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NEFLCAI.COM

VOL. 5 | ISS. 4

Northeast Florida Chaper Community Association Institute

THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION

IN THIS ISSUE Thanksgiving Kitchen Safety Hydro-Raking - An Aquatic Management Tool Pest Proof Your Home for Cooler Temperatures Multipotentialite Safety Tips for High-Rise Building Emergencies Are You a “Certified Board Member”?


a message

contact information

4250 A1A South, F-32 St. Augustine, FL 32080 www.neflcai.com info@neflcai.com 904-907-7234

2018 board of directors Jimmy Dycus, President Catie Marks, President-elect Patricia Truax-Stewart, Treasurer Pilar Willis-Dixon, Secretary Ed Ronsman, Esq., Immediate Past President Bob Chamberlain, Director David Robinson, Director Karen Foy - Chapter Executive Director

committees Membership - Mary Price; Board Liaison: Pilar Willis-Dixon/Karen Foy Finance - Patricia Stewart; Board Liaison - Bob Chamberlain Expo - Cindy Dunlop; Board Liaison - Ed Ronsman Programs/Education - Ed Ronsman Social - Melissa Rowe; Board Liaison David Robinson Legislative Action, Pilar Willis-Dixon & Robyn Severs, Esq.

newsletter Editor - Leslie F. Pragasam; Board Liasion - Jimmy Dycus/Karen Foy Assistant - Katie Cabanillas

from the president Dear NEFL CAI Family, I continue to be amazed each time I get that friendly email reminder from Leslie, the most fabulous editor of this award-winning newsletter, that it is already time to write a message to you for our fourth quarter of 2018 edition. The third quarter had some great social events as well as final educational events to ensure the CAMs could get continuing educational credits. As always, I would be doing your team of board members a huge disservice if I didn’t take the time to recognize them and thank them for their continued hard work and dedication! These men and women that have been elected to lead this amazing chapter have truly been working their tails off to make this the #1 CAI Chapter. From the bottom of my heart, THANK YOU David Robinson, Pilar Willis Dixon, Patricia Truax Stewart, Bob Chamberlain, Catie Marks, Ed Ronsman, and of course my right and left hands, Karen Foy, for volunteering your time and efforts to make this a great chapter. Summer fun was in full effect this year with a great night out at the Jumbo Shrimp game. It’s always so nice to meet your families and enjoy food and fun while taking in a great game. Thank you so much to Ramco Protective, PuroClean, and of course our Social Committee, led by the amazing Melissa Rowe, for helping make that such a great event. Educationally, we were busy with educational events on Hurricane Preparedness and our annual Legal Update. Thanks to our special guest for that event, WJAX-TV Meteorologist Mike Buresh, A HUGE THANK YOU to our LAC delegates, Pilar Willis Dixon and Robyn Severs, who participate monthly in a national LAC conference call where they give up over three hours of their Saturday for us! Additionally, your President-elect, Catie Marks, Chapter CED, Karen Foy and I attended a Florida Leadership Meeting with all the CAI chapters in the state.

Before we know it, this year will be wrapped up, and we will be moving into 2019. Before we do, we have some great things lined up for our chapter this quarter. In just a few weeks we will have our last Chapter Luncheon of the year, “How to Conduct an Annual Meeting”. On October 21st, we invite you to join us watch our Jaguars annihilate the Houston Texans with a huge tailgate party before the game catered by Bono’s BBQ. Our final event of the year will be our Annual Awards Ceremony and Gala, which you will DEFINITELY not want to miss! We will also announce the results of the upcoming board elections. This year, there are two openings – 1 Homeowner Leader and 1 CAM. If you are interested in becoming part of the 2019 board, please do not hesitate to contact Karen ASAP! Finally, none of this would be possible without our wonderful chapter sponsors and event sponsors. Equally as important are the people who volunteer on the different committees making this all come together. I challenge you to get more involved in this up and coming chapter. We need your talents and your sponsorships at our different events! If you have any questions on how to become more involved or would like additional information on sponsorship opportunities, please do not hesitate to contact me or Karen. Enjoy this stellar newsletter! It has been my honor to serve as your President this year! Thank you for making this the greatest CAI chapter in the country! Respectfully, Jimmy Dycus President


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Seeking Nominations for our 2019 Board of Directors The Northeast Florida Chapter of Community Associations Institute is pleased to announce the call for nominations for the 2019 Board of Directors. The Call for Nominations is now open and we are seeking candidates for two (2) open positions. At least one of the open positions must be filled by a Homeowner Leader. The other position may be filled by a Homeowner Leader or a CAM. Each position is for a three (3) year term. There are no open positions for a Business Partner this year. Service on the Board of Directors of NEFL CAI is a rare chance to help drive the decisions of our Chapter. The opportunity to work with other leaders in NEFL CAI allows you to be part of the decision-making process, driving the strategic goals of the organization. This is an exciting time to join the leadership and help us map our ambitious future.

