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New Milford, New Hampshire: Once a Jewel; Now a Ghost

white pine The

series of

architectural monographs volume xxx number two

Lumber and Sons family-owned lumber mills

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% Letter from the Publisher 5 % A Walk in the Woods 5 % The Last Generation? 5

The Third Crop -1 165 Years of Stewardship

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Passing the Buck of Success at The Hammond Lumber Company

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% LumberM and Sons - The Movie 5

Not Mall Rats, Mill Rats: Growing Up in a Lumber Mill

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Š NELMA 2013 Cumberland, Maine


an architectural

monograph Lumber and Sons Family-Owned Lumber Mills Prepared for Publication by Northeastern Lumber Manufacturers Association 272 Tuttle Road Cumberland, ME 04021 Š 2013


+ Letter from the Publisher: This White Pine Monograph is dedicated to family-run lumber mills. These mills bring a texture to the industry that guides and underscores the very fabric of our industry. And while we could not interview all of the family-run mills for this project, we hope to in the near future.

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e set out to learn more about running a family lumber mill by sending our research team to interview some of them in the Northeast. The research team also captured video of the interviews, and a brief web-short is available at http://easternwhitepine.org/movie/. Our hope it to extend this project into a full-length documentary film on family run lumber mills. Our goal is to capture the generational stories and share them with the next generation of mills owners and managers. Throughout the interviews completed for this issue, we heard the phrase “sawdust in our veins.” That metaphor manifests itself in hard work, environmental stewardship, and a dogged determination through volatile market conditions beyond our control. Most NELMA mills, family-run or not, tend to have sawdust in their veins. But to see the direct lineage is a fascinating look at a part of our industry that is both under-celebrated and fading fast as the economics of running a mill, the hard work involved, and the rural locations fail to, in some cases, attract the upcoming generation. What will happen to our family run mills if we are unable to pass them forward? It’s hard to tell. So for now, we celebrate. I hope you enjoy these stories of lumber mill families. If you would like to add your own voice, please don’t hesitate to reach us at monograph@easternwhitepine.org. Enjoy,

Jeff Easterling Publisher of the White Pine Monographs President of the Northeastern Lumber Manufacturers Association (NELMA)

PS: If you have a project or idea you would like us to consider featuring in an upcoming Monograph, please email monograph@easternwhitepine.org.

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a walk in the woods

The

white pine series of

architectural monographs A publication suggesting the architectural uses of eastern white pine and its availability today.

(8 volume xxx number two (8 +

A Walk in the Woods. Jim Robbins knows family, and he knows how to manage a forest. It’s no surprise that he draws upon his experience with one as an analogy for the other. He’s quick to acknowledge that raising children is a lot more complicated and important, but being part of a lumber family going back 5 generations, it’s not hard for Jim to see life through the lens of the forest. Robbins Lumber Company is a 5th generation lumber mill [founded in 1881] managing 30,000 acres of its own forests. Milling operations are located on a 40-acre site that includes a 1.2 MW co-generation plant, 675,000 board foot capacity kilns, computerized sawmill, planing mills, cut up shop, 70,000 square feet of warehouse, and the company’s general offices. www.rlco.com Father and Son, Jim and Alden Robbins, Robbins Lumber Company. 1

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n a cool Fall afternoon we spent some time with Jim and his family, touring his state of the art lumber mill in Searsmont, Maine. With his son Alden and his grandson Eli, we walked the family Christmas Tree farm, and his well-managed forests. A tour given through the eyes of three generations provided insight into how and why the family has been so successful. Jim Robbins amongst the pines.

Jim’s all business in the Mill, but the moment his foot touches the forest floor, he lights up, relaxes, and you catch a glimpse of what made him such a great salesman - a passion for timber. Jim’s all business in the Mill, but the moment his foot touches the forest floor, he lights up, relaxes, and you catch a glimpse of what made him such a great salesman - a passion for timber. He is comfortable in a board room, alert in the mill, but seems most at home among the trees. Leading us deeper into the woods, Jim and Eli duck into a pine grove. Jim turns and says “c’mon in,” as if he inviting us into his home. And in a sense he was.

