no tillage, diverse cover crops, in-farm fertility, compost, holistic planned grazing, no pesticides or synthetic fertilizers, multiple crop rotations, biochar, and pollinator “highways.” Together, these practices increase carbon-rich soil organic matter. The result: vital microbes proliferate, roots go deeper, nutrient uptake improves, water retention increases, plants are more pest resistant, and soil fertility compounds.

Biodynamic Agriculture There are six principles of biodynamic agriculture: plant diversity, crop rotation, animal rotation grazing, composting, homeopathic solutions, and life forces. 1. Plant Diversity A method of keeping soil healthy by allowing a variety of plants to grow on uncultivated land—enhanced by mixing crops so plants work in support of each other (if one plant depletes a certain nutrient in the soil, a companion plant releases that same nutrient into the soil). 2. + 3. Crop Rotation + Animal Rotation Grazing The practice of rotating crops from field to field and raising varied animal species, along with cover crops and green manures, encourages healthy soil, reduces parasites and controls weeds and pests. 4. Composting Recycling food and other organic waste into compost provides a range of environmental benefits, including improving soil health, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, recycling nutrients, and mitigating the impact of droughts. In larger farms, recycled manures and organic waste in the compost pile create humus vital to the farm. When spread on fields, the humus stabilizes nitrogen in the soil, vital to crop productivity. 5. Homeopathic Solutions According to the website HowStuffWorks.com, there are nine homeopathic preparations based on extracts from animal, plant, and mineral manure, each diluted into sprays and used sparingly to homeopathically treat compost, soil, and plants in a process called dynamization. Each preparation is numbered, 500 through 508—six are key to composting, two are used to stimulate humus and one is used to suppress fungal disease on crops. 6. Life Force The principle of life force separates biodynamic farming from other agriculture because it’s the acknowledgement that in addition to earthly influences (biology, physics, chemistry), cosmic forces (moon phases, celestial and seasonal cycles) play a role in the life of the farm. N


1. 9.

TRE ND ALE RT BY TAY LO R T I T U S

stylishly

SUSTAINABLE

8.

Choosing sustainable pieces for your home doesn’t require you to skimp on style! These environmentally conscious items paired together create an organic and inviting dining room.

2.

3.

1. SERVING TONGS Handcrafted by artisans in Vietnam using sustainably grown bamboo. Tia Bamboo Salad Server in Galet Matte, $39; madetrade.com 2. DINING CHAIR Custom made-to-order in the U.S. by a carbon-negative company, who plants one tree with the National Forest Foundation for every purchase. Espresso Polk Side Chair in Honey, $369; insideweather.com 3. WOVEN BASKET Handmade from natural grasses in Tanzania by WomenCraft, a female-focused fair trade social enterprise. Large Basket, $50; thelittlemarket.com 4. STORAGE BIN 100% vegan leather, ethically sourced and responsibly made. Large Storage Bin in Camel, $99; gathre.com 5. WOVEN PITCHER Handmade by fair-trade artisans in Morocco from recycled glass. Woven Pitcher, $62; thelittlemarket.com 6. DINING TABLE Crafted with FSC-certified, Baltic birch wood, each unit is handsanded and made to order. Rectangle Vienna Dining Table in Espresso, $1,150; insideweather.com 7. SERVING TRAY Herringbone pattern cutting board and serving tray, composed of FSC-certified teak wood. Sild Tray by Skagerak, $229; goodeeworld.com 8. DINNERWARE Sustainablly crafted, organically shaped, one-of-a-kind dishware, hand-finished in Portugal. 16-piece set, $250; fablehome.co 9. WOOL RUG Handwoven by a weaving co-operative in Huancayo, Peru. Frames Wool Rug in Oat, 4’ x 6’, $880; madetrade.com

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5.

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6.

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C A N

B E E S

H E L P

Save the World? Why backy ard bee k eep i n g ma y b e t h e fu t u r e o f t h e p l a n et .

TEXT BY AARON H. BIBLE

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If you’ve followed headlines on

frames to hold the honey and honeycomb.

fact pop up at least once: bees are in danger.

with perforations small enough to keep

environmental issues, you’ve likely seen this Honey bee populations have long suffered the effects of Colony Collapse Disorder

(CCD), a situation that stems predominantly

You’ll then insert a queen excluder sheet

the queen trapped in hive but large enough to allow the rest of the bee population to

migrate between the hive and the supers.

from pesticide use, invasive species activity,

The stack will need a different bottom board

number of bee colonies surviving each

during the summer for better ventilation

and climate change complications. The

winter has plummeted 25-30% over the last 15 years.