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The Board meets once a month, on the first Friday. While attendance in person is encouraged, OCCASIONAL ATTENDANCE may be by teleconference, if necessary. Board members are expected to make the commitment to attend Board meetings. It is also important to have as many Board members as possible attend Chapter events, usually one a month on the third Thursday. You will also be asked to serve as a committee liaison. If you are willing and able to make the time commitment to help lead your Chapter into the future please nominate a colleague or yourself. The Call for Nominations closes on November 15th and the election will be held at the Annual Meeting & Gala on November 30th. To submit a nomination please send the name and contact information to our Executive Director, Karen Foy, at info@neflcai.com.

CONTENTS

Message from the President Welcome New Members Editorial Calendar Events Calendar Keep Your Kitchen Safe This Thanksgiving Hydro-Raking - An Aquatic Management Tool Pest Proof Your Home for Cooler Temperatures Multipotentialite Safety Tips for High-Rise Building Emergencies Are You a “Certified Board Member�? Past Events Premier Directory Basic Directory

Providing education, networking, resources and advocacy for Community Associations in Northeast Florida and the professionals and volunteers who serve them. 4 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION


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chapter news

Welcome New Members NEFL-CAI proudly welcomes the following members who have joined (rejoined or renewed) the chapter in September! Community Association Managers Gianna Rahmani - Castle Group Vina Delcomyn - Awakenings Association Management Shannon Loizzo, CMCA Alice Hubbard - First Coast Association Management

Business Partners

Ron Mans - Coastal Construction Products Robin Braddock - ServPro of Mandarin Blaine Peterson - Yellowstone Landscape Hans Wahl - Jimerson & Cobb, P.A. Jeffrey L. Ducker - MBAF CPAs and Advisors

Thank you to all of our members who have rejoined or renewed their membership with the NE Florida Chapter! Thank you for your continued support!

THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION EDITORIAL CALENDAR

Month Article/Submissions Due Ads Due January 2019 December 3, 2018 December 17, 2018 April 2019 March 1, 2019 March 18, 2019 July 2019 June 3, 2019 June 17, 2019 October 2019 September 6, 2019 September 13, 2019

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October 18, 2018 Chapter Meeting

Ocean Village Club 250 A1A South St. Augustine, Florida Member Non-Member H/O Leader FREE $10 CAM FREE $10 Business Partner $20 $35

October 21, 2018

Social Event

Jacksonville Jaguars Game TIAA Bank Field TIAA Bank FIeld Drive Jacksonville, Florida 32202 Price Tailgate Party ONLY $10 Tailgate & Game $60

November 30, 2018

Annual Meeting and Awards Gala

11:30 AM - 1:30 PM

Registration, lunch, and networking begin at 11:30 AM. Program begins at noon. How to Conduct HOA & Condo Annual Meetings - Including Elections

Join us in a panel discussion led by area business leaders, James Giancola - Branch President at CMC Jacksonville, Christene M. Ertl, B.C.S. Attorney - Ansbacher Law, Amanda Terry, CAM - MAY Management, and Robert Tankel, Esq., Attorney - Tankel Law Group. 11:30 AM - 5:00 PM

Thank you to First Coast Mulch, our event sponsor for our first ever NFL Social Event to watch the Jacksonville Jaguars battle the Houston Texans. Join us for tailgating fun before the game with food catered by Bono’s BBQ followed by what will certainly be a great time. Kickoff is 1 PM.

Visit our website often and watch your inboxes for the latest information. You do not want to miss this year’s Annual Meeting and Awards Gala. 4TH QUARTER 2018 | NEFLCAI.COM | 7

calendar of events

For more information on NEFL-CAI meeting, upcoming events, or meeting sponsorship availability, please contact Karen Foy at info@neflcai.com or visit www.neflcai.com.


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Keep Your Kitchen Safe This Thanksgiving

Provided by Melissa Rowe, Account Executive at PuroClean As Thanksgiving approaches, it is important to remember that, amidst the festivity, safety should take precedence. According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), in 2014, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated 173,300 home structure fires involving cooking equipment. These fires caused 480 deaths, 5,540 injuries, and $1.1 billion in direct property damage. Unfortunately, Thanksgiving is the peak day for home cooking fires. The good news is that the vast majority (71%) of Thanksgiving cooking fires are considered “confined fires,” meaning that they don’t result in serious injury or significant property damage. The other main type of fire, a “non-confined fire,” is the opposite, typically resulting in injury and structural damage. So what’s the recipe for safety in the kitchen this Turkey Day? Following, are some recommendations from the NFPA:

IF A COOKING FIRE OCCURS • • • •

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW • • • • •

Be on alert! If you are sleepy or have consumed alcohol, don’t use the stove or oven. Stay in the kitchen while you are frying, grilling, boiling or broiling food. If you are simmering, baking or roasting food, check it regularly. Remain in the kitchen while food is cooking and use a timer to remind you when the food is done. Keep anything that can catch fire such as loose clothes, oven mitts, wooden utensils, food packaging, towels or curtains away from your stovetop.