The crew at the lumber yard in 1891.

Frank and Otis Robbins [Jim’s great grandfather and grandfather] opened up their first mill, a stave mill producing narrow strips of wood for barrels, in 1881. Barrels were big business in Maine, and Robbins provided them for farmers and fishermen to ship their goods. Recognizing and responding to market conditions is apparent in their business strategy. This is not unique to family mills, but the stories that make up their family history also make up the business history, so lessons are not lost on next generations of managers.

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A Walk in the Woods

An employee at the old barrel stave station.

In the 1880‘s, upstairs at the Mill, Otis turned baseball bats on a lathe for the town kids. “Every kid in town had a baseball bat made by my grandfather. They never bought a bat,” Jim tells us. “If they played baseball, they got a bat, ‘cause he just loved kids and he loved baseball.” In his 80’s Otis even had the thrill of a lifetime to turn a few bats for Red Sox legend Ted Williams. The passion and pride that stories like this carry are nearly non-existent in “corporate mills.”

By 1958, the Robbins’ mill had burned down and was re-built adding dimension lumber to the business mix. As the post-war housing boom was reaching a fever pitch due to a surging economy, a family exodus from cities to the suburbs, and a housing shortage by the end of the War in the 40‘s, the Robbins poised themselves to once again capture the opportunity through innovation. A burned mill, became an opportunity to retool for new markets. This was about the same time the family started planting Christmas Trees. Jim remembers that the plan was to plant the trees when he was young, shear them in High school, so that they could harvest them to pay for his college. Well, he graduated from college before they had matured, but the tradition continues today with over 150,000 Christmas trees on their land. All the Robbins kids have grown up shearing the Christmas trees, Jim tells us as grandson Eli demonstrates the skills passed down by generations.

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James Robbins shows off some Robbins’ baseball bats from 1957.


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A teaching moment between Jim Robbins and grandson Eli on the Christmas tree farm. 4

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A Walk in the Woods

Watching this tradition it’s no wonder that Jim makes easy connections between being a steward of the land and raising a mill family. As we walk through the Christmas trees, Jim keeps a grandfather’s eye on Eli who wields the shearing knife shaping the trees, as they began to take their classic shape. “There are a lot of similarities between growing kids and growing trees,” Jim tells us. “Growing trees is easier, you don’t have as many outside influences, especially like today,” he admits. Ever practical, Jim explains this philosophy without romanticizing it too much. “In forestry, it takes about 10 years to recognize that you have made a mistake.” He tells us about clearing low grade hardwoods in the 1970’s to burn wood for the biomass boiler and replanting the land with Eastern White Pine. It was years before they would realize that a forest with a diverse species mix would be a healthier forest and produce better and straighter timber. Today, they will leave low grade hardwood tree in their pine forest for shade - they call them ‘nurse trees’.

“Raising children,” he says, “seems to be about the same. It takes a good long while before you can realize that you may have made some mistakes. And like that pine forest, it’s important not to give them too much freedom [sunlight], but not shelter them too much. It’s a delicate balance in both foresting and in child raising.” Speaking of trees, Jim reminds us that the ones that have the right amount of shade don’t grow very fast, but they grow up straight and tall. Eastern White Pine, like kids, needs lots of sunlight, “but not too much sunlight or you attract weevils,” he quickly warns. You need to keep the negative influences away from both of them. Kids with too much freedom attract their own kind of weevils. The Robbins family has learned most of what there is to know about managing healthy forests. With 30,000 acres under direct management, they’ve learned the lessons that only 130 years of managing the land can teach you. It could be their greatest competitive edge in the marketplace. As Jim says, “you give the best soils, the best seed stock, the best management techniques and hopefully we will come out with the best pine product in the end.” “I’m proud of the way we manage our forests,” he says, but he might as well be talking about his kids. /