No matter your feelings about bees

themselves, CCD raises serious cause for concern. Bee colony stability is directly

linked to food stability, and much plant

growth depends on reliable pollination. One

way to directly support bee populations is by keeping bee hives of your very own. Despite common fears, beekeeping can be made

safe and accessible in even the most basic backyard settings.

GET IN THE KNOW

depending on the season—a screened board during the hot and muggy months—and a solid board throughout the winter to help trap in heat. Wintertime also calls for an

entrance reducer at the base of the hive to

protect from inclement weather. “Entrance reducers also help prevent pests like mice

or other small animals from seeking shelter inside the hive in the winter,” says Bill

Theiss of the Shenandoah Valley Beekeepers Association in the Shenandoah Valley of

Virginia. “They can also help the hive defend against robbing in the summer or during periods of drought.”

You’ll also place a varroa trap drawer

along the bottom of the hive, to keep an

According to Lindsay Graves, owner

eye on the amount of varroa—an invasive

vegetable garden consultation service,

wreaking havoc in your hive so that you

or experience. Graves has supported her

whole thing off with a roof cover, and your

of Fourth Street Farm, a professional

mite species that attacks bees—currently

backyard beehives don’t take a ton of work

can treat for infestation as needed. Top the

personal bee population for several years

hive is ready for action.

running, first working with a local beehive

educator to acquire the necessary knowledge. Regional beekeepers associations and

programs like The Bee Conservancy and

PerfectBee offer both online and in-person beekeeping lessons.

Novice beekeepers should consider

obtaining a pre-made hive. “I was lucky

enough to rehome a hive from a friend,” says Graves, “which really cut down on

the initial time and materials. I also felt more comfortable getting started that

way because I knew that it was built well GATHER YOUR SUPPLIES

enough to keep the bees happy.”

To start out, you’ll need a central hive to

If you’ve got enough carpentry experience to

central hive sits a separate brooder box for

construction plan for guidance. Bees can be

house the main bee population. Below the the queen and her eggs. Atop these boxes,

you’ll place the super boxes—where the bees produce the actual honey—complete with

go the DIY route, make sure to follow a hive picky when it comes to their ideal habitat for producing honey, so their success rides on your careful construction.

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EXPLORE YOUR OPTIONS If you can’t commit to a whole hive just yet, you can still offer your support to native bee populations by tailoring your garden and outdoor spaces for the bees. Bees need both pollen and nectar to feed off of and supply to the whole hive. Any plants with both pollen and nectar sources will do the trick (hazel, snowdrops, primroses, saffron, willow, hellebore, heather, wild cherry, dandelion).

STAY SAFE

PUT IN THE TIME

Beekeeping doesn’t have to be dangerous.

Graves only checks on her established

with your immediate neighbors to make

monitor honey production and treat any

Designate a space for your hive, and check sure you’re not near someone with a bee allergy. As for protective gear, you’ll at

least need a bee veil and gloves to protect your face and hands. But a full bee suit goes a step further. “Bees become more

aggressive in the late summer when nectar flows subside due to drought,” says Theiss,

so you may need more or less protection at different times of year.

Graves offers the reminder that,

“Honeybees don’t really want to sting us as much as we think they do. They die when they sting, so they save that weapon for

when they’re feeling the most threatened.” As an extra precaution, you can add a

smoker to your operation. “We burn old

pieces of burlap or leaves in our smoker,” Graves explains, “It tricks the bees into thinking there’s a wildfire nearby. That

convinces them to stay inside the hive for safety and feast up for energy, so they’re

hive about one to two times a month to

varroa mite infestations that pose a threat

plants native to your exact region,” warns Graves. “Native bees need native food, and they know how to tell the

to the bees. Most of the time and effort

difference.” In the Mid-Atlantic

or inheriting a hive like Graves did keeps

Shenandoah Valley beekeepers

the bees!” If you’re building each of the

are some of the first trees to

comes in during the initial stages. Buying

where Theiss and his fellow

it simple: “Just stack it all up and add in

operate, “Maples and willows

components yourself, factor in the time it

bear sustenance to bees, and

will take to construct each of the pieces. The real time commitment is rooted in

patience. Graves didn’t actually harvest any honey from her hive throughout the entire first year, because her bee population was

still building a solid foundation. “The bees seemed stressed, and didn’t have enough

goldenrod makes a good option near the end of the season.” Beyond plants themselves, bees also benefit from expanses of dirt because “Loose bees spend most of the winter hiding underground,” Graves notes. Any bare dirt that you can

honey built up yet for me to take from,” says

provide within your landscaping

pounds of honey, depending on the season

safely burrow down.

