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Friday, June 25, 2021 • Vol.125 No. 48 • Neepawa, Manitoba

Trade in your rain dance for a victory dance!

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Inside this week Friday, June 25, 2021 • B Section

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PHOTO BY JOHN DRINKWATER

Jamie Porrok (centre), his wife Ashton and their children Adley and Beau, along with their dog Bailey, showed off the shop for the Porroks’ new agricultural equipment repair business. See the full story about the new business on Page B2.

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Province grants $300,000 for pool, over $11,000 for Langruth park

By Kira Paterson Neepawa Banner & Press The Municipality of WestLake-Gladstone got a rather large injection of funding for two recreational projects recently. On Friday, June 18, the Manitoba government announced a round of grants from their Building Sustainable Communities fund, with $300,000 going to the construction of a new pool in Gladstone and $11,583 going to upgrades at the Langruth Einarson Park & Campground. Nicole Sellers, recreation director for WestLakeGladstone, noted that these grants were applied for earlier this year by herself and A ndrea Smith, of the municipality’s finance department. “Building Sustainable Communities has been a huge contributor in enhancing many projects within the Municipality of WestLake-Gladstone in the past and we have built a great relationship with them,” Sellers stated. Continued on Page A2

SUBMITTED PHOTO

The Municipality of WestLake-Gladstone received a provincial grant to help pay for the construction of a new pool in Gladstone to replace the current pool (pictured), which is over 50 years old.

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A2 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021

Provincial plans for reopening unveiled

Banner Staff Neepawa Banner & Press Manitoba is mov ing ahead with a loosening of restrictions related to COVID-19. On Wednesday, June 23, the Province announced that effective 12:01 a.m. on Saturday, June 26, all Manitobans will benefit from the following changes: • Outdoor gathering sizes on private property to double to 10 persons, and to allow outdoor visitors to briefly access homes for essential activities (e.g. to use a washroom); • Public outdoor gathering sizes to increase to 25 persons; • Retail businesses to open with increased capacity at 25 per cent to a limit of 250 persons, with no restrictions on the number of household members permitted to shop together; • Personal service businesses (hair and nail salons, estheticians, barbers, etc.) to reopen at 50 per cent capacity, on an appointment basis only; • Restaurants and bars to reopen at 25 per cent capacity for indoors and 50 per cent for outdoor dining. For indoor dining, patrons seated together must be from the same household, unless all patrons at the table are fully immunized. Patrons who are fully immunized and from different households may dine together. For outdoor dining, tables are limited to a maximum of eight patrons and can be from different households regardless of immunization status; • Indoor faith-based services and organized community gatherings to resume at 25 per cent capacity to a limit of 25 persons, with masks worn at all times; • Outdoor faith-based and orga n i zed commun it y gatherings to resume for up to 50 persons, provided distance can be maintained between households. Drivein services continue to be permitted; • Outdoor weddings and funerals may take place, with up to 25 participants, in addition to photographer and officiants. Indoor wed-

dings and funerals remain limited to 10 persons; • Indoor dance, music, theatre and other organized sports and recreation activities may reopen at 25 per cent capacity to a limit of five persons, with no tournaments allowed; • Outdoor dance, music and theatre classes and other organized recreation activities may reopen for groups up to 25 people, with no tournaments allowed; • Swimming and wading pools, both indoor and outdoor, may reopen at 25 per cent capacity; • Gyms and fitness facilities may reopen for individual and group fitness classes at 25 per cent capacity, with three metres distance maintained between patrons; and • Summer day camps may reopen to a maximum of 20 participants in groups. Extra benefits for those fully vaccinated Manitobans who are fully immunized (two vaccine doses, plus two weeks from the time of their second dose) will now benefit from the following exemptions: • Visit loved ones in personal care homes or hospitals; • Participate in social or communal activities, if you are a resident of a personal care home or congregate living facility; • Travel domestically for essential and non-essential purposes outside of Manitoba without the requirement to self-isolate on their return; and, • Dine indoors at restaurants and bars with other fully immunized friends and family from outside your household. Large-scale, outdoor professional sports or performing arts events may also allow fully immunized Manitobans to attend, subject to approval by Manitoba Public Health. The province will work with sports and arts organization to implement proof of vaccination protocols for these events. Following theCOVID-19 safety fundamentals, including indoor mask use and physical distancing, is still required.

‘We are that much closer to our new pool’

Continued from Page A1 She said they were notif ied of the pool grant before learning about the park grant and it was very exciting to find out that they were receiving money for not one, but two local projects. A brand new pool The $300,000 grant for the pool brings the municipality just over half-way to securing all the funds needed for the project. “It felt amazing to just take a deep breath knowing we are that much closer to our new pool. To be granted $300,000, it makes me feel more relieved when looking at the numbers and how we achieve our goal in the timeline,” Sellers stated. The current pool facility in Gladstone is over 50 years old, being built in 1967 as a centennial project. The municipality decided it was long overdue for an upgrade. “The main tank of the swimming pool is still concrete. You don’t usually see that anymore, as most pools are constructed with a PVC membrane shell that can resist higher levels of chlorine,” explained Sellers. The municipality put out a request for proposals for construction of a new pool in April of 2020. “Western Recreation was the successful applicant and we have been working with them since,” stated Sellers. “After hearing some ideas and looking at our current pool, they made a preliminary drawing to provide us. Our proposed timeline is to start some of the construction in the fall of 2022, then they would finish at the end of May 2023.” Sellers noted that the project is estimated to cost about $1.25 million and will include not only a new pool, but updates to the change rooms and washroom facilities to make them more accessible. “With the cost of materials changing constantly, we are keeping a close eye on the budget to make sure we are still in line with our end goal of the pool being completed in the spring of 2023,” she explained. “We will be

SUBMITTED PHOTO

The tentative layout image above shows the new pool as being 2,684 square feet. The new pool will be located to the southwest of where the current pool is.

sending out sponsorship packages shortly to help us fund some of the pool and are always welcoming any donations at the municipal office (14 Dennis Street East, Gladstone). We are also partnering with Plumas Prairie Initiatives Inc. for a raffle and 50/50, but we are just in the process of getting a lottery license before we can launch that fundraiser and start selling tickets.” She added that they will also be applying for more grants and planning some smaller fundraisers that the pool staff will be able to participate in. The new pool will be located in the same area as the current one, Williams Park, but not in the exact same spot. “Council has made the decision to move it over to the southwest side of the current buildings to offer more space on the east end of the park, for the possibility of future growth of campsites,” Sellers stated. The construction will begin in the fall of 2022 and continue through the winter, with work being done on the structural components starting in the new year. “One of the pool’s structural components is the Ecco Pool System (patented galvanized steel, powder-coated double wall panel system). Although it is winter, there will be heaters in this crawl space

of an area, where the plumbing will be located. This is probably one of the many features I am excited about, so our public works team won’t need to jack hammer the pool deck to access any plumbing issues,” Sellers shared. “It involves a lot of hard work to raise over a million dollars in such a short period of time, however the pool that is located in Gladstone offers a great space to improve the physical, mental and social wellbeing. And after the last year and a half with this pandemic, I believe it will be a perfect place to stay connected to help improve the wellbeing of individuals and to add sustainability to new infrastructure for the years to come.” Einarson Park upgrades The grant of $11,583 for Einarson Park in Langruth will cover half of the cost of the upgrades happening there. There are a few things

Sales Cooling Down?

the municipality will be working on at the park. “We are wanting to upgrade our sign, landscaping and campground enhancements, such as picnic tables and fire pits,” explained Sellers. “After the pool grant news, we were thrilled that we received this additional funding to enhance the development of Einarson Park.” In closing, Sellers expressed, “I am so grateful to be a part of a municipality that has support from many different individuals, businesses, federal provincial and community grants, surrounding communities and visitors. The connections and relationships that I have been able to make in the year and a half that I have been in this position has taught me when we all work together, great things will be achieved.”

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JUNE 25, 2021

Travel & Entertainment

Farmers’ market season kicks off in Neepawa

By Kira Paterson Neepawa Banner & Press Summer has officially started and what better way to kick it off than with fresh, homegrown and homemade products? ArtsForward’s first farmers’ market of the season took place this Thursday, Jun. 24 and will once again be running weekly throughout the summer. The market will be every Thursday from 4:00 to 6:00 pm, as they have been in previous years. “We’re running right from the last week of June until the first week of September. Now, things may change during the summer, as we all know, but right now, that’s what our permit says,” explained Rrain Prior, director of programming for ArtsForward. Because the market is considered retail, as opposed to a gathering, the current public health orders allow for it to happen, with some capacity restrictions. “Because it was allowed last summer and even when restrictions went down in late August last summer, we figured it would probably be allowed this year, so I put the application in,” she explained. Prior noted that they applied for a market permit about three months ago and finally heard back at the beginning of June. Prior reiterated that the farmers’ market is not going to be a place where you

many in at a time. “It tends to flow fairly quickly, because it doesn’t take a long time to get through the market, even when you’re stopping at every table,” she added.

FILE PHOTO

The first farmers’ market of last year was indoors due to rain (pictured). This year’s markets will have to remain outdoors due to restrictions.

go to socialize, like it has been in normal years. “It’s actually very specifically not social, we’re not allowed to have musical performances, which we’ve had in past years, or things like the face painter, stuff like that which we’ve done in the past. You’re not allowed to do any of that, it’s just a market,” she explained. In addition to those restrictions, the market will have one entrance and one exit, with visitors limited to going in one direction. The vendors will also be spaced out, only 10 customers will be allowed in at a time and hand sanitizer will be available at the entrance and at every vendor table. “It’s pretty much exactly the same as last year, be-

cause we were very diligent about it last year,” Prior noted. “So if you were at the market last year, you know what you’re gonna be seeing this year.” While traditional stores currently have to limit patrons to one person per household, except in cases with a parent and child or a person with a caregiver, ArtsForward won’t have to worry about that with their market. “Because we’re outdoor, that doesn’t apply to this, however, we tend to only see one person per household coming through the market,” Prior explained. She noted that the only thing they have to restrict in terms of people coming through is how

Excitement for the return Prior noted that all the feedback she’s seen since they announced the farmers’ market starting has been positive. “The universal response that I have received is, ‘we’re very glad this is happening,’ because we’ve had very few events, and this isn’t an event per se, but it is something new to go and do,” she expressed. “Also, our vendors were quite pleased that we were able to have this outlet. Because they, of course, are limited to where they can sell, you can’t sell off your own property right now, that kind of thing. So having the space where they come out into the community and sell is really important, too,” she added.

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The Lord will keep you from all harm— he will watch over your life; the Lord will watch over your coming and going both now and forevermore.

Psalm 121:7-8 (New International Version)

NACTV SCHEDULE All programs are repeated 12 hours after listed time, during the night. Mon. June 28 10:00 ............ Good Morning Canada 10:03 .Dalrympole’s Greenhouse Tour 10:20 ..................... Making Marks #1 10:30 ....Exercise for Older Adults #1 10:55 ....Community Announcements 11:00 ....Prairie Mtn. Artist Showcase 11:30 ....... Minnedosa Ag Fair (2019) 11:55 .......... Heart Smart Cooking #1 12:30 .Recreating Eden - B. Strohman 12:55 ....Community Announcements 1:00 ...............Reliving Old Memories 2:00 ..........Lassie in the Painted Hills 3:10 ........................................ Egrets 3:30 ................ Bill Fraser Band 2009 4:00 .Kid’s Story-Time - Prairie Tales 4:35 ........................................ Rotary 5:20 ............................. Fact or Fraud 6:00 ............Neepawa News & Views 6:30 ......Community Announcements 6:40 ...Miles for Mental Health (2018) 7:00 .The Beverly Hillbillies - E22S01 7:30 .Heroes & Heroines - Alf Newton 9:30 .................. NACI Student Chats 9:50 .. Neepawa & Area Recent Clips 10:00 .........Start of Schedule Repeat Tues. June 29 10:00 ............ Good Morning Canada 10:03 ........WtBI?-Gunny Sack Acres 10:20 ....Community Announcements 10:30 ....Exercise for Older Adults #2 11:00 ................ Tom & Jerry (Part 4) 11:40 ........................ Boo in the Park 12:00 .................Maritime Holiday #1 1:30 .Filip. Heritage 2021 (Interviews) 2:30 .Brandon Travellers Day Parade 3:20 .... The Dennis Nykoliation Band 4:55 ......Community Announcements 5:00 ......... Aboriginal Church Service 7:00 ............Story Behind the Stories 7:30 ........................Val’s Adventures 9:00 ..........................Today’s Church 10:00 .........Start of Schedule Repeat Wed. June 30 10:00 ............ Good Morning Canada 10:03 .Filipino Language Lesson # 13 10:25 ....Community Announcements 10:30 .............................. Steppin’ Up With Confidence - Exercise Program for Older Adults #1 10:55 .Neepawa & Area Recent Clips 11:05 ..................... Making Marks #1 11:15 . ...Community Announcements 11:30 ..........Story Behind the Stories 12:00 .Dalrympole’s Greenhouse Tour 12:20 ...................................... Rotary 1:05 ......Community Announcements 1:10 ......Travel Talk-Cayman Islands 2:00 .Church Service - Calvary Chapel 3:15 ......Community Announcements 3:20 ... Npa. Car Show & Drag Races 4:00 .Filip. Heritage 2021 (Interviews) 5:00 ................ Gladstone Grad 2021 6:00 ..Salv. Army Building Demolition 6:20 .. Neepawa & Area Recent Clips 6:30 ..................................Herb Dock 7:00 ..............NAC TV BINGO - LIVE 8:00 .............................Town Council 9:00 ........ Western - The Dawn Rider 9:55 ......Community Announcements 10:00 .........Start of Schedule Repeat Thurs. July 1 10:00 ............ Good Morning Canada 10:03 ...................Neepawa Flooding 10:20 .Neepawa & Area Recent Clips 10:30 ....Exercise for Older Adults #2 11:00 ....Cubs vs. Ebb & Flow Lakers 12:45 ..................... Making Marks #1 NACTV programming is done by volunteers and substitutions are sometimes necessary. Programming may also be seen livestreamed at www.nactv.tv/live .