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+ The Last Generation? What happens when a tradition dies? What happens when a generation moves away, and doesn’t return home to run the mill? As one generation reaches retirement and another reaches maturity, this is a very real question. Shut the mill down? Merge? Sell? What happens to the brand or the family name, the employees and the community that relies on the mill for jobs and support? For Pleasant River Lumber, that’s a decision that they don’t have to make....yet. Pleasant River Lumber is a 100% U.S., family-owned Maine business with four generations of experience in the forest products industry. Their mills produce over 100 million board feet of spruce dimensional lumber and Eastern White Pine annually, for customers throughout the East Coast region. www.pleasantriverlumber.com

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Luke, Jason and Chris Brochu, two of four generations to run Pleasant River Lumber.

rothers Jason and Chris Brochu [both vice presidents of the company] are the fourth generation to run the spruce mills. They remember playing in the debris pile at the lumberyard at Stratton lumber when they were kids. They didn’t spend a lot of time inside the mill though - it was more playground than proving ground. In fact, their father Adrian Brochu, never pressured them into the business. Instead, he was of the philosophy, that it had to be their choice to enter into this difficult [but rewarding] business.

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The Last Generation?

One of the first memories Chris has of the mill is when he was on a tour of the mill for school. His Uncle Luke was guiding the tour, and he was just another student on the tour - being educated about the process like every other child in the class. This handsoff approach to recruiting the next generation to help run the mill might be rare, but was extremely successful in this case. The strategy almost backfired, however. After college, Jason and Chris each went their own way, away from the family business. Chris moved to New Hampshire and was working for a hardwood mill, while Jason moved to Boston and was running a few Golf shops. Working in the golf industry seemed to be the antithesis of forestry - open, perfectly manicured field as opposed to healthy lush forests. There was no pressure to return, and had they not, the family run business would have likely been sold, said Luke Brochu, current President of Pleasant River Lumber. “You can’t make them work in the mill,” said Luke, “they have to want to.” Fortunately for Pleasant River Lumber and its employees, the two had a change of heart. They returned to the mill eight years ago to assume day to day operations. And with them, they brought what every next generation brings the current generation - new ideas. Stacks of timber and lumber at the mill.

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And yet, they are quick to point out there is obviously some nepotism, this is a requirement for any family run business. As Jason points out, however, “they had enough relevant experience to offset the nepotism.” That relevant experience was about to prove invaluable as the two brought the company in new directions. Luke Brochu remembers the two walking into his office one day. “I could tell they had something going on....” To be fair, the brothers often carry a mischievous look about them. But on this day, they really shook things up. Pleasant River Lumber had always been a spruce mill operating two mills. One in Dover-Foxcroft and the other in Enfield, Maine. They had built, staked and proven time and time again their reputation in manufacturing quality spruce lumber. They had even taken it so far as to secure an innovative trademark strategy to identify their lumber in the marketplace. How do you tell a stick of Pleasant River Lumber lumber from any other stick? Look for the American Flag. They are the only manufacturer who can legally reproduce the flag on their lumber.

The current generations: Chris and Jason Brochu.

How do you tell a stick of Pleasant River Lumber lumber from any other stick? Look for the American Flag. They are the only manufacturer who can legally reproduce the flag on their lumber. But “the boys,” as they are called around the mill, had a different plan and direction for the company. At the tail-end of the Great Recession with the housing market starting to perk up, but with great uncertainty, they told their Uncle that they wanted to expand into the pine market and buy another mill.

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The Last Generation?

“We don’t know much about the pine market,” Jason is quick to remind us. “But the industry is more collaborative than you would expect. And we also had many generations of family experience to call upon. We’re not conceited enough to enter into the pine market and think we’re going to get it right, right off the bat. But we do like the idea of expanding our offering.” In late 2011, Pleasant River Lumber expanded its offerings to include Eastern White Pine with the purchase of a sawmill facility in Hancock, Maine. They have modernized the sawmill and a new drying facility has been constructed, including replacing obsolete equipment and adding optimization to improve production and efficiency. The mill has been back to full operations since January 2012. But the boys didn’t stop there.