Graves. “Bee hives need a base of 40 to 100 and where you live, to feed off of and make

them feel safe.” New beekeepers can expect to wait about a year for their bees to build up a big enough base before harvesting.

distracted from stinging us.”

Whether you install a complete backyard beekeeping system or simply factor

24

“Make sure to focus on

plans gives them space to

Finally, bees appreciate a good water source. Consider installing bird baths, small ponds or even specialized bee

drinking balls. Fill deeper water sources with pebbles or stones because “Bees can’t swim!” Graves remarks. “Give them

bees into your gardening plans moving forward, we can all do our part to support

something to perch on so that

honeybee populations—and create a positive ripple effect through the food chain.

they don’t drown.”

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Cut out and paste in your pantry for quick reference!

WHICH

IS BEST?

Your simple guide to choosing the proper onion for every instance.

WHITE ONION

RED ONION

SHALLOT

CRUNCHIEST AND SHARPEST ZING

BEST FOR EATING RAW

MILDER AND MORE SUBTLE

Use For: • salsas • chutneys • stir-fries

SWEET ONION BEST FOR FRYING Use For: • onion rings • gratins • roasted vegetables

Use For: • gucamole • pickled onions • salads • sandwhiches

GREEN ONION/ SCALLIONS BEST FOR ZEST Use For: • garnishes • savory baking

Use For: • vinaigrettes • garnishes

YELLOW ONION BEST ALL-AROUND COOKING ONION Use For: • sauces • soups • stews

NEST MAGAZINE | SPRING/SUMMER 2022

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NEST MAGAZINE | SPRING/SUMMER 2022


MODERN

Mountain HOUSE TOUR

“Mountain doesn’t have to scream rustic lodge,” quips Jill Jones, Senior Interior

Designer at ID.ology Interiors & Design in Asheville, NC. When clients from Charleston, SC, approached Jones to help with the finish selection and design

of their new construction home in The Ramble neighborhood of Asheville, they wanted the home to feel like an extension of what they had in Charleston–a sophisticated but casual lifestyle.

Her approach with all clients is to begin with who they are as people—how they relax, entertain, and exist on a daily basis. By truly understanding how a client

wants to live in a space, she can then design the layout, finishes, fabrics, and the

artistic details to make it truly feel personal and unique. “As a designer, I help lead my clients to where they ultimately want to go.” Designer: Jill Jones Firm: ID.ology Interiors & Design Project Location: Asheville, North Carolina Instagram: @id.ologyinteriorsdesign Website: idologyasheville.com

Working in tandem with builder Living Stone Design & Build, and local

furnishings source, Atelier Maison & Co., Jones was able to deliver a modern mountain home, complete with organic materials, a beautiful mix of woods, tailored upholstery, and case goods with clean lines (tables, dressers, chests, storage pieces).

A key element to the design was creating harmony between the indoor and

outdoor spaces. The retractable doors between the living room and fully screenedin-porch allow each space to expand, enabling effortless flow between cooking,

dining, entertaining, and relaxing. The furnishings remain low, while the lighting remains high, to not impede on sight lines between each space and out onto the gorgeous backyard.

TEXT BY JASMINE BIBLE + PHOTOGRAPHY BY RYAN THEEDE PHOTOGRAPHY

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Photo by Justin Adams

Throughout the main living spaces, dark walnut

Luxe blue/gray leather swivel chairs pair with the

stained to match the flooring and the open shelving

footrest and place to set a serving tray. The sofa is

beams are both structural and design-forward,

in the kitchen, creating balance and cohesion. The

“Mountain doesn’t have to scream rustic lodge.”

off-white shaker cabinets reach all the way to the soffit, providing extra storage space for less-used

items. Gold hardware plays off the stainless steel appliances, and is echoed in the glass and gold hanging pendants, sink faucet, and legs of the

barstools. Varying tones of blue are used throughout. The island is finished in a rich deep blue, while

a softer shade of blue was chosen for the pencil-

glass backsplash that adorns the hood. To the sides,

undulating white subway tiles bounce light around at certain times of day.

cocktail ottoman, a piece that works as both a

finished in an off-white linen color created from

earth-friendly products with no off gassing. For the choice of woods, Jones opted for contrasting tones, varying dark and light woods that still worked in

harmony. “In the round drum table, there are dark

wood accents, creating a relationship with the dark stained wood on the fireplace.”