Just get out! When you leave, close the foor behind you to help contain the fire. Call 911 or the local emergency number after you leave. If you try to fight the fire, be sure others are getting out and you have a clear way out. Keep a lid nearby when you’re cooking to smother small grease fires. Smother the fire by sliding the lid over the pan and turn off the stovetop. Leave the pan covered until it is completely cooled. For an over fire, turn off the heat and keep the door closed.

you plan on deep-frying your turkey, be sure to follow these safety guidelines. •

Finally, smoke detectors should be tested monthly to ensure they’re functioning properly and replaced every 10 years. They should be placed on all levels of the home, especially outside of sleeping areas.

DEEP-FRIED TURKEY

Deep-frying turkeys for Thanksgiving has become very popular. If

Turkey fryers should never be used inside the home, inside of a gargage or on a deck, because hot oil splattering has the potential to cause fire and injury. The fryer should be at least 10 feet away from any structure or trees. The placement area should be very firm and must be flat. Do not move the fryer when it is in use. Buy a fryer with at least 4 legs or a solid base because they provide the very best stability for the hot oil cooker. Read and carefully follow the fryer’s instructions. Make sure the turkey is thawed and dry before cooking. Ice or water that mixes into the hot oil will turn to steam and can cause explosions or large flare-ups. Watch the weather. Never operate a fryer outdoors in the rain or snow. If either fall into hot oil, they will turn to steam and can

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• • •

• • •

• •

cause serious flare-ups. Place the propane tank at least 2 feet from the burner. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to avoid overfilling. Oil can ignite when it makes contact with the burner. BEST PRACTICE - Place the turkey in the empty fryer. Add water to the fryer until it just covers the turkey. Remove the turkey and note how much water is in the fryer. Dry the fryer and then add oil until it is 1-2 inches below the water line (the oil expands significantly when heated). Choose a smaller turkey for frying. A bird that’s 8 to 10 pounds is best; pass on turkeys over 12 pounds. Never leave fryers unattended. Purchase a fryer with temperature controls, and watch the oil temperature carefully. Cooking oil that is heated beyond its smoke point can catch fire. If you notice the oil is smoking, turn the fryer off. Turn the burner off before lowering the turkey into the oil. Only when the turkey is submerged and you are finished with the placement, should you turn the burner back on. It is recommended that you wear goggles or safety glasses to protect your eyes, use oven mitts to protect your hands and arms, and keep a grease-rated fire extinguisher close by. Skip the stuffing when frying turkey, and avoid water-based marinades. Keep children and pets away from the fryer at all times.

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• •

Once finished, carefully remove the pot from the burner using oven mitts, place it on a level surface and cover to let the oil cool overnight before disposing. Consider using an oil-less fryer which uses infrared heat, rather than oil, to cook the turkey and is much safer.

Even with all the proper precautions in place, accidents and equipment malfunctions can still happen.


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Have You Considered Hydro-Raking as an Aquatic Management Tool? By Emily Walsh - Environmental Scientist at SOLitude Lake Management If you own or manage a lake or pond, you’ve likely heard of hydro-raking as a unique management tool utilized by aquatic professionals to remove aquatic vegetation. A hydro-rake is essentially a floating barge supporting a mounted backhoe and rake attachment that can remove up to 500 pounds of lake and pond muck, plant material and organic debris in a single scoop. The hydro-rake has the ability to target certain areas of nuisance and/or invasive aquatic vegetation, while conserving other areas in their natural state. This is crucial in the eyes of aquatic management, which is geared towards retaining and restoring balance within the waterbody’s ecosystem. Maintaining an equilibrium of native vegetation enhances the potential for increased species richness and ecosystem resilience – the ability to maintain balance despite challenges posed by nutrient loading, water stratification and other factors that can affect water quality. In addition to proactively managing vegetation, hydro-raking can help reduce or prolong the need for dredging, which is often the costliest project a homeowners association will ever face.

EMERGENT SPECIES Emergent vegetation such as cattails, common reed and maidencane are common plants that can plague waterbodies; however, removal can be achieved by utilizing the hydro-rake as a stand-alone management option or as a complement to other management approaches. Emergent plants are fantastic candidates for the hydro-rake because they are usually found along

While the hydro-rake is not a suitable management strategy in every situation, it can be extremely effective when used to control several types of vegetation often found in waterbodies used for recreation, community fishing, the collection of stormwater runoff, or simply the enjoyment of their aesthetic beauty:

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the edge of the waterbody, where they can be easily accessed by the rake attachment. During the removal process, the hydro-rake will extract the plant in its entirety, as well as its attached rhizome (root) structure lain beneath the water’s surface. Because the hydro-rake works from the water rather than land, desirable ornamental and buffer plant species along the shoreline are not impacted.


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FLOATING LEAF SPECIES The hydro-rake is effective when removing common floating leaf vegetation such as water lily and watershield. These plant species are ideal for hydro-rake management, due to their leaf structure and attached root systems underneath. As with common reed and cattail removal, the hydro-rake can remove the plants, as well as the root structures. Open water is then restored, thus enhancing the ability of native aquatic flora and fauna to repopulate the area. Other common floating-leaf species, such as water hyacinth, water chestnut, and water lotus are additional candidates for hydro-raking service. SUBMERSED SPECIES

Submersed species such as curlyleaf pondweed, big leaf pondweed and tape grass can be effectively managed through hydro-raking. These prescribed programs can provide sufficient plant reduction, especially when combined with

herbicide management options. As with any management strategy, it’s important to always consider the biology of the targeted plant before beginning a hydro-raking project. Some submersed plants, such as such as milfoil and fanwort spread heavily through fragmentation and may require alternate management strategies to ensure fragmentation and repopulation do not occur. Hydro-raking is a management tool used in a wide array of aquatic restoration projects ranging from inlets, outlets, littoral zones, coves, private shorelines, and more. Aquatic vegetation removal projects can be performed any time of year, but the best time is when the nutrients are in the vegetative structure; this is relative to the associated region, weather conditions, and plant biology. When considering this service, the first step is to contact your

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local lake and pond management professional to conduct a site visit. During this time, they will identify nuisance plant species and management areas, and consider a strategy that aligns with your long-term waterbody goals. As with any form of proactive management, hydro-raking can help improve the health, longevity and beauty of your lake or pond for years to come, but is most effective when used in conjunction with other preventative management methods, including aeration, buffer management, nutrient remediation and other strategies that prevent the premature aging, or filling in with sediment, of the waterbody.


Pest Proof Your Home for Cooler Temperatures Provided by Zenpura Pest Solutions WINTER IS COMING Well‌ one day winter will come to Jacksonville and you should have your home prepared for the cooler temperatures.

When the days do get cooler, it can cause a variety of pest issues for home owners. The colder it gets outside, the more these pests want to come inside for protection from the cold. This can include an increase in roaches, spiders and rodents in your home.

Taking steps to pest proof your home can seem like something that is easy to put off until later, but getting it done now will cause less issues down the road when it does start getting colder. What steps can you start taking

3. Store food in airtight containers and dispose of garbage regularly in sealed receptacles. 4. Eliminate all moisture sites in your home – such as leaking pipes or clogged drains. 5. Store firewood at least 20 feet from your house.

to make your home pest proof?

6. Before you pull out the Christmas decorations from the garage or shed, make sure to inspect the boxes before bringing them inside.

1. Seal any cracks or crevices outside of the home with steel wool and caulk. Specifically look where drainage pipes enter the home. 2. Replace any damaged window or door screens, and install door sweeps on the bottom of all exterior doors.

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Multipotenialite By Betsy Barbieux, CAM, CFCAM of Florida CAM Schools, LLC Who knew there was such a word as “multipotentialite” and that it perfectly describes a community association manager who has multiple job-related skills? The younger generation thinks they have discovered something new - that a person acquires many skills over a lifetime of work and involvement with others that build on each other and bring benefits to your present work. Just look at some of the skills of a CAM. These are not acquired overnight!

• Communicated sufficiently, orally or in writing, with owners, residents, volunteers, and contractors • Maintains a positive, cordial, businesslike relationship with owners and tenants • Satisfactorily oversees contractors working on the property • Routinely inspects the property for maintenance and repair needs • Performs or oversees the basic administrative tasks for the association • Works without supervision • Works cooperatively with other staff members and volunteers • Demonstrates proficiency using technology (computer, software, email, etc.) • Maintains a safe work envi-

ronment • Profides timely financial reports • Demonstrates ingenuity in developing solutions to multiple problems • Develops controls to prevent future problems • Uses good analytical ability in reviewing budgetary and usage data to determine meaningful trends or problems • Adequately presents/explains the data or results to personnel, directors, or residents not versed or trained in the area • Uses good analytical skills when compiling and analyzing supporting data • Makes reasonable recommendations using supporting data • Makes equitable decisions required in the course of implementing the association’s policies and procedures • Tactful when making recommendations concerning solutions to problems and procedures. Overall, the CAM has a working knowledge of the following, none of which are acquired overnight! • Management procedures and techniques • Accounting procedures • Personnel practices • Rules, regulations, and standards of the association • Inventory and procurement

• Contract relations • Property maintenance as it pertains to the association • Current maintenance procedures and practices • Safety hazard and practices • Environmental issues • Insurance • Taxes • Disaster preparedness • Local permitting codes and regulations • Human behavior; conflict prevention/resolution

Florida community association managers are “multipotentialite” leaders. The Visionary is committed to growth, looks beyond immediate problems to root causes, and develops precise steps of action to achieve success. This leadership perspective may

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be described as wise, descerning, trusting, discrete, loving, creative, and enthusiastic. The Visionary has the ability to understand the deeper reason as to why things happen. He has a keen sense of cause and effect and usually has a step-by-step backup plan for getting out of trouble. The Teacher imparts wisdom, maturity, and skill to others; validates direction; and ensures completeness. This leadership perspective may be described as self controlled, respectful, diligent, thorough, dependable, secure, and patient. The Teacher likes to research every aspect of a project. She has a tendency to cover you up with paperwork that validates her position, but you can always depend on the accuracy of her work.

The Server sees and meets the practical needs of others, freeing them to accomplish their goals, and invests time and energy in others’ success. This leadership perspective may be described as alert, hospitable, generous, joyful, flexible, available, and having a lot of endurance. The Server is aware of all that is taking place around him, especially things that need to be done and people who need help. He may enjoy helping others be successful so much that he forgets to get his own assignments completed. The Organizer visualizes final results and directs resources for the successful completion of goals. This leadership perspective may be described as orderly, self initiating, responsible, humble, decisive, determined, and loyal. The Organizer has the unique ability to know the right person for the job and can easily delegate. Sometimes she delgates so well, it appears as if she has nothing left to do.

The Mediator is deeply loyal, compassionate, and analyzes the benefits and problems of a given direction, while keeping in mind the feelings of others. This leadership perspective may be described as attentive, sensitive, just, compassionate, gentle, deferring, and meek. The Mediator invests whatever is necessary to heal the hurts of others and shows personal care and concern in meeting the needs of others. He has “big shoulders” and is an attentive listener. The Idealist can speak the truth boldly, is brave and 20 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION

daring, and has great visions for his organization. This leadership perspective may be described as truthful, obedient, sincere, virtuous, bold, forgiving, and persuasive. The Idealist has the confidence that what he has to say or do is true, right, and just. What you see is what you get with the Idealist, even if the truth hurts.

The Provider is resourceful, prudent, thrifty, and constantly ensuring the best use of all available resources. This leadership perspective may be described as resourceful, thrifty, content, punctual, tolerant, cautious, and grateful. The Provider finds practical uses for what others would overlook or discard and does not let herself or others spend unnecessarily. She very seldom throws anything away and hates to spend money. Multipotentialite CAMs have varied decision-making styles. They can be capable of making fastpaced/high-risk decisions and focusing on the task aspects, especially the future picture. This CAM can get the job done quickly. They are capable of making fast-paced/high-risk decisions and focusing on the people aspects and keeping people happy. They can enjoy getting to know their owners and families and will make sure everyone feels welcome.

They are capable of making slower-paced/lowrisk decisions and focusing on being supportive along with aspects such as harmony, peace, simplicity, and teamwork. They prefer to take time to think about their decisions. They will spend time gauging the impact of their decisions on the community as a whole and on the people in particular.

They are capable of making slower-paced/lowrisk decisions and focusing on the tasks, especially the details, laws, rules, and timelines. They will be very knowledgeable about the govering documents, statutes, and Robert’s Rules of Order.

So, I say to the Florida community association manager - You did not learn all this in college. That makes you a Multipotentialite!


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Practicing Smart Safety Tips Can Save Lives in High-Rise Building Emergencies By Kimber Westmore, director of Fire Life Safety Training Division for Allied Universal People who live or work in high-rise residential or commercial buildings face very specific disaster-preparedness challenges. Emergencies such as fires, bomb scares, weather-related incidents and earthquakes present special dangers for such buildings as dormitories, apartment homes, condominiums and office complexes. The best defense is a coordinated emergency-response plan that identifies potential risks and outlines the best response. With limited access to egress, if you’re in a high-rise when disaster strikes, you might need to stay in the building until the emergency passes. Or, if evacuation is necessary, you would need to quickly find the exit. The good news is that high-rise building requirements include more working sprinklers and fire alarm equipment than non-high-rise facilities. And if your building owner or manager subscribes to the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System, first responders will have access to building-specific instructions, which will help in emergency situations. To help make sure you are prepared, we have assembled some tips to keep you safe. HIGH-RISE DISASTER SAFETY TIPS In all situations • Take responsibility for your own safety. This is important because, in some situations, first response may be delayed in reaching you. • Familiarize yourself with the safety features of your facility (fire alarms, sprinklers, voice communication procedures, evacuation plans and alarm response). • Make sure exit and stairwell doors are clearly marked, remain unlocked and are free from debris and clutter which could obstruct the walkway.

• If an official makes an announcement, listen carefully and follow directions. • If you are told to evacuate, go outside and gather at the pre-arranged meeting place. • Stay put until an official instructs you it is safe to return to the building. For Fire The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) reports there are approximately 16,000 to 20,000 fires in high-rise buildings each year. This represents 2 to 4 percent of all building fires. If you are in a high-rise when fire breaks out: • Well in advance of an emergency, find the locations of all available exit stairs from your floor in case the nearest one is blocked by fire or smoke. • Don’t automatically run for the stairs. In some instances, it may be best to stay put and wait for instructions. • If it is clear you should evacuate, pull the alarm on your way out, to notify the fire department and your neighbors. Don’t assume someone else will handle this. • If the fire alarm sounds, feel the door before opening and close all doors behind you as you leave. If the door is hot, find another way 4TH QUARTER 2018 | NEFLCAI.COM | 23


• •

out. If it is cool, leave by the nearest exit. Instead of taking the elevator, use the stairs in a fire, unless the fire department instructs otherwise. Some buildings come equipped with elevators, which are intended for emergency use. Such elevators should be clearly marked. If someone is trapped in the building, notify the fire department. If you are unable to evacuate your apartment or high-rise workplace in a fire due to flames, smoke or a disability, stuff wet towels or sheets around the door and vents to keep smoke out. Call the fire department to alert officials to your location. Slightly open a window and

wave a bright-colored cloth to signal your location. However, be prepared to close the window if smoke conditions worsen. To Shelter In Place In some emergency scenarios, you may need to stay put instead of evacuating. • If you are in a high-rise building during a flood or storm surge, stay on floors located just above flood waters. • In case of a hurricane or other situations which could produce strong winds, stay in hallways or interior rooms. Also, remember, modern high-rise buildings are built to sway with weather. So, the higher the floor, the more

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wind you will likely feel. • If an earthquake occurs while you are in a high-rise building, stay put. Studies in Japan (Tokyo is home to 2,390 high-rise buildings and 114 skyscrapers) reveal that traversing as little as 10 feet during an earthquake significantly increases the odds of injury. Take Cover. The Great ShakeOut teaches participants to drop, cover and hold on. This is great advice during an earthquake, in any size building. If you are in a high-rise building when an active shooter incident occurs—depending on the circumstances—run, hide or fight. When it is safe to do so, call 911 and describe the shooter, location, and weapons.


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Are You a “Certified Board Member”? By W. Jeff Earnshaw, Esq. and Partner - Jackson Law Group All Florida Condominium, Cooperative, and Homeowners Association’s (“HOA”) should be aware that Florida law requires mandatory certification of newly elected members of an Association’s Board of Directors within 90 days after becoming elected to the Board. Failure of a Board Member to meet the certification requirements results in the Board Member being suspended from the Board until the certification requirement is met. Below is a summary of the two certification options (See Florida Statutes 718.112(2)(d)(4)(b); 719.106(1) (d)(1)(b); 720.3033(1)): 1. Written Certification. The first certification option requires that the newly elected Director certify in writing to the secretary of the association within 90 days after being elected or appointed to a board, that he or she has read the association’s declaration of condominium or declaration of covenants or proprietary lease (depending on whether condominium or HOA or cooperative, respectively), articles of incorporation, bylaws, and current written rules and policies; that he or she will work to uphold such documents and policies to the best of his or her ability; and that he or she will faithfully discharge his or her fiduciary responsibility to the association’s members. 2. Educational Certificate. In the alternative, within 90 days after being elected or appointed to the board the newly elected or appointed director may submit a certificate of having satisfactorily completed the educational curriculum administered by an education provider approved by the Division of Florida Condominiums, Timeshares, and Mobile Homes within one year before or 90 days after the date of election or appointment. Whichever of the two certification options that the director provides will be valid for the uninterrupted tenure of the director on the board, so a director does not need to provide a new certification unless there is a break in the term of service as a director. It is very important that all newly elected directors comply with this new requirement because the law requires that a 26 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION

director who does not timely file the written certification or educational certificate must be suspended from the board until he or she complies with the requirement and the board may temporarily fill the vacancy during the period of suspension. An association is required to retain each director’s written certification or educational certificate for inspection by the members for 5 years after the director’s election. Fortunately, the failure to have the written certification or educational certificate on file does not affect the validity of any board action. If an association has any questions regarding these board member certification requirements or needs assistance or advice in complying with them, they should contact their attorney. Board member certification courses not only meet the mandatory statutory requirements, but they also provide a lot of information for new board members to ensure the Association operates effectively and in compliance with Florida law.


events A night at the baseball field is always a fun time & this year was no exception! CAI members & their families enjoyed buffet-style hotdogs & hamburgers, a visit with the team mascot, Scampi. and a great baseball game against the Birmingham Barons! Thank you to the evening’s sponsors, PuroClean & Ramco Protective!

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events September 7th Jacksonville Golf & Country Club - Paul Terry & Laurie Shrader of Angius & Terry provided a 2018 Legislative Update to those in attendance. Paul provided an introduction to the Legislative Process, how the Process works, and explained why Association board members and CAMs should get involved in the Process. He then discussed Bills from 2015, 2016, & 2017 that impact Community Associations & Legislation that passed in 2018. Thank you to Alliance Association Bank for sponsoring this important event!

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Directory PREMIER LISTING

AEGIS COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS, INC. DAVID BURMAN AMS, PCAM DAVIDB@AEGISCMS.COM AEGISCMS.COM

ALLIANCE ASSOCIATION BANK PAUL KNUTH PKNUTH@ALLIANCEASSOCIATIONBANK.COM ALLIANCEASSOCIATIONBANK.COM

PREMIER LISTING ANGIUS & TERRY, LLP LAURIE SHRADER LSHRADER@ANGIUS-TERRY.COM ANGIUS-TERRY.COM

ANSBACHER LAW BARRY B. ANSBACHER BBA@ANSBACHER.NET WWW.ANSBACHER.NET

ASPHALT RESTORATION TECHNOLOGY GEORGE RING GEORGE.RING@ASPHALTNEWS.COM ASPHALTNEWS.COM

ALLIED UNIVERSAL SECURITY SERVICES JIMMY DYCUS JAMES.DYCUS@AUS.COM AUS.COM

AQUATIC SYSTEMS, INC. MS. KATIE CABANILLAS KATIE.CABANILLAS@AQUATICSYSTEMS.COM AQUATICSYSTEMS.COM

4TH QUARTER 2018 | NEFLCAI.COM | 29


Disclaimer - Information listed reflects that provided from the CAI National Office. Any changes or updates to listed contact information may be made by logging into your account at www.caionline.org or through the National Office.

PREMIER LISTING BB&T ASSOCIATION SERVICES GEORGIA MILLER GGMILLER@BBANDR.COM BBT.COM

BECKER ROBYN M. SEVERS, ESQ. RSEVERS@BECKERLAWYERS.COM BECKERLAWYERS.COM

BROWN & BROWN OF FLORIDA, INC. PILAR DIXON, CIC, CIRMS PWILLIS@BBJAX.COM BBJAX.COM

30 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION

PREMIER LISTING CASTLE GROUP PATRICIA TRUAX STEWART, CMCA, AMS, PCAM PSTEWART@CASTLEGROUP.COM CASTLEGROUP.COM

COMMUNITY ADVISORS, LLC CHARLES SHEPPARD, RS CSHEPPARD@COMMUNITYADVISORS.COM COMMUNITYADVISORS.COM

FIDUS ROOFING CONSTRUCTION & PAVERS SHANE KOWALCHIK SHANE@THEFIDUSGROUP.COM THEFIDUSGROUP.COM


Directory PREMIER LISTING

GUNSTER, YOAKLOY & STEWART, P.A. THOMAS JENKS TJENKS@GUNSTER.COM GUNSTER.COM

PREMIER LISTING MAY MANAGEMENT SERVICES, INC. CATIE MARKS CMARKS@MAYRESORTS.COM MAYMGT.COM

JACKSON LAW GROUP, LL.M., P.A. EDWARD RONSMAN, ESQ. INFO@JACKSONLAWGROUP.COM JACKSONLAWGROUP.COM

METRO PROPERTY SERVICES JOHN MOORE FRONTDESK@METROPROPERTYSERVICES.COM METROPROPERTYSERVICES.COM

LAKE & WETLAND ADAM GRAYSON ADAM.GRAYSON@LAKEANDWETLAND.COM LAKEANDWETLAND.COM

4TH QUARTER 2018 | NEFLCAI.COM | 31


Disclaimer - Information listed reflects that provided from the CAI National Office. Any changes or updates to listed contact information may be made by logging into your account at www.caionline.org or through the National Office.

PREMIER LISTING

PREMIER LISTING

PPG PAINTS ELIZABETH PIKE ELIZABETH.PIKE@PPG.COM PPG.COM

VALLEY NATIONAL BANK BILL WENDELL BWENDELL@VALLEYNATIONALBANK.COM VALLEYFLORIDA.COM

PUROCLEAN EMERGENCY RESTORATION SERVICES MELISSA ROWE MROWE@PUROCLEAN.COM PUROCLEAN.COM

VERDEGO BEAU BARNETT BBARNETT@VERDEGO.COM VERDEGO.COM

SOLITUDE LAKE MANAGEMENT TRACY FLEMING INFO@SOLITUDELAKE.COM SOLITUDELAKEMANAGEMENT.COM

32 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION


Directory BASIC LISTING

Amelia Island Management Mr. Nick Lambiase, Jr., CPM, LCAM nick.lambiase@omnihotels.com Arthur J. Gallagher Risk Management Mr. David Dawson david_dawson@ajg.com

BCM Services, Inc. Mrs. L. Denise Wallace denisew@bcmservices.net

Brightview Landscape Services Mr. George Rugen george.rugen@brightview.com Burg Simpson Eldredge Hersh Jardine PC Ms. Laura Sanchez LSanchez@burgsimpson.com CertaPro Painters Mr. Jeff Lee jlee@certapro.com

CINC Systems Ms. Vickie Johnson, CMCA, AMS vickie@cincsystems.com Clark Simson Miller Mr. Jason Miller sales@csmhoa.com

CMC-Jacksonville Ms. Colleen Michelle Griggs cgriggs@cmcjax.com

Coastal Construction Products Mr. Ron Mans rmans@coastalone.com

BASIC LISTING

Coastal Insurance Underwriters, Inc. Mr. Chuck Bushong cbushong@ciuins.com Covert Appraisal Services, Inc. Ms. Constance Covert Connie@covertappraisal.com

D. Armstrong Contracting, LLC Mr. Dennis Armstrong dennis@darmstrong.net Driveway Maintenance, Inc. Mr. Kerry Barnes kbarnes@driveway.net

BASIC LISTING

First Coast Mulch Mr. David Robinson davidr@firstcoastmulch.com First Federal Bank of Florida Mr. Mike Mickler micklerm@ffbf.com

Fletcher Stein Insurance Agency Ms. Carie Whitcomb cwhitcomb@fletcherstein.com Florida Certified Contractors Mr. Adam Russo

Florida Community Association Journal Mr. Jim McMurry jmcmurry@adpub.com

Duval Asphalt Ms. Jennifer Garrett jgarrett@duvalasphalt.com

Envera Ms. Shar Caballero SCaballero@Enverasystems.com Enverasystems.com EverBank Ms. Terri Anderson terri.anderson@everbank.com

Global Solution Partners Mr. Keith Ruehl, RS kruehl@globalsolutionpartners. com Herbie Wiles Insurance Mr. Wayne Howell whowell@herbiewiles.com

Heritage Insurance Evergreen Lifestyles Management Mr. Randy Jones heritagepci.com Mr. Kraig Carmickle Fidelity Bank Ms. Mary E. Price mary.price@lionbank.com

First Coast Association Management Ms. Alice Hubbard alice@firstcoastam.com

HomeTeam Pest Defense Mr. Dan Eckman dan.eckman@pestdefense.com Ian H. Graham Insurance Ms. Sylvia Tagle sylvia.tagle@aon.com

4TH QUARTER 2018 | NEFLCAI.COM | 33


Disclaimer - Information listed reflects that provided from the CAI National Office. Any changes or updates to listed contact information may be made by logging into your account at www.caionline.org or through the National Office.

BASIC LISTING

Inspections R Us Ms. Marianne E. Bailey marianne@inspectionsr.us Jimerson & Cobb, P.A. Mr. Hans Wahl hwahl@jimersoncobb.com

Kings III Emergency Communications Ms. Candace Harrison charrison@kingsiii.com Kipcon, Inc. Mr. Ed Pazden epazden@kipcon.com

Krystal Klean Mr. Anthony Lewis Morgan tmorgan@krystalklean.com Martin Home Exteriors Mr. Chris Lentzke chrisl@mhejax.com

MBAF, CPAS & ADVISORS CONDOMINIUM AND ASSOCIATION DIVISION Mr. Jeffrey L. Ducker jducker@mbafcpa.com McCabe | Ronsman Mr. Edward Ronsman eronsman@flcalegal.com McCall Services, Inc. Mr. Jerry Hall jhall@mccallservice.com

BASIC LISTING

McGowan Program Administrators Mr. Joel W. Meskin, Esq., CIRMS jmeskin@mcgowanins.com Mutual of Omaha Bank Mr. Keith Collopy keith.collopy@mutualofomahabank.com

Norman Insurance Advisors, LLC Mr. Andy Norman anorman@normaninsuranceadvisors.com North Florida Emulsions Mr. Jeffrey King northflemulsions@bellsouth.net Owens Corning Ms. Zack Farris zack.farris@owenscorning.com Pacific Premier Bank Mr. Michael Coleman mcoleman@ppbi.com

Popular Association Banking Ms. Molly Hime mhime@popular.com

Property Management Systems, Inc. Mr. Scott William Steffen, CMCA ssteffen@pmsiofflorida.com Pursiano Barry Bruce Lavelle, LLP Mr. Jason Bruce, Esq. jbruce@pblbh.com

34 | THE COMMUNITY CONNECTION

BASIC LISTING

Reserve Advisors Mr. Nick Brenneman nick@reserveadvisors.com Sentry Management, Inc. Mr. Gordon Wolfram

Servpro of Mandarin, the Beaches/Ponte Vedra & St. Augustine Ms. Robin Braddock robin@servpromandarin.com Sherwin-Williams Mr. Linsey Ritch swrep5784@sherwin.com

Shimp Sign and Design, Inc. Mr. Roy Luster Shimp, Jr. rlshimp@comcast.net

Sovereign & Jacobs Property Management Companies Mrs. Ellen Lumpkin elumpkin@sovereign-jacobs.com Sperlonga Data & Analytics Mr. Scott Swanson s.swanson@sperlongadata.com Tankel Law Group Mr. Bob Tankel Bob@TankelLawGroup.com

The Lake Doctors, Inc. Mr. Eric Williams eric.williams@lakedoctors.com TOPS Software, LLC Ms. Stefanie Ford stafanief@topssoft.com


Directory BASIC LISTING

Union Bank Homeowners Association Services Ms. Amanda Orlando, CMCA amanda.orlando@unionbank.com

BASIC LISTING

BASIC LISTING

Vesta Property Services, Inc. Ms. Leslie Pragasam lpragasam@vestapropertyservices.com Vote-now.com LLC Mr. James Claiborne jclaiborne@vote-now.com

Williams Law Association, P.A. Mr. K.C. Williams III, Esq. kcw@williamspa.com

Yellowstone Landscapes Mr. Blaine Peterson bpeterson@austinoutdoor.com Zenpura Pest Solutions Me. Ken Maszy ken@zenpura.com

4TH QUARTER 2018 | NEFLCAI.COM | 35

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NE Florida CAI Chapter Vol. 5 Iss. 4  

NE Florida CAI The Community Connection - Providing education, networking, resources and advocacy for Community Associations in Northeast Fl...

NE Florida CAI Chapter Vol. 5 Iss. 4  

NE Florida CAI The Community Connection - Providing education, networking, resources and advocacy for Community Associations in Northeast Fl...

Profile for neflcai