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12:55 ....Community Announcements 1:00 ...........Road Runners Car Show 1:30 . SH - Case of the Singing Violin 2:00 ......... Aboriginal Church Service 4:00 .Filip. Heritage 2021 (Interviews) 5:00 .......B & P Building Construction 5:55 ......Community Announcements 6:00 ............Neepawa News & Views 6:30 .Snack - Apple Cucumber Salad 7:00 ............Story Behind the Stories 7:30 ........................Val’s Adventures 8:30 .............................Town Council 9:30 .Choraliers at Country Meadows 10:00 .........Start of Schedule Repeat Fri. July 2 10:00 ............ Good Morning Canada 10:03 ...............WtBI?-Prairie Quinoa 10:25 .Neepawa & Area Recent Clips 10:30 ....Exercise for Older Adults #1 10:55 ....Community Announcements 11:00 ....Prairie Mtn. Artist Showcase 11:30 ........................ Boo in the Park 12:00 ...........................Town Council 1:00 ............Story Behind the Stories 1:30 ..............Kinsmen Kourts 2 Tour 2:00 ........Theatre - Private Buckaroo 3:10 .. Art with Elianna # 7 Duct Tape 4:00 ....Story-Time - Christian Stories 4:45 .. Neepawa & Area Recent Clips 5:00 ................ Gladstone Grad 2021 6:00 ..........E. Cornock’s 100th B-day 6:20 ......Community Announcements 6:30 ................Coast to Coast Sports 7:00 ........... NACTV Reads the News 8:15 ........................................ Rotary 9:00 .Frontier Friday - Lawless Frontier 9:55 ......Community Announcements 10:00 .........Start of Schedule Repeat Sat. July 3 10:00 ............ Good Morning Canada 10:03 ... Whitemud River Flooding #2 10:25 ....Community Announcements 10:30 ....Exercise for Older Adults #2 11:00 ......... NACTV Reads the News 12:15 ....Community Announcements 12:25 .Jamboree: Lazy Creek Express 1:00 .................. Tom & Jerry (Part 5) 1:40 ...Dalrymple’s Greenhouse Tour 2:00 ... McCreary’s Got Talent (2021) 2:45 ......Community Announcements 3:00 ........... NACTV Reads the News 4:15 ... Manitoba Hyrdo Building Tour 5:00 ............ Chat - Pastor Makyeyev 5:30 .............................Town Council 6:30 ..................................Herb Dock 7:00 ............Story Behind the Stories 7:30 .The Beverly Hillbillies - E23S01 8:00 .............................. England Trip 9:00 .Prairie Mountain Artist Showcase 9:30 .............. NACI Track Meet 2017 10:00 .........Start of Schedule Repeat Sun. July 4 10:00 ............ Good Morning Canada 10:03 ....United-Ang. Shared Ministry 11:15 . ... Calvary Church, Minnedosa 12:00 .. St. Dominic’s Church Service 1:00 .Church Service - Calvary Chapel 2:15 ......Community Announcements 2:20 .........Arden Elevator Demolition 2:40 ............................ La Bella Terra 3:00 ............Cubs vs. Plumas Pirates 4:50 ......Community Announcements 5:00 ................ Gladstone Grad 2021 6:00 ............Neepawa News & Views 6:30 ......Community Announcements 6:45 .. Neepawa & Area Recent Clips 7:00 .Church Service - Calvary Chapel 8:15 ........................Sherlock Holmes 8:45 .. Neepawa & Area Recent Clips 9:00 .......Brandon Manitoba Ag Days 9:55 ......Community Announcements 10:00 .........Start of Schedule Repeat

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Perspectives

A4 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS

Tundra

JUNE 25, 2021

Homebodies

By Chad Carpenter

Rita Friesen

Manitoba– How do we measure up?

L

ast week, I posed this question to Manitoba Health: “If Manitoba had the same ratio of population to ICUs as North Dakota, there would be over 400 ICUs in Manitoba instead of 72. Do you know why Manitoba numbers of available ICUs varies so much from North Dakota?” I actually got an answer but, as usual, the words can’t be attributed to an actual person, but here’s the answer which was “attributed to a Shared Health spokesperson”: “Manitoba’s ICU capacity preCOVID was 72 beds. In addition, up to 22 beds are maintained to meet the needs of cardiac sciences patients. This bed base has regularly expanded to meet patient demands during surges and busy periods, such as the annual flu season, but has been considered by system experts and leaders as appropriate capacity for a population the size of Manitoba and in line with historical needs during normal, non-surge times. COVID has placed unprecedented pressures on critical care services not just in Manitoba, but around the globe. In response to these demands, Manitoba has increased critical care capacity to 152 beds locally and has arranged for access to additional capacity out of province through a number of agreements with other Canadian jurisdictions. As of Thursday, 122 patients (60 COVID and 62 non-COVID) were being cared for in Manitoba ICUs. T he sust a ined pressures of COVID-19 are expected to subside over the coming months with the expanded availability and adoption of vaccines. System and critical care leadership continue to review evidence and data related to the ongoing and anticipated demands on critical care capacity both for potential future waves of COVID and for the future health demands of Manitoba’s population. Comparison of bed base between vastly different jurisdictions, particularly between Canada and the United States which have extremely different health sysneepawa

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Right in the Centre Ken Waddell tems, does not provide an accurate picture of capacity or demand in Manitoba ICUs.” In a newspaper article in the Grand Forks Herald ,Minot Trinity Hospital Dr. Jeffrey Sather explained that at the height of the C-19 pandemic, North Dakota was running low on ICUs. If that was the case, then it’s no wonder Manitoba’s ICUs were overloaded. North Dakota has had 111,000 cases and 1,554 deaths. The ND population was stated as 762,000 in 2019. By the numbers, they haven’t done as well as Manitoba on cases and deaths. C-19 has always been about numbers. Manitoba has done better than North Dakota. In Manitoba, there have been 1,125 deaths attributed to C-19 as of June 21. Out of a population of 1.4 million, that is a small percentage, but every death is sad and many were tragic. It has been stated many times that a high percentage of the deaths were among the elderly and in care homes. The situation will be studied much more I am sure, but it is widely felt that many of the care home deaths could have been avoided. We will never know for sure. There have been 55,405 cases, which means about four per cent of Manitobans tested positive for C-19. How many more actually had C-19? We will also never know. Earlier this month, Manitoba Health, when I asked how many people died in ICU, stated that one in four people in ICU didn’t survive. Now, go back and re-read Manitoba Health’s statement above about ICUs. They defend Manitoba numbers by saying, “Comparison of bed base

between vastly different jurisdictions, particularly between Canada and the United States, which have extremely different health systems, does not provide an accurate picture of capacity or demand in Manitoba ICUs.” That’s a very telling statement. In Manitoba, the government decides how many ICUs or most other services we have. In the U.S., demand determines how many services they have. While we can be very thankful for the quality of health care in Manitoba, the availability is often lacking. In the U.S., there are very short waiting lists. In Canada, a person can wait for months or years to get a treatment or surgery. Canada, and especially Manitoba, has been adamant that private health care is a bad thing. Maybe it’s time to re-examine that premise. Had we re-visited that premise a few years ago, maybe we wouldn’t have run out of ICUs. Sixteen months ago, the whole C-19 process was geared to two numbers. One was reducing deaths and the other was not overloading the ICUs. It appears we fell short on both counts and in the process ran into a pile of social and economic issues as a consequence. I feel that overall, Manitoba did OK, but we could have done a lot better. We fell short, we didn’t measure up and that should be a wake-up call. There will be another pandemic, there will be more and more demand on health care, even without a pandemic. Manitoba Health admits we only had enough ICU beds for “non-surge” times. Will we do better in the future? Only if we decide to do so.

423 Mountain Avenue, Box 699, Neepawa, Manitoba R0J 1H0 Telephone: (204) 476-3401 Fax: (204) 476-5073 Toll-free: 1-888-436-4242 (within Manitoba) www.neepawabanner.com

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And just like that... C

an’t say that I am a sun worshiper, I am a sincere sun appreciator! The winter solstice is almost as important as Christmas, for I long for the days to begin their lengthening. Spring is glorious, with each sunrise minutes earlier than the day before. And then, just like that, it is the summer solstice, and the sunlight hours decrease by racing minutes. June has long been my favourite month. Most years, the days are warm and sun-filled with refreshing rains in season. This year, it seems that we have had intense winds, blistering hot days, making the occasional single digit evening feel frigid, and then just a bit more wind, with not quite enough gentle rain. The Graysville High School yearbook recorded my goal as to have 13 children. A baker’s dozen. Indicative of my love for babies and little people. It was interesting that when I jotted down the names of my children, and then the wonderful collection of individuals who have shared space– physical space and heart space– the number was 13. I did achieve that goal! Loved being a mom, and was in my late 40s and a grandmother before I fully recovered from baby hunger. And just like that, my grandbabies are mamas. The time flew by, and somehow, unless I look in the mirror or try to open a jar, I don’t feel older! I love to see the care and nurturing these young women devote to their children. Sum total of great grands is now eight, and there may be more in the future. So, five children, nine grands, and now great grands. My last chapter could be interesting, well, even more interesting than the first ones. My mother had strong expectations for a clean house. We all had Saturday chores, right down to setting the kitchen chairs upside down on the table top and removing the guck on their feet. Back in the day, the kitchen floor was vinyl tile and it required a waxing and a polishing. No machine, hands and knees and skating around in a pair of old wool socks to buff it. Oh, the cleaning was detailed and thorough. And just like that, it was Saturday and we had to do it all over again. The same goes for laundry. Even now, in my retirement, there is always a need for a Saturday clean. I wonder, with the limited activity occurring in my home, how can that be? And then I watch my dogs roll about on the lawn, re-entering our home, and shedding dried grass. So I regularly rake the floors! But seriously, where does dust come from? How much skin do we shed? Yep, just like that, the home needs to be tidied and the laundry needs to be done, again and again. As I age, it feels that all cycles of life have been hit with “fast forward”. It’s Sunday, then Friday and Sunday again. My babies are grandparents. There is one comfort; I asked my father, at that time a resident of a long term care home, if the days seemed long. He looked at me, “surprisingly, they don’t.” Good to know!

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Perspectives

JUNE 25, 2021

Listen with head and heart

T

wice in the last two weeks, I have experienced something I haven’t experienced in a long time. Two people, one I have known for some time and one I had never met, spoke of the challenges they were facing thanks to COVID-19. The first person spoke of the lingering grief being felt because of public health orders that did not allow family members to gather together for the funeral of a loved one or even visit in small groups to share memories and grieve together. The second person spoke of difficulties experienced working in a high stress environment and of how hard it was to stay positive and upbeat in the face of ever changing orders and restrictions. I had heard similar stories before. But these were different. The words spoken, the tone of voice and the downcast looks in the eyes of those with whom I was speaking triggered something in me. I felt my heart break as I listened to

of the Law always on his lips and study it ( Joshua 1:8). Jesus prays for His disciples and asks His Father to “Sanctify them by the truth; your Word is truth” ( John 17:17). When we stay close to what the Bible teaches, we can have peace, contentment and tranquility in a world of unrest.

Neil Strohschein their words; and I have kept them and others like them in my thoughts and prayers ever since. For all its challenges, dealing with COVID-19 has forced me to interact differently with the people I meet each day. When speaking with someone, I have to listen very carefully (masks can cause words to get slurred) and watch the speaker’s eyes. The eyes and the tone of voice tell me far more than the words themselves. When he created us, God gave us two eyes and two ears– but only one mouth. This was no accident. To fully understand what another person is saying, we need to keep our ears attuned to and our eyes fixed on the one who is speaking. By doing this, we

By Addy Oberlin

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time we find out that it is all wrong what we are doing. The best place to find out the truth, and what is the best thing to do, is in the Bible. If we believe that the Bible is “God-breathed,” as it tells us in 2 Timothy 3:16, we can be assured that we can find the truth in there. God told Joshua in the Old Testament to keep the Book

Faithfully Yours

Observation ately when I hear or read a newsy story, I wonder which side this story represents. Each story, true or false, has two sides and we need to make

will also keep our thoughts focused on what we hear and see. Our reaction or response should wait until we have fully understood what we have been told. This is what I call “listening with the head;” and it is an essential discipline in good communication. Equally important is mentally putting ourselves in the same situation as the one with whom we are speaking and imagining how we would feel if we were there. I call this “listening with the heart” and it is just as important as listening with the head. In his letter to the Romans, St. Paul encourages us to “rejoice with those who rejoice and to weep with those who weep.” Rejoicing and weeping are emotional responses to things we see

and hear. They come from the heart, not from the head. Unless we are willing to emotionally identify with the injustices, injuries and pain that others are experiencing, we will never be able to rejoice with those who rejoice or weep with those who weep. And our reactions to their cries for help will reveal a lack of understanding and compassion and may cause more problems than they solve. We can do better. We can learn to listen with head and heart. We can let our hearts be broken with the things that break the heart of God. We can find some time (even it it’s just a minute or two) to sit with people, hear their stories, share their pride and pleasure over a job well done or feel their pain as they talk about the challenges they face each day. And then, when we respond to what we have heard, our words will bring comfort, hope and encouragement to them and through them to those they love.

sure that we know where the story comes from and if we know or hear both sides. It can become very confusing. Sometimes, we are told to do one thing and the next

Thumbs up, thumbs down Thumbs down to the Neepawa Giant Tiger store for never having flyer stock. Bette Therrien Neepawa, MB

Thumbs down to the Powers That Be of our Neepawa Riverside Cemetery for the disgraceful, weed-filled grave tops. Is this in keeping with the Provincial Cemetery Perpetual Care that was much touted a few years ago? Edith Burnside Neepawa, MB Related photo on Page A18

Dear Cliff Cullen; Minister of Education: Re your Bill 64 (Modernization of Education): If the MTS (MB Teachers Society), MAST (MB Association of School Trustees), MPAC (MB Parent Advisory Councils) all oppose Bill 64, who is in favour? Oh yes, government beaurocrats! Robert Smith Edrans, MB Would you like to send a thumbs up or thumbs down to an individual or group in the community? Please send it our way. Submissions must include a name and must be under 100 words. We want to hear from you! In person: 423 Mountain Ave. Neepawa By fax: 204-476-5073 By email: news@neepawabanner.com

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS A5

Letters

Life beyond the perimeter

As a long-time political activist and freelance scribe, I have known the Waddells for many years. Ken Waddell is one of very few surviving publishers/ editors that make reading the paper a necessity and has earned my deep respect over the years. Rural papers have to contain local news. Wire services are of little value, as most content is urban centred and we get that stuff on cable or satellite TV. There is life beyond the perimeter highway, a life less stressful and more rewarding for the most part. Values are different, rooted in cornerstones of caring, compassion and personal responsibility. Ken is a natural fit in that environment. When Ken encounters a community problem or defect, he is inclined to try to find a solution and encourages others to join in the endeavour. Presiding over a paper with a 125-year history is a significant responsibility. The Waddells have lived up to the commitment to their community and neighbours. I wish them well going forward. John Feldsted Winnipeg, MB