In your home, you can utilize a similar approach—a

pairing of light walls with a mix of woods, natural

elements, and comfortable finishes. Jones used the

color blue to create cohesion throughout the entire home. Use your favorite color to achieve the same

In the living room, the fireplace becomes the focal

effect. For the finishing touch, bring in lighting,

wood serves as the mantle, hovering above a black

as you are.

point. A 17’ long beam made from reclaimed barn

artwork, and greenery to make the home as unique N

granite hearth. Large-format porcelain tiles soar

above. The use of larger format materials suit the scale of the room.

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appealing astroturf Why Artificial Grass May Be the Right Answer for Your Home by Aaron H. Bible

“The big one is drainage,” he says. “If there

a 1,200 square foot dog area at his vacation

is a wet area of your yard that doesn’t drain

home on the Eastern Shore. A few months

well, we would create the proper drainage,

later we were back at his daughter’s house

and then turf.”

replacing her entire yard with turf,” shares Puoplo. He recently stopped by to take a look at this client’s primary residence

INVESTMENT

where he had installed artificial turf nearly

According to Home Depot, the average artificial grass installation project starts at around $5,000, and online calculators will vary by the type of product being installed and by location. Puopolo says his jobs on average cost about $10 per square foot, and of course that varies by size and scope.

Green grass may feel classically all-

20 years ago, and was impressed that it still looked fantastic.

One of the major selling points for pet owners is the infill product, he explained. “It neutralizes odors and drains liquids instantly. Solid waste still has to get picked up, but there’s no more digging, muddy paws, etc,

American, but is it the best choice for

WATER SAVINGS AND OTHER

modern day yards? Is artificial grass, or

ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS

Astroturf, a viable alternative? Beyond the

When it comes to water savings, as

beautiful, manicured, year-round appeal it

well as cost savings over time, Puopolo

LIMITATIONS

has on the surface, we wanted the details.

says it depends on how much time and

Are there any limitations? If it seems too

What’s the annual water usage savings?

money you spend on your yard now.

good to be true, it probably is, right? “Really

Is it more environmentally friendly than

According to the EPA (Environmental

steep grades can be problematic, but since

grass? What is the upkeep and how much

Protection Agency), as much as one third

steep areas would generally have very little

is the investment?

of all residential water consumption goes

traffic we would make something work,

towards watering lawns, so never having

usually just not using an infill, which would

To find out, we went to friend of Nest

to water your lawn again adds up to

tend to wash out anyway,” Puopolo says.

Jim Puopolo, owner of XX South LLC, a

substantial savings and water conservation.

and the yard looks great all year long.”

Do people create entire yards with turf, or

Charlottesville, VA, company that installs residential turf and backyard game courts.

“The cost of cutting grass, fertilizer, and

is it mostly done on porches and patios and

“This year I’ve taken on a couple large

water usage all add up to hard costs, but

smaller spaces? According to Puopolo, it’s

commercial jobs, but I prefer smaller

customers are also more aware than ever

both. “We see people with big yards they

residential jobs,” he shared with us from

of the environmental impacts of those

are sick of taking care of, but also people

a job site in South Carolina where he was

same factors: environmental costs of water

who have a couple tiny grass areas that

installing an 8,000 square foot section of

usage, small engine pollution, and fertilizer

they just don’t want the hassle of dealing

turf at a student housing complex.

production and runoff, which are all

with any longer. I’ve had installations that

horrible for the environment,” he says.

were anywhere from a couple hundred square feet to thousands of square feet.”

So who is the ideal candidate for artificial grass? “Homeowners who are tired

Particularly appealing to some may be

of natural grass and the upkeep and

the fact that artificial turf is completely

Is artificial turf something you’ve

maintenance required,” Puopolo says.

maintenance free—except for leaf

considered for your outdoor spaces? We

“People who struggle to grow nice grass in

management when needed, said Puopolo.

love the clean, tidy look, the ease of picking

areas that are too wet, too shady, etc.”

“No lawnmowers, no irrigation

up after pets, and the water savings. If you

maintenance.”

have a small space around your home that is crying out for a makeover, be sure to take

To get started, there are the costs of

before and after pics so we can see what

preparing the site, removing existing

“Pet facilities use synthetic turf all the

grass, and other organic vegetation, says

time. I have a repeat customer who told

Puopolo. For example, are there sprinkler

me ‘Once your dog poops on artificial turf

heads or an irrigation system to remove?

you’ll never have real grass again!’ I installed

you’ve accomplished! N

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An Introduction to

The nutritional and social importance of sustainable food sources. TEXT BY JASMINE BIBLE + PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRONTLINE FARMING

You may or may not have heard of urban agriculture (also commonly referred to as urban farming and urban gardening) but what is it really? In its simplest state, urban agriculture is fresh food access for people living in urban areas. This can take the form of backyard, neighborhood, roof-top, or balcony gardens. It can be a solo plot in a community garden, or participation in a greater community-wide farm.

Expert Damien Thompson, Ph.D. Co-Founder, FrontLine Farming frontlinefarming.org

26

To gain more insight, we spoke with Damien Thompson, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Anthropology, Sociology, and Criminal Justice at Regis University in Denver, Colorado. He holds certifications in Advanced Permaculture Design, is a Mayor-Appointed member of the Sustainable Food Council for the City of Denver, serves as co-chair for the city’s Good Food Purchasing policy group, and is the Co-Founder of FrontLine Farming.

NEST MAGAZINE | SPRING/SUMMER 2022

According to Dr. Thompson, “Urban agriculture is any act where you are combining care of the land and production of food in the city.” With a personal and academic passion for food justice and food sovereignty, Thompson co-founded FrontLine Farming in 2018 alongside Fatuma Emmad. This advocacy group now operates more than four acres of urban farmland, and is committed to providing food to people of all income levels by sustainably growing

Why is urban agriculture important and what does it achieve? “It’s a three-pronged answer—first, the physical nourishment of our bodies, second, the social justice and food sovereignty aspect, and third, its position as a vital part of a sustainable food system,” explains Thompson.


“We live diminished lives because we don’t have access or connection to the land.” ~ Dr. Thomson

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PHYSICAL NOURISHMENT The location of your home shouldn’t affect your access to fresh food. Yet in many cities, locally grown food

is scarce. For Thompson, his wife, and two daughters,

what you grow, what you eat—you reclaim your power. This can be on an individual basis, or community level.

growing food in their yard began first as a form of

VITAL PART OF FOOD SUSTAINABILITY

a tomato fresh off a vine, especially one that you’ve

and sustainable growing system,” explains Thompson.

feeding their own family, “There is nothing like tasting

“Urban agriculture is an important part of a balanced

grown yourself,” he says.

“To maintain a system that allows everyone access to

Spending time with his family in their garden sparked a desire to engage others. “I was interested in creating a context in which I could help other people, and

“You can be a steward of the soil wherever you are— you don’t have to live in a rural area.”

relationship with your food and your land—choosing

advocate for people that have been marginalized. We live diminished lives because we don’t have access or connection to the land.”

freshly grown food, there are three growing systems that must coexist: urban, peri-urban, and rural

agriculture.” Urban agriculture refers to growing that

happens within city limits or inside of a municipality,

peri-urban refers to smaller farms (1-5 acres) that exist immediately outside of a metropolitan area, and rural refers to everything larger in scale and production.

Bringing people into the cycle of life that agriculture

Growing up in suburban North Carolina, Thompson

they eat—is one of the fundamental goals of FrontLine

a lawn that you mowed once a week. “It requires real

provides—to truly understand what goes into the food Farming and urban agriculture as a whole. The

nutritional value of a locally grown piece of fruit versus one that came from another continent and traveled

many food miles (the distance from where the food

is grown to where it is consumed) is vastly different. Using food, flowers, and herbs as medicine for our

bodies is an ancient and sacred practice that we seem to have lost reverence for.

SOCIAL JUSTICE + FOOD SOVEREIGNTY FrontLine Farming is a community engaged in food

production and education, whose mission is to create

greater equality across local food systems. They seek to support and create leadership for women and people of color by growing food, listening, educating, and

honoring land and ancestors through policy initiatives

was accustomed to the mentality that your yard was

change to do something that’s not ornamental,” he says. A shift in perspective and priorities is required to start growing on your own land, patio, or window ledge.