The inspectors name and the American Flag proudly displayed on Pleasant River Lumber.

In December, they made another acquisition. This one moving them further south giving greater access to markets with the purchase of another pine mill [bringing their total to 2 spruce and 2 pine mills]. It’s an aggressive market play supported by four generations of experience as opposed to the deep pockets offered by “corporate” expansion.

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In an interview with the Weekly Observer, Jason made mention of another advantage that a youthful current generation can bring to the operations: modernization. This is the generation that grew up not realizing that phones used to have cords, they adapt to new technology easily, and for some, lack of efficiency is not only a business disadvantage, but personally frustrating. “There are other mechanical improvements we can make to help the flow of the mill,” Chris said in the interview. “It will make it produce more, and produce more efficiently.”

In a very real sense, the legacy of the company has served as a platform for a new generation to come in, modernize and take risks. They are putting that legacy on notice, pushing the company forward. The Brochu’s take pride in another impact that their decisions have. As a family-run business, they are more connected to community and relationships than a conglomerate may be. Pleasant River employs a total of 175 workers at its four mills, 44 at the newly acquired mill. The impact of losing jobs in these mill towns can be devastating, and as a family that relies on these jobs, they understand the impact that their operational decisions have. This is part of the gestalt of family run businesses. In a very real sense, the legacy of the company has served as a platform for a new generation to come in, modernize and take risks. They are putting that legacy on notice, pushing the company forward. Will the aggressive nature of a younger generation pay off? That remains to be seen. In an industry that seems to quietly innovate while remaining true to traditions, the strategy just might work. But what about the next generation? Pleasant River Lumber lives to see another 50 years of business for today. What will happen if the next generation doesn’t have a taste for the industry? “Then,” Luke Brochu says, “this business as we know it will end after this generation...it will continue, but not as we know it.” /

The Patriarch: Luke Brochu surveys the yard.

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The Third Crop - 165 Years of Stewardship

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The Third Crop 165 Years of Stewardship Established in 1848, Hancock Lumber Company is a sixth generation, family owned business operating a land company, a sawmill division and a retail business. Hancock Lumber Company is one of America’s oldest family-owned lumber companies. www.hancocklumber.com

Kevin Hancock, President of Hancock Lumber Company, is the only family member still active in the day to day operations of Hancock Lumber, a company that reaches back to before the first cannon ball was fired in the Civil War. During a recent renovation, they found a hand-written contract for the construction of a new mill in 1848. In 1848 that mill cost a grand sum of $800 to build. In fact, the original foundation of that mill site can still be found in the Sebago Lake region not too far from Hancock’s current headquarters. This history lesson (Kevin used to be a history teacher) is a study in family genealogy, economics and horticulture.

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ix generations of running a mill seems like a long time, but Kevin is quick to point out that they have only just completed their second complete crop of Eastern White Pine. “When working with White Pine the first connection is the patience because it takes 80 to 100 years to grow a tree,” said Kevin. “We have literally only had two complete crops cycles in our business.” Eastern White Pine, he reminds us, requires a long-view. You can’t work with white pine and not take a long view. With some competitive species on the market place, a short-view can be taken. Radiata Pine for example can mature in about a quarter of the time it takes Eastern White Pine to be ready for harvest. The result of this fast and uneven growth is a less durable material to work with. Because of this rapid growth of Radiata Pine, the species lends itself to plantationstyle farming and harvesting, which offer greater opportunity for clear-cutting. Radiata Pine forests also don’t retain carbon dioxide as well as natural pine forests which require a biologically diverse environment to grow healthy, tall straight trees. Well-managed forests, Kevin reminds us, are better for the environment, for the trees and for the business. “We’re remarkably lucky to live in and work with this natural resource. It’s not like we’re working with plastics and can just drop something into a mold to make as many as you want. We are working with a natural resource that is ready when it’s ready.” 11

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Kevin touches on an often over-looked environmental benefit of lumber. “It’s renewable. That it’s recyclable and biodegradable is great. But the miracle is that it’s renewable. You can grow more.” This is an important point. The type of forestry that works best for growing the most valuable Eastern White Pine trees is not plantation farming. It is rich, biodiverse land management. It’s elective harvesting amongst a mixed species forest. When it is harvested, you cut some of the trees, and you leave most of the trees. The trees that are removed open up the canopy to let sunlight in and to give other species and younger Eastern White Pine a more equitable share of space and soil and water. “All you have to do to grow a new crop of white pine trees,” Kevin reminds us,“ is nothing.” “We don’t have to do any replanting, the forest replenishes itself.” Deforestation, the public relations bane of the lumber industry, in the northeast is only an issue when the use of the land is changed. When developments encroach into the further reaches of the wilderness deforestation become a problem. Raising and harvesting Eastern White Pine on the other hand requires a “willingness to do nothing, but you have to be willing to do nothing for a long time.”

Raising and harvesting Eastern White Pine on the other hand requires a “willingness to do nothing, but you have to be willing to do nothing for a long time.” Keeping land active and in the public use is part of Hancock’s strategy. They own and manage over 12,000 acres of certified timberlands in Western Maine. All of their land is open to the public for hiking, hunting, fishing, and recreation. Hancock’s land is managed for multiple uses, with considerations given to water quality, soil quality, wildlife habitat, and forestry. Specifically, the Company has opened up 5,000 acres and constructed over 15 miles of trails that are open to the public for recreation and nature exploration. The project, Jugtown Forest, is a working forest open for all to recreate on, from hunting to fishing, trail riding and education. The only thing you have to do is leave the land as forest land, Kevin reminds us. Keeping forest land open to people to recreate on is a strategy with multiple benefits. “Part of the reason that farming is such backbreaking work,” Kevin notes, “is that every year the trees want to grow back on the farmland. If you just abandon a farm, did nothing, invested nothing in the site and came back a generation later, it would be forested. People love to talk about how fragile the forest is, but that’s not the right story. People don’t realize how resilient the forest is. That’s the real story.” Resiliency is a trait that is passed down from generation to generation especially when it comes to managing a business whose primary product is Eastern White Pine. And Kevin grounds this reality when he talks about the potential for the next generation of managers at Hancock Lumber Company. Generational transitions from management and ownership perspectives are very difficult. Hancock has had six of these generational transitions, and that is a mark of their own resilience. A seventh generation of owner-managers is not a given, and that is a sad reality that Maine and the lumber industry in general may need to get used to. / 12

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Passing the Buck of Success at The Hammond Lumber Company

+ Passing the Buck of Success at The Hammond Lumber Company The Hammond family is short on words, but long on history in the lumber industry. Founded in 1953 by Clifton “Skip” Hammond, the company is currently celebrating their 60th anniversary, and the family has made perfect practice of innovating their business. And while their down-home, down-east drawled television commercials may be ubiquitous across the Maine airwaves, there is a business strategy hidden in those commercials - the Hammonds don’t like to take credit for their own success. They’d rather let their customers and their employees do the talking.

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his modesty is clearly a family trait handed down through the generations. When asked about their success, Skip is quick to credit “the boys” (son Don and grandson Mike now run the company as President and Vice President respectively). “The boys,” however, are just as quick to push that praise on to the employees who go above and beyond their customer’s expectations at every turn. An exercise in humility for sure, but there has also been a lot of strategy and innovation coming from within the business since it began. Don brought one of these first big innovations to the company in 1967 (14 years after the company started) by opening up their retail division. Now with twelve retail locations, a log home division, kitchen design services, and a widely promoted Shoreline dock distributorship, the company has diversified their offerings while remaining true to core values that are often found in family-run businesses: humbleness and a community-first attitude. The passion for innovation is perhaps rivaled only by the company’s commitment to the communities they serve. With a large footprint in Maine, and 400 employees, there is a lot of community ground to cover. This community engagement seems to be an important part of both the Hammond culture and business strategy.

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For example, when a fire siren wails near a Hammond Lumber Company, don’t be surprised to see a string of Hammond employees walking off the job to help fight the fire. They don’t ask permission because they know they have the company’s blessing to support the community. And, from fundraising for the Make-a-Wish Foundation, Maine Children’s Cancer Fund, the Family Violence fund and many other organizations, to providing scholarships for students heading to vocational schools, Hammond Lumber knows the value of supporting the community. The strategy seems painfully simple: support your community and your people and they will support you back.

When a fire siren wails near a Hammond Lumber Company, don’t be surprised to see a string of Hammond employees walking off the job to help fight the fire. They don’t ask permission because they know they have the company’s blessing to support the community. In an interview with Home Channel News, Mike summed up their strategies of growth and humility, “We’re just aggressive and progressive in whatever we do,” he said. “Treat your people well—that was taught from my grandfather to my father—and they’ll treat you good in return.”

The Hammond Lumber Company.

When asked if he thought the company would ever be this successful, Skip said “I guess I hoped it wouldn’t.” It seems that no one wants to take the blame for the success of Hammond Lumber. / 14

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Lumber and Sons - the Movie

+ Lumber and Sons The Movie

Lumber and Sons, a movie documenting family run mills.

A special web-feature has been produced as a companion piece to this edition of the White Pine Monographs. It’s part of a new offering we are bringing to these classic publications - web content to bring the Monographs into the 21st Century.

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his particular video is a trailer to a longer documentary that NeLMA is in the early stages of funding and ultimately producing. We feel, and our research and documentation to date reveals, that we are in a critical junction within the lumber industry. The knowledge and experience gained through generations of family run mills is at risk, as younger generations opt to move into new industries. We want to take this opportunity to not only capture the stories and wisdom of family-run mills, but document their impact on local communities and, most importantly, celebrate them. / So please visit http://easternwhitepine.org/movie/ to see a trailer for this exciting documentary. 15

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+ No Mall Rats, Mill Rats: Growing Up in a Lumber Mill Nepotism might catapult the sons and daughters of mill owners into mill management eventually, but before that happens, it’s more likely that their jobs often end up being far down the corporate ladder. In fact, growing up in a mill family quickly turns into an endless supply of the worst summer jobs you can imagine. But there’s a method to the madness. Running a mill is rough business, and learning the trade from the ground up seems to be an essential part of the training ground. It provides hands-on experience, a solid work ethic and humility. Merle Record (Founder of Record Lumber and father of) Michael Record (Current President) “You [referring to Michael] started working at my first mill when you were about 10 years old. One of his first jobs when he’d come home from school was to clean the bark out from under the roller cases with a potato digger. He worked pretty hard at it. And then when we built the new mill he worked here in the pit until he was eighteen, and then he started working inside the mill. And then for one summer he ran a second shift. He got some boys together and they ran a second shift all summer. Now he does all of the log buying and all of the lumber sales and he saws almost all of the time and I couldn’t do it without him. No way.”

Son and Father, Michael and Merle share a laugh at their lumber mill. 16

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No Mall Rats, Mill Rats: Growing Up in a Lumber Mill

Son [Craig] and Mark Woodbury, Lovell Lumber.

Mark Woodbury, President of Lovell Lumber “I worked summers for LC Andrews, a retail yard over in South Windham, I always had a summer job. You know my dad worked there and was Vice President. Then right through high school, and not to age myself but that was in the 60s and 70s when I was exposed to the lumber business. I was driving a lift truck, loading trucks, and doing whatever, delivering wood.” “Then I went away to college and would come home in the summers and work up here - dad bought this in ‘73. I spent several summers up here sticking wood. I went away after college and played some semi-pro baseball and ended up playing some professional baseball for the Giants for five years, so I was away, and never came back home all those 5 years. My career wasn’t going the way I wanted, and when they wanted to send me back to the minors, I said ‘No way. I’m going home to help my father.’ Maybe it was sawdust in my blood that brought me back.” Father (Jim) and Son (Alden Robbins), Robbins Lumber Company “I remember working on the edge sorter with my brother and my sister, and I could only pile boards up so high in piles. I’d have all these three-quarter high units of lumber. I used to have the older men come around and finish off the piles for me because I couldn’t reach the piles high enough, I’d have to throw the board up and hop up onto the drop bin and then hop up onto the lumber to push the board over. And then we could get the strap around it, but we couldn’t crimp the metal strap and the band because we weren’t strong enough or old enough yet to crimp the band. And that’s when you [Jim] used to tell me that if you ever see Alden [Sales Manager] and Jim [President] Robbins someone pull into the mill yard and they have a white helmet on, run around to the back side of Robins Lumber Company. corner of the headquarters and hide” /

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Architects, Designers and Building Professionals

is looking for story ideas, articles, photos and feedback for our next issue to be published in Summer of 2013

What we’re looking for:

% Updates on projects or designs featured in the original White Pine Monographs 5 % Photos of modern uses of Eastern White Pine 5 % Techniques for building with Eastern White Pine 5 % Projects showcasing Eastern White Pine 5 % New and old homes with classic styling of Eastern White Pine 5 % Innovative uses of New England’s most historic wood 5 % Industry news pertaining to Eastern White Pine 5

Submit your story ideas, photos, thoughts, expressions or well-written articles to: monographs@EasternWhitePine.org


List of Mills of The Northeastern Lumber Manufacturers Association Hull Forest Products Beaulieu Brothers Lumber, Inc. Chester Forest Products Fontaine, Inc. Fraser Timber Limited Hammond Lumber Company Hancock Lumber Company, Inc. Haskell Lumber, Inc. Hunt, N.C., Inc. Irving Forest Products Kelly, P.M., Inc./Kelly Lumber Sales Limington Lumber Company East Lovell Lumber Company, Inc. Lowell, R.E., Lumber, Inc. Maschino & Sons Lumber Company, Inc. Moose River Lumber Company, Inc. Pleasant River Lumber, Inc. Pleasant River Pine, Inc. Record Lumber, Inc. Robbins Lumber, Inc. Stratton Lumber, Inc. Robinson, W.R., Lumber Company, Inc. Bingham Lumber, Inc. DiPrizio Pine Sales Durgin & Crowell Lumber Company, Inc. H.G. Wood Industries, LLC King Forest Industries, Inc. Madison Lumber Mill, Inc. Milan Lumber Company, Inc. Patenaude Lumber Company, Inc. Precision Lumber, Inc. Seacoast Mills, Inc. HDK Wood Products Johnson Lumber Company Ward Lumber Company, Inc. Brojack Lumber Britton Lumber Company, Inc. Cersosimo Lumber Company Cyr Lumber, Inc. Lamell Lumber Corp. Manchester Lumber M.B. Heath & Sons Lumber Company, Inc. Mill River Lumber Ltd. Newman Lumber Company, Inc.

Pomfret Center,Connecticut Chapman, Maine Lincoln, Maine Woburn, Quebec Masardis, Maine Belgrade,Maine Bethel, Casco & Pittsfield, Maine Lincoln, Maine Jefferson, Maine Dixfield, Maine Ashland, Maine Baldwin, Maine Lovell, Maine Buckfield, Maine New Gloucester,Maine Jackman, Maine Dover-Foxcroft, Maine Hancock & Sanford, Maine Oxford, Maine Searsmont, Maine Stratton, Maine Wheelwright, Massachusetts Brookline, New Hampshire Middleton, New Hampshire New London, New Hampshire Bath, New Hampshire Wentworth, New Hampshire West Ossipee, New Hampshire Milan, New Hampshire Henniker, New Hampshire Wentworth, New Hampshire Brentwood, New Hampshire Harrisville, New York Carthage, New York Jay, New York Olyphant, Pennsylvania Fairlee, Vermont Brattleboro, Vermont Milton, Vermont Essex Junction, Vermont Johnson, Vermont North Hyde Park, Vermont North Clarendon, Vermont Wells River, Vermont



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