I’ll stay with the vaccine

Interesting comments about treating COVID-19 with Ivermectin ( June 4 letter). As a farmer, I used Ivomec, a trade name, for most of half a century. It is a systemic insecticide. For sheep, it was a subcutaneous injection, getting rid of stomach and intestinal worms, sheep ticks, lice, fleas and mites, though sheep seldom have the last three. There was little or no lasting effect so treatment was given two or three times a year. It had no effect on bacterial problems, such as footrot or viral diseases like pinkeye and orf. Ivomec is cheap and available at any veterinary supply. So if you would rather inject yourself with a sheep wormer than trust medical science and doctors, have at it. For cattle, Ivomec was poured on the animal’s back and absorbed through the skin. It eliminated lice, ticks, fleas, mange mites and worms. Again, no effect on footrot or viral problems like infectious Bovine Rhinotracheaitis. That required a vaccine. And given a choice to treat a respiratory ailment, I think I would rather have an old fashioned mustard plaster on my chest than bathe my butt with cow medication. Or how about doubling up with a cow pattie plaster on the chest? Thanks, but I’ll stay with the vaccine. And then there’s Ivomec for dogs. The Ivomec-infused flea and tick collar, our German Shepard was fine but our Border Collie became very sick. The veterinarian quickly removed the tick collar and explained that Ivomec can kill a Border Collie. Apparently the Border Collie is hyper intelligent and hyperactive (smart and hardworking) making them susceptible to Ivomec poisoning. I believe I could match most Border Collies in an IQ test, and since Mr. Waddell has often watched me repair his farm machinery, I’m sure he would vouch for my work ethics, I will carry on with my second dose of vaccine next week. I doubt you will see me wearing a flea and tick collar instead. Continued on Page A14


A6 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021

Helen Drysdale out of helen’s kitchen

War brides

After World War II, as the Canadian men returned home to Canada to resume civilian lives, many waited for the 48,000 overseas war brides and their 22,000 children to join them. The majority of war brides were from England, with the remaining number from Holland, Belgium, France, Italy and Germany. The young women had seen never-ending bombings, had a fear of impending invasion or lived under Nazi occupation and often near starvation. The heightened emotions of war made romance especially passionate. The young Canadian soldiers, many of whom were away from home for the first time, were homesick and wanted a good time. Since the British men were away fighting when the handsome Canadians arrived, the young women found the Canadians appealing. They had money to spend and their stories of Canada were intriguing. Romances blossomed swiftly. Knowing their time together may not be long, many of the young couples married quickly, with little acquaintance. The bride-to-be produced a letter from her clergymen, or employer that she is a person of good character and the groom-to-be a letter from his commanding officer that he was allowed to marry and all was good to go. Brief honeymoons were enjoyed before the husbands left for battle, some never to return. When the war ended, the husbands went home with their units, while the wives filled out numerous application forms. When their travel documents were ready, the wives said their tearful goodbyes to family and friends, without knowing if they would ever see them again. They embarked on crowded, beat up old troop ships, nicknamed “bride ships”. “They were homesick, seasick and lovesick,” said one war bride. They were given train tickets for their destinations to join their husbands in Canada. As many of the brides had children with them, the trains were dubbed the “Diaper Special.” Many war brides experienced culture shock and many were disillusioned by what awaited them upon arrival. The stories of the house and properties owned had been greatly exaggerated. Many went to their new homes to find wood stoves, outhouses, no running water and no electricity, all of which they had enjoyed in England. At times, the new families were not too pleased with the new bride and their displeasure of their son’s choice showed. They were introduced to new foods and re-introduced to foods that they had not seen over the war years. These women were struck by the abundance of food in Canada, as most of them had endured five years of food rationing and hunger. Many former city women settled in very rural areas and it was a completely new way of life and incredibly lonely. They learned how to prepare wild game like moose, deer and rabbit, plant gardens, raise chickens and learn one end of a cow from another. Clubs were established, especially on the prairies, by war brides and acted as support groups. There were possibly more clubs on the prairies because war brides who moved to farms had a much tougher time adjusting to Canada and placed more value on meeting with women who shared the same experience. In larger cities, war brides were more easily immersed into Canadian culture. Most overcame the obstacles they faced and became involved in their communities. Once they immigrated to Canada, some of the women never returned to their home countries and never saw their families again. Living so far away was challenging, but they stayed connected with their families through letters, phone calls and packages sent through the mail. To help these new brides adjust, the Canadian government published “Welcome to War Brides”, in which, among other things, it informed the wives that they should not spend too much time openly displaying their loneliness for their old friends and family, and homesickness for the old country. The booklet suggested “they keep busy and interested, that’s the best cure-all.” The Canadian Cook Book for British Brides provided recipes and tips. Tips such as making a good cup of coffee, noting, “We certainly shan’t try to tell you how to make a good cup of tea, but you might find some pointers on coffee making useful.” Or that their “Canadian husbands preferred pie of any sort over suet pudding and took cream in their coffee, not hot milk.” So with that in mind, a pie recipe! Rhubarb cream cheese pie 1- 9 inch single pie crust Topping: 1/4 cup cornstarch 1 250g pack of cream cheese, 1 cup white sugar room temperature 2/3 cup water 2 eggs 2 Tbsp. frozen concentrated orange juice 1/3 cup sugar 3 cups fresh chopped rhubarb 1 tsp. vanilla In a small saucepan, combine cornstarch and 1 cup of sugar. Add water and orange juice concentrate. Bring to a boil; turn heat down and cook and stir for 2-3 minutes or until thickened. Add the rhubarb. Pour into pie shell. Bake in preheated 375°F oven for 15 minutes. Meanwhile, for topping, beat cream cheese, eggs, sugar and vanilla until smooth. Pour over pie. Return to oven and reduce heat to 325°F. Bake for 35 minutes or until set. Cool. Chill several hours or overnight.

Spruce Plains RCMP report By Cpl. Jacob Stanton Spruce Plains RCMP During the week of June 14 to June 20, Spruce Plains RCMP dealt with 57 police activities. June 14: RCMP responded to a commercial alarm in Neepawa that was later determined to be false. Police conducted various traffic enforcement, engaging with several motorists. Numerous tickets were issued for speeding. June 15: RCMP responded to a report of a person causing a disturbance at a business in Minnedosa. Police learned the person was breaching numerous court orders; the matter is still under investigation. Police responded to a break and enter at a residence in Neepawa. The investigation is ongoing. Police conducted a Covid compliance check at a residence in the RM of North CypressLangford. All person(s) were found complying with quarantine regulations. June 16: RCMP were dispatched to a single vehicle rollover in the RM of Oakview. It was determined that the driver hit the shoulder, overcorrected and then went into the ditch. The driver sustained no injuries. Police received a report of a disturbance between neighbours in Glenella. All parties were spoken to and the issue was resolved without incident. Police responded to a theft of fuel complaint in Rapid City and a fraud report in Neepawa; there was insufficient evidence to proceed in both matters. June 17: RCMP responded to a report of a suspicious person at a residence in Neepawa. Police attended and did not locate anyone. Police received two hit and run reports in Neepawa. There was insufficient evidence to proceed further in both matters. June 18: RCMP received a report of a disturbance in Minnedosa. Police attended and spoke with all involved parties and the

issue was resolved without further incident. Police responded to a commercial alarm in the Municipality of Westlake-Gladstone and a residential alarm in the RM of North Cypress-Langford. Both were determined to be false. June 19: RCMP responded to a vehicle vs deer collision in Minnedosa. The driver wasn’t injured but the vehicle was towed as it was significantly damaged. Police conducted a Covid compliance check in the Municipality of Westlake-Gladstone. All persons(s) were found complying with quarantine regulations. June 20: RCMP responded to a Covid compliance complaint in Neepawa. After investigation, the matter was deemed unfounded. Police received a report of a vehicle vs deer collision in the RM of North CypressLangford. The vehicle was still driveable and the deer was not located. RCMP conducted 19 traffic enforcement actions during this reporting period. Public service announcement If you have any information about these crimes or any other crimes, please contact your local RCMP Office or Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-8477. Due to the on-going COVID-19 pandemic, the Neepawa and Minnedosa RCMP detachments advise they will be limiting front counter services at the detachments until further notice.  We request that you contact each detachment at 204-476-7340 (Neepawa) or 204-867-2916 (Minnedosa) to inquire about criminal record checks or to file a report. Leave a message if needed and it will be checked the following business day. Do not leave a message if you require immediate police assistance. You must dial 204-476-7338 (Neepawa), 204-867-2751 (Minnedosa) or 911 to have a police officer respond to you promptly.

Conclusion It is safe to conclude that the scientific discoveries of the past hundred years do not contradict the account of creation given in Genesis one. On the contrary, those discoveries have confirmed the accuracy of the Genesis account. Evidence to support this conclusion has been copied from a more detailed document called “Science and Creation”. This document includes an appendix with links to some fascinating science articles for those who are interested. One that is of special interest to me is a biology website for kids. When I was a kid, such information was not available. The complexity of life is awe-inspiring, and I can’t resist giving the link: http://www.biology4kids.com/files/cell_main.html God’s work of creation is wonderful. And the redemption that he has provided in the sacrifice of his Son on our behalf is more wonderful still. Christ came to save the lost. Anyone who would like to receive “Science and Creation” by email can contact me at: margaretcollier059@gmail.com. For those who do not have a computer, my mailing address is: Box 258, Austin, MB, R0H 0C0.


Rural Outlook

JUNE 25, 2021

The way I see it: Too many cooks in the COVID kitchen

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS A7

Plumas couple wins student-made hunting blind

By John Feldsted Submitted The longer the coronavirus saga lingers, the more perplexing it is that efforts to contain the virus have been brought to us by squadrons of allegedly educated and intelligent people. We have official senior health care officers for 10 provinces, three territories, various cities and the federal government. In addition, we have politicians from all of those jurisdictions. Add to that full-time commentators from major media outlets who parade an endless stream of alleged experts to add commentary on what is and is not working. We have so many cooks in the COVID kitchen that whenever one of them moves, he knocks over three nearby people. We have watched this insanity for 15 months. Collectively, they failed to limit virus spread. We have over 26,000 bodies as proof. The idiots who came up with social distancing based their theory on preliminary studies of how far coronavirus droplets might spread if someone coughed or sneezed. The six-foot or two-metre distance chosen is arbitrary, not scientific. There are many mitigating factors – indoors or out, ventilation, wind, humidity, and degree of energy (playing volleyball will require more energy and hard breathing than someone seated and playing cards). Initially, we were told to wear face masks where physical distancing was not possible. That quickly became a separate edict because it signalled that wearers followed virus regulations, not because they served any useful purpose. No studies show that anything less than a properly fitted N-95 (medical grade) mask will prevent coronavirus transmission. The virus droplets are so tiny that they penetrate lower-quality masks. The highlight of a ridiculous approach to coronavirus containment was to start issuing fines for not complying with silly regulations. The thinking seems to be that fines will discourage non-compliance. The fools who came up with that one have not gone for a 50-mile road trip recently. Medical people and politicians insist that the coronavirus epidemic is unprecedented. Records show: 1832 – Cholera; 1834 – Cholera; 1849 – Cholera; 1851 – Cholera; 1854 – Cholera; 1890 – Influenza; 1918 – Influenza; 1957 – Influenza; 1968 – Influenza; 1982– AIDS; 2003 – SARS; 2009 – H1N1 (Swine Flu); 2020 – Coronavirus. We are now naming influenzas which does not change anything. What is unprecedented is that steps taken to combat influenza epidemics in 1957, 1968, 2003 and 2009 successfully were ignored in favour of an untested system of locking down all but essential services and quarantining healthy people. Sadly, it failed to work. We are told that (1) all available vaccines are safe, and (2) getting two doses of vaccine will protect us from severe effects of COVID. Now that vaccine supplies are readily available, over 75 per cent of people age 12 and older have gotten the first dose, and 22 per cent are fully immunized. Continued on Page A14

SUBMITTED PHOTO

We have a winner! The holder s of the luck y ticket for the hunting blind raffle at the William Mor ton Collegiate on Friday, June 18, were Eric and Robyn Doerksen, of Plumas. The luxury blind was built by the s c hool ’s shops c las s as a year-end projec t and to raise money for f u t ur e proje c t s . T he class, taught by Trevor Lang, was comprised of s tudent s Brendan Palmer, Brock Sigurdson, Rylan Denbow and Justin Spurrell. Hey! you!

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A8 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS

Looking Back

JUNE 25, 2021

1981: The Arden 12 and Under fastball team

By Casper Wehrhahn Neepawa Banner & Press

110 years ago, Friday, June 23, 1911 The Neepawa post office was profusely decorated in honor of Coronation Day. It is said that flies may be effectively disposed of by taking half a teaspoonful of black pepper and mixing it well with a teaspoonful of cream. Place where they can get to it and they will soon disappear. The theory is that they inhale the pepper and go and sneeze their heads off. 100 years ago, Friday, June 24, 1921 Photography is 82 years old next August, the secret of the first pictures, those of Daguerre, having been disclosed in 1889. Note: The Daguerreotype was the first successful form of photography, named after LouisJacques-Mandé Daguerre, of France. According to Britannica Encyclopedia, Daguerre invented the technique in collaboration with Nicéphore Niépce in the 1830s. The two found that if a copper plate coated with silver iodide was exposed to light in a camera, then fumed with mercury vapour and made permanent using a solution of common salt, a permanent image would be formed. A great number of Daguerreotypes, especially portraits, were made in the mid19th century. The technique was later replaced by the “wet collodion process”. This particular process was invented by Frederick Scott Archer, an Englishman, in 1851. Archer’s process involved adding a soluble iodide to a solution of cellulose nitrate (collodion) and coating a glass plate with the mixture. In a dark room, the plate would be immersed in a solution of silver nitrate to create silver iodide. While still wet, the plate was then exposed in a camera. To develop the photo, a solution of pyrogallic acid was poured over it, and then fixed with a strong solution of sodium thiosulfate. (Potassium cyanide was later substituted for that portion of the process.) Immediate developing and fixing of the photo was required due to the collodion film’s nature. That is, once it had dried, it would become waterproof and the necessary solutions would not be able to penetrate it. However, the process was valued because of the level of detail and clarity it provided. A rch e r ’s p ro c e ss w a s

modified to involve the use of an underexposed negative backed with either black paper or velvet to form an “ambrotype”, which was very popular in the late 19th century. Also popular at that time was the tintype (also known as a ferrotype), which involved black lacquered metal.

were Peter Cottingham, first vice-president; John Oslund, second v icepresident; Keith Lockhart, treasurer; Vic McBride, Tail Twister; Don Clark, L ion Ta mer; G ordon Johnsen and Nor man Hasiuk, directors.