But organizations across the country like FrontLine

Farming offer educational classes on getting started, maintaining, and growing your own garden. Visit a

community garden or small farm to familiarize yourself with what grows best locally.

“Educating kids especially is vital,” Thompson says.

“Helping them to understand where their food comes from, establishing a connection to the land…Just like

you wouldn’t take a rural kid and not teach them about computers, why would you not teach an urban kid about farming?”

and direct action.

The best advice Thompson offers is also the simplest:

“I’m particularly interested in how communities

plant. You might be disappointed, but you can go back

can utilize traditional and modern information

and practices to build food systems which uplift marginalized and oppressed peoples, restore

“Just start planting! The worst thing you can do is kill a to the garden center and buy more plants. No one is perfect at the beginning.”

ecosystems, build biodiversity, and support cultural

If that still feels daunting, subscribe to a local CSA

with the highest level of access to the means to support

dirty, humble yourself, and resign to the beauty of not

diversity, as well as provide individuals and families their own health,” shares Thompson.

Food sovereignty goes beyond ensuring that people

have enough to eat. It’s about regaining control over

what we consume. By establishing your own personal

program, and volunteer for a season. Get your hands

knowing what’s to come. “Every year, every season, you start anew,” Thompson reassures. “Farming relies on so

many things you can’t control— so start small and learn from trial and error.”

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C AP E C O D Waynesboro, Virginia

CURB APPEAL 30

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get the look

GOLD KI CK PLAT E Kick plates not only protect the lower portion of your door from damage, but also add a beautiful bit of charm. The taller the plate, the more charm you add! 10” x 34”, Polished Brass Door Kick, $63, homedepot.com

SHUT T ER HO OKS Also known as shutter dogs or tiebacks, shutter hooks provide the perfect hold back mechanism and decorative trim for exterior shutters. 7” Black Exterior Shutter S Hooks, $6, homedepot.com

S H UTTE RS Shutters may be used for a variety of reasons—privacy, blocking sunlight, or protecting the windows against harsh weather. And they add a delicious dose of character. Louvered Vinyl Exterior Shutters in Black, $38, homedepot.com

COLOR PALET T E

Ice Mist | 2123-70

White and black is a classic color combination that’s hard to beat. It works well on nearly any style of home, and this adorable cape cod is no exception. The crisp white and black keeps the home feeling fresh and well maintained. House: Ice Mist 2123-70 by Benjamin Moore Shutters: Jet Black 2120-10 by Benjamin Moore

Jet Black | 2120-10

Front Door: Jet Black 2120-10 by Benjamin Moore, benjaminmoore.com

MAI LBOX Subtle detailing makes this wall-mounted mailbox feel special. Victoria Black Wall Mount Vertical Mailbox, $160, homedepot.com

LI GHT FI XT UR E Classic lines in a stately black finish work well in a pair, flanking the entrance. 1-Light Imperial Black Outdoor Wall Lantern Sconce, $109, homedepot.com

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Allowing Nature to Drive Your Design Use your exterior surroundings to inspire your interior decor.

Utilize the natural beauty or classic architecture that surrounds you to determine a color palette or style for your home. We’ve taken three inspiration images from around our Nest locations and created a mood board based on each. Some of our selections are budget savvy, some are splurge-worthy. Find what speaks to you and your personal style.

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NEST MAGAZINE | SPRING/SUMMER 2022


1.

2.

3.

5.

6.

4.

SOFT + SERENE SITTING ROOM Arches are all the rage in interior design right now, and we love the way they pay homage to the iconic RF&P Bridge in Fredericksburg, VA. Pulling in the soft tones of the cotton-candy skies, we created our ideal sitting room, complete with curved edges, supple textures, and a balance of feminine and masculine materials.

1. PINK WALLPAPER Drop It Modern Raceway Wallpaper in Amber, $180/roll, westelm.com 2. CABINET Tolle Cabinet, $3,999, burkedecor.com 3. SOFA Abey Sofa in Pink Velvet, $1,309, overstock.com 4. BENCH Roma Bench, $799, cb2.com 5. PAINT Prince by Clare, $59/gallon, clare.com 6. PAINT Baby Soft by Clare, clare.com 7. SIDEBOARD Harper Sideboard, $1,099, castlery.com

7.


1.

2.

7. 3. 6.

5.

4.

8.


ETHEREAL ESCAPE Using this gorgeous sunrise image taken from atop The Chimneys, a popular hiking spot in Morganton, NC, we created a bedroom mood board that leans into rich hues and natural textures.

9.

10.

11.

1. LAMP Raw Marble Lamp, $149, cb2.com 2. WALLPAPER - AMORINA LEAF Amorina Brown Leaf Wallpaper by Brewster, $60.00/roll, burkedecor.com 3. RUG Jute/Sisal Area Rug In Taupe, 8’ x 10’, $342, birchlane.com 4. BENCH Hani 72” Velvet Bench, $1,299, cb2.com 5. ART PRINTS Floral Botanical Study by Jennifer Goldberger, $383, wayfair.com 6. ART SCULPTURE 5-Link Wood Decorative Object, $108, westelm.com 7. BASKET BlueMake Woven Seagrass Belly Basket, Medium in Sand, $19, amazon.com 8. WALLPAPER - ALANNAH BOTANICAL Alannah Botanical Wallpaper in Green by Brewster Home Fashions, $72.00/roll, burkedecor.com 9. PAINT Good as Gold by Clare, $59, clare.com 10. PAINT Coffee Date by Clare, $59, clare.com 11. BED Mannion Bed in Barnwood, Queen, $555, birchlane.com

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FRESH FOYER Decor doesn’t have to be stuffy. Take the fun up a notch with punchy colors and unexpected materials. This vibrant image of a sweeping blue sky and electric chartreuse green grass taken outside of Roanoke, VA, inspired us to take a fresh approach to a foyer. Utilizing a literal approach to tiny trees (bonsais) and green grass (shag rug), we love the way this happy mood board came together.

1. PAINT Hyperlink by Clare, $59/gallon, clare.com 2. PAINT Avocado Toast by Clare, $59/gallon, clare.com, 3. TRAY Kaleido Tray, Medium, $34, dwr.com 4. WALLPAPER - GRASSCLOTH Grasscloth Removable Wallpaper in Sand, $149/roll, potterybarn.com 5. MIRROR Romano Wall Mirror in Sapphire Blue, $747, burkedecor.com 6. BONSAI Ethically Sourced Juniper Bonsai, $36-48, plants.com 7. RUG Shag Rug in Green Grass, 5’ x 8’, $79, rugs.com 8. LAMP Bellhop Table Lamp in Yellow, $325, lumens.com 9. CONSOLE Burled WoodHolland Open Console, $2,495, williamsonoma.com 10. WALLPAPER - SUMMER GARDEN Summer Garden Wallpaper by Milton & King, $268/roll, burkedecor.com

1. 2.

3.


7.

8.

9. 4. 10. 5.

6.


Lovely landscaping in Earlysville, VA

LAN DS CA P I N G IN V E STM E N T HOW MUC H SH O U L D I I N VE ST IN MY L A N DS C A P I N G?

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You’ve heard by now that even simple acts like sprinkling

Gardens suggested that you can increase your home’s

wood chips neatly around your existing outdoor

value 5-15% by spending 5-15% of your home’s current

landscaping can add instant value and curb appeal to

value on landscape upgrades and maintenance.

your home, especially when you are in the process of listing and selling your home.

So while 5-15% of your home’s value has become a rough guideline based on averages, more expensive homes have

But what if you’re planning on staying put for a while?

greater potential to increase in value from well-designed

When investing in exterior landscaping, as with interior

and well-installed landscape upgrades, according to the

upgrades like a kitchen or a bath, always keep in the back

publisher.

of your mind when you may or may not see a return on your investment (ROI). If your investment choices are

The American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA)

simply for the ongoing enjoyment of your home, that’s

recommends investing 10% of your home’s value in

wonderful. But if you are hoping to recoup the cost of

landscaping, which quickly adds up to a lot of money,

landscaping, bear in mind that things like hardscapes

especially for higher priced homes.

may last, but vegetation may not, and that larger plants and trees tend to increase in value over time.

To get the inside scoop on landscape investment success, we turned to our Nest agents, who have facilitated

So when should you DIY it with some bags of wood

countless transactions throughout the nation. We wanted

chips, and when do you need to bring in the pros? Is

to know what they’ve invested in their own landscaping.

there a secret formula? A magic sauce? What’s the ROI of various stages of outdoor landscaping…how do you

More than 43% of Nest agents across regions have

know when you’ll recoup your money and by how much?

invested up to $5,000 in landscaping to their own homes since closing, and almost 14% of agents have invested $10,000 or more. 42% of Nesters wish their yard was

SO HOW MUCH, EXACTLY?

higher performing (with a bee hive, garden, edible native plants); and almost 19% employ a mix of xeriscaping,

The fact is, a good first impression translates into higher

grass, turf, and other creative landscaping.

perceived value, which translates into real life ROI. And if you follow some basic landscape design principles like

So what’s right for you? The answer is, it depends.

balance, repetition, focal points, contrast and rhythm,

Check with your local Nest agent to discuss your local

you should generally be okay. If this immediately sounds

market conditions and your home’s particulars. If you

out of your scope or realm, then you may want to call in

are planning on selling soon, putting $500-$1,000 into

a professional.

your home’s exterior can improve curb appeal enough to entice buyers or close a deal.

A study from the Virginia Tech Cooperative Extension found that investment in landscaping can increase value by 5-12%, depending on location and the intricacy of the

DO WHAT’S RIGHT FOR YOUR BUDGET

design (curved pathways, integrated stonework, large trees, etc.).

At the end of the day, you have to do what you can afford and what will bring you the most satisfaction,

Some sources suggest spending more, even up to 20%

whether that is the highest immediate sale price for

of your home’s value in not just softscaping (plantings)

your home, or a zen garden to wait out a pandemic. But

but hardscaping and structural investments like ponds,

knowing these averages and best practices will set you

paths, fences, lighting, outdoor living spaces, pools and

down the path to making the right decision for you and

yes, fire pits. A study often cited by Better Homes &

your household. Set a budget, stick with it, and enjoy!

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d o o F e t s a W

UP TO 40 PERCENT OF FOOD THAT IS PRODUCED IN THE U.S. IS WASTED. MEANWHILE, 1 IN 7 PEOPLE IN THE U.S. GO HUNGRY EACH DAY. LEAH LIZARONDO, CEO AND FOUNDER OF 412 FOOD RESCUE, IS CHANGING THE WAY FOOD IS BEING SAVED.

TEXT BY AARON H. BIBLE

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As we strive to achieve a balanced and sustainable food growing system, we also have to consider what happens to the food that isn’t consumed. The idea of food waste is a relatively recent phenomenon as we have, as a society, shifted further and further away from the sources of our food. And you may not give it much thought on a daily basis, because food waste is primarily generated from grocery chains and large restaurants. Sadly, up to 40 percent of the food that is produced in the U.S. is wasted. When this food ends up in landfills, it produces methane, a greenhouse gas. LEAH LIZARONDO, CEO & FOUNDER Meanwhile, 1 in 7 people in the U.S. go hungry each day, according to Leah Lizarondo, CEO and Founder of 412 Food Rescue. 412 Food Rescue, a food reclamation group, is working to keep good food out of landfills and redistribute it to those in need. Lizarondo is also the CEO and Founder of Food Rescue Hero—a new app developed by the organization that is changing the way food is being saved, and hoping to expand into 100 cities nationwide by 2030, in accordance with the United Nations’ Sustainable Development goals. It operates like a "DoorDash for good," laughs Lizarondo. Through the Food Rescue Hero app, volunteer drivers are alerted when surplus food is available nearby to be picked up and delivered to a household in need or nonprofit serving people experiencing food insecurity. “We always knew we would need it. In the early days we were really just hacking social media to coordinate these drivers, but after a while it became impossible.” The app now mobilizes the nation's largest fleet of on-demand volunteer drivers working to prevent food waste. The app is currently being used in 14 U.S. cities where more than 80 million pounds of good food has been rescued. So far, they have redistributed 21,293,707 pounds of food in the Pittsburgh, PA, area alone, and mitigated 11.5 million pounds of CO2 emissions. Phoenix, AZ, and Madison, WI, are both on their target list. Your city can be, too. “For cities that aren't currently using our app technology, we are suggesting that people reach out to their local food rescue organizations and let them know that we exist—we have options available for food rescues of all sizes,” says Lizarondo. “We look for partners that are other food rescue non-profits or startups that want to do food rescue and we provide them with all the technology and training.”

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OF 412 FOOD RESCUE



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