February 23, 2024 - Neepawa Banner & Press

Page 1

Friday, February 23, 2024 • Vol.128 No. 30 • Neepawa, Manitoba FOR RENT

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Inside this week Farmers’ Advocate

Farmers cautiously optimistic about 2024 Viterra hosts marketing meeting at Neepawa

By Ken Waddell Farmers’ Advocate Feb. 13 was Canada’s Agriculture day. As Viterra’s grain marketing Ray Baloun stated in opening the company’s farmer appreciation breakfast on Feb. 13, “This is Canada’s Agriculture day but most people don’t even know, right?” Baloun, who has achieved an almost famous status among Western Manitoba grain producers said he wanted to have grain growers come out to a breakfast on Feb. 13 to celebrate agriculture and to learn more about marketing grain. A room at Neepawa’s Chicken Chef restaurant packed with farmers and a couple of media types learned a lot about the mindset around farming and world markets. As part of the intro, Baloun said that Viterra supports STARS air ambulance and Food Grains by allowing grain growing on Viterra land around five of their elevators. Keith Brownell, Viterra marketing rep opened his presentation by stating, “We need as much advocacy as possible. We need to pull back the veil about farming especially in centres like Winnipeg.” Brownell has many years of Ag and marketing experience that started with a couple of university degrees. He obviously loves farming but he still posed the question, “Why do you farm? If you sold, what would you do? Most farmers keep on because they love to farm. Farmers are the most optimistic people in the world. They put seed in the ground, add in fertilizer and then battle the weather.” He suggested that if you treat your farm as a business it can be a great way of life. If you treat your farm as a way of life it can be a poor business.Warren Buf fet would say, “Can I make a profit.” Buffet says “always make a profit”. Brownell says you have

lots of bins, aeration and equipment but marketing needs to be planned ahead. “I don’t want to see farmers selling when they have to like when a bill is due.” Grain companies are buying in smaller increments and many geopolitical forces are big issues. Wars and political tensions will affect markets. “Know your cost of production and goals are more important than emotions. Loss is felt deeper than gains. Gut decisions come when the stress is on. Make rational decisions.” He noted that both Canadian and American farmers have been holding back on sales of grain on hand. There is more grain being grown than sold and that is holding prices back. Strange as it may seem, the world isn’t short of grain right now. Only 49 per cent of the canola is sold to date. The mood of the farmers seemed to still be optimistic, but cautious.

204-212-5037

PHOTOS BY JOHN DRINKWATER

Keith Brownell, Viterra’s marketing specialist, was the feature speaker at a Viterra sponsored grain marketing breakfast on Feb. 13 at the Chicken Chef restaurant in Neepawa. The meeting was hosted by Ray Baloun who is locally known as Ray, the Grain Guy.

Farmers’ Advocate Page 9 - 12

Call us at 204-476-6908 for early on-farm delivery and delayed billing. We would be happy to serve you.

Brownell emphasized the need for planning and preparation when it comes to grain marketing. He said, “Know your cost of production” when deciding when to sell and when to hold on to inventory

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PHOTOS BY JODI BAKER PHOTOGRAPHY, GEM MENDOZA BENAMER AND CASPER WEHRHAHN

Residents and visitors to Neepawa enjoyed a variety of activities at The Flats on Feb. 18 for the annual Neepawa Winter Festival. There was a glow-in-the-dark adventure trail (top right), fire works (above), skating, enjoying a warm bonfire together (bottom right) and other activities such as sleigh rides. Activities for the day began at 4:00 p.m. and concluded after the fireworks, which lit up the sky at 8:00 p.m.

FRIDAY, Deer Range School Reunion (1898-1959) JULY 19 Edrans (1900) - Firdale (1890) TO

Home Coming

SUNDAY, For more information contact Rob Smith at JULY 21 call or text: 1-204-573-7160 or email: deer_range_farm@yahoo.ca


2 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS FEBRUARY 23, 2024

Curling for a Cure an ‘incredible success’ Minnedosa fundraiser for cancer care brings in $33,021

By Casper Wehrhahn Neepawa Banner & Press The Minnedosa Curling Rink was bustling with activity throughout the February long weekend. Curlers and spectators alike flocked to the arena, filling it to capacity for the fifth annual Curling for A Cure fundraiser, held Feb. 16 to 18. This year’s event was, in the words of head organizer Chad Yanchycki, “an incredible success”. “This year, we raised $33,021, which will be donated to Cancer Care Manitoba and Candlelighters Childhood Cancer Support Group. We are incredibly grateful for the overwhelming support and generosity,” said Yanchycki. “We are especially proud to share that over the five years we have held this event, we have raised and donated a total of $94,551 to cancer programs in our area.” On behalf of Curling for a Cure, Yanchycki extended thanks to its sponsors, ‘whose generous support was crucial in making this event a success’, and to all those who participated, or came to watch the games and show support. “The success of this event would not be possible without everyone’s contributions

PHOTOS BY CASPER WEHRHAHN AND SUBMITTED

Pictured left: A pair of teams looks on as a rock is swept down the ice towards the ‘house’. Pictured above: There was cause for celebration as these individuals gathered for a photo with a large cheque, announcing the results of the 2024 event.

and we appreciate each and every person who is involved in some way,” Yanchycki enthused. He added, “We love hosting this event, where we can make a difference in the lives of individuals and families of those with cancer and we also get to enjoy a fun weekend of curling. Can’t wait to see you all next year! This year was by far the busiest year we’ve had and we are excited to get working on next year’s

Jodie Byram MLA for Agassiz

Agassiz Constituency Office

Box 550, Neepawa | MB R0J 1H0

204.390.5428 officeofagassizmla@gmail.com

event already.” The 2024 event was met with a high demand for team entry, selling out for the fourth consecutive year. This year’s sell-out also occurred one month before the event, with a waiting list to get in. While there is still quite some time until 2025, it appears that this may hold true come next year as well. “ We e x p e c t [t e a m registration] to sell out fast for next year’s event– We already have teams

registering for 2025,” said Yanchycki. “There’s only 24 spots available, so register early so you don’t miss out!” The sixth annual Curling for A Cure is currently planned to take place from Feb. 14 to 16, 2025. In the meantime, congratulations are in order for this year’s winning team. The 2024 winning team was: Doug Cook (skip), Donna Dowsett (third), Miles Dalrymple (second) and Carole Dalrymple (lead).

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Looking Back

FEBRUARY 23, 2024

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS 3

1974: Land o’ Plenty chorus hosts annual show

By Casper Wehrhahn Neepawa Banner & Press

125 years ago, Saturday, February 4, 1899 Mr. William E. Philip, for t hree seasons t he principal tenor of the Bostonians, has tendered his resignation from that company. 100 years ago, Friday, February 22, 1924 Glencairn: Another land deal was put through last week when O. Chapman purchased W. J. Clemente homestead in the Glenhope district. Mr. Chapman has a bunch of cows and intends to go in on the dairy business, as the above place is well suited, having abundance of good water and shelter. Birnie: Most of the wells in the burg appear to be on the dry side. Perhaps this

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

Linden Hatcheries had this adver tisement in the Feb. 7 edition of The Neepawa Press.

is due to the great depth of the frost in the ground. Sir Henry Thornton expresses a determination to keep politics out of C. N. R. operation. We hope he succeeds. But the system became so saturated with politics prior to his day that elimination will be no easy job.

75 years ago, Thursday, February 24, 1949 Fire Saturday afternoon wiped out a large part of the business section in the village of Eden. Vic Wilson’s fine garage and service station and the Red and White store owned by John Pulak were completely destroyed and considerable damage done to Frank Sawchuk’s confectionery store. The Sawchuk store also houses the bus depot at Eden. It was the third big fire in Central Manitoba recently. Large sections in the business area of Shoal Lake and Gilbert Plains having been wiped out. 50 years ago, Thursday, February 21, 1974 Barrie Strohman spoke for the developers of the Barrie Heights subdivision. He requested to have the entire division serviced with sewer and water as the development begins. He expects 20 new houses in the area in 1974 and streets and access to the houses as they are constructed. The development plans include a kiddies’ park in the area. Neepawa w ill again be without taxi service after midnight, Thursday, Feb. 28 when Paul’s Taxi will cease operation after trying to maintain the operation for the past year. Even with a subsidy of $320 from the Chamber of Commerce, the proprietor Paul Peterson found that there just wasn’t enough

Dr. Gerard Murray Optometrist 418 Mountain Ave. ~ Neepawa •Evening Appointments Available•

PHONE: 476-5919

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

The Neepawa Barbershoppers Land o’ Plenty Chorus (pictured) hosted the 1974 edition of their annual show in February of that year. Pictured front row, left to right: Bruce Johnson, Don Clark, John Oslund, chorus director Ron McKelvey, Harold Casselman and Vic Murray. Top row: Ken Blatz, Ken Clyde, Palmer Nesbitt, Bjorki Jakobson, Russ Tiller, Ralph Lowe, Stan Drysdale, Murray Elliott, George Wiebe, Ken Harper, Ed Salway, Norval Lee, Kelly Carlson and Peter Stronski.

demand to make it a paying proposition. Glenella: The grade seven and eight class a t G le ne l l a r e a l i z e d approximately $650 this weekend from a Wakea-Thon. The class of 23 students have been twinned with an Ottawa classroom of grade seven and eight students, under an Ontario program known as Project Canada. The class at Glenella is enthusiastically planning a trip to Ottawa to spend five days visiting their twinned classmates. On Saturday, Feb. 23 at about 9:15 p.m., a group of students from Avondale, Newfoundland will be arriving at the local collegiate by bus from Winnipeg. They will be accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Crawley and Mr. Bonia and their purpose in coming is to have a first hand look at life on the Canadian prairies. Mrs. Florence Bates has been hostess of the Neepawa Welcome Wagon since it was organized 10 years ago.

On Saturday evening, Feb. 2 family members met at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Boyd to celebrate Mr. Boyd’s 87th birthday. Sixteen rinks entered the Brookdale ladies’ bonspiel held Jan. 28 and 29. Winner of the main event (Tom-Boy Store) was Mrs. Doris Shannon of Pierson, Man., with her rink of Mrs. Noreen Craven, Mrs. Ellen Vickers and Mrs. Norma Minshull. 20 years ago, Monday, Feb 23, 2004 Minnedosa’s ethanol plant– the only one in the province– will be upping its capacity by 700 per cent after receiving a multimillion-dollar grant from the federal government. The Husky Oil M a rket i ng C ompa ny, which operates an ethanol pl a nt i n M i n ne do s a , i s one of seven f uel companies in the country to share $10 0 -mi l l ion under Ottawa’s Ethanol Expansion Program. Disclaimer: The information

www.neepawaroxy.ca

February 23 & 24 • SHOWTIME: 7:30 pm

Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom

Black Manta seeks revenge on Aquaman for his father’s death. Wielding the Black Trident’s power, he becomes a formidable foe. To defend Atlantis, Aquaman forges an alliance with his imprisoned brother. They must protect the kingdom. PG

March 1 & 2 • SHOWTIME: 7:30 pm

Madame Web

Host your birthday party at the Roxy! • www.facebook.com/neepawaroxy

gathered and used each week in the Looking Back feature is directly taken from the original print copy of the Neepawa Press and Neepawa Banner newspapers. Any errors or omissions from

stories (Factually or otherwise) are the result of the original print and not the responsibility of the archivist for the current version of the Neepawa Banner & Press.

Whoever would foster love covers over an offense, but whoever repeats the matter separates close friends.

Proverbs 17:9 (New International Version)

MTS Channel 30 & 1030 • Bell ExpressVu 592 • Cable 17 online at www.nactv.tv • nactv@wcgwave.ca • 204-476-2639

Highlights of the week Viterra- Canada’s Agriculture Day

Feb. 26 at 11:55 am | Feb. 27 at 12:25 pm | Feb. 29 at 8:00 pm | March 3 at 5:30 pm

Neepawa Garden Club: Vegetable Gardening

Feb. 26 at 4:35 pm | Feb. 28 at 3:25 pm | March 2 at 1:00 pm

World Day of Prayer 2024

March 1 at 2:00 pm | March 3 at 8:30 pm

NACTV Bingo Jackpot now over $17,000 Packages ($12 each) are available at: NACTV Office, Harris Pharmacy, Neepawa Legion, Tim Tom Store, Rock’N Animal House, Wednesday Kinsmen Kourts 2 (exclusive to residents) & Touchwood Park. Bingo cards can also be mailed directly to your home. nights at Contact NACTV to receive them weekly or monthly.

7 P.M.

Visit nactv.tv to see this week’s jackpots!

The stories in the Neepawa Banner & Press are local, unlike other news outlets that only tell you about issues that are far away.

Stories in paper are closer than they appear


Perspectives

4 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS

Tundra

Homebodies

By Chad Carpenter

I

Rita Friesen

Random Quotes…

Publishing is a long needed enterprise

n 2024, it will be 35 years that my wife and I have been in the newspaper publishing business. The Rivers Banner has been going for 108 years. The Neepawa Press for 128 years. The Neepawa Banner for 35 years. I personally produced my first publication 58 years ago Needless to say, much has changed in 128 years. We have in our possession, newspaper archives that go back to 1896 and the words written in that year are still clear to read and understand on the printed pages. That is the absolute rock solid foundation of the printed word. It can’t be changed, it can’t shifted around to hide the facts or the errors that may have been committed. A newspaper publisher has no place to hide. I say rock solid, as printed words can’t be changed. Because they can’t be changed, most people who put words in print are careful how they select their words, knowing that errors will come back to haunt the writer. What passes for journalism today has become a farce. CNN, Fox News and even CBC and CTV have become more entertainment than a forum for facts. Consumption of TV news is declining, radio newscasts are rarely more than three minutes on the hour and most people know they can’t, or shouldn’t, rely on Internet and Twitter “news”. I am a proud newspaperman and especially proud that we have three local publications, namely the Neepawa Banner & Press, the Rivers Banner and the Farmers’ Advocate which currently publishes ten times per year. In the last few years, Canada has lost 100s of newspapers and many TV and radio stations. It’s impossible to count the number of blogs, web sites neepawa

Banner & Press

STAFF

Owners/Publishers Ken and Chris Waddell Editor Ken Waddell

FEBRUARY 23, 2024

M

Right in the Centre Ken Waddell and Twitter accounts that have evaporated or been abandoned. There are many reasons. Running any news outlet, be it print, radio, TV on-line is a lot of work. It has to be kept fresh, with new news every edition regardless of the method of production. You have to have reporters and production staff. You have to have ad sales to pay the bills. News costs money as the staff, the printer and the fuel bills all have to be paid. Quite frankly, the news outlets that have disappeared are gone because they went broke. Blunt, but true. So in the towns that still have newspapers, events are turning somewhat. People are realizing that without ads, the news outlet will die. I am thankful that ads are re-gaining popularity in this paper. Certainly there are other ways than newspapers to spread the word about a business or an event, including reputation, word of mouth, posters and yes, social media. I use social media myself, but it isn’t the be all and end all by any means. Some people don’t use social media at all, some don’t use it much. And social media is set up on a system that severely limits what we see. It may be unintentional, but social media actually limits and censors news and information quite severely. The newspaper is always sitting

there on your table, ready to be read in whole or in part and it is around for a week or more. Running a local newspaper isn’t easy. It’s a constant work in progress. Note I say “local” newspaper, as many of the 100s of papers and all the TV and radio stations that have disappeared have been owned by big corporations. The “Bigs” don’t place local news or priorities at the top of their list. They, without any apology, place making money at the top of their list. Their CEOs glide from one corporate misadventure to another, taking their over-priced salaries with them as they go. I am an unapologetic promoter of small local businesses. A business has to have strong local ownership or at least strong local management. Local papers and local businesses have to work diligently to survive and many have survived for well over 100 years. As long as local people want and need local news it will continue. Thank you to our faithful readers and advertisers, your support is appreciated. Disclaimer: The views expressed in this column are the writer’s personal views and are not to be taken as being the view of the Banner & Press staff.

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uch of the reading that I do these days is for study; some for the services I share and some for selfimprovement and spiritual growth. I can’t tell if the work is working, but I can tell you that my thinking is challenged and my outlook expanding. Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) lived a powerful, visionary life. She entered a monastery at the age of fifteen and continued her life and work pursuing knowledge of God and creation, sin and redemption. “She wrote three visionary works, a natural history, and a medical compendium. She was a pastor, a poet, a composer and teacher, seeing herself as ‘a feather on the breath of God’.” That image of a feather on the breath of God caused me to set aside the book and simply breathe. What a goal, and then to be able to define your life work with those words. Fred Craddock (1928-2015) Distinguished Professor of Preaching and New Testament Meritus, offers insight into lectionary readings. We are entering the Season of Lent, the time of introspection and reflection on the power of the Easter story, and Sundays’ reading from the Gospel of Mark was on Jesus’ baptism and time of temptation in the desert before beginning his ministry and the journey to the cross. It is in a garden where Jesus is apprehended and the mockery and abuse begins. The quote here that again caused me to set aside the book itself and settle into the words, “ Gethsemane was a garden, but for one night it, too, was a wilderness.” As an outsider and an observer, too often I view another’s place in life as a garden. There are many gardens that are, for a time, a wilderness. I know from experience. Carl R. Holladay (1943-) American Scholar of New Testament, Christian origins and Hellenistic Judaism, in his study of 1 Corinthians- a letter written by the Apostle Paul to the new Christian church in Corinth- a letter promoting understanding and acceptance between Jews and Gentiles. To emulate Paul’s personal ethics “would inevitably mean that the strong would be willing to bear the burdens of the weak, that those ‘in the know’ would be more tolerant of those ‘not in the know’ and that those more practiced and experienced in religious matters would be more patient with those whose conversion to Christianity is their first real exposure to the regimen and religion of a religion with high ethical standards.” Yikes. In the last decade I have been introduced to too many people who are ‘in the know’, and I’m not always certain their source is accurate. Patience, patience…a slow mare and yet she jogs on. A first glance it’s rather intense reading. It is thought provoking. There are lessons that I still want to, and need to, learn about life and living. It’s quite ok to wonder what I do for entertainment! Heavy reading aside, I walk my dog, have coffee with friends, send out thinking of you notes when I reflect on the impact an individual has had on my life- any stage of my life- and have become more comfortable in my own skin.

The Neepawa Banner & Press does not guarantee publication of any submitted articles or pictures. Such submissions, if printed, will appear at the discretion of the editor or publisher and only when time and space permit. We are not responsible for electronic transmissions which are not confirmed either in person or by phone. All letters to the editor must be fewer than 400 words and include name, address and telephone number, for verification purposes. We reserve the right to edit or condense letters.

Circulation as of November 2023: 7,875

News Staff Eoin Devereux Casper Wehrhahn

Distribution Staff Bernie Myker Matthew Gagnon Shannon Robertson Betty Pearson

News releases and leads: news@neepawabanner.com sports@neepawabanner.com Printing and office supplies: print@neepawabanner.com Advertising: ads@neepawabanner.com


Perspectives

FEBRUARY 23, 2024

Your gifts, your choice Part III

S

o far in this series, we have examined the true value of money you donate to a church or registered charity; how to decide on an annual giving budget and how to choose a worthy charity or two to whom you can send regular donations. This week, I want to share some guidelines I follow when deciding how much to donate to my charities of choice. These are guidelines that work for me. You may have some of your own; and that is fine. Remember that these are your gifts; so the choice is yours. Step One - Set an overall giving goal. Go back to Part I of this series to see some ideas that will help you do this. Please try, as best you can, to incorporate a mixture of realistic budgeting (giving what you are sure you can afford) and faith (giving funds that you are trusting God to supply). Do this as early in the year as you can. Step Two - Choose one charity as the primary recipient of your donations;

Faithfully Yours

Neil Strohschein and designate at least half of your donations to that organization. In making your choice, I strongly suggest that you choose an organization from your local community-one that, in addition to taking your donations, allows you to observe their activities and, if you so desire, to participate as a volunteer. Donations of time and volunteer service are gifts all charities welcome. Step Three - Allocate 40 per cent of your giving goal to charities from which, as in the case of your primary recipient, you will receive a receipt for tax credit. You are free to decide how many charities you support and how much each charity will receive. Step Four - Leave some room (I suggest 10 per cent) for miscellaneous dona-

tions. These are donations you make during the year for which you will not receive a tax receipt. In my case, I donate the paper, envelopes and printing costs I incur while carrying out my duties as an officer in my church. The dollar amount is not that significant, but I record it as part of my overall giving goal. This gives me the freedom to respond to sudden community needs without taking funds from those who rely on my regular monthly contributions. Step Five - Keep a running tally of your donations. You will be thrilled to see how, with each donation, you inch closer to achieving your overall goal. And if, at the end of the year, the amount on your receipt does not match the amount shown in your records, contact the charity’s financial

officers immediately. They will investigate your complaint, amend their records and issue you a corrected receipt. One final note. As tax payers in Canada, we can claim a tax credit for charitable donations we make each year. The dollar value of our credit is linked to the dollar value of donations made during the year and for which we have a receipt qualifying us to claim the credit. While tax credits are nice to receive, they should never be a factor in determining our giving goal, choosing charities to support and deciding how much each charity should receive. Our gifts should be a sign of our gratitude to God for what he has given us; and our desire to share his love, acceptance and forgiveness with others. Financially supporting and volunteering with charities that offer physical, emotional, practical and spiritual help to others is one of the best ways by which this can be done.

Gladstone cattle market report By Tyler Slawinski Gladstone Auction Mart If the hoar frost is any indication, according to the old timers there should be a fair amount of moisture to come six months down the road. A promising grazing and crop season would go hand in hand with the strong cattle market! It’s a dying profession, fa r m i ng of a ny k i nd, whether you are a cattleman, a grain farmer, or both. Look ing further down the road, I’m not quite sure who will be t here to hand le t hese duties. The high cattle prices definitely act as a double edged sword, yes they are fantastic to be selling at these record prices, but how easy is it to just jump into the business with both feet?! How tempting is it

not to retain any heifers? Or, simply anyone who was on the fence about retiring, just go ahead and have a herd dispersal? All of these factors are gonna play a big role in the North American cow herd over the next years to come! We have definitely seen a lot more “selling” lately than “buying, retaining and building”. Farming is a lifestyle I hope is never forgotten! Cat t le f ut ures were green and cattle were in strong demand this week. We sold 1,935 cattle through the ring and on the video sale in Gladstone on Feb. 20. The market saw a variety of cattle– whether they were big or small, the market welcomed all classes of cattle with open

arms. The market was quite aggressive with reassuring returns! Fat cattle prices are constantly climbing, boxed beef is selling, meat exports are rising and red meat is an excellent source in protein! Cows and bulls traded with plenty of stability

Gladstone Auction Mart Cattle Market Report Feb. 20, 2024 Steers

3-400 lbs. 4-500 lbs. 5-600 lbs. 6-700 lbs. 7-800 lbs. 8-900 lbs. 900+ lbs. Bulls

Heifers

$4.65 to 5.32 $4.30 to 5.10 $4.15 to 4.68 $3.75 to 4.11 $3.41 to 3.67 $3.05 to 3.30 $2.70 to 3.08 $1.47 to 1.60

3-400 lbs. $3.95 to 4.50 4-500 lbs. $3.85 to 4.57 5-600 lbs. $3.66 to 3.96 6-700 lbs. $3.15 to 3.56 7-800 lbs. $2.99 to 3.21 8-900 lbs. $2.65 to 2.98 900+ lbs. $2.47 to 2.82 Cows $1.20 to 1.35 1,935head sold

from 120 to 135 showing consistent averages. Bulls traded also with consistent levels ranging between 147.00 to 160. All classes of cattle sold well! Plainer type cattle, are still being discounted! Here is a look at the feeder market! S ome ma rket h ighlights from todays sale, mixed steers weighed 505 brought 468.00. Red steers weighed 600 and brought 411.00. Silver hided steers weighed 736 and traded for 361.00. And a big set of Black X steers weighed 835 and they brought 326.50 per pound! Heifers, Crossbred heifers weighed 518 and brought 387.00. And a fancy set of big buckskin heifers that weighed 617 and they fetched 356.00. Red heifers weighed 714 traded for 321.00. And big Red X heifers weighed 850 brought 290 per pound.

The Neepawa Banner & Press can also be found online at: www.myWestman.ca

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS 5

Letters

Canada Post methods questioned Editor’s note: The following letter to the editor is in response to my column in the Feb. 16 edition ofthe Banner & Press. Some Post Offices, it seems, may do local mail sorting while some send everything to Winnipeg or Brandon for sorting, even if it’s local mail. Ken Waddell. Just a comment about Canada Post: My big beef is that they force the rural office to send all their mail to Winnipeg, even the local mail. It used to be that you could hand a sympathy card for a neighbour to the local staff, and they would take 10-15 steps and put it in the mailbox. The recipient got it the same day. Now it is at least two days to receive a local card or grant application (we are told to allow a week for that). When I questioned Canada Post, and Dan Mazier’s office about it - I was told that it was “sorted” in Winnipeg. It has to get “sorted” when it gets back to the rural office, before it goes in the box. Makes no sense to me. So, I hand deliver any local mail now. I agree that local staff are great, and not to blame. If there were a slot for local mail, it would expedite things! Gloria Mott

Sports in days gone by fit in better with church schedules

Afternoon Ken, as always, I enjoy your column in the Banner & Press, and if I may, I would like to relate my thoughts about churches etc. Many decades ago, when I was close to my teens (Mar. 13, I turn 75) my meagre hockey/baseball career games were played after 1:00 p.m. and against teams such as Oak River, Crandall and the odd time McConnell and Lavinia. We never were far away from Hamiota. Then a little later, the sports groups speculated going further away and having games around 11:00 in the morning. That was the era of Ralph Clark, Minister of the Hamiota United Church, remember him, Ken? Continued on Page 18

Thumbs up, thumbs down Thumbs Up the Grade 3 classes of Mrs. Pollock and Mrs. Hackewich from HMK School. The kids made valentines day cards for the residents of Kinsmen Kourts I & II. The kids made 90 hand-made and specialized cards. The residents were surprised and really appreciated by the creativity and effort that went into the cards. Thank you!! Kinsmen Kourts I & II residents Neepawa, MB


6 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS FEBRUARY 23, 2024

Helen Drysdale out of helen’s kitchen

Banana loaf

MLA congratulates Todoruk and Jones

Did you know that Feb. 23 is banana bread day? In Canada, bananas are most commonly eaten fruit and the cheapest fruit to buy. Bananas are not only healthy and tasty but also convenient. One banana provides 105 calories, a healthy source of fiber, potassium, vitamin B6, and vitamin C. They make a great addition to yogurt, cereal, or smoothies as well as baked in desserts, muffins and loaves or chilled in pies or puddings. To slow down bananas from ripening put them in a refrigerator. However, the peels of these bananas will certainly change from yellow to brown, even though the inner flesh remains the same. There are as many as 1,000 different types of bananas in the world. Their color usually ranges from green to yellow, but some varieties are red. The commonly found light-yellow bananas that we find in our local store are Cavendish bananas. India is the world’s largest producer of bananas followed by China and Philippines. Banana is considered the third most popular fruit in the world after apples and oranges. The banana is the 4th most popular agricultural product grown in the world. In many countries bananas make up 25 per cent of their total daily diet. A cluster of bananas is called a ‘hand’, while a single banana is called a ‘finger’. Enjoy super moist and flavorful banana bread with a layer of cinnamon-sugar in the middle and celebrate banana bread day. Banana Bread 2 1/2 cups flour 1/2 cup buttermilk or milk with 1 tsp. 1 tsp. baking soda vinegar added 1 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. vanilla 1/2 tsp. salt 2/3 cup nuts or raisins or chocolate 2/3 cup sugar chips, your choice 1/2 cup butter, softened to Cinnamon Sugar: room temperature 3 Tbsp. butter, melted 2 large eggs 1/4 cup white sugar 1 1/2 cup mashed bananas 1 Tbsp. cinnamon Adjust the oven rack to the lower third position and preheat the oven to 350°F (177°C). Lowering the oven rack prevents the top of your bread from browning too much and too soon. Grease large loaf pan or 2 smaller pans with nonstick spray. Set aside. Mix the flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt together. Set aside. In another bowl mix the sugar and butter. Stir in eggs until well blended. Add bananas, buttermilk and vanilla. Beat until smooth. Stir in flour mixture just until moistened. Add the 2/3 cup addition of your choice. Stir in. Cinnamon Sugar: Mix the cinnamon sugar ingredients together. Spoon half of the banana bread batter into prepared loaf pan. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar mixture. Pour and spread remaining batter on top. Bake for 55–65 minutes until a tooth pick inserted in the centre comes out clean. Remove bread from the oven and allow the bread to cool in the pan for 5-10 minutes. Remove bread from the pan and cool on a wire rack. Enjoy.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Jan. 31 was a special day at the Manitoba Legislature for a pair of individuals from the Agassiz riding. Jesse Jones and Bryan Todoruk of Neepawa were in Winnipeg to participate in the Conservation Officer Service Awards The pair recently graduated with diplomas from Lethbridge College, where they completed course studies in Natural Resource Compliance. The program focuses on protection of land, water, forest and cultural resources. Career opportunities in the field include Park Rangers, Patrol Officers, Fish and Wildlife Officers and Federal Fishery Officers. As part of the day, Agassiz MLA Jodie Byram recognized and congratulated the two riding residents on their accomplishments. Byram also wished them all the best in their new postings in northern and southern Manitoba. Pictured: Agassiz MLA Jodie Byram, Jesse Jones and Bryan Todoruk.

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NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS FEBRUARY 23, 2024 7

Neepawa Eats Healthy: A February school lunch celebration Submitted Neepawa Eats Healthy On Wednesday, Feb 7, 21 children from Mrs. Dudenhoffer’s grade six class enjoyed this month’s Neepawa Eats Healthy Meal in 30 Recipe. Sheet Pan Gnocchi with Italian Sausage was prepared by Chef J.P. Charpentier from HyLife and served by members ofthe Neepawa Titans Junior ‘A’ Hockey Club. T he c l a s sroom w a s awarded with the free lunch in appreciation for their commitment to helping out with the school’s breakfast program. Experiencing the lunch f irst hand was an opportunity for kids to get involved in the Meal in 30 Project by encouraging them to explore new ( and tasty!) foods. This was a great way to involve more community partners in our project and it is hoped that even more community members will

get behind the community initiative that focusses on promoting quick easy meals, cooking at home and enjoyment of eating with others. HyLife and the Local Titan Hockey club along with committee members Norma Holmes a nd Glenda M acPhee played a key role in hosting the classroom lunch, commented, Sherrill-Lee Hyra, Health Promotion Coordinator with Prairie Mountain Health. Having their support and getting behind the project has made it fun and the committee plans to host two more lunches throughout the remainder of the school year. If you are curious and want to try the Sheet Pa n Gnocch i Rec ipe, make sure you head to the Neepawa Safeway or Co op food store, cook it up at home and be sure to scan the Recipe Card QR code to have a chance to win free groceries!

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

Members of the Neepawa Titans Hockey Club assisted with the Neepawa Eats Healthy program on Wednesday, Feb. 7 at Neepawa Middle School.

Rolling River School Division receives support increase By Casper Wehrhahn

Neepawa Banner & Press

In the Feb. 9 edition of the Neepawa Banner & Press, it was shared that the province of Manitoba would be increasing its annual allocation to public and independent schools to $104.2 million. Also included were specifics for what that announcement meant for the Beautiful Plains School Division. T h is week, t he paper wishes to share details with its readers regarding how this increase affects the Rolling River School Division (RRSD). The Neepawa Banner & Press spoke to RRSD secretary treasurer Kathlyn McNabb, who stated that RRSD will be receiving an

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increase of 2.1 per cent in provincial funding over the 2023-2024 budget. “This is an increase of $259,000 in operating support,” said McNabb. “RRSD will also receive $143,000 from the Province of Manitoba to support the new universal nutrition program for students.” “The RRSD Board is still in the process of developing its [2024-2025]

budget and the final proposed budget will be determined near the end of February,” said McNabb. T he R R SD’s publ ic proposed budget presentation is scheduled for Mar 6, 2024– a link to the presentation will be made available on the division’s website

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8 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS FEBRUARY 23, 2024

Neepawa Wildlife Prairie Mountain Health Association supports announces new CEO local food bank Submitted Prairie Mountain Health

By Eoin Devereux

Neepawa Banner & Press

Ne e paw a a nd a r e a hunters are helping the hung r y in 2024. L ast week, members of the Neepawa Wildlife Association (NWA) donated 300 pounds of frozen elk meat to the Salvation Army, Neepawa Community Ministries Centre and the operation of the local Food Bank. The meat was collected over the course of the hunting season, which is primarily during the months of September through January. Community and Family Services Worker Leah Anderson said the Food Bank is very grateful to have received this donation. “This donation will provide two to three food bank visits worth of meat for each of our families,” said Anderson. “We are currently serving 55 families every month and the meat received will provide multiple portions of to each family we serve.” The clients of the food bank are able to access it once a month if needed. They do so by booking a scheduled appointment. Each appointment is 30 minutes long where they select their items. Item amounts are based on the size of family. NWA goes above and beyond for Food Bank As for the details behind the donation, Anderson informed the Banner &

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Amanda Naughton-Gale of the Salvation Army, Neepawa Community Ministries Centre accepts 300 pounds of frozen elk meat from Perry Snedden, John Lavich and Ben Filiipchuk of the Neepawa Wildlife Association.

Press that there are very specific rules in place for the acceptance of these types of products. She noted the Wildlife Association was very accommodating in their efforts to follow those rules. “When Constable Ben [Filiipchuk] reached out to me to ask if we could receive wild game, I was happy and grateful he thought to call us. Unfortunately, we cannot accept donated meat that has not been processed through a butcher due to

not knowing how, when or where it was prepared. The NWA was willing to cover the cost of butchering the Elk for us, allowing me to accept it and distribute it,” stated Anderson. “I love that the Elk that was apprehended does not go to waste and we are able to use it to provide needed protein for our families. I am thrilled to form this relationship with the NWA and Conservation.”

The Board of Directors of Prairie Mountain Health (PMH) is pleased to announce that Treena Slate has accepted the position of Chief Executive Officer (CEO). Slate will assume the role from Brian Schoonbaert, who will retire effective April 5, 2024. The Board expressed sincere thanks and appreciation for Schoonbaert’s commitment, dedication and strong leadership as CEO of the health region. “Brian’s commitment to providing quality health care and supporting all PMH staf f, physicians and volunteers has always been evident. All who have worked with him will miss Brian’s positive, welcoming, genuine approach.” Lon Cullen, Board Chair, is pleased to welcome Slate to the role of Chief Executive Officer. “Treena is a familiar face for many in Prairie Mountain Health and the province. With over 30 years in healthcare and 15 years in a leadership role, Treena is bringing a wealth of experience and knowledge into the role of Chief Executive Officer.” The PMH Board of Directors undertook an extensive search across Canada for a CEO to replace Schoonbaert. Included in the recruitment process, the Board of Directors asked PMH staff what they felt were important qualities for

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Treena Slate will step into the role of Chief Executive Officer for Prairie Mountain Health, effective April. 5.

the Chief Executive Officer. “We appreciate that PMH staff took the time to provide their input into the selection criteria, and the Board was able to use this feedback in selecting candidates,” Cullen commented. “Those that know Treena recognize her compassion, openness, decisiveness and energy, which will be important qualities to lead Prairie Mountain Health in these challenging times.” Slate is excited to be stepping into the CEO role. “I am following in some incredible footsteps – Brian will be truly missed by all who worked with him. Prairie Mountain Health has

an incredible team of over 7,500 individuals providing quality health care to the residents of PMH – and I feel very fortunate to work alongside these dedicated staff.” Slate has held many roles during her years in healthcare, including a staff nurse, educator, public health nurse, manager, director and most recently, Regional Lead – Acute Care Services and Chief Nursing Officer for Prairie Mountain Health. Slate recently completed her Master of Health Administration through the Johnson Shoyoma School of Public Policy in 2023.

Invites the Public to view the 2024/25 Public Budget Presentation available on the Beautiful Plains School Division Website

https://www.beautifulplainssd.ca/ Thursday, February 29th, 2024 Any feedback or questions regarding the presentation are welcome and can be submitted by email to: bpsd@bpsd.mb.ca The 2024/25 Budget is on the agenda to be approved at the March 5, 2024 Regular Board Meeting.


FARMERS’ ADVOCATE FEBRUARY 23, 2024 9

Farmers’ Advocate Farmers cautiously optimistic about 2024 Viterra hosts marketing meeting at Neepawa

By Ken Waddell Farmers’ Advocate Feb. 13 was Canada’s Agriculture day. As Viterra’s grain marketing Ray Baloun stated in opening the company’s farmer appreciation breakfast on Feb. 13, “This is Canada’s Agriculture day but most people don’t even know, right?” Baloun, who has achieved an almost famous status among Western Manitoba grain producers said he wanted to have grain growers come out to a breakfast on Feb. 13 to celebrate agriculture and to learn more about marketing grain. A room at Neepawa’s Chicken Chef restaurant packed with farmers and a couple of media types learned a lot about the mindset around farming and world markets. As part of the intro, Baloun said that Viterra supports STARS air ambulance and Food Grains by allowing grain growing on Viterra land around five of their elevators. Keith Brownell, Viterra marketing rep opened his presentation by stating, “We need as much advocacy as possible. We need to pull back the veil about farming especially in centres like Winnipeg.” Brownell has many years of Ag and marketing experience that started with a couple of university degrees. He obviously loves farming but he still posed the question, “Why do you farm? If you sold, what would you do? Most farmers keep on because they love to farm. Farmers are the most optimistic people in the world. They put seed in the ground, add in fertilizer and then battle the weather.” He suggested that if you treat your farm as a business it can be a great way of life. If you treat your farm as a way of life it can be a poor business.Warren Buf fet would say, “Can I make a profit.” Buffet says “always make a profit”. Brownell says you have

lots of bins, aeration and equipment but marketing needs to be planned ahead. “I don’t want to see farmers selling when they have to like when a bill is due.” Grain companies are buying in smaller increments and many geopolitical forces are big issues. Wars and political tensions will affect markets. “Know your cost of production and goals are more important than emotions. Loss is felt deeper than gains. Gut decisions come when the stress is on. Make rational decisions.” He noted that both Canadian and American farmers have been holding back on sales of grain on hand. There is more grain being grown than sold and that is holding prices back. Strange as it may seem, the world isn’t short of grain right now. Only 49 per cent of the canola is sold to date. The mood of the farmers seemed to still be optimistic, but cautious.

PHOTOS BY JOHN DRINKWATER

Keith Brownell, Viterra’s marketing specialist, was the feature speaker at a Viterra sponsored grain marketing breakfast on Feb. 13 at the Chicken Chef restaurant in Neepawa. The meeting was hosted by Ray Baloun who is locally known as Ray, the Grain Guy.

Call us at 204-476-6908 for early on-farm delivery and delayed billing. We would be happy to serve you. Brownell emphasized the need for planning and preparation when it comes to grain marketing. He said, “Know your cost of production” when deciding when to sell and when to hold on to inventory

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10 FARMERS’ ADVOCATE FEBRUARY 23, 2024

Farmers’ Advocate Three challenges facing the global agricultural sector Submitted

Metro Creative Connection

Since the World Health Organization declared a global pandemic in early 2020, businesses big and small have faced significant challenges. Though the pandemic has ended, many sectors, including the agricultural industry, are facing familiar and unfamiliar challenges. The agricultural sector is crucial to the survival and health of billions of people across the globe. Though it’s obvious that modern agriculture is vital to feeding a global population that was greater than eight billion people at the dawn of 2024, the United Nations notes that agriculture also boosts prosperity and economies by providing jobs. That reality only underscores the notion that the challenges facing the agri-

cultural sector are facing everyone, even those whose livelihoods are not directly linked to the industry. According to Earth. org, an organization that offers environmental news, data analysis, research, and policy solutions, the following are three sizable challenges facing modern agriculture. 1. Climate change: Perhaps no challenge is greater for humanity in the twentyfirst century than climate change, and the agricultural sector is no exception. Climate change has caused shifting weather patterns marked by unpredictability and potentially disastrous developments like prolonged drought. Estimates

IMAGE COURTESY OF METRO CREATIVE CONNECTION

from NASA indicate corn yields may decrease by 24 per cent by the end of this century, a potentially dangerous development linked to a host of factors, including a shifting climate and elevated surface carbon dioxide concentrations that can be traced to humancaused greenhouse gas emissions.

US cattle inventories By Shawn Cabak Submitted The USDA released their Jan. 1 inventor y report and US cattle inventories totaled 87.1 million head on Jan. 1, 2024, down 1.9 per cent from last year. This is 1.5 per cent below the previous cycle low made in 2014 with inventories eight percent or 7.65 million head below the 2019 peak. Beef cow inventories were down 716,300 head or 2.5 per cent at 28 million head. This is 11 per cent below the 2019 peak and 2.9 percent below the 2014 cycle low. Beef cows in the Pacific Northwest were up a combined 1.5

per cent. This is dwarfed by the declines in the Colorado-Nebraska region where beef cows are down 3.1 per cent or 72,000 head. Dry conditions in the US have impacted the central and southern plains to a greater degree. For every beef cow in the US, there is one-third of a dairy cow. As beef on dairy has grown, these are not ‘new’ calves but a more efficient calf (beef-cross steer) with improved feed efficiency and fewer days to slaughter. The dairy cow herd was down 0.4 per cent with replacement dairy heifers mirroring that trend. Beef replacement heifers were down 1.4 percent,

which when combined with significant revisions to the year ago number is now 12.5 per cent below the 2014 low and the lowest since 1950. The 2023 calf crop was down 2.7 per cent or 846,500 head at 33.6 million head.

What’s the scoop? If you’ve got a news tip, story or event, let us know! Give us a call, email or visit the office! 204-476-3401 news@neepawabanner.com 423 Mountain Ave.

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2. Population growth: The booming global population is attributable to numerous factors, including longer life expectancies in developed nations due to medical advancements. How to keep the global population fed at a time when the climate is adversely affecting crop yields is a significant challenge fa-

cing both humanity and the agricultural sector. As the population grows, so, too, does the demand for water, which also must be used to grow crops. Navigating this challenge will be significant, and how it’s managed could af fect the economic stability of the agricultural industry in the decades to come.

3. Investment: Perhaps no industry is more vital to human survival than agriculture. Earth.org notes that countries with strong agricultural sectors often boast higher standards of living and health than nations with a less productive agricultural industry. Despite that, Earth.org notes that investment in

the agricultural sector is not commensurate with the growing population. Supporting measures to invest more heavily in the agricultural sector could reduce food shortages in the decades to come and ensure the agricultural sector is better positioned to address the many challenges it is already confronting in the twenty-first century. The challenges facing the agricultural sector affect those who work in the industry but also the global population as a whole. Recognition of that reality may compel more people to support measures designed to ensure the agricultural sector can thrive and help the world to overcome potentially devastating challenges in the decades ahead.


FARMERS’ ADVOCATE FEBRUARY 23, 2024 11

Farmers’ Advocate Yield Manitoba 2024 released: New crop records set!

Belles, Beaux and Builders

By Shawn Cabak

A great start to 2024 for Neepawa 4-H club

Submitted

Yield Manitoba is an annual publication of Manitoba Agricultural Services Corporation (MASC) and provides a breakdown of annual crop yields on a provincial, risk area and variety basis insured by MASC (over 90 per cent of acres). Even with the dry conditions in 2023 several crops had record breaking years. Canola was grown on 3.01 million acres and averaged 48 bushels per acre, beating its previous record of 47 set in 2017. Red spring wheat didn’t set a new record but yielded a respectable 63 bushels per acre on 3.06 million acres. Soybean acres were third highest in Manitoba at 1.55 million and averaged 37.6 bushels per acre. Other record yields were set by peas at 54 bushels per

By Chloe Pankratz Neepawa Belles, Beaux and Builders The Neepawa Belles, Beaux and Builders 4-H club had a great start to the 23/24 4-H year! The group reconvened in October with exciting project topics of Building Teams and Science in the Kitchen, monthly meetings and activities. The group is proud to have been part of the Remembrance Day service, and supporting the community through sorting food at the Salvation Army, and volunteering at the Neepawa Roxy theater. Our group is now busy preparing for communication night, to be held on Feb. 26, 2024.

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acre on 159,000 acres, and both oil and confectionary sunf lowers at 2,401 and 2,131 lbs per acre respectively on 79,000 acres combined. Grain corn produced 135.8 bushels per acre on 468 000 acres, barley averaged 83.8 bushels per acer on 354,000 acres and oats was just shy of the century mark at 99.9 bushels per acre over 302,000 acres. For a copy of Yield Manitoba 2024 stop by your nearest MASC office or contact shawn. cabak@gov.mb.ca or phone 204-239-3353.

The front cover of Yield Manitoba magazine for 2024 SUBMITTED IMAGE

Weather conditions and reports

By Shawn Cabak Submitted

Manitoba’s ag weather program measures and records data year round from over 100 weather stations across agro-Manitoba. The stations monitor air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, precipitation, wind speed and direction, solar radiation, soil temperature, and soil moisture. The latest weather conditions from each station are made available every 15 minutes throughout the growing season and every hour during the winter months. A ll regions of agroManitoba have experienced higher-than-normal average temperatures since November first. The majority of Manitoba’s agricultural region saw a mean

temperature difference of over 5℃ above normal. Normal (based on the 30-year historical average) precipitations range from 48.0mm to 87.4 mm across agro-Manitoba. Per cent of normal precipitation varied greatly across the province with areas receiving as low as 17 per cent (Clearwater 13 mm) compared to the 30-year average, while others were at 140 per cent (Wasagamserving

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ing 88 mm) of normal. Most of southern Manitoba is below 50 per cent normal precipitation with Gladstone at 50, Holland at 21, Treherne at 20 and Portage at 48 per cent normal. For more weather related information or to monitor individual weather stations go to https://www.gov.mb.ca/ agriculture/weather/weatherconditions-and-reports.html

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12 FARMERS’ ADVOCATE FEBRUARY 23, 2024

Farmers’ Advocate

Sunny days in the calving pen

PHOTOS BY MADISYN ROBERTSON

Reports coming in from the cattle farms indicate that calving season is going fairly well. Milder winter temperatures helped, but producers were also happy to see the foggy, dreary days move into sunny days. Baby calves are a lot healthier and happier if they can warm up in the bright sunshine and stay dry. W E I N V I T E Y O U T O T O U R T H E B U L L S A N Y T I M E & J O I N U S AT T H E FA R M S A L E D AY

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Sports

FEBRUARY 23, 2024

Neepawa Tigers Hockey are still in the hunt for first place

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS 13

Varsity Tigers keep their eye on the prize

PHOTO BY EOIN DEVEREUX

PHOTO BY EOIN DEVEREUX

The NACI Tigers have gone 8-2-0 in their last 10 games in the Westman High School Hockey League, including a 7-0 home win over Boissevain on Feb. 16 (pictured). The Tigers (23-4-0. 47 pts) are currently in second place in the overall league standings with three games in hand on the first place Vincent Massey Vikings (25-5-0. 50 pts).

The Neepawa Tigers Varsity Basketball team closed out its regular season schedule with a perfect 10-0 record, beating Elton on Feb. 15, by the score of 7835. Their next game will be the Zone 7 semi-final on Feb. 27 versus Minnedosa.

Farmers fall to MacGregor in THHL playoffs By Eoin Devereux

Neepawa Banner & Press

It was a quick playoff exit for the Neepawa Farmers in the Tiger Hills Hockey League, as they were knocked out in the opening round by the MacGregor Wild. Neepawa was defeated 2-games-to-0 over the long weekend in their best-of-three East Division Quarter final. The first game was played in MacGregor on Friday, Feb. 16, and saw the Wild win 4-1. The Farmers opened up the scoring with a Kyle McDonald chance going in just before the first intermission. Bret Levandoski assisted on the play, which gave the Farmers a 1-0 lead. Kyle Isenor and Braden Klippenstein replied for MacGregor in the second, while Justin Minoletti and Kelly Rintoul secured the W for the home side, with followup goals in the third. Game two was in Neepawa on Feb. 18, and was do-or-die for the Farmers. They’d come out strong, which would ultimately pay off with Zak Hicks scoring just 4:08 into the game. Le-

vandoski and Ward Szucki collected the assists on this effort. Before the end of the first, however, the Wild struck back with a pair of goals, including one on the power-play, to make it 2-1. Tanner Garnham and Braden Nicol were registered as the goal scorers. MacGregor start off quickly in the second, creating several great scoring chances in the first four minutes. Fortunately, for Neepawa, some big saves from goaltender Reece Jones, kept them in the game. Then, with just onesecond left in a power-play opportunity, Braden Gillies would score the tying goal for the Farmers, off a pass from Zak Hicks. Brad Marshall was also credited with an assist on the play. Ultimately, the momentum of the game shifted dramatically, as MacGregor’s scored Daylen Moir on an unassisted effort a few minutes later. Neepawa argued that there had been goaltender interference on the play, but the officials didn’t see not that way. Perhaps still slightly flustered from the previous goal,

the Farmers were caught off guard on a MacGregor 2-on-1 fast break out of their own zone just one minute later. Garnham picked up his second goal of the game off a slick pass from Drake Sheppard, as they charged into the Neepawa zone. There wasn’t much Jones could do on this play, which made the score 4-2 after 40 minutes. For the third period, Neepawa tried everything they could to create another scoring chance, but they were stymied by goaltender Niklas Anderson and the defensive core of the Wild. Later in the game, MacGregor added two more, including an empty netter, to make it a 6-2 final. Robert Smith and Drake Sheppard picked up those goals. With the series win, MacGregor moves on to face the Killarney Shamrocks in the East Divsion semi-finals. The other East Division series features the Minnedosa Bombers versus the Gladstone Lakers. As for the West Division, it will be Miniota/ Elkhorn vs. Hartney and Virden vs. Rivers

PHOTO BY EOIN DEVEREUX

Kelly Rintoul (#8) of MacGregor moves in on a breakaway chance against goaltender Reese Jones of Neepawa. Jones would make the stop on this play, but Rintoul and the Wild would end the night the victors of the game and the series. OPTOMETRISTS

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Sports

MJHL Standings Western Division

G

W

L

OTL SOL Pts

x-Virden Oil Capitals

47 34

7

3

3

74

OCN Blizzard

48 30 14

1

3

64

Dauphin Kings

46 30 14

1

1

62

Wayway Wolverines

47 21 22

1

3

46

Neepawa Titans

47 21 25

1

0

43

Swan Valley Stampeders 51 10 39

2

0

22

Eastern Division

G

W

L

OTL SOL Pts

x-Steinbach Pistons

49 39

7

3

0

81

x-Winkler Flyers

48 35

8

2

3

75

x-Portage Terriers

49 31 10

4

4

70

Niverville Nighthawks

48 23 21

3

1

50

Selkirk Steelers

48 20 21

3

4

47

Winnipeg Blues

48

9

34

4

1

23

Winnipeg Freeze

46

8

35

3

0

19

DATA UP TO DATE TO WEDNESDAY, FEB. 21 X = CLINCHED PLAYOFF POSITION

Game results Friday, Feb. 16

Virden 5-1 Neepawa

First Period 04:55 VDN R. Bazin (14) ASST: T. Hunt (20), J. Bielik (17) 05:33 NPA E. Poirier (6) ASST: L. Paquette (6), K. Weisgarber (12) Second Period 02:42 VDN J. Bielik (6) PP ASST: D. Bielik (29), T. Hunt (21) Third Period 03:59 VDN B. Lewis (11) PP ASST: E. Groening (12), J. Lehto (28) 09:25 VDN B. Lewis (12) ASST: R. Bazin (18), E. Guthrie (10) 13:55 VDN N. Englot (8) ASST: E. Guthrie (11), L. Robson (8) Scoring 1 2 3 Total PP NPA 1 0 0 1 0/4 VDN 1 1 3 5 2/4 Goaltender NPA K.C. Couckuyt - (L) 36/41 saves VDN E. Reid - (W) 28/29 saves Attendance: 914 - Tundra Oil & Gas Place

Sunday, Feb. 18

Winkler 8-0 Neepawa

First Period No scoring Second Period 03:09 WKR Z. Nicolas (16) ASST: M. Svenson (15) 03:45 WKR B. Matheson (4) ASST: D. Andrew (33), Z. Nicolas (21) 12:06 WKR J. Legaarden (13) PP ASST: B. Beauchemin (42), D. Andrew (34) 13:57 WKR B. Matheson (5) ASST: B. Young (17), I. Peters (10) 16:28 WKR M. Svenson (14) PP ASST: I. Deveau 91), A. Nicolas (22) 17:19 WKR T. Penner (25) PP ASST: B. Young (18), D. Andrew (35) Third Period 15:14 WKR D. Andrew (32) PP ASST: B. Young (19) 16:55 WKR J. Legaarden (14) ASST B. Matheson (20), N. Diemer (8) Scoring 1 2 3 Total PP WKR 0 6 2 8 4/8 NPA 0 0 0 0 0/3 Goaltender WKR B. Hood - (W) 16/16 saves VDN M. Lobreau - (L) 37/45 saves Attendance: 716 - Yellowhead Arena

Turn the page for even more news!

MJHL Player stats G 1. Dalton Andrew (WKR) 32 2. Trent Penner (WKR) 25 3. Leo Chamber (STN) 19 4. Brody Beauchemin (WKR 13 Leading scorers (MJHL)

A 35 38 40 44

Pts

67 63 59 57

5. Josh Lehto (VDN)

12 38 53

Leading scorers (Titans)

G

1. Cody Gudnason 2. Connor Thompson 3. Tim Tychonick 4. Hayden Stocks 5. Cooper Kasprick

13 14 14 16 13

A Pts

24 19 17 14 17

37 33 31 30 30

Monday, Feb. 19

Wayway 4-2 Neepawa

First Period 04:29 WAY S. Williams (260 ASST: B. Rouletter (29) 14:26 NPA K. Weisgarber (7) ASST: B. Knox (4) Second Period 08:39 WAY S. Williams (27) ASST: J. Clarke (25), J. Roth (11) Third Period 07:09 WAY N. Kiemeney (13) PP ASST: O. Wheatley (16), S. McPeak (19) 18:39 WAY S. McPeak (12) EN ASST: Unassisted 19:50 NPA C. Kaprick (13) ASST: H. Stocks (14), L. Paquette (7) Scoring 1 2 3 Total PP NPA 1 0 1 2 0/2 WAY 1 1 2 4 1/3 Goaltender NPA KC Couckuyt - (L) 24/27 saves WAY K. Kirkwood - (W) 27/29 saves Attendance: 430 - Arena Complex

FEBRUARY 23, 2024

Reversal of fortunes for Neepawa Titans arrives at worst possible time A three game losing skid, which includes an 8-0 home loss to Winkler (pic tured), combined with a recent seven game winning streak from the Waywayseecappo Wolverines, has shifted the Neepawa Titans out of a playoff position. As of Wednesday, Feb. 21, the team was three points out of four th place with 11 games remaining. The Titans will look to reverse its fortunes with a home game on Saturday, Feb. 24 against the Swan Valley Stampeders. BY EOIN DEVEREUX

Carberry U9s take home ‘A’ side League banner By Jolene Balciumas

Local Journalism Initiative

The U9 Carberry Plainsmen were on the road this weekend to Reston. The 900 km we traveled this weekend was all worth it! A side play off Tournament first game ended with a big win 15-9. The second day saw them face some tough teams. They lost a close game to Reston 7-5 but bounced back with a very well deserved win against Virden 8-6 which sent them to the Semi Finals. They defeated Reston in the final with a 12-9 win. This team worked hard for their U9 A Side League Championship.. These kids and coaches deserve it, they worked as a team, played as a team and won as a team! Shoutout to Crozby Campbell, our goaltender this weekend. We know you made Zander proud and we

Club 55 Bowling Ladies’ High Single: Carole LeBoutillier 213.

Ladies’ High Triple: Vivian Oswald 526. Men’s High Single & Triple: Len Pritchard 233 & 580. Other

Scores to Note: Calvin Goetz 227, 188; Eleanor

Scott 160; Laurie Kohinski 182, 158; Vivian Oswald 200, 204; Darrell Gabler 156, 216; Elsie Slimmon 171, 204; Frank Porada 177, 177; Carole LeBoutillier 164; Muriel Porada 203; Len Pritchard 194, 153.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

The U9 Carberry Plainsmen Hockey team.

know he was cheering you on all weekend every step of the way. The U9s had a successful season that wouldn’t be possible without amazing coaches Jason Chandler, Jordan Dick, Kelby Minshull and David Manns. Their countless hours of teaching, encouragement and motivation has pushed this young team. Coach Jordan has promised to shave his

head in celebration. U7s got to skate on the Wheat Kings ice today at their intermission but the real highlight was slatomg with hometown heros Carson Bjarnason and Ben Saunderson for taking the time to join in a picture with these kids! The U13 Plainsmen won their second playoff game against Reston 4-2 in their play off series. They

then hosted Reston for the 3rd game in our best-of-3 playoff series. They lost the game but put in a great effort. Two wins for the Carberry/Glenboro U15 team this weekend, defeating Melita 7-1 on Saturday and Boissevain 4-1 on Sunday. Great way to end the regular season. Don’t shut us out!

Neepawa Titans Junior “A”

Hockey team

Send us results from your games so we can keep everyone up to date on our local teams!

sports@neepawabanner.com

Neepawa Titans regular season home games February 24 at 7:30 pm vs Swan Valley March 1 at 7:30 pm vs Swan Valley March 8 at 3:00 pm vs Dauphin

Banner & Press

NEEPAW A

14 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS


NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS FEBRUARY 23, 2024 15

Classifieds Murray Kenneth Mulligan

Murray Kenneth Mulligan of Neepawa Manitoba passed away Sunday January 28, 2024 at Country Meadows Personal Care Home at the age of 82 years old. Murray was born June 11, 1941 in McCreary Manitoba to Richard and Marjorie Mulligan. He grew up and attended school in Reeve which was a farming community only a few short miles south east of McCreary. Growing up in the 1940s instilled in him was the value of helping neighbours and friends which he continued to demonstate his whole life. Upon the completion of school Murray began working for farmers in the area and then a couple of jobs in town where he met the love of his life Donna Reinson. Murray and Donna were married on Aug 20, 1965 and in their early years together resided in places like McCreary, Fairfax and Swan Lake doing various jobs but then buying a property and moving to Neepawa where he started working as a mechanic at Murray’s garage. Eventually because of his natural talent for vehicle repair he began a small business at his home and continued until his body said it was time to slow down. Growing up Murray loved working with horses and learning how to play his guitar and could be seen honing his skills at house parties and around numerous camp fires. He enjoyed hunting with family and friends which he continued doing into his late 70s. Due to an injury, Murrays last few years were spent in the Country Meadows Personal Care Home where his wife Donna had lived there because of MS from Jan 2012 till her passing in May 2022. Murray made many friend throughout the years and will be sadly missed. Murray is survived by his sisters Eva and Sharon, brother-in-law Earl, sister-in-laws Eileen and Norma along with many nieces, nephews and friends The family would like to thank the staff at Country Meadows Personal Care Home and McCreary/Alonsa Personal Care Home for the kindness and compassion given to Murray during his stay. A private Celebration of Life will take place at a later date. White’s Funeral Home in care of arrangements.

Cynthia “Margaret” Rose Ginter

1935 - 2024 Cynthia “Margaret” Rose Ginter (Fidler) was born in Dry River Municipality of Manitoba to Ben and Rose Fidler on June 22, 1935. The family moved to Ethel Saskatchewan for several years and then back to Glenora and Neelin Manitoba. Margaret attended several country schools in the area including Glenora and Neelin where she cherished many life long friends and was forever grateful to attend the Glenora School Home Coming. After school Margaret moved to Crystal City Manitoba and worked in the hospital. Margaret married Frank Ginter at Crystal City on November 7, 1959. From there they moved to the Municipality of Glenella where they farmed. Margaret had many passions: spending time with family, grandchildren, sewing, quilting, camping, travelling, playing cards, raising turkeys and chickens and tending to her special cactus plants. Margaret’s life was so much more then words could describe. The way she lived her life, hard work, giving not only of her time but always when there was only one piece of pie left she never seemed to be hungry. Our Mom had a strong spirit and determination to keep us on our toes. Margaret was predeceased by her parents Ben and Rose Fiddler, father and mother in laws John and Helen Ginter, daughter Beverly, son Curtis, sister Ruth, brothers in law Karl E, Karl P, Eugene, Mike, Lawrence, George and sister-in-law Anne, Margaret was survived by her husband of 64 years Frank, sons Brent, Todd, daughter Cindy and grandchildren Kayla, Kelis, Grace, and great grandchild Everett, sisters Doreen, Winnie and brother Ray, as well as many brother and sister in laws, nieces, and nephews. Funeral service was held on Friday, February 16, 2024 at 2pm at the Glenella Hall, Glenella Manitoba with interment at Goodland Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Margaret’s memory to a charity of one’s choice. Clarke’s Funeral Home Gladstone/MacGregor in care of arrangements.

To place an ad:

Classified Ad Deadline: Tuesday Noon • Cancellations and corrections only within business hours and corresponding deadlines • Please check your ad when first published the Neepawa Banner & Press will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. • All copy is subject to approval by the Neepawa Banner & Press. • We reserve the right to edit copy or to refuse to publish any advertisement we deem illegal, libelous, misleading or offensive

Telephone: Fax: Email:

204-476-3401/ 888-436-4242 204-476-5073 ads@neepawabanner.com

All word classifieds must be prepaid before printing

–––––––––– Birthday

–––––––––– Notice

–––––––––– Notice

–––––––––– For Rent

–––––––––– Auctions

Happy 100th Birthday to Joe Dutko from Neepawa on February 27th. Best Wishes from family, friends and neighbors.

Alanon meetings currently being held at 342 Mountain Ave, Neepawa - Old Co-op Store. Tuesdays at 7 pm. Call 204-841-2192 _____________________ Alcoholics Anonymous meetings currently being held at 342 Mountain Ave, Neepawa, Thursdays at 7 pm. Call 204841-0002 _____________________ Arden Hall, cap. 255. Park, camping and sports facilities, rink, curling ice, kitchen and lounge. Call 204-368-2202 _____________________ Minnedosa Handivan 204868-8164 Mon-Fri 9:00-3:30

BAR 66 TACK N TRADE & Candy's Cottage Western general store, men's clothing, animal feeds, horse dewormers, and meds, gifts, pure vanilla, cowboy boots, jeans, t-shirts and more. Opening Feb 9, 11 am - 5 pm. Reg hours Wed - Sat, 11 am - 5 pm. 3-37 Main Street, (Bailey Building) Carberry, MB _____________________ Neepawa Banner & Press offers full research and re-print services from our archives that go back to 1896. Additional copies of papers, $2 each depending on availability. Re-print of a page from past copies, $2 per page. Archival research, $25 per hour with a $10 minimum. Individual photos on photo paper $5 depending if we have a suitable original in our digital, print or photo archives. Ken Waddell, publisher

Apartment for rent. Bri-Mont apartments, 331 Mountain Avenue. Phone 204-8414419 _____________________ Two bedroom, one bathroom apartment at Stewart House in Minnedosa. The apartment is in a quiet 12-plex apartment block and is a 55+ building for a single or couple. The apartment includes AC, a plug-in parking stall, fridge, stove, in-buiding laundry, secure entrance into the building, storage room, deck and more. Rent is $1,050./month plus hydro. Water is included with the rent. No smokers or pets. A one-year lease is necessary and references required. For more information or to book a viewing call 204-826-2184.

Meyers Auctions & Appraisals. Call Brad at 368-2333. www.meyersauctions.com

–––––––––– Coming Events

It’s not too late. Minnedosa Adult Learning Centre’s March registrations start Monday March 4th. Contact: Val Gawel in Rm 2 Minnedosa Collegiate 74 Armitage Ave. 204-867-2519

Obituary Peter Kopytko

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our Dad, Grandpa and Great Grandpa Peter Kopytko. He passed away peacefully surrounded by his family on Friday, February 9th, 2024 at the McCreary/Alonsa Personal Care Home. Peter was born (along with his twin brother William, who passed away days later at birth) in Portage La Prairie, MB on July 28 th, 1934, to John & Irene (nee Puhach) Kopytko. Peter had 7 sisters and 6 brothers. Peter attended Griffith School in the Alonsa area. He started his Apprenticeship in Plumbing in 1954 and worked on receiving his Journeyman paper five years later. He was a member of the Plumbers and Pipefitters Union in Winnipeg for 70 years this year. At the start of his career, he worked for Canadian Comstock Ltd for 10 years and later branched off to work on the Trans Canada Pipeline which took him to work on the pipeline in different provinces for 2-3 months at a stretch. He worked on numerous jobs across Canada in Northwest Territories and Kapuskasing, Ontario. Dad married the love of his life, Janet Shirley Ohirko, on May 9th, 1959 in the Our Lady of Nativity Roman Catholic Church officiated by Father Rudachek in McCreary, MB. Their reception was held on a windy day at the Ohirko Family Farm. After their marriage, they moved on to resume their married life on Rosedale Avenue in Winnipeg for 13 years. After many years of us kids dreaming around our kitchen table, a lifelong dream about living on a farm and owning dogs, cats, chickens, horses, cows and numerous pets, our dad made it a reality when he purchased the Roy Jackson Farm a mile away from our Grandparents. Our Mom always explained that these were very busy and happy times. Our memories of this time included many hours of planting a shelter belt of trees around our farm yard and many more hours of weeding trees before any off farm activities would happen! I guess that was for building character and a strong work ethic that we all have! Mom and Dad were blessed with 4 Children; Sandra (Gerald) Walker, Susan (Calvin) Friesen, Michael Kopytko & Murray (Sherry nee Fosty) Kopytko, 10 grandchildren Angela Walker; Melanie (Aaron) Maczuga; Christopher Walker Craig Joshua Friesen & Jeff Solis; Bryon (Susanna) Friesen; Sarah (Dave) Brinkman; Tessa (David) Critchley Cole (McKenna Angus); Wade (Hannah Gingera); Paige (Kalum Caswell), 6 great grandchildren; Mark Friesen, Luke Friesen; Jonah Critchley, Sparrow Critchley,Wren Critchley and Teal Critchley, and his sister Aileen (Leonard) Ross along with many nieces and nephews too numerous to mention. Dad was predeceased by his wife: Janet Shirley Kopytko (Ohirko), his parents: John & Irene (nee Puhach) Kopytko , his siblings: Katie (Steve) Tereck, Annie (Joe) Henowitch, Mary (Fred) Tereck, Henry Kopytko, Olga (Walter) Chrustie, Fred (Lillian) Kopytko, Johnny Kopytko, Walter (Julie) Kopytko, Effie (Tony) Mospanchuk, Ernie (Shirley) Kopytko, Joe (Karen) Kopytko, Doreen (Ron) Dilk along many extended family members. Cremation has taken place and a private family service was held. Should Family and friends so desire, in lieu of flowers, please consider remembering Peter with a donation to the McCreary/Alonsa Health Center Activities Department, P.O. Box 250, McCreary, MB, R0J 1B0 Sneath-Strilchuk -McCreary Chapel 204-835-2004 • www.sneathstrilchuk.com

–––––––––– Personal

Crisis Pregnancy Centre Winnipeg: Need to talk? Call our free help line, 1-800-6650570 or contact our Westman office: 204-727-6161

–––––––––– For Sale or Rent

Storage vans (semi trailers) for rent or sale. Anderson's 204-385-2685, 204-3852997 Gladstone.

–––––––––– Real Estate

188 acres for sale near Langruth MB. SE 20-16- 9 west, NE 20-16-9 west, 170 cultivated. Call Tony at 204-509-1963 for more information.

Obituary Asgar Sveistrup Sigurdson

1939 - 2024 Asgar Sveistrup Sigurdson was born to Skapti and Gudrun at their home in Oakview, MB in the RM of Siglunes on May 15, 1939. In 1951, the family moved across the lake and settled at the farm in Lakeland, MB. Many happy memories were made on the farm. It was here that Asgar spent the majority of his days doing what he loved. He truly loved farming, which he was able to do alongside his dad, brother, and later his son. Asgar was very proud of the purebred Herford cattle herd, which he and his brother built up. On August 18, 1962, Asgar married the love of his life, Doris Johnson. Together, they built a good life, lovingly raising three children, Peggy, Einar, and Jennifer. Asgar was a true friend and good neighbor to many. He willingly would lend a helping hand in the community as he was involved in service clubs including the Elks, 4-H, and the Langruth Lutheran church board. Neighbours may also remember him as the community vet who was willing to make a late-night call to assist in delivering a new calf. Friends may also remember the days when Asgar curled on the Lakeland dream team. Many fun times were had with the hunting crew and on the occasional hunting trip. He was a true gentleman with a great sense of humor. Asgar was proud of all of his grandkids and he would light up when he was around them. The grandchildren along with his nieces and nephews have shared many of the one-liners and advice that Asgar shared with them. Asgar was predeceased by his wife Doris, grandson Brad, parents Skapti and Runa, and his siblings Viola (Don), Einar (Margaret), and Evelyn (Ernest), and brothers-in-law, Tommy and Eddie. He also lost his nephews Ian Lasson, Erik Johnson, and Erwin Wild, and niece Ann Kuharski. The family remembers how Asgar was the rock for everyone during these hard times. He is survived by his sister Helga, his children Peggy, Einar (Karen), and Jenny, grandchildren Samantha (Chris), Kristen (Devlin), Erik (Angel), Brock, Alix (Ryan), Maggie (Andy), and Josh (Sam) and his great-grandchildren Carson, Avery, Greyson, Camilla, and Shawn. Also mourning his passing are brother-in-law Harold (Sandy), Kelly (Phyllis), Joey (Lydia), and many nieces, nephews, and friends. On February 14th, 2024, Asgar peacefully went to be with his sweetheart, Doris. He will be truly missed. Funeral Service was held on Tuesday, February 20, 2024, at the Langruth Hall. Clarke’s Funeral Home Gladstone / MacGregor in care of arrangements.

Wanted

McSherry Auctions 12 Patterson Dr., Stonewall, MB

Online Timed Auctions @mcsherryauction.com

Estate & Moving

Featuring Guns & Ammo Closes February 28, 7:00 PM

Poole’s Antiques Auction in Gunton, MB Featuring Vintage Signs, Furniture, Antiques February 29 @ 6:30 PM

Estate & Moving

Closes March 6 @ 7:00 PM

204-467-1858 or 204-886-7027 Consignments Welcome!

Help Wanted ROSE INC.

Is now accepting applications for the position of:

DIRECT SUPPORT WORKER

In our Community Living Disabilities Program In Ste. Rose, Manitoba Successful Candidate must Demonstrate Good Organizational Skills, Be Self-Motivated, Possess Good Inter-Personal Skills, and be willing to work as a team. Starting wage is $18.75 with an increase following a successful 6-month probation period and benefit package included. Interested Applicants are invited to apply to: ROSE INC. Box 28, Ste Rose du Lac, MB R0L 1S0 Or Contact Program Manager - Diana White at 204-447-3224 EXT. 3

Harris Pharmacy is looking for a

PHARMACY ASSISTANT

to join our team. Job Type: Full Time No experience necessary, willing to train the successful applicant. Skills required: strong attention to detail, excellent communication skills and the ability to multi-task. Includes competitive wage and benefit package. Please apply with resume in person to Heather Todoruk no later than March 4th, 2024. Please note – only successful applicants will be contacted for an interview.

invites applications for the following

Educational Assistant positions: - One Full time term Educational Assistant (6.25 hours per day) at R. J. Waugh School in Carberry - Two Full time term Educational Assistants (6.25 hours per day) at H. M. Kellington School in Neepawa See Division website for more details on this position at www.beautifulplainssd.ca Click on Job Postings.

www.myWestman.ca


16 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS FEBRUARY 23, 2024

Help Wanted

Manitoba Community Newspaper Association Province-wide Classifieds NOTICES Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement, and the Manitoba Community Newspaper Association and membership do not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness

or reliability of such advertisements. For greater information on advertising conditions, please consult the Association’s Blanket Advertising Conditions on our website at www.mcna.com. URGENT PRESS RELEASES - Have a newsworthy item to announce? An excit-

Help Wanted

ing change in operations? Though we cannot guarantee publication, MCNA will get the information into the right hands for ONLY $35.00 + GST/HST. Call MCNA (204) 947-1691 for more informa-

tion. See www.mcna.com under the “Types of Advertising” tab for more details. SEASONAL CRAFT SHOW? REGISTERING Spring Programs? Having an AGM?

Have your blanket classified ads seen in the 31 Member Newspapers which are seen in over 368,000+ homes in Manitoba. Now booking Winter and Spring advertising for 2024. Please Call THIS

Help Wanted TOUCHWOOD PARK ASSOCIATION INC. A non-profit organization with a mandate to provide services to adults with intellectual disabilities.

FOODS Industrial Butcher (NOC 94141) Why join our team?

HyLife is a global leader in food processing, with a vision to be the best food company in the world. To achieve this, we are currently expanding our team and have exciting career opportunities at 623 Main St. Neepawa, MB. We are actively seeking to fill 25 positions.

Find it in the

Classifieds Shur-Gro Farm Service is looking to add to the operations staff in Neepawa Manitoba. The successful candidate will be responsible for all aspects of operations of an Ag retail outlet including; Anhydrous Ammonia, Seed, Fertilizer and Crop Protection Products, while providing service to a growing customer base. Custom Application experience would be a bonus. Training will be provided. Please apply by resume by March 15, 2024 Contact: Gary Rossnagel Box 455, Neepawa, MB. R0J 1H0 Phone: 1-431-276-0386 Email: garyrossnagel@shur-gro.com

The current starting wage is $16.45/hour with incremental increases to $24.60/hour based on tenure as per our Collective Agreement Quick Facts:

• Culturally diverse – employ people from all over the world • Fully integrated facility –Feed Mills, Barns, Transportation, and Production Plant • 2500+ employees worldwide • We Care about our employees, communities, customers, animals, and our environment

What we can offer you:

• Competitive Wage • Vacation: 10 working days of paid vacation as per our collective bargaining agreement • Comprehensive Benefits package – health coverage, dental plan, vision care, long-term disability, and pension plan • Permanent full-time employment (74-80 hours per bi-weekly) • PM Shift Premium • Full training, with genuine opportunities for career progression • Employee Referral program - $500! • Free parking • Company events • And more!!!!

Your duties may include:

An area full of recreational opportunities, parks, lakes, cultural events, a sense of community and much more!

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES NEEPAWA & CARBERRY Health Facilities Cooks & Dietary Aides Casual & Part-time positions

Licensed Practical Nurses & Registered Nurses

Casual; Full-time & Part-time positions

Home Care Attendants & Health Care Aides Casual & Part-time positions

Environmental Services (Housekeeping & Laundry) Casual; Full-time & Part-time positions

Clerk III- Health Information (Neepawa) Casual positions

Mental Health Proctor III (Neepawa) Casual positions

Community Mental Health Worker (Neepawa) Full-time position

Occupational Therapist (Neepawa) Part-time positions

Supervisor- Environmental Services (Carberry) Full-time position

JOIN THE HEALTH CARE TEAM! APPLY TODAY! www.prairiemountainhealth.ca, click on Careers An excellent health care benefit package that includes but limited to health & dental benefits, pension plan & a health spending account. We thank all applicants in advance for their interest in Prairie Mountain Health however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted. These positions are subject to a Criminal Record Check (including Vulnerable Sector), Adult Abuse Registry Check, and a Child Abuse Registry Check. The successful applicant will be responsible for any services charges incurred.

• Slaughter, eviscerate, and mark hogs for further processing; • Debone edible parts and remove inedible organs for parts; • Cut pork carcasses into primal cuts for further processing, cutting, or packaging for local, national, and international premium markets.

We are looking for people who are:

• Fit and capable of working in a physically demanding role • Capable of repetitive manual tasks and standing for long periods of time • Open to working in colder/warmer environments • Minimum of one (1) to seven (7) months experience in meat cutting or slaughter or completed a program in Industrial Meat cutting • Completion of Secondary school or equivalent experience • Able to effectively communicate in English

HyLife is dedicated to promoting equal employment opportunities for all job applicants, including those who identify as a member of the following groups: Indigenous people, Newcomers to Canada, Older workers, Veterans, and Visible minorities.

Ways to apply:

Online at http://hylife.com/careers/ or mail to PO Box 10,000, 623 Main St E, Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0. Fax to: 204.476.3791 | Email to: jobs@hylife.com In Person at 623 Main ST. E, Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0

For inquiries contact: Phone: 204.476.3393 HyLife has an accommodation process for employees with disabilities. If you require a specific accommodation during your employment because of a disability, please contact Jobs@hylife.com. An HR representative will be in touch with you as soon as possible. Reasonable accommodations will be determined on a case-by-case basis and our accommodation policy can be forwarded upon request.

Be a part of the HyLife experience – your journey starts here! We thank all applicants, however, only those under consideration will be contacted

NEWSPAPER NOW to book, or call MCNA at (204) 9471691 for more details or to book ads. MCNA - Manitoba Community Newspapers Association. www.mcna.com WANTED Wanted old advertising: Dealership signs, service station, gas pumps, globes, oil cans, Red Indian, White Rose, Buffalo, Husky, Ford, GM, Dodge, Tire signs, Coke, Pepsi etc. Call 306-221-5908

For Sale

We are seeking energetic, organized applicants for the position of Seasonal Contract Facilitator This position(s) is a full-time term with an anticipated start in May and end in August 2024, extension possible based on scope of work remaining and availability of successful candidate(s). The rate of pay is $17.50 per hour. Qualifications: - Minimum Grade 12 education - Valid Class 5 Driver’s License - Ability to provide supervision and direction to a small team responsible for a variety of duties - Ability to self-manage time and responsibilities while working alone - Adaptable to changing priorities - Experience working with adults with developmental and/or physical disabilities an asset - Groundskeeping skills, including operation and maintenance of relevant equipment This position is subject to a Criminal Records Check, Adult Abuse Registry Check, and requires valid First Aid/CPR certification. The successful candidate will be responsible for any service charges incurred. Please submit your resume by May 15, 2024 to: Human Resources Director Box 1149 Neepawa, MB, R0J 1H0 Email: hr@touchwoodpark.ca

TOUCHWOOD PARK ASSOCIATION INC. A non-profit organization with a mission to provide services to adults with intellectual disabilities. Applications are currently being accepted for the position of Day Program – Director of Services. The successful applicant will be responsible for adhering to plans and protocols relative to implementation, training and maintenance of Day Program services. This is a full-time position. Group benefits plan and matched RRSP will be offered. The successful candidate will be self-motivated and committed to the goals and objectives of the organization. Qualifications: - Post-secondary education in a related field is preferred, however a combination of education and experience will be considered - Demonstrated time management and collaboration experience - Demonstrated skills in Microsoft 365 applications - Experience in an administrative role managing a sizeable team of staff and Supported Individuals - Experience working with people with disabilities - Proven organizational, leadership, interpersonal and teambuilding skills in a dynamic environment - Familiarity with applying provisions of a collective agreement as well as organizational policies and procedures - Effective verbal and written communication - Valid driver’s license with satisfactory driving record Employment is subject to a Criminal Record Check with Vulnerable Sector Search, Adult Abuse Registry Check and Child Abuse Registry Check. Successful candidates will be required to obtain First Aid with CPR and AED certification and provide a driver abstract. All charges incurred will be at the expense of the candidate. Please submit your resume to: Human Resources Director Box 1149 Neepawa, MB, R0J 1H0 Fax: 204-476-8849 Email: hr@touchwoodpark.ca This position will remain open until filled.

Announcement


NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS FEBRUARY 23, 2024 17

Health

Notice

Banner Real & Press Estate

KEEP CALM

Virtual Public Presentation Rolling River School Division 2024-2025 Proposed Budget 6:00 p.m. Wednesday, March 6, 2024

AND

ADVERTISE WITH US

Access the presentation via link on the Rolling River School Division (RRSD) website homepage https://www.rrsd.mb.ca/ A summary of the proposed budget will be available on the RRSD website by March 1, 2024 links as follows: Governance - Budget/Finance - Upcoming Budget

TURTLE RIVER SCHOOL DIVISION Notice

TURTLE RIVER SCHOOL DIVISION Kindergarten Registration for the 2024 Fall Term will be held during the regular school hours between March 1 and March 22, 2024 at the following schools: Alonsa School Tele # 204-767-2168 Glenella School Tele # 204-352-4253 Ste. Rose School Tele # 204-447-2088 McCreary School Tele # 204-835-2083 We are once again proud to offer a Full-Time Kindergarten Program. All children born on or before December 31, 2019 are eligible to register. To register you will need to bring your child’s Manitoba Health PHIN# and one of the following: Birth Certificate, Baptismal certificate, Certificate of live birth, Health card or Statutory declaration. If you have any questions, please feel free to call your school today.

UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE PLANNING ACT NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONDITIONAL USE CU 23-03 The Municipality of WestLake-Gladstone, under the authority of The Planning Act, will hold a PUBLIC HEARING at 14 Dennis St. Gladstone, MB on Wednesday March 20, 2024 @ 9:00 am at which time and place Council will receive written or verbal representations from the applicant and any persons who wish to make them in respect to the following application matter: APPLICATION FOR CONDITIONAL USE UNDER THE MUNICIPALITY OF WESTLAKE-GLADSTONE ZONING BY-LAW 2020-02. Where: SW 16-15-12W – 69113 Road 86N Property Owner: Brian & Nicola Smith Applicant: Happy Rock Holsteins Ltd. Proposal: To complete the steps required for Conditional use for Livestock operations: 1) To allow for expansion of current diary operations from 1360 Animal Units (AU) to 1500 Animal Units in the Agricultural zone. Zoning: Agricultural

École Laurier French Immersion Inscription à la maternelle Kindergarten Registration

The Keys to Colton Spraggs Your new Home 204-868-8090

Tous les enfants qui sont nés avant le 31 décembre, 2019 sont admissibles. Veuillez apporter à l’école, votre carte d’immatriculation ainsi qu’un des suivants : le certificat de naissance de votre enfant, le certificat de baptême, une déclaration de naissance vivante ou une déclaration solennelle. Nous sommes une école d`immersion française, la pré-maternelle à la 8ième année, et nous offrons une excellente éducation dans les deux langues officielles. Full Time French Immersion Kindergarten registration will take place from March 1 to March 22, 2024. All children born on or before December 31, 2019 are eligible to register. To register you will need to bring in your child’s Manitoba Health PHIN# and one of the following: Birth Certificate, Baptismal certificate, Certificate of live birth, Health card or Statutory declaration. We are a Jr. K-8 French Immersion school and provide an excellent education in both official languages. École Laurier Laurier, Manitoba 204-447-2068

MUNICIPALITY OF NORTH NORFOLK MUNICIPAL HERITAGE NOTICE TAKE NOTICE THAT the site described as follows: The structure commonly known as “The Tree Planting Car” at the Manitoba Agricultural Museum, Austin, Manitoba in the Municipality of North Norfolk, Province of Manitoba, and located on land legally described in Certificate of Title No. 1989596/3 as follows: The SW 17-11-11 WPM in the Municipality of North Norfolk.

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Diane Martin 204-841-0932

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Phone: 204-476-2345 Toll Free: 1-877-476-2345 www.gillandschmall.com

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L’inscription à la maternelle à temps plein aura lieu du 1 mars au 22 mars, 2024.

Notice MUNICIPALITY OF NORTH CYPRESS-LANGFORD PUBLIC NOTICE REGARDING SPECIAL SERVICE PROPOSAL BY-LAW NO. 1/2024 TO ESTABLISH A RATE TO RECOVER COSTS OFCOLLECTION AND TRANSPORTATION OF SOLID WASTE AND RECYCLABLE MATERIALS Public notice is hereby given pursuant to subsection 318(1) of The Municipal Act that the Council of the Municipality of North Cypress-Langford has scheduled a public hearing on April 1, 2024 at 7:05 p.m. 316-4th Avenue (Municipal Office) Carberry, MB to present the following Special Service Proposal By-law No. 1/2024: A. DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED SERVICE: The Municipality of North Cypress Langford has provided solid waste and recycling services under By-law No1/2021. Council deems it necessary to continue to provide these services as a special service. Continuing with a special service levy based on an amount per parcel ensures that solid waste and recycling costs are equitably portioned among all benefitting properties. Solid waste and recyclable materials will be collected on a weekly basis from the areas within municipal boundaries where roll off bins are provided including the Carberry Transfer Station. These materials are then transported to Evergreen Environmental Technologies Ltd. The proposed by-law will be effective for the years 2024 -2026. B. AREAS OF THE PROPOSED SPECIAL SERVICE: A special service tax will be charged on all residential commercial and institutional properties receiving solid waste and recycling services within the Municipality of North Cypress-Langford as described in Schedule B attached hereto. C. ESTIMATED COST OF THE SPECIAL SERVICE The estimated cost of the special service plan for 2024 to 2026 are as follows: Waste & Recycling Costs

2024

2025

2026

$229,531.56

$236,414.12

$243,511.76

Less: Recycling Revenue

$52,000.00

$52,000.00

$52,000.00

Total

$177,531.56

$184,414.12

$191,511.76

D. PROPOSED METHOD & RATE USED TO CALCULATE SPECIAL SERVICE TAX The method for calculating the special service levy will be by a per parcel (assessment roll) tax rate. Per parcel rates for residential properties will be based on the number of dwellings on each parcel. Per parcel rates for commercial and institutional properties are based on volume of waste/recycling collected. The rate structure is as follows: Property Type

2024

2025

2026

Residential/Commercial (1 dwelling)

$156.83

$162.91

$169.18

Residential/Commercial (2 dwellings)

$313.66

$325.82

$338.36

Residential/Commercial (4 dwellings)

$627.32

$651.64

$676.72

at the Manitoba Agricultural Museum, Austin, Manitoba in the Municipality of North Norfolk, Province of Manitoba, and located on land legally described in Certificate of Title No. 1989596/3 as follows:

Residential/Commercial (10 dwellings)

$1,568.30

$1,629.10

$1,691.80

Residential/Commercial (13 dwellings)

$2,038.79

$2,117.83

$2,199.34

Residential/Commercial (16 dwelling)

$2,509.28

$2,606.56

$2,706.88

Parcel 1: NW¼ 17-11-11 WPM Exc Road Plan 967 PLTO

Residential/Commercial (28 dwellings)

$4,391.24

$4,561.48

$4,737.04

Parcel 2: The Wly 1353 feet of the Nly 561 feet of SW¼ 17-11-11 WPM Exc Road Plan 967 PLTO;

Residential/Commercial (29 dwellings)

$4,548.07

$4,724.39

$4,906.22

Institutional

$313.66

$325.82

$338.36

and in Certificate of Title No. 2125760/3 as follows: SW¼ 17-11-11 WPM, Exc Firstly: The Wly 1353 feet of the Nly 561 feet and Secondly: Road Plan 967 PLTO Of which the records of the Portage la Prairie Land Titles Office show as owner: Manitoba Agricultural Museum Inc., as registered owner have been designated as a municipal heritage site to be protected under the authority of The Heritage Resources Act by Municipal By-Law No. 111/2024 of the Municipality of North Norfolk, adopted on the 14th day of February, 2024. A copy of the above proposal and supporting material may be inspected during regular office hours before the Public Hearing. Copies may be made, and extracts taken there from, upon request. Any questions or concerns please call the Municipal office at 204-385-2332.

neepawa

Invitation to Attend

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE THAT: A copy of this Municipal Heritage Notice shall be filed in the appropriate land titles office, in accordance with the provisions of The Heritage Resources Act. Dated at MacGregor, MB, this 15th day of February, 2024. Theresa Bergen, CMMA Chief Administrative Officer Municipality of North Norfolk

Incremental increases are then applied for the years 2025 and 2026 to cover the anticipated 3% increase in contractor fees and any additional increases that may be imposed by Evergreen Environmental Technologies. Note that the below noted properties shall not be liable for an annual tax for waste management services supplied: (a) NW ¼ 20-10-14WPM ex N 200’ of S 717 @ 265’ (b) SW ¼ 20-10-14 WPM ex Plan 1005, Parcels A & B in Plan 1077 and Lot 1 Plan 31719 (c) Sections 5, 6 and 7 in Township 10 Range 16WPM Council will hear any potential taxpayer who wishes to make representation, ask questions, or register an objection to By-law No. 1-2024. A written objection may be filed with the Chief Administrative Officer, at 316 Fourth Avenue, Box 220, Carberry, MB R0K 0H0, prior to the commencement of the hearing. At the hearing, Council will hear any potential taxpayer who wishes to make a presentation, ask questions or register an objection to the special services plan. All objections, written or verbal, must be filed prior to the adjournment of the hearing and must include the name, address, and property description of the person filing the objection and the grounds of their objection. Copies of Special Service Proposal No. 1/2024 are available at the municipal office at 316 Fourth Avenue, Carberry. Dated at the Municipality of North Cypress-Langford this 20th day of February, 2024. Teresa Parker, CMMA CAO Municipality of North Cypress-Langford (204) 834-6600 Ext 3


18 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS FEBRUARY 23, 2024

Letter: Sports and Neepawa Rotary gets update on church may collide Central Plains Cancer Services Continued from Page 5 Ralph had sermons saying that games should be after 1:00 p.m. so people could still go to church and their children go to Sunday School. Jack Mathison, sports writer for the Brandon Sun, challenged Ralph in his columns on this issue. Any one who knew Ralph said this challenge would have a return message from Ralph. He didn’t disappoint us, and in return, challenged Jack that he and Ralph change roles for a week. Jack would take a Sunday Service at Hamiota United Church and Ralph would write in Jack’s column. A lot of good

came out of this for both sides in my mind. The problem in today’s world, Parents and their children have to travel all over the province, other provinces and into the States. So, unfortunately it is tough to go along the lines that worked years ago. Hopefully this answers a few questions you mentioned in your column. Thanks Ken, and keep up your good work. Sid Lewis, Hamiota. MB

By Ken Waddell

Neepawa Banner & Press

Neepawa Rotary Club was treated to a visit from Sharalyn Knox when she appeared as guest speaker at the Club’s Wednesday lunch meeting. Knox could have spoken of her role as Mayor of Portage la Prairie, but this visit was to talk about Central Plains Cancer Services (CPCC). Knox’s day job is as director of the CPCS and she is passionate about her task, Knox related how in 1997, several cancer care

organizations faded away or were centralized but the group based out of Portage decided to make a larger regional group and have been functioning that way since 1998. “We used to fund raise by going door-to-door but that method was fading even before Covid-19 hit and the pandemic killed off the canvass.” CPCS holds several other fund raisers including a live on location radio-thon broadcast from several Stride Credit Union offices. “Last year’s radio-thon raised $77,000,” said Knox.

Knox emphasized if a patient needs a ride to a cancer appointment, the group tries to make sure a patient gets a ride and it’s always for a flat fee of $30. There are several volunteer drivers needed every day, mostly for treatment trips to Winnipeg. “We try to accommodate people outside the region if we can.” While the flat fee applies across the whole region, Knox emphasized that the actual cost is much higher. Drivers volunteer their time but the mileage rate averages out way higher than the $30 charged.

CPCS official regional boundaries cover from Alonsa to Swan Lake and from Minnedosa to Elie.

Want to promote your community event? Visit neepawabanner.com and email us your event info More than your community newspaper

Notice

NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION SALE OF LANDS FOR ARREARS OF TAXES RURAL MUNICIPALITY OF ALONSA Pursuant to subsection 367(7) of The Municipal Act, notice is hereby given that unless the tax arrears for the designated year and costs in respect of the hereinafter described properties are paid in full to the Municipality prior to the commencement of the auction, the Municipality will on the 21st day of March, 2024, at the hour of 01:00 PM, at Rural Municipality of Alonsa, 20 Railway Avenue, Alonsa, MB, proceed to sell by public auction the following described properties:

Roll Number

16030

Description

Assessed Value

Amount of Arrears & Costs for Which Property May be Offered for Sale

LOT 3 PLAN 42127 PLTO IN NW 1/4 34-18-10 WPM EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER RESERVATIONS AS CONTAINED IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT - LOT 3 PLAN 42127

L -$14,900 $5,002.48

AT AMARANTH AND BEING: LOT 2 SP PLAN 2243 PLTO IN SW 1/4 1-19-10 WPM EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND SPECIAL RESERVATIONS AS RESERVED IN THE ORIGINAL GRANT FROM THE CROWN - LOT 2 SP--2243 LUD OF AMARANTH

L -$1,300

48600

THE WLY 416 FEET OF THE SLY 416 FEET OF SW 1/4 3-19-10 WPM EXC ALL MINES AND MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN THE ORIGINAL GRANT FROM THE CROWN - 108005 ROAD 57W

L -$2,000 $6,322.60 B -$46,600

153400

AT ALONSA AND BEING LOT 29 BLOCK 1 PLAN 673 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN THE ORIGINAL GRANT FROM THE CROWN IN NE 1/4 7-21-11 WPM - LOT 29 BLOCK 1 PLAN 673

L -$500

$3,428.07

153500

AT ALONSA AND BEING LOT 30 BLOCK 1 PLAN 673 PLTO IN NE 1/4 7-21-11 WPM EXC ALL MINES MINERALS AND SPECIAL RESERVATIONS AS RESERVED IN THE ORIGINAL GRANT FROM THE CROWN REGISTERED AS TRANSFER 52572 PLTO - 17 RAILWAY AVE, ALONSA

L -$500

$4,764.73

235281

LOT 9 BLOCK 5 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM - 35 MOON SHADOW DR

L -$30,700 $7,231.76

236200.117

LOT 17 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED) - 5 SHOVELER BAY

L -$19,200 $5,292.00

237137

LOT 4 BLOCK 4 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED) - 47 NORTHWINDS ROAD

L -$12,800 $6,226.33

43000

237145

LOT 12 BLOCK 4 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED) - 31 NORTHWINDS ROAD

L -$12,700 $5,517.50

237147

LOT 14 BLOCK 4 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED) - 27 NORTHWINDS ROAD

L -$12,100 $4,078.84

237167

LOT 8 BLOCK 6 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED) - 7 NORTHWINDS RD

L -$12,800 $4,362.51

237168

LOT 9 BLOCK 6 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED) - 5 NORTHWINDS RD

L -$12,800 $4,362.51

$2,410.61

The tax sale is subject to the following terms and conditions with respect to each property: • The purchaser of the property will be responsible for any unpaid municipal utilities and any property taxes not yet due. • The Municipality may exercise its right to set a reserve bid in the amount of the arrears and costs. • If the purchaser intends to bid by proxy, a letter of authorization form must be presented prior to the start of the auction. • The Municipality makes no representations or warranties whatsoever concerning the properties being sold. • The successful purchaser must, at the time of the sale, make payment in cash, certified cheque or bank draft to the RURAL MUNICIPALITY OF ALONSA as follows: i) The full purchase price if it is $10,000 or less; OR ii) If the purchase price is greater than $10,000, the purchaser must provide a non-refundable deposit in the amount of $10,000 and the balance of the purchase price must be paid within 20 days of the sale; AND iii) A fee in the amount $498.75 ($475 + GST) for preparation of the transfer of title documents. The purchaser will be responsible for registering the transfer of title documents in the land titles office, including the registration costs. • The risk for the property lies with the purchaser immediately following the auction. • The purchaser is responsible for obtaining vacant possession. • If the property is non-residential property, the purchaser must pay GST to the Municipality or, if a GST registrant, provide a GST Declaration. Dated this 6th day of February, 2024. Managed by:

Tami Dumanske Chief Administrative Officer RURAL MUNICIPALITY OF ALONSA Phone: (204) 767-2054 Fax: (204) 767-2044


A lake-full of fun

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS FEBRUARY 23, 2024 19

Minnedosa Lake host to annual Skate/Rock the Lake festivities PHOTOS BY CASPER WEHRHAHN AND JOHN DRINKWATER

Minnedosa Lake was bustling with activity on Feb. 17 to 18 for the 16th annual Skate the Lake and fifth annual Rock the Lake festivities. Shown right: A pair of competing hockey teams speed down the ice, each deterined to be the one handling the puck. Bottom left: An aerial view of the curling. Bottom right: A group of individuals chat and watch a round of hockey unfold.

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Garbage Bin Rentals Roll Off Bins We buy Scrap! Phone 476-0002 for more information

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HEAT THEM UP! Contact the Banner & Press 204-476-3401

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Trenching • Ditching Water & Sewer Dugouts • Demolition Brushing • Trucking Sand & Gravel Snow Removal Winter Parking Lot Sanding

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20 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS FEBRUARY 23, 2024

Kunzelman brings her art back home

By Ken Waddell

Neepawa Banner & Press

Cheryl Kunzelman’s art work had a homecoming of sorts on Feb. 16, when her exhibit opened at Arts Forward in Neepawa. Kunzelman lived in Neepawa and ran a restaurant for a number of years. Her parents, Fred and Sylvia Quist, still live in the community and she started creating art with dad when she was very young The exhibit and Kunzelman’s life journey are best described in her own words noted below that she spoke at the opening of the exhibit. “Welcome! I’m so grateful and excited so see you all here and happy I get to share my collection with you all. It’s a homecoming for me. My lovely daughters and I moved here in 2002 and we were here for 12 years. I have amazing memories of Neepawa and so many great friends. I made so many friends when I had my coffee shop Tody’s Cabin. My girls grew up here and it was a fantastic place to raise our family. I’m now in Winnipeg. I really wanted to speak tonight because this is actually a very special opportunity for me. My parents Fred and Sylvia Quist are here. Many of you know them as Neepawa is their home. Dad was my first art influence. If you saw the little display at entrance, there was a picture of our masterpiece. We drew this together when I was around 10 years old. When people say all they can draw as a stick man, they should be proud. My dad is the master of Stickman drawing! A lot of my dad’s art was in the form of woodworking commissions. He made so many things for people, such as spoon racks, and gun cabinets and picnic furniture. At one point, he made a to scale diorama of the lumber mill for the museum. He always went that extra step to make pieces unique one a a kind. He and I took a short oil painting course together, and I think that was kind of the beginning of Dad’s really pursuing his interest in oil painting. Over the following years that he had his own art shows and sold countless paintings as well as once some awards. He hosted and facilitated an artist guild and encouraged many budding artists to pursue oil painting.

I think in the more recent years since coming to Neepawa, Dad has moved towards his artisan work more so. In the summer he’s been out in his wood working shop creating Antarsia, ring bowls, masterful working wooden toys, beautiful hand made vases, puzzles and games, jewellery boxes and home decor ornaments. He has been involved in this community sharing his art interest and skill with students, clubs and interest groups as well as been interviewed a few times for community TV. He’s done piles of charity sales with his beautiful pieces and has supported an amazing cause. Lately he has become quite the carver. He carves amazing little animals, like bears, owls, gnomes, Father Christmases, and the most incredible little men with their hands in their pockets. And wouldn’t you know it he still passing on his learning with others. He’s teaching a young girl from their church from how to carve little people now as well. So there are hundreds of people out there with Northern Wood Art or Fred Quist originals that have made the world a little more beautiful. So you see, there was no hope for me that I couldn’t at some point seriously pursue art. So as a teenager, I was all about graphite portraits, but I started to get into some oil painting and then I met a really cool watercolour artist in Grande Prairie Alberta named Nick May and that started an interest in watercolours for me. So I painted in watercolours for several years and then I landed on PanPastel around 2021 and it was like I found the medium that was meant for me. I have really enjoyed working with PanPastel and it has renewed my passion and spark in art and given me such joy and peace. Dealing with chronic illness has kind of kept me close to home but it’s OK because my studio is always waiting for me there to bring something to Life. We were created in the image of the greatest artist the ‘creator’ so i am so blessed to have the inclination and passion to create art to help colour my corner of the world just a little. So once again, thank you all so much for coming to support me and to explore this collection.”

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINE WADDELL

When asked to choose her favourite, this has special memories. Cheryl’s father, Fred Quist, would tell her stories and they always began “One Day a Little Mousie …” Perhaps the mousie was Cheryl herself and all the adventures she had growing up. This Little Mousie painting conjures up a lot of memories.

2024 2024

CASH LOTTO

CASH

NEEPA NEEPAWA TITANS

JUNIOR

BI TICK

JUNIOR ‘A’ HOCKEY CLUB

LOTTO

GRAND PRIZE: $20, 000 PLUS 5 DRAWS OF: LGCA 4876-RF-43220 $1,000 L G C A 4 8 7 6 - R F - 4 3 2 1 9

BIG 50/50 TICKETS 5/$50

WINNER WILL RECEIVE 50% WINNER W OF TOTAL SALES T

FINAL DRAWS

GRAND PRIZE: ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION #23 $20, 000 PLUS 5 DRAWS OF: $1,000 FRIDAY, MARCH 22ND

ONLY 800 TICKETS SOLD

LGCA 4876-RF-43220 LGCA 4876-RF43219

NAME: ___________________________________________________________________________________ ADDRESS: _______________________________________________________________________________

EMAIL: ___________________________________________________________________________________

FINAL DRAWS

TELEPHONE: _____________________________________________________________________________ NUMBER OF TICKETS:

__________ @ $100 EACH = $_____________

SATURDAY, MARCH 22ND

NUMBER OF 3 PACKS:

___________ @ $250 EACH = $_____________

NUMBER OF 5 PACK 50/50 TICKETS: _________ @ $50 EACH = $______________ TOTAL = $______________ METHOD OF PAYMENT: __ CHEQUE ___ MASTERCARD ___ VISA __ CASH CREDIT CARD: __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ EXPIRY DATE __ __/__ __ CVV _______ CARD HOLDER NAME: ______________________CARD HOLDER SIGNATURE __________________________________ PREFERRED TICKET DELIVERY: ____ EMAIL ____ MAIL -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------MAKE CHEQUES PAYABLE TO : NEEPAWA TITANS CASH DRAW | MAIL TO BOX 446 NEEPAWA MB R0J 1H0


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