90 years ago, Tuesday, June 23, 1931 Lieut. Beardmore, a Canadian airman, is the first person to successfully cross the English channel in a glider.

40 years ago, Thursday, June 25, 1981 Neepawa is “breaking new ground” with the arrival next week of a cer t if ied specia l ist in internal medicine at the Neepawa Medical clinic, according to a spokesman for the clinic. Dr. Michael Hewitt, 28, will re-join colleagues at the clinic on Wednesday, July 1, after a two year “loan” to the Health Sciences Centre and St. Boniface Hospital. Neepawa has never had a certified specialist; in fact, Neepawa may be the only “small town” in the province with such a highly qualified doctor, according to his colleague. Dr. Hewitt was in general practice with the clinic here from Feb. to June 1979. He spent the past two years in Winnipeg hospitals working in ward medicine, rheumatology, haematology, infectious d i s e a s e s , n e u r o l o g y, cardiology, cardiovascular surgery, gastroenterology, endocr inolog y and intensive care.

80 years ago, Tuesday, June 24, 1941 The once lofty elevators and annex of the McCabe Bros. and the Morden M i l l ing Company lay wrapped in a dense pall of smoke Friday night, a s Morden’s g reatest fire, which started some twenty hours before [it] continued to lick away with seemingly insatiable hunger at the mountainous piles of blackened grain and flour and into losses unofficially estimated at $175,000. 70 years ago, Thursday, June 28, 1951 Miss Gladyss Donaldson, R.N., of Winnipeg, attended the opening ceremonies of the Neepawa District Memorial Hospital last week. 60 years ago, Tuesday, June 27, 1961 The people of Kelwood and district filled the Legion Hall there Thursday night as they came to do honor to Wm. W hitelock, a district farmer and one of the community’s leading citizens. The occasion was the formal unveiling of a trophy cabinet, which was donated to the Legion branch by Mr. Whitelock, and contained ribbons, certificates and grain samples representing some of the achievements by him in half a century of raising seed grain in the community. 50 years ago, Thursday, June 24, 1971 Ron Forsman became president of the Neepawa Lions Club last Wednesday night, when he assumed the gavel from retiring president Wally Millan. Other off icers installed

30 years ago, Monday, June 24, 1991 The pesticide container s ite at t he Nee paw a Nu isa nce Grou nd s is piled up with cans, pails and boxes. They are not supposed to be burned but the accumulation went up in smoke earlier this year. 20 years ago, Monday, January 25, 2001 Even t hough t hey recently opted to home school their son, an Arden couple said they’re sorry to see the village’s school close... H o w e v e r, w i t h a projected enrollment of only five students for the coming year, Beautiful Plains School Division is closing the school at the end of the month. Neepawa’s Rotary Club is abandoning its community auction and casino night in favor of a new fundraiser. The club plans to host a

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

This was Arden’s 12 and Under fastball team in 1981. The coach was Charlie Jones. The team members pictured here are, back row, left to right: Carey Glauser, Sharon Rogers, Shauna Francis, Corina McLaren, Sonya Plett, and Linda Popkes. Middle: Hylin McLaren, Geraldine Jones, Christine Terin, Lisa Bercier, and Cindy Enns. Front: Nola McLaren, Darlene Perrett, Kristine Windus and Sandra Jones.

television auction Oct. 25 in the Roxy Theatre. “It w i l l become an annual event, we hope,” said auction committee chairman Steve Scrupa.

“This is a new thing for us and Neepawa too.” … Scrupa said the community auction and casino generally raised around $10,000 a year, and

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the 40-member club hopes to raise at least that much with its television auction.


NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021 A9

‘This is not a trailer, this is a home’ This N’ That expands business to park model mobile homes

By Eoin Devereux

Neepawa Banner & Press

A well established Neepawa business has expanded its reach into a quickly growing market, as This N’ That Mfg. Ltd. has launched a new division focused on the construction and sale of park model mobile homes. For those unfamiliar with the concept, a park model home is neither an R.V., or a manufactured home. These types of dwelling are often 12’ wide and no more than 538 square feet and designed for long-term or permanent placement in seasonal lots, such as beach properties and mobile home parks. The major contrast to a park model is that they are able to have decks, patio covers or carports permanently attached to them. Built in Neepawa On Tuesday, June 15, a small group of individuals had the chance to tour the Neepawa based facility where the homes will be constructed. They were shown two park models, one of which was 428 square feet (sq. ft.) of space, and another which was 536 sq ft. Those seeing the dwellings for the very first time were extremely impressed with them, noting that they didn’t have a mobile home “look or feel” to them. Product ion manager Rob Moman, of This N’ That Mfg. Ltd. said that’s exactly the point, ensuring anyone who buys these homes feels at home in them. “[Park models] are a tough thing to define if you haven’t seen them before, because you really have to come and see them. People really don’t appreciate it, until they walk in the door and they go, ‘Oh my gosh! This is not a trailer, this is a home.’” Moma n added t hat there hasn’t really been much of a market for these

types of homes ferent from what in the province is out there right until recently. now. A lot of He said recent other park modimprovements el homes that in design and are pretty much const r uct ion an assembly line have a l lowed style. Not many manufacturers options for into adapt them dividuality, for to be able to making it your keep them cool own. We didn’t in the summer want to be like and warm in the that. The way winter. we will be conA pair of park structing these model homes park homes, you will be on discan really shape play, with one this for you. The already located colours and style at Creek s ide of the f loors, C a mpg rou nd cabinets, walls; in Portage la just anything PHOTO BY EOIN DEVEREUX P r a i r ie. A n really. It’s not This N’ That production manager Rob Moman lead the tour of the new park ot her mo d e l cookie-cutter,” model home division of the Neepawa based business on Tuesday, June 15. will be able to said Moman. be v iewed in Neepawa. This N’ That She attributes that positive really positive interest here, Expansion quite Mfg. Ltd. director Coreen reaction to the wide var- numerous enquires and impressive Moman told the Banner iety of options that will be calls already coming in. Neepawa mayor Blake & Press that the early re- available. There are so many people McCutcheon and economic sponse has been incredible. “We’ve received some looking for something dif- development officer Mari-

PHOTO BY EOIN DEVEREUX

Rob Moman showcases the interior of a 538 sq. ft. park model home. 21064mc0

Don’t

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reading now! Keep flipping those pages or you’ll miss out on a lot!

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Rob and Coreen Moman stand in the kitchen portion of a 428 sq. ft. park model home.

lyn Crewe were amongst the group who toured the homes. McCutcheon was quick to praise the operation and what they’re trying to accomplish. “I’m so proud of our local entrepreneurs here that have the courage to go ahead and do this. I mean, Rob and Coreen are moving forward with this project. It’s pretty spectacular what they done here,” stated McCutcheon. Crewe acknowledged that what This N’ That has been able to do here in creating a new expansion of the business is quite impressive. She also said that when it comes to economic development in a community, most of the notable growth will come from businesses from within. The starting base price for the park home models will be $87,500 with construction of the individual homes estimated between 10 to 12 weeks. Additional information can be found at thisnthatmfg.ca


A10 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021 A11

The Beautiful Plains Community Foundation Inc.

ANNUAL REPORT for the year ending 2020

2020-2021 BOARD OF DIRECTORS President: Brent Sorenson Vice President: Keith Jury Treasurer: Ian Thomson Ann Kuharski Ashley McCaughan Brad Walker Jack Falk Jeffrey Miner Marilyn Crewe Mark Morehouse Sarah Fast

Box 486, Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0 487 Walker Ave. Phone/Fax: 476-2681 Email: info@beautifulplainscf.ca www.beautifulplainscf.ca

SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AS AT DECEMBER 31

Auditor’s Report on Summarized Financial Statement To the Community Members of Beautiful Plains Community 2019 2020 Foundation Inc. Cash 200,253 152,957 Opinion: The summary financial statement, which comprises the Accounts receivable 1,052 615 summarized statement of financial position as at December Prepaid expenses and deposits 353 31, 2020, is derived from the audited financial statements Current portion of investments 144,790 149,788 of Beautiful Plains Community Foundation Inc. (the “Foundation”) for the year ended December 31, 2020. In our Capital Assets 63,773 56,631 opinion, the accompanying summary financial statement is a Investments 3,868,152 4,203,471 fair summary of the audited financial statements. Summary Financial Statement Total Assets 4,278,020 4,563,815 The summary financial statement does not contain all the 3,246 3,664 disclosures required by Canadian accounting standards for Accounts payable not-for-profit organizations. Reading the summary financial Deferred contributions 3,100 statement and the auditor’s report thereon, therefore, is not Cumulative grant commitments 199,251 201,444 a substitute for reading the audited financial statements and Total Liabilities 205,597 205,108 the auditor’s report thereon. The Audited Financial Statements and Our Report Thereon Community fund 1,746,629 1,925,149 We expressed an unmodified audit opinion on the audited Designated fund 2,102,056 2,250,224 financial statements in our report dated May 10, 2021. Management’s Responsibility for the Summary Operating fund 223,738 183,334 Financial Statement 4,072,423 4,358,707 Management is responsible for the preparation of the Total Net Assets summary financial statement in accordance with Canadian 4,278,020 4,563,815 accounting standards for not-for-profit organizations. Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on whether the summary financial statement is a fair summary of the audited financial statements based on our procedures, which were conducted in accordance with Canadian Auditing Standards (CAS) 810, Engagements to Report on Summary Financial Statements. Yours truly, MNP LLP Neepawa, Manitoba • May 10, 2021

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

2020 has been a year like no other and the same could be said for the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation. In 2020, the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation celebrated our 25th anniversary of providing grants to qualifying organizations within the Town of Neepawa, Rural Municipality of Rosedale, Rural Municipality of Glenella-Lansdowne, and the Langford portion of the Rural Municipality of North Cypress-Langford. Due to the global COVID-19 Pandemic that reached Manitoba in March of 2020, our annual Grant Luncheon was cancelled in 2020, however, we still provided grants and scholarships of $172,850 in 2020 to our communities. Additionally, in 2020, as part of the celebration of our 25th Anniversary, we also held a 25 Days of Giving Draw, where 25 randomly drawn organizations each received a share of $25,000, ranging in amounts from $500 to $5,000. Our 25th Anniversary celebrations did not end there, with a random acts of kindness celebration, where we gave out an additional $2,500 that was awarded to local business supporters of the foundation for the purpose of being granted to a charity or organization of their choice. Furthermore, we also distributed a total of $70,000.00 in funds to area organizations through Community Foundations of Canada grants related to the COVID-19 Global Pandemic. In June of 2020, we saw Shelley Graham complete her 6-year term as a Board Member of the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation. The board would like to thank Shelley for her valuable contributions to the board through our meetings and many community events that she assisted in during her time on the board of the Foundation. Brad Walker concluded his term as the President of the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation in June 2020 as well. Brad’s leadership and guidance through his term as president did not go unnoticed and was greatly appreciated by all who served on the board during that time. In December 2020, we welcomed Sarah Fast as a new board member of the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation. We look forward to her contributions to our board meetings and future community events. As the President of the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation, I am extremely proud of our Board Members for all their contributions this year. This past year has been challenging from a board perspective, having to hold our meetings virtually due to the COVID-19 Health Restrictions. This was a challenge that we all persevered through. Helping guide us all through these times is our Executive Director Brenda Kryschuk. Brenda continues to provide the board with the direction needed for all of us to succeed, while displaying dedication and a strong passion to the success of the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation. Her direction has guided us through these most challenging

times, bringing everyone on the board of directors along to ensure that our meetings can be as productive and efficient as possible during these uncertain times. While the board had plans for multiple events through the course of the 2020 year to celebrate our 25th Anniversary, the COVID-19 Pandemic forced us to cancel many of these events. Despite the cancellation of many of our special events planned for the 2020 year, along with many of those events that everyone has come to know the foundation for hosting, we were able to have another successful year as a foundation, in large part to our supporters. Without the continued support of the community, we would not be in the position we are today, and for that, I sincerely thank you. While we are uncertain of any special events occurring during the 2021 year at this time due to COVID-19, we will be hosting the annual Giving Challenge again in November in conjunction with the support from Endow Manitoba and the Province of Manitoba. Thank you to all of you in our communities who have supported the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation in some way in the past. We look forward to any continued support that you can provide, allowing us to continue to make a difference in our communities every year. Brent Sorenson President

$242,850 IN GRANTS WERE AWARDED IN 2020

COMMUNITY FUND GRANTS

Victoria’s Quilts Canada, Neepawa Chapter ........... $2,500 Neepawa Tourism .................................................... $4,444 Yellowhead Centre ................................................... $6,250 Neepawa & Area Cross Country Ski Club .............. $4,000 Franklin Memorial Hall Association Inc.................... $5,000 Neepawa Theatre Centre ........................................ $6,250 Neepawa Bird Sanctuary ........................................ $7,106 NACTV ..................................................................... $2,000 Beautiful Plains Museum ......................................... $2,750 Margaret Laurence Home ........................................ $7,000 Neepawa Men’s Shed .............................................. $2,000 Neepawa Golf Course & Country Club ................. $12,500 Total Community Fund Grants .......................... $61,800

Neepawa Novas Gymnastics Club........................... $5,000 Burrows Trail Art Council ......................................... $1,172 Neepawa Rec ........................................................... $2,000 Viscount Cultural Council ......................................... $3,142 Emergency Community Support FundsRound 2 Grants ................................................. $30,000

ANNIVERSARY GRANTS

JM Young School...................................................... $1,230 Neepawa & District Drop In Centre ........................ $4,240 Neepawa Middle School .......................................... $9,110 Neepawa Rec ........................................................... $3,530 The Salvation Army - Neepawa ............................... $6,300 Neepawa & District Centennial Project – Yellowhead Centre ................................................. $3,460 Touchwood Park..................................................... $12,130 Emergency Community Support Funds – Round 1 Grants ................................................. $40,000

Arden Ladies Auxillary ............................................. $2,000 Touchwood Park....................................................... $1,000 Neepawa and Area Cross Country Ski Club ............ $2,500 Whitemud Comedy Company .................................... $500 Girl Guides of Canada - Neepawa Unit ................... $1,000 Neepawa and District Disabled Persons Association (Handivan) .............................................................. $1,000 Neepawa Breakfast Club ............................................ $500 Eden Rink & Hall Committee ...................................... $500 The Salvation Army - Neepawa .................................. $500 Riding Mountain Curling Club .................................... $500 Neepawa Area Men’s Shed...................................... $1,000 Neepawa Bird Sanctuary ............................................ $750 Neepawa & District Centennial Project ...................... $750 Neepawa & Area Palliative Care................................. $500 Brookdale Community Centre ................................. $1,000 Neepawa Minor Baseball Softball Association ........ $1,000 Rotary Club of Neepawa ............................................ $750 Polonia Community Hall Committee .......................... $500 Neepawa & District Drop In Centre ........................... $750 Neepawa Lions Club ................................................... $500 Burrows Trail Art Council ............................................ $500 YSDI - Neepawa Curling Rink ..................................... $750 Neepawa & Area 4H Beef Club .................................. $500 Neepawa Golf & Country Club ................................... $750 Neepawa & District Fine Arts Festival..................... $5,000 Total Anniversary Grants ................................... $25,000

The Salvation Army - Neepawa ............................... $6,286 Touchwood Park....................................................... $5,000 Beautiful Plains School Division ............................... $5,400 HAND ....................................................................... $2,000

The Salvation Army - Neepawa .................................. $400 BPCF............................................................................ $200 Neepawa Wildlife Association ................................... $200 Neepawa Health Centre ............................................. $550 Lansdowne Rec Commission ...................................... $200

BUILD 150 GRANTS

Yellowhead Centre ................................................... $6,250 Franklin Memorial Hall Association Inc.................... $5,000 Neepawa Theatre Centre ........................................ $3,750 Beautiful Plains Museum ......................................... $2,750 Neepawa Bird Sanctuary ......................................... $2,250 Total Build 150 Grants ...................................... $20,000

EMERGENCY COMMUNITY SUPPORT FUNDS- ROUND 1 GRANTS

EMERGENCY COMMUNITY SUPPORT FUNDS- ROUND 2 GRANTS

2020 NACI Grad Committee Adam Farr Adrian & Sharon de Groot Alan Goddard Alison J. Campbell Ann Nielsen Anonymous Arden Madill Barrie Bohn Barry & Lorraine Hockin Bernice Nelson Bert & Lynda Lowry Beta Sigma Phi Rho Chapter Blair & Marla Steen Bob & Carolyn Durston Bob & Sharon McCreath BPCF Random Acts of Kindness Brad & Joy Walker Brad Hill Brenda Loewen Brendan Monka Brent & Ginny Collins Brent & Michelle Sorenson Brian McCannell Cameron A. Tumber Carter Schettler Cheryl Beaumont Chris Kulbacki Chris Waddell Clayton Terin Cliff & Eleanor Nicholson Cody Pasowisty

Elizabeth A. Currie Curtis Kostenchuk Dan Mazier Dan Tariff Darian Major Darlene Gillies Darrell & Judy Gabler Dave & Myra Bennet Dave Cochrane Dave Walker Denise Campbell Dennis Magwood Dick & Penny Lee Don & Brenda Kryschuk Don & Kim Denoon Don & Susan Schmall Doreen McLeod Dorothy K Babcock Dorothy M. Smith-Harris Dr. Sandra Norine Wiebe Medical Corporation Dwayne Gardy Eleanor Scott Enns Brothers Provincial Ernie Kuharski Evelyn McConnell Franklin Memorial Hall Association Fred Nelson & Kathie Beach-Nelson Garth & Gail White George & Susan Phillips Gerald E. Mainman Glen & Cindy Tibbett Glenda MacPhee

RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS

Country Meadows PCH ............................................. $750 Neepawa Palliative Care ............................................. $200 Total Random Act of Kindness Grants ................... $2,500

FLOW THROUGH GRANTS

Neepawa Bird Sanctuary ......................................... $1,500 Gaynor Vivian Flow Through Grant The Salvation Army - Neepawa - Food Bank ....... $10,000 Total Flow Through Grants................................ $11,500

NACI YOUTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE GRANTS Country Meadows PCH .............................................. $300 Neepawa Bird Sanctuary Association ...................... $1,000 Neepawa & District Health Centre ............................ $175 The Salvation Army - Neepawa ............................... $1,500 Total NACI Youth Advisory Committee Grants ... $2,975

DESIGNATED FUND GRANTS

Allan Lytle Memorial Fund .......................................... $350 Arts Stabilization—Burrows Trail ................................ $500 Beautiful Plains Museum .......................................... $5,035 Contact MB ‘95— Margaret Laurence Home ............. $225 Country Meadows PCH ........................................... $7,505 Country Meadows PCH Courtyard ............................. $180 IOOF & Rebekahs - Belles, Beaux & Builders 4-H Club .. $220 IOOF & Rebekahs - NACI Band ............................... $1,085 IOOF & Rebekahs - Neepawa Minor Ball ................... $605 Naomi Chapter—Children’s Ward .............................. $210 Neepawa Health Centre ........................................ $48,965 Touchwood Park....................................................... $1,330 Riverside Cemetery..................................................... $195 Community Donor Award ........................................... $500 Eden Scholarship......................................................... $210 Jeff McCannell Memorial Scholarship ........................ $600 Kin Club of Neepawa Scholarship .............................. $315 Mrs. A.K. & Joe Butcher Scholarship ....................... $5,270 NACI Safe Grad Scholarship .................................... $1,180 NARTA Scholarship - NACI ......................................... $200 NARTA Scholarship—William Morton......................... $200 Owen-Sumner Memorial Scholarship ......................... $535 Roy Lewis Memorial Scholarship ............................... $500 Whitmore Family Scholarship .................................. $2,160 Total Designated Fund Grants .......................... $78,075

2020 COMMUNITY FUND DONORS

Grant & Val McKelvy Hector Swanson Helen Mitchell HyLife Foods Ltd. Inga Zahodnik Jack Falk & Donna Black James & Lorraine Griffiths James Boxhall James Pollock Jane MacKeen Janice Clark Janine Hargreaves Jason Cook Jean Ann Rempel Jean Ernest Jeff Cook Jesse & Ashley McCaughan Jim & Lois Aitken Jim & Shelley Graham Jim Schmall Joan Baker Josh McDonald Judi Wolfe Judy Perrett Judy Zeke Justin Pollock Kate Jackman-Atkinson Kathy Jasienczyk Keith & Debbie Jury Kelvin Bell Ken Urquhart Kerrilee Lapointe Kirk Kennedy Lane Englund Leah Sumner Len Kuharski

Leonard & Ann Pritchard Leonard Boychuk Leonard Johnstone Linda Crooks Liz Sumner Lois Hulme LUD Glenella M. Leggatt Mac Buchanan Manitoba Liquor & Lotteries -Neepawa Margaret E. Clarke Margaret Fehr Marie Huxley Marilyn Crewe Mark Husak Marlene Siatecki Mary Weiss Meg Gray Megan McLeod Mervyn Martin Michael T. Mainman Mike & Evelyn Pasosky Family Fund Mr. & Ms. Dale De’Ath Muriel Gamey Muriel, Turner & Audrey McPhail Murray & Linda Hart Murray & Lisa Davie Murray & Marjorie Potter Neepawa Gladstone Coop Neepawa Gladstone Coop - Fuel Good Days - 2020

Neepawa United Church Choir New Hope Health Centre Ltd Norma Rainkie Odile Butterfield Olive Olsufka Patricia Dick Patricia Fedoruk Poettcker Medical Corporation Province of Manitoba Randy Gutierrez Ray Netzel Reg & Sharon Nylen Richard & Sherill Carriere RM of GlenellaLansdowne RM of Rosedale Rob & Norma Somers Robert & Mary Beck Robert Cameron Ron & Dianne Nordstrom Ron & Janice Goldade Ron & Olia Jesson Ron McKee Rosemary Postey Rudy & Isobel Jarema Sandra Worley Sheila Cook Stephane LaPointe Stride Credit Union Stride Credit Union Staff Susan Drayson Sydney Magwood

Sylvia Kuharski Tangled Threads Quilt Guild Terry & Donna Smith Terry Drayson The Winnipeg Foundation Town of Neepawa Trevor Bennett Tyler Rossnagel Ulla Spangen Wayne & Jane Wilson Wayne & Joanne Nelson Wayne Clark Wes Kolesar William & Judith Martin William Nicholson Wilma Gill Yves Gordon IHO Brenda Kryschuk’s hard work and dedication IHO Brent Wilson IHO The 50th Wedding Anniversary of William & Judith Martin IMO Anna Borsa-Janza IMO Anna Tibbet IMO Brenda Enns IMO Cecil Cox IMO Dorothy Babcock IMO Ed Williams

IMO Eleanor Swanson IMO Ida and Ralph Graham IMO Lawrence Hargreaves IMO Lloyd Reidle IMO Norman Martin IMO Orville Tanner IMO Phyllis (Hockin) Stewart IMO Robin Hulme IMO Ron Gray IMO Rosie Tyack IMO Roy McGillivary IMO Susan Drayson IMO Travis Doak IMO Venetta Csversko IMO Wendy Menzies Bob & Sharon McCreath Family Fund Cliff & Eleanor Nicholson Family Fund Hockin Family Fund Howard & Eva Martin Family Fund Jack and Dorothy Nicholson Family Fund Lowry Family Fund Stephen & Jane Goudie Family Fund

Don & Kim Denoon

Wayne & Jane Wilson

2019 COMMUNITY FUND DONORS

2020 DESIGNATED FUND DONATIONS AND DONORS

Jeff McCannell Memorial Scholarship Brian McCannell Roy Lewis Memorial Scholarship Lansdowne Recreation Commission Sumner-Owen Scholarship Liz Sumner Two Small Coins The Milligan Family Gaynor Vivian Flow Through Grant Gaynor Vivian

MB Heritage -Margaret Laurence Home Fund Margaret Laurence Home Committee Keegan Airey Memorial Fund for Youth Sports Harding Community Club Vaughan & Francis Wilson Shelby Colvin Michael Aldcroft & Elizabeth Hiebert Brent & Ginny Collins

Scott & Michelle Gibson Len & Ann Kuharski Ian & Arleigh Wilson David Pope Jason, Jamie, Riley & Cheyenne Davie Sidney & Theresia Lewis Ken & Catherine Charlton Henry & Linda Giesbrecht Garth & Gail White & Family Ian, Sherrie, Kellen & Brooks Hockin

Darlene, Neil, Lisa, Shelby & Braden Gillies Donald & Dawn Curtis Murray & Donna Smith Jack & Marg Kaspick Andrew & Shannon Hockin Jason, Leah, Rylan & Makenna Sumner Doreen Bates Liz Sumner Barry & Lorraine Hockin Scott, Deb, Zach & Tanner Johnson


A10 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021 A11

The Beautiful Plains Community Foundation Inc.

ANNUAL REPORT for the year ending 2020

2020-2021 BOARD OF DIRECTORS President: Brent Sorenson Vice President: Keith Jury Treasurer: Ian Thomson Ann Kuharski Ashley McCaughan Brad Walker Jack Falk Jeffrey Miner Marilyn Crewe Mark Morehouse Sarah Fast

Box 486, Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0 487 Walker Ave. Phone/Fax: 476-2681 Email: info@beautifulplainscf.ca www.beautifulplainscf.ca

SUMMARIZED STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION AS AT DECEMBER 31

Auditor’s Report on Summarized Financial Statement To the Community Members of Beautiful Plains Community 2019 2020 Foundation Inc. Cash 200,253 152,957 Opinion: The summary financial statement, which comprises the Accounts receivable 1,052 615 summarized statement of financial position as at December Prepaid expenses and deposits 353 31, 2020, is derived from the audited financial statements Current portion of investments 144,790 149,788 of Beautiful Plains Community Foundation Inc. (the “Foundation”) for the year ended December 31, 2020. In our Capital Assets 63,773 56,631 opinion, the accompanying summary financial statement is a Investments 3,868,152 4,203,471 fair summary of the audited financial statements. Summary Financial Statement Total Assets 4,278,020 4,563,815 The summary financial statement does not contain all the 3,246 3,664 disclosures required by Canadian accounting standards for Accounts payable not-for-profit organizations. Reading the summary financial Deferred contributions 3,100 statement and the auditor’s report thereon, therefore, is not Cumulative grant commitments 199,251 201,444 a substitute for reading the audited financial statements and Total Liabilities 205,597 205,108 the auditor’s report thereon. The Audited Financial Statements and Our Report Thereon Community fund 1,746,629 1,925,149 We expressed an unmodified audit opinion on the audited Designated fund 2,102,056 2,250,224 financial statements in our report dated May 10, 2021. Management’s Responsibility for the Summary Operating fund 223,738 183,334 Financial Statement 4,072,423 4,358,707 Management is responsible for the preparation of the Total Net Assets summary financial statement in accordance with Canadian 4,278,020 4,563,815 accounting standards for not-for-profit organizations. Auditor’s Responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on whether the summary financial statement is a fair summary of the audited financial statements based on our procedures, which were conducted in accordance with Canadian Auditing Standards (CAS) 810, Engagements to Report on Summary Financial Statements. Yours truly, MNP LLP Neepawa, Manitoba • May 10, 2021

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

2020 has been a year like no other and the same could be said for the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation. In 2020, the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation celebrated our 25th anniversary of providing grants to qualifying organizations within the Town of Neepawa, Rural Municipality of Rosedale, Rural Municipality of Glenella-Lansdowne, and the Langford portion of the Rural Municipality of North Cypress-Langford. Due to the global COVID-19 Pandemic that reached Manitoba in March of 2020, our annual Grant Luncheon was cancelled in 2020, however, we still provided grants and scholarships of $172,850 in 2020 to our communities. Additionally, in 2020, as part of the celebration of our 25th Anniversary, we also held a 25 Days of Giving Draw, where 25 randomly drawn organizations each received a share of $25,000, ranging in amounts from $500 to $5,000. Our 25th Anniversary celebrations did not end there, with a random acts of kindness celebration, where we gave out an additional $2,500 that was awarded to local business supporters of the foundation for the purpose of being granted to a charity or organization of their choice. Furthermore, we also distributed a total of $70,000.00 in funds to area organizations through Community Foundations of Canada grants related to the COVID-19 Global Pandemic. In June of 2020, we saw Shelley Graham complete her 6-year term as a Board Member of the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation. The board would like to thank Shelley for her valuable contributions to the board through our meetings and many community events that she assisted in during her time on the board of the Foundation. Brad Walker concluded his term as the President of the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation in June 2020 as well. Brad’s leadership and guidance through his term as president did not go unnoticed and was greatly appreciated by all who served on the board during that time. In December 2020, we welcomed Sarah Fast as a new board member of the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation. We look forward to her contributions to our board meetings and future community events. As the President of the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation, I am extremely proud of our Board Members for all their contributions this year. This past year has been challenging from a board perspective, having to hold our meetings virtually due to the COVID-19 Health Restrictions. This was a challenge that we all persevered through. Helping guide us all through these times is our Executive Director Brenda Kryschuk. Brenda continues to provide the board with the direction needed for all of us to succeed, while displaying dedication and a strong passion to the success of the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation. Her direction has guided us through these most challenging

times, bringing everyone on the board of directors along to ensure that our meetings can be as productive and efficient as possible during these uncertain times. While the board had plans for multiple events through the course of the 2020 year to celebrate our 25th Anniversary, the COVID-19 Pandemic forced us to cancel many of these events. Despite the cancellation of many of our special events planned for the 2020 year, along with many of those events that everyone has come to know the foundation for hosting, we were able to have another successful year as a foundation, in large part to our supporters. Without the continued support of the community, we would not be in the position we are today, and for that, I sincerely thank you. While we are uncertain of any special events occurring during the 2021 year at this time due to COVID-19, we will be hosting the annual Giving Challenge again in November in conjunction with the support from Endow Manitoba and the Province of Manitoba. Thank you to all of you in our communities who have supported the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation in some way in the past. We look forward to any continued support that you can provide, allowing us to continue to make a difference in our communities every year. Brent Sorenson President

$242,850 IN GRANTS WERE AWARDED IN 2020

COMMUNITY FUND GRANTS

Victoria’s Quilts Canada, Neepawa Chapter ........... $2,500 Neepawa Tourism .................................................... $4,444 Yellowhead Centre ................................................... $6,250 Neepawa & Area Cross Country Ski Club .............. $4,000 Franklin Memorial Hall Association Inc.................... $5,000 Neepawa Theatre Centre ........................................ $6,250 Neepawa Bird Sanctuary ........................................ $7,106 NACTV ..................................................................... $2,000 Beautiful Plains Museum ......................................... $2,750 Margaret Laurence Home ........................................ $7,000 Neepawa Men’s Shed .............................................. $2,000 Neepawa Golf Course & Country Club ................. $12,500 Total Community Fund Grants .......................... $61,800

Neepawa Novas Gymnastics Club........................... $5,000 Burrows Trail Art Council ......................................... $1,172 Neepawa Rec ........................................................... $2,000 Viscount Cultural Council ......................................... $3,142 Emergency Community Support FundsRound 2 Grants ................................................. $30,000

ANNIVERSARY GRANTS

JM Young School...................................................... $1,230 Neepawa & District Drop In Centre ........................ $4,240 Neepawa Middle School .......................................... $9,110 Neepawa Rec ........................................................... $3,530 The Salvation Army - Neepawa ............................... $6,300 Neepawa & District Centennial Project – Yellowhead Centre ................................................. $3,460 Touchwood Park..................................................... $12,130 Emergency Community Support Funds – Round 1 Grants ................................................. $40,000

Arden Ladies Auxillary ............................................. $2,000 Touchwood Park....................................................... $1,000 Neepawa and Area Cross Country Ski Club ............ $2,500 Whitemud Comedy Company .................................... $500 Girl Guides of Canada - Neepawa Unit ................... $1,000 Neepawa and District Disabled Persons Association (Handivan) .............................................................. $1,000 Neepawa Breakfast Club ............................................ $500 Eden Rink & Hall Committee ...................................... $500 The Salvation Army - Neepawa .................................. $500 Riding Mountain Curling Club .................................... $500 Neepawa Area Men’s Shed...................................... $1,000 Neepawa Bird Sanctuary ............................................ $750 Neepawa & District Centennial Project ...................... $750 Neepawa & Area Palliative Care................................. $500 Brookdale Community Centre ................................. $1,000 Neepawa Minor Baseball Softball Association ........ $1,000 Rotary Club of Neepawa ............................................ $750 Polonia Community Hall Committee .......................... $500 Neepawa & District Drop In Centre ........................... $750 Neepawa Lions Club ................................................... $500 Burrows Trail Art Council ............................................ $500 YSDI - Neepawa Curling Rink ..................................... $750 Neepawa & Area 4H Beef Club .................................. $500 Neepawa Golf & Country Club ................................... $750 Neepawa & District Fine Arts Festival..................... $5,000 Total Anniversary Grants ................................... $25,000

The Salvation Army - Neepawa ............................... $6,286 Touchwood Park....................................................... $5,000 Beautiful Plains School Division ............................... $5,400 HAND ....................................................................... $2,000

The Salvation Army - Neepawa .................................. $400 BPCF............................................................................ $200 Neepawa Wildlife Association ................................... $200 Neepawa Health Centre ............................................. $550 Lansdowne Rec Commission ...................................... $200

BUILD 150 GRANTS

Yellowhead Centre ................................................... $6,250 Franklin Memorial Hall Association Inc.................... $5,000 Neepawa Theatre Centre ........................................ $3,750 Beautiful Plains Museum ......................................... $2,750 Neepawa Bird Sanctuary ......................................... $2,250 Total Build 150 Grants ...................................... $20,000

EMERGENCY COMMUNITY SUPPORT FUNDS- ROUND 1 GRANTS

EMERGENCY COMMUNITY SUPPORT FUNDS- ROUND 2 GRANTS

2020 NACI Grad Committee Adam Farr Adrian & Sharon de Groot Alan Goddard Alison J. Campbell Ann Nielsen Anonymous Arden Madill Barrie Bohn Barry & Lorraine Hockin Bernice Nelson Bert & Lynda Lowry Beta Sigma Phi Rho Chapter Blair & Marla Steen Bob & Carolyn Durston Bob & Sharon McCreath BPCF Random Acts of Kindness Brad & Joy Walker Brad Hill Brenda Loewen Brendan Monka Brent & Ginny Collins Brent & Michelle Sorenson Brian McCannell Cameron A. Tumber Carter Schettler Cheryl Beaumont Chris Kulbacki Chris Waddell Clayton Terin Cliff & Eleanor Nicholson Cody Pasowisty

Elizabeth A. Currie Curtis Kostenchuk Dan Mazier Dan Tariff Darian Major Darlene Gillies Darrell & Judy Gabler Dave & Myra Bennet Dave Cochrane Dave Walker Denise Campbell Dennis Magwood Dick & Penny Lee Don & Brenda Kryschuk Don & Kim Denoon Don & Susan Schmall Doreen McLeod Dorothy K Babcock Dorothy M. Smith-Harris Dr. Sandra Norine Wiebe Medical Corporation Dwayne Gardy Eleanor Scott Enns Brothers Provincial Ernie Kuharski Evelyn McConnell Franklin Memorial Hall Association Fred Nelson & Kathie Beach-Nelson Garth & Gail White George & Susan Phillips Gerald E. Mainman Glen & Cindy Tibbett Glenda MacPhee

RANDOM ACTS OF KINDNESS

Country Meadows PCH ............................................. $750 Neepawa Palliative Care ............................................. $200 Total Random Act of Kindness Grants ................... $2,500

FLOW THROUGH GRANTS

Neepawa Bird Sanctuary ......................................... $1,500 Gaynor Vivian Flow Through Grant The Salvation Army - Neepawa - Food Bank ....... $10,000 Total Flow Through Grants................................ $11,500

NACI YOUTH ADVISORY COMMITTEE GRANTS Country Meadows PCH .............................................. $300 Neepawa Bird Sanctuary Association ...................... $1,000 Neepawa & District Health Centre ............................ $175 The Salvation Army - Neepawa ............................... $1,500 Total NACI Youth Advisory Committee Grants ... $2,975

DESIGNATED FUND GRANTS

Allan Lytle Memorial Fund .......................................... $350 Arts Stabilization—Burrows Trail ................................ $500 Beautiful Plains Museum .......................................... $5,035 Contact MB ‘95— Margaret Laurence Home ............. $225 Country Meadows PCH ........................................... $7,505 Country Meadows PCH Courtyard ............................. $180 IOOF & Rebekahs - Belles, Beaux & Builders 4-H Club .. $220 IOOF & Rebekahs - NACI Band ............................... $1,085 IOOF & Rebekahs - Neepawa Minor Ball ................... $605 Naomi Chapter—Children’s Ward .............................. $210 Neepawa Health Centre ........................................ $48,965 Touchwood Park....................................................... $1,330 Riverside Cemetery..................................................... $195 Community Donor Award ........................................... $500 Eden Scholarship......................................................... $210 Jeff McCannell Memorial Scholarship ........................ $600 Kin Club of Neepawa Scholarship .............................. $315 Mrs. A.K. & Joe Butcher Scholarship ....................... $5,270 NACI Safe Grad Scholarship .................................... $1,180 NARTA Scholarship - NACI ......................................... $200 NARTA Scholarship—William Morton......................... $200 Owen-Sumner Memorial Scholarship ......................... $535 Roy Lewis Memorial Scholarship ............................... $500 Whitmore Family Scholarship .................................. $2,160 Total Designated Fund Grants .......................... $78,075

2020 COMMUNITY FUND DONORS

Grant & Val McKelvy Hector Swanson Helen Mitchell HyLife Foods Ltd. Inga Zahodnik Jack Falk & Donna Black James & Lorraine Griffiths James Boxhall James Pollock Jane MacKeen Janice Clark Janine Hargreaves Jason Cook Jean Ann Rempel Jean Ernest Jeff Cook Jesse & Ashley McCaughan Jim & Lois Aitken Jim & Shelley Graham Jim Schmall Joan Baker Josh McDonald Judi Wolfe Judy Perrett Judy Zeke Justin Pollock Kate Jackman-Atkinson Kathy Jasienczyk Keith & Debbie Jury Kelvin Bell Ken Urquhart Kerrilee Lapointe Kirk Kennedy Lane Englund Leah Sumner Len Kuharski

Leonard & Ann Pritchard Leonard Boychuk Leonard Johnstone Linda Crooks Liz Sumner Lois Hulme LUD Glenella M. Leggatt Mac Buchanan Manitoba Liquor & Lotteries -Neepawa Margaret E. Clarke Margaret Fehr Marie Huxley Marilyn Crewe Mark Husak Marlene Siatecki Mary Weiss Meg Gray Megan McLeod Mervyn Martin Michael T. Mainman Mike & Evelyn Pasosky Family Fund Mr. & Ms. Dale De’Ath Muriel Gamey Muriel, Turner & Audrey McPhail Murray & Linda Hart Murray & Lisa Davie Murray & Marjorie Potter Neepawa Gladstone Coop Neepawa Gladstone Coop - Fuel Good Days - 2020

Neepawa United Church Choir New Hope Health Centre Ltd Norma Rainkie Odile Butterfield Olive Olsufka Patricia Dick Patricia Fedoruk Poettcker Medical Corporation Province of Manitoba Randy Gutierrez Ray Netzel Reg & Sharon Nylen Richard & Sherill Carriere RM of GlenellaLansdowne RM of Rosedale Rob & Norma Somers Robert & Mary Beck Robert Cameron Ron & Dianne Nordstrom Ron & Janice Goldade Ron & Olia Jesson Ron McKee Rosemary Postey Rudy & Isobel Jarema Sandra Worley Sheila Cook Stephane LaPointe Stride Credit Union Stride Credit Union Staff Susan Drayson Sydney Magwood

Sylvia Kuharski Tangled Threads Quilt Guild Terry & Donna Smith Terry Drayson The Winnipeg Foundation Town of Neepawa Trevor Bennett Tyler Rossnagel Ulla Spangen Wayne & Jane Wilson Wayne & Joanne Nelson Wayne Clark Wes Kolesar William & Judith Martin William Nicholson Wilma Gill Yves Gordon IHO Brenda Kryschuk’s hard work and dedication IHO Brent Wilson IHO The 50th Wedding Anniversary of William & Judith Martin IMO Anna Borsa-Janza IMO Anna Tibbet IMO Brenda Enns IMO Cecil Cox IMO Dorothy Babcock IMO Ed Williams

IMO Eleanor Swanson IMO Ida and Ralph Graham IMO Lawrence Hargreaves IMO Lloyd Reidle IMO Norman Martin IMO Orville Tanner IMO Phyllis (Hockin) Stewart IMO Robin Hulme IMO Ron Gray IMO Rosie Tyack IMO Roy McGillivary IMO Susan Drayson IMO Travis Doak IMO Venetta Csversko IMO Wendy Menzies Bob & Sharon McCreath Family Fund Cliff & Eleanor Nicholson Family Fund Hockin Family Fund Howard & Eva Martin Family Fund Jack and Dorothy Nicholson Family Fund Lowry Family Fund Stephen & Jane Goudie Family Fund

Don & Kim Denoon

Wayne & Jane Wilson

2019 COMMUNITY FUND DONORS

2020 DESIGNATED FUND DONATIONS AND DONORS

Jeff McCannell Memorial Scholarship Brian McCannell Roy Lewis Memorial Scholarship Lansdowne Recreation Commission Sumner-Owen Scholarship Liz Sumner Two Small Coins The Milligan Family Gaynor Vivian Flow Through Grant Gaynor Vivian

MB Heritage -Margaret Laurence Home Fund Margaret Laurence Home Committee Keegan Airey Memorial Fund for Youth Sports Harding Community Club Vaughan & Francis Wilson Shelby Colvin Michael Aldcroft & Elizabeth Hiebert Brent & Ginny Collins

Scott & Michelle Gibson Len & Ann Kuharski Ian & Arleigh Wilson David Pope Jason, Jamie, Riley & Cheyenne Davie Sidney & Theresia Lewis Ken & Catherine Charlton Henry & Linda Giesbrecht Garth & Gail White & Family Ian, Sherrie, Kellen & Brooks Hockin

Darlene, Neil, Lisa, Shelby & Braden Gillies Donald & Dawn Curtis Murray & Donna Smith Jack & Marg Kaspick Andrew & Shannon Hockin Jason, Leah, Rylan & Makenna Sumner Doreen Bates Liz Sumner Barry & Lorraine Hockin Scott, Deb, Zach & Tanner Johnson


A12 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021

Kinsmen Kourts hires new executive director, starts fundraising campaign By Kira Paterson Neepawa Banner & Press Kinsmen Kourts 2 is getting prepared for its eventual opening. Neepawa Kinsmen Senior Citizens Incorporated has now hired an executive director for the new seniors housing complex and a fundraising campaign has begun to help pay for furnishing the facility. Dana Menzies is the new executive director for Kinsmen Kourts 1 and 2, the latter of which is still under construction. Menzies is coming into this job after working at Country Meadows Personal Care Home for eight years. “Seniors, I’ve always said, is my passion and that’s why I came to this role, just because I wanted to advance my career with seniors and especially in our Neepawa community,” she stated. Although the new facility isn’t scheduled to open until the fall, there is still lots for Menzies to work on in the meantime. “Right now, I’m kind of touching base with some of the applicants that have already put in their ap-

PHOTO BY KIRA PATERSON

The Kinsmen Kourts 2 building, as it appeared on June 15. Construction has been going steady, with its opening currently expected this fall. Stucco is currently being applied to the exterior, with the left side of the building showing a near-finished product.

plication, just to give them an update on how things are progressing and what we’re gearing up towards and now I’m trying to do a lot more with our fundraising campaign,” she explained.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

One of the fresh poured Gypcrete floors inside the Kinsmen Kourts 2 building.

“Otherwise, just developing what we’re going to need to do as far as the assisted living component, as far as job postings and kind of figuring out what we’re really going to need in order to open this facility.” One of Menzies’ main focuses right now is looking for an executive chef for the new complex, as there will be a restaurant in the building, with a meal plan included in the rent for residents. “That’s going to be a big part of this building,” she expressed. Applications are now being accepted for the position. Come fall, when Kinsmen Kourts 2 is up and running, Menzies will be looking after a lot of the regular activity in the place. “I’ll be responsible for all the day to day functions, as far as the residents and if they’re happy. I’ll be in charge of the staff for the housekeeping and the laundry and recreation,” she stated.

Fundraising for furnishings While the actual construction of Kinsmen Kou-

rts 2 has been sorted out financially, there are a lot of other expenses that will need to be covered to finish

210646m0

the space. The Beautiful Plains Community Foundation donated $12,575 to help kick off the facility’s fundraising efforts to furnish the space. “On behalf of the Neepawa Kinsmen Senior Citizens Incorporated, we are very appreciative of the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation,” Menzies stated. “Our goal is to raise $300,000 locally and this grant is just a reflection of our generous community.” She added that they’ve reached out to the surrounding municipalities and Neepawa area organizations to request support. “We hope that other community members will be just as generous and support us in our project. We are using these donations to purchase furnishings, recreation and landscaping and it’s just a big project that we’re really excited about and it’s going to benefit our community immensely.” Continued on Page A15


NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021 A13

‘We cannot Road repair underway in Neepawa breach the public Micro-sealing planned for large portions of Brown Avenue health order’ Neepawa clarifies situation on gatherings and COVID restrictions

By Eoin Devereux

Neepawa Banner & Press

Neepawa’s municipal office has received many calls as of late related to the current COVID-19 regulations and just how they would impact the upcoming high school graduation. With the existing provincially mandated restrictions scheduled to remain in place until at least Saturday, June 26, there has been uncertainty surrounding what types of festivities can or cannot take place. Because of that, a group of parents and supporters have enquired about what can be done in celebration of the student’s achievements. During the most recent town council meeting, held on Tuesday, June 15, chief administrative officer Colleen Synchyshyn clarified just where the situation with celebrations, such as a parade, for example, currently stands. “We certainly feel for a lot of these people who feel that they cannot celebrate,” said Synchyshyn. “The bottom line is, there is a section in the public health orders that clearly s pea k s to g at her i ng s. So if you are all coming together for the same purpose and same intent, it’s called a gathering. It doesn’t matter if you are standing six feet apart anymore, it’s a gathering. Not to pick on grad, it’s just the most recent example. But, coming in separate cars, keeping sepa rate a nd wea r i ng mask; if you are asked why you are there, you are

there for grad. And if there are 100 families there for grad, it’s a gathering. It doesn’t matter if it’s 10 people, we cannot breach the public health order.” Clarifying the point In a response to a request for clarification on that point from the Banner & Press, Synchyshyn indicated that, as of Monday, June 21, the Town had not received any request for a street closure for the purposes of a parade, but for isolating a block of street to host a grand march and pictures. Synchyshyn noted that from a liability standpoint, the Town of Neepawa cannot approve any type of mass gatherings. “Simply put, in t he instance that the Town authorizes the closure of a public street, this would be viewed as approving a nd enc ou r a g i n g t he organizing of an event to promote a gathering. As a result, Council would be placing the Town in a position of liability by closing the street and we cannot engage in actions that would place the Town in a position of liability or non-compliance with Public Health.” T he st r ic t er publ ic hea lt h order s , put i n place back in April, only permitted outdoor gatherings of up to 10 people in public outdoor spaces only. A “gathering” has been defined as a grouping of people in general proximity to each other who have assembled for a common pur pose or reason.

Dr. Gerard Murray Optometrist 418 Mountain Ave. ~ Neepawa •Evening Appointments Available•

PHONE: 476-5919

PHOTO BY DIANE WARNER

The process of micro-sealing Brown Avenue in Neepawa began on Tuesday, June 22, as West-Can Seal Coating started near the post office building.

By Eoin Devereux

Neepawa Banner & Press

The planned microsurfacing of about 20,000 square metres of road in Neepawa has begun. On Tuesday, June 15, WestCan Seal Coating Inc, the company selected to do the work, recently informed mayor Blake McCutcheon that barring any unforeseen circumstances, they would be able to start work within the community very shortly. On Tuesday, June 22, preliminary work and evaluation on the road by West-Can employees had started. The areas of road that West-Can are working on include Brown Avenue, between Hospital Street and Adelaide Crescent and Hamilton Street, from Walker Avenue to the bridge near Broadway Avenue. A section of Brown near the Flats will not be part of the micro-surfacing plans, as severe washouts can minimize the micro-seal’s ability to properly adhere. That section will actually be repaved, though the work will be happening at a later date.

Micro surfacing is a ‘surface treatment’ for roads. It is laid over the top of the existing surface to seal and protect it. It consists of a water-based mix of stones and bitumen which is spread over the existing surface by a special machine. The cost of the work will be $209,200 plus applicable taxes Paperwork for Park Lake Town officials recently met with Stantec, the Alberta based engineering services company that will lead the Park Lake restoration project. In an update to town council, administration indicated that for the work to proceed, up to a dozen permit requirements will need to be met through the Canadian Dam Association and other agencies. Those licensing and permit efforts are already well underway, but are still expected to extend into the winter Can you spare a chair? The Town of Neepawa has been asked if it can assist in furnishing the community’s newest senior’s living

Congratulations on your Retirement! Thank you for your dedication and hard work, you deserve the best retirement ever. Cherish every moment and have fun! Please join the Municipality of McCreary to celebrate

Wendy Turko’s 28 years of service. A Come and Go will be held on Wednesday June 30, 2021 from 1:00 until 3:00 p.m. at the Municipal Office located at 432 1st Ave., McCreary, Manitoba All are welcome to attend. Due to the COVID-19 Pandemic the Municipality of McCreary will be following all Public Health Guidelines and Orders. Please RSVP by telephoning 204-835-2309 or emailing municipality@mccreary.ca

facility. Administration and Council recently reviewed a letter from the executive director for the Neepawa Kinsmen Senior Citizens Housing Inc. The correspondences asks if there was funding available to help with the furnishing of Kinsmen Kourts Two, an assisted living residence under construction on the 200 block of Davidson Street. The construction of the building itself has been covered through a CMHC mortgage, but the decor, including furnishings, wall hangings, exercise equipment, recreation supplies and landscaping, is not. The total cost for those amenities is estimated at around $300,000. Community fundraising has been taking place and is ongoing, but to date, has not been enough to cover the total amount needed. Council will review the request at a later date. The Town of Neepawa has previously supported the housing project through the sale of the former Resource Centre land to Kinsmen for parking. That land was sold at half its assessed value.

Bray Farms subdivision The owners of land most likely known to many in Neepawa as the “Chicken Barn” property, has asked for a change to its designation. Bray Farms Ltd. has requested a subdivision to a portion of its lot located just of Westward Ford. The intent of the request is to create a 3.44 acre lot for commercial use. The property is currently designated as commercial highway. Counci l approved t he request. OPTOMETRISTS

DR. R. P. ASHCROFT DR. K. VANDERHEYDEN DR. J. MILLS Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 115-2nd Ave., N.W. Dauphin, MB NEW PATIENTS WELCOME CALL FOR APPOINTMENTS

204-638-3223 Turn the page for even more news!

Valley Optical Dr. Perkins Greg Perkins Dr. Greg Dr. Derek Papegnies Dr. Derek Papegnies Optometrists Optometrists

Mountain 499499 Mountain Ave.Ave.

& District Wellness Centre) Beautiful Plains Community Medical Inc. (Neepawa & District Wellness Centre) Beautiful(Neepawa Plains Community Medical Clinic Inc.Clinic

For appointment please For appointment please call: call:

476-2002 476-2002


A14 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS

Carberry/North Cypress-Langford

Opinion: Time to get their act together

Continued from Page A7 As the number of fully immunized people increases, they expect to be relieved of most virus restrictions. Fifteen months of isolation and restrictions followed by appointments to get vaccine doses must have a reward. I favour fire pits in public parks where immunized people can burn their face masks and hug their friends. It is irrelevant whether my friend is immunized or not – he or she cannot infect me with serious consequences. Our governments say so. As the number of immunized people increases, the relevance of social distancing and face masks decreases. We can’t have it both ways. Medical people are now whining about a coronavirus delta variant that is allegedly more easily transmitted from person to person and makes people sicker, quicker. It is discouraging that this cable of clowns appears incapable of learning. Since they failed to contain the original coronavirus, what makes them think they can deal with the variant? They are not going to revert to the failed COVID strategy. They had their 15 minutes of tyranny, and it is over forever. It is time for health care experts and politicians to get their act together. The 15 month COVID gong-show is proof that they are hopelessly incompetent. It should come as no surprise that the COVID containment strategy was hatched by the Privy Council Office arm of the Prime Minister’s Office – the same PCO twisting the arm of the Attorney General to give the crooks at SNC-Lavalin a break. We can be confident that the PMO has used federal borrowing power as a lever to keep the provinces on side. But, like any other organization with a dismal leadership lacking in ethics and principles, our federal government is rotten from the head down. Remember that when you vote. Disclaimer: John Feldsted is a political commentator, consultant & strategist based in Winnipeg. The views expressed in this column are the writer’s personal views and are not to be taken as being the view of the Banner & Press staff.

Letter: What more do we want?

Continued from Page A5 Ivermectin sounds a lot like a Trumpian remedy. You remember those, don’t you? Drink bleach and shove a bright light up your rectum. How stupid can people get? No. Please don’t answer that... Let it come as a surprise. A religious friend told me recently that God had sent a messenger with full information to cure cancer. Unfortunately, when the mother discovered that she was pregnant, she had the messenger aborted. And then there was the pastor down in the Bible Belt who was caught in a severe flood. He retreated to his rooftop, where a Police Boat found him. But he insisted that God was looking after him and sent the police away. The next day, a fire boat offered help, but he turned them away. On day three, a helicopter appeared, but he still refused help. The water rose higher and the pastor was drowned. When he met God face to face, he protested that God had promised to look after him. God replied, “I sent the police, the firemen and a helicopter. What more did you want?” Through science, God very promptly sent us a vaccine for COVID-19. What more do we want? Leonard Paramor, Arden, MB

JUNE 25, 2021

Here and there

By Gladwyn Scott Neepawa Banner & Press

• Carberry Collegiate 2021 class valedictorians Zara Dickson and Griffin Adriaansen, elected by the graduates, will speak early in the exercises Monday, June 28. Carberry Collegiate graduation can be viewed on the school’s website. 9:00 to 10:00 am will be the ceremony itself, followed by individual graduates receiving their diplomas from 10:30 am to 6:00 pm. Award winners will be listed in next week’s Banner & Press. See photos of the valedictorians on Page A20. • Sporting events and organizers have been badly stymied over the last 15 months. However, several large events are trying to make future plans to restart. Largest and most relevant are the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, which are scheduled for Japan July 23 to Aug. 8, in spite of tremendous issues, especially COVID-19, and very low vaccination rates in that country. The Canadian Football League starts its season Aug. 5 in Winnipeg, with the Blue Bombers meeting the Hamilton Tiger-Cats and ends with the Grey Cup Dec. 12 in Hamilton. Each team is slated for 14 games instead of 18 and minimum salaries were lowered from $65,000 to $50,000. The Western Hockey League is slated to start a 68 game schedule on Oct. 1. There will be no interlocking games between the Eastern and Western Conferences. Manitoba has two teams, the Brandon Wheat Kings and the Winnipeg Ice, in the WHL.

Kyle Nixon, formerly of Russell, has signed on as head coach of the U15 male Pilot Mound Academy team for the 2021-22 season. He has taught physical education in Stonewall, played hockey with Swan Lake in the Tiger Hills League and baseball with the Neepawa Cubs in the Santa Clara League. Recently, he completed his Masters of Education in Coaching Studies with the University of Victoria. In Stanley Cup playoffs, the Vegas Golden Knights, with 18,000 rabid fans and several Manitobans ie. Kelly McCrimmon, Mark Stone, Ryan Reaves, and Zach Whitecloud, split the first two games with the Montreal Canadiens, who have a Westman defender, Joel Edmundson. • Congratulations to Jim Schmall and Gerald Buchanan, who recently received their 60-year membership pins with Neepawa Elks from Les Walker, Exalted Ruler of the Manitoba Elks. Six decades of community service is quite impressive! Jim and Gerald are former members of the Neepawa Cubs (1955-60), who were inducted into the Manitoba Baseball Hall of Fame at Morden in 2007. • American President, Joe Biden, signed a recent bill which marked the official end of slavery on June 19, 1865. This will be an official holiday annually in the USA, even though 41 Republicans voted against the Emancipation Bill. Galveston, Texas was the last area to hear the good news. Although many slaves were still shot when they tried to leave their plantations.

New minister ordained, arrives in Carberry

By Gladwyn Scott

Neepawa Banner & Press

Carberry’s new United Church minister, Emma Seamone, who was ordained in an impressive ceremony at Moncton’s Mount Royal Church June 14, arrives in Winnipeg July 1. The ordination service, which was viewed on

LEN’S

Box 5, Site 400, R.R.1 Brandon MB R7A 5Y1

Zoom, concluded when her husband, Jason, presented her with a beautiful stole and a huge hug. Mrs. Seamone graduated with a Masters of Divinity degree from the Atlantic School of Theology in Halifax after five years of study and preaching in three small communities in New Brunswick. Previously,

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Emma obtained a four year Science degree, majoring in Environmental Science, at Acadia University (Wolfville, Nova Scotia), which included four months in 2008 at Brandon Research Station. A soprano, she enjoys singing and toured England and Scotland with Acadia Chapel Choir in 2006. Her

first service in Carberry will be in August. Jason Seamone, who graduated with a degree in Communications from the University of New Brunswick, and Emma will quarantine for two weeks in Carberry. Carberry is fortunate to attract a talented, young couple for the United Church manse.

Effective June 30, 2021, Michael Davids will be practicing as

MJ Davids Law Office

at Office 1 - 341 Mountain Avenue, (above Team Electronics) Neepawa.

Mike will continue to provide residents and businesses in the Neepawa area with courtroom and advocacy services, including family law and civil litigation.

MJ Davids Law Office

Box 396. Neepawa, MB. R0J 1H0 Phone: 204-476-5347 • Fax: 204-476-5362 email: mike@mjdl.ca • angela@mjdl.ca

Think the Banner & Press only has local news? Think again! You can pick up the paper to get your weekly news, find a new recipe, look for jobs, go house hunting, even scout out upcoming events or sales in the area!


NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021 A15

Construction coming along for Kinsmen Kourts 2 Continued from Page A12 Grant Luk in, board president, added that any donations made will be tax deductible. “I know we have a good community here to raise funds and we’re really in need, we’ve never really asked for any funding for the project, so we’re hoping that the community can get together and raise our $300,000 so we can finalize the building,” Lukin stated. Construction progress As far as where the project is at in the construction process, there is still lots of work going on. “It’s a little behind schedule, but hopefully we’ll get it back on track over the next month or so, if the weather stays good,” Lukin stated. He noted that the outside stucco is still in process, which is about an eight-week project. Inside, the drywall is going up and Lukin explained that that’s a big undertaking, as all the walls will be three layers thick. “We’re all boarded up to, I think,

PHOTO BY KIRA PATERSON

The Beautiful Plains Community foundation donated $12,575 to Kinsmen Kourts 2 on June 15 to aid with furnishing. Pictured from left: Kinsmen member Perry Snedden, BPCF board member Brad Walker, Kinsmen Kourts 2 executive director Dana Menzies, Kinsmen Kourts board chair Grant Lukin and Kinsmen member Tom Borsa.

the third floor,” he shared. “The lower level, the basement, is actually painted. Some of the frames and doors are painted.” Lukin added that the drywall in the main floor is on hold at the moment, waiting on some ducting, but they’re busy drywalling, taping and mudding in the rest of the

building. The facility will have 48 suites, 15 of which will be subsidized to offer lower rates. Each suite has one bedroom, a bathroom and a kitchenette and apartment sizes vary from 450 to about 560 square feet. Prices range from just over $1,700 a month to over $2,800,

depending on which suite and if it will be one person or a couple living there. All utilities and services are included in the monthly rental fees. The building has shared laundry facilities on each living floor, as well as commercial laundry in the basement. Meals will be provided from the res-

taurant on the main floor, while that floor also houses recreational space. Menzies noted that there have already been 42 applications put in requesting a suite, so anyone interested shouldn’t hesitate to put in an application. Even those who are only just considering the possibility can put

in an application, because they aren’t obligated to take a suite if they later decide they don’t want to. Anyone interested in applying can call (431) 351-0611, email kinsmenkourts2@yahoo. com or visit the website kinsmenkourts2.ca to get an application form.

TAYLOR LAW OFFICE Taylor & Cummings

Taylor Law Office

Charlie Taylor and his wife, Vicky, moved from Winnipeg to Neepawa in 1975 when Charlie joined Hersh Lerner and Dale Brawn’s law firm. When both Lerner and Brawn went their separate ways, Bob Cummings joined up with Charlie to form Taylor & Cummings Law Office.

As the business thrived and more staff were hired to keep up to demand, Taylor Law Office expanded to our current location, 269 Hamilton Street, in 2009.

(The Past)

Taylor Law

Patersons LLP (The Future)

(The Present)

Bob Cummings eventually went on to become a Judge and Charlie decided to go solo and carry on business as Taylor Law Office. Taylor Law Office operated out of the original location at 294 Hamilton Street until 2009. Michael Davids joined the law staff in 2001, practicing mainly in the area of family law.

Sarah Fast joined the team of lawyers in 2016, initially as an Articling Student. Sarah was called to the Bar in 2017 and will remain a practicing lawyer with the firm going forward. Taylor Law Office currently employs three lawyers and six support staff. In July, 2021, Michael Davids will be leaving Taylor Law Office to open his own firm, M.J. Davids Law Office, in the Team Electronics building.

Taylor Law Office is very excited to announce that on July 1, 2021, we will be entering into a partnership with Patersons LLP law firm from Brandon. This partnering of firms will enable us to continue to expand upon the quality legal services offered by our firm, including real estate, wills and estates, corporate law, civil litigation and family law. Charlie Taylor will always have an office within the new firm and will remain on staff as a marketing manager. So while he may not be seeing as many clients, he will still be providing us with his own special brand of expertise. Taylor Law Patersons LLP is proud to honor the legacy created by Charlie over the past 40 + years.

Charles D. Taylor B.A., LLB. • Sarah J. Fast, B. Comm. (Hons), J.D.

204-476-2336

269 Hamilton St. Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0


A16 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021

Classifieds –––––––––– Thank You My deep appreciation to the ambulance attendants, doctors, nurses, nurses aids and all the support staff at the Brandon, Neepawa, Grace and Portage Hospitals. To friends and family, sincere thanks for the cards, flowers, donations and good wishes. Florence Kerr

–––––––––– Personal Crisis Pregnancy Centre Winnipeg: Need to talk? Call our free help line, 1-800-6650570 or contact our Westman office: 204-727-6161

–––––––––– Auctions

Meyers Auctions & Appraisals. Call Brad at 368-2333. www.meyersauctions.com

In Memory

Ruth Wallman

January 31, 1920 - June 17, 2000 Lovingly remembered by all her family.

Obituary Brent Mitchell With deep sadness and broken hearts, Brendan and Michael, along with their mother, Cheryl, struggle to announce the sudden passing of their loving father, Brent Mitchel, on June 14, 2021. He leaves to mourn his passing: his loving parents Joe and Agnes Mitchell, siblings Scott (Christa), Donna (Rob), Shelley (Richard), nephews and nieces, aunts and uncles and many very close family and friends. Family and friendships were extremely important to Brent. Brent always had an interest in carpentry, completing his journeyman red seal in Brandon in 1981. He invested his love and passion in the trade his entire life, building Sunspaces Canada Inc. Brent’s travels across Canada for various jobs over the years, along with his vibrant and infectious personality, allowed him to meet and maintain many lifetime friends. If you were privileged to meet Brent, you will know that his zest for life and love of a good joke was what you will always remember, along with his famous knee slap or watching him playing the spoons. Brent followed in his father’s footsteps and was a member of the Masonic Lodge in Neepawa. He was also a highly respected member of the Longbow Lake Volunteer Fire Brigade for many years and always looked forward to the social get-togethers with his fellow firefirefighters, which really touched his heart. Brent was recognized around the lake area by his many different clothing pieces he wore advertising the fire brigade. Brent loved the peace and tranquility of the lake, spending every summer of his youth at his family’s cottage at Clear Lake, which is where his passion and love for the lake began. As a young man, with a push from his Uncle Norm and Aunt Pat, he was determined to have a piece of property at Lake of the Woods, ON, which he first acquired in 1995. Since that time, Brent has helped an enormous number of people make their dreams come true by assisting in constructing many dream cottages along the lake, including one for his own family, which he recently completed. The lake was his dream place; it captured his heart. Brent’s drive through life was to work hard to be able to provide a place at the lake he could share with his boys. Brent can be remembered zooming around the lake in his pontoon boat with the music playing loudly and the laughs of those on board ringing throughout the lake; he lived life to the fullest. Hold your memories of Brent close to your heart, as they last forever. He was a genuine and kind soul that will be missed by everyone he met. In memory of Brent, if you so wish, donations can be made to the Lake Volunteer Fire Brigade, Longbow Lake Post Office, Longbow Lake, ON. P0X 1H0. Brendan, Michael and Cheryl would like to thank everyone for their outpouring of support and kindness at a time that has been incredibly difficult. Your stories of Brent will remain in our hearts.

Classified Ad Deadline:

To place an ad:

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• Cancellations and corrections only within business hours and corresponding deadlines • Please check your ad when first published the Neepawa Banner & Press will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. • All copy is subject to approval by the Neepawa Banner & Press. • We reserve the right to edit copy or to refuse to publish any advertisement we deem illegal, libelous, misleading or offensive

–––––––––– Notice

–––––––––– Notice

–––––––––– For Sale

Alcoholics Anonymous meetings postponed. Call 204841-0002 _____________________ Arden Hall, cap. 255. Park, camping and sports facilities, rink, curling ice, kitchen and lounge. Call 204-368-2202

Neepawa Banner & Press offers full research and re-print services from our archives that go back to 1896. Additional copies of papers, $2 each depending on availability. Re-print of a page from past copies, $2 per page. Archival research, $25 per hour with a $10 minimum. Individual photos on photo paper $5 depending if we have a suitable original in our digital, print or photo archives. Ken Waddell, publisher

Cemetery plot for sale in Neepawa. $1000 OBO. 204-841-8020

–––––––––– Notice

KINSMEN KOURT 2 assisted living for seniors is now accepting applications for residency. Pick up an application at Stride Credit Union Neepawa, to be mailed back to Box 1842 Neepawa or the applications can be found on the website www. kinsmenkourts2.ca or email kinsmenkourts2@yahoo. com For further information call 431-351-0611

–––––––––– Help Wanted

Handy person, mechanically inclined to do minor repairs and maintenance on trucks and trailers etc. Contact Roy at Anderson Sand and Gravel. 204-385-2685 Gladstone.

–––––––––– For Rent

71 Main St. Neepawa, 3 bedroom, 1 bath, living room, dining room, 4 appliances. Available July1, 2021. Call 204-212-2331 _____________________ Apartment for rent. Bri-Mont apartments, 331 Mountain Avenue. Phone 204-8411425

–––––––––– For Sale or Rent

Storage vans (semi trailers) for rent or sale. Anderson's 204-385-2685, 204-3852997 Gladstone.

204-476-3401/ 888-436-4242 204-476-5073 ads@neepawabanner.com

All word classifieds must be prepaid before printing

Help Wanted Jarvis Trucking Ltd, Gladstone, MB.

Full-time position available for a

TIRE TECHNICIAN/ SERVICE TRUCK OPERATOR

In shop and roadside tire service for farm, truck and passenger/light truck. Willing to train the right individual. Please call Dale or Liz at 204-447-3336 for more information or submit resume to Integra Tire Ste. Rose Box 106, Ste. Rose du Lac, MB R0L 1S0 tireman1@mymts.net. 204-447-3226 Fx

Thank You

Class 1 drivers & Owner Operators Operating super B grain hoppers, prairie provinces only. Contact Steve, 204-385-3048 or 204-871-5139 Email kjarvisfarms@gmail.com

HARRIS PHARMACY

FULL TIME CASHIER 4 week schedule, 2 Saturdays per month No evenings, Sundays and holidays closed Mail applications to: Harris Pharmacy, Box 416, Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0 Or drop off in person at 424 Mountain Ave, Neepawa, MB Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

FOODS Meat Cutters/Production Personnel

We wish to thank all who reached out to our family in these difficult times either through text messages, phone calls, cards, flowers, food or donations to the Alzheimer’s Society after the passing of our Dad, Lawrence Olson. Your thoughtfulness and support is very much appreciated. Thanks to Wendy Denbow for officiating and to Clarke’s Funeral Home for their compassionate guidance to ensure such a special service during Covid restrictions. Dad would have been pleased. Gayle & Colin Gowan Heather & Laurie Kirkland & families

Our sincere “Thank you” to our friends for the phone calls of condolence, the lovely flowers, the food, cards and other expressions of sympathy we all received following Irwin's recent passing. Thank you for the donations in Irwin's memory to the Carberry and Area Foundation, and/or other charities. Linda Steen, Daryl, Mervyn, Garth and families

Notice PUBLIC HEARING As per The Planning Act, any person can make representation on the matter at the meeting. DATE & TIME: July 8th, 2021 at 4:00 p.m. LOCATION: Public hearings will be held virtually via Zoom. To indicate your support, make comment, or file an objection, you must email info@westlake-gladstone.ca at least two days prior to the hearing. The following must be included in the email: Full name, Civic address, mailing address and Hearing number. The Municipality will send the individuals a link/invitation to the web conference 24 hours prior to the meeting. You may telephone (204)871-5870 during the hearing and upon identifying yourself, providing your civic and mailing address, you may ask a question or provide a comment that will be provided to the chairman of the hearing. CONDITIONAL USE ORDER 2021-CU-08 APPLICANT/OWNERS: Topigs Norsvin Canada Inc. Project Consultant: Peter Mah AREA AFFECTED: W ½ of NW 25-17-12W (Site 1) Roll No. 116300.000 PROPOSAL/PURPOSE: To allow a pig operation made of 1,600 sows-farrow to weanling, 8,300 weanlings, nursery and 255 growers/ finishers (710 animal units) and a proposed accessory multiple (2-unit) farm residence for caretaker and staff within an Agricultural Zone (AG). FOR MORE INFORMATION Information about the proposed project, applications and the Technical Review Report for the site can be viewed online: https://www.gov.mb.ca/mr/livestock/trc-12-083.html or may be inspected at 14 Dennis Street East, Gladstone, Manitoba during normal office hours, Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Please contact project consultant, Dale Lyle at dale.lyle@waytogoconsultinginc.ca if you have any further questions.

PUBLIC HEARING As per The Planning Act, any person can make representation on the matter at the meeting. DATE & TIME: July 8th, 2021 at 7:30 p.m. LOCATION: Public hearings will be held virtually via Zoom. To indicate your support, make comment, or file an objection, you must email info@westlake-gladstone.ca at least two days prior to the hearing. The following must be included in the email: Full name, Civic address, mailing address and Hearing number. The Municipality will send the individuals a link/invitation to the web conference 24 hours prior to the meeting. You may telephone (204)871-5870 during the hearing and upon identifying yourself, providing your civic and mailing address, you may ask a question or provide a comment that will be provided to the chairman of the hearing. CONDITIONAL USE ORDER 2021-CU-09 APPLICANT/OWNERS: Topigs Norsvin Canada Inc. Project Consultant: Peter Mah AREA AFFECTED: N ½ of NW 16-17-11W (Site 2) Roll No. 098200.000 PROPOSAL/PURPOSE: To allow a pig operation of 10,200 growers/finishers (1,459 animal units) and a proposed accessory multiple (2-unit) farm residence for caretaker and staff within an Agricultural Zone (AG). FOR MORE INFORMATION Information about the proposed project, applications and the Technical Review Report for the site can be viewed online: https://www.gov.mb.ca/mr/livestock/trc-12-084.html or may be inspected at 14 Dennis Street East, Gladstone, Manitoba during normal office hours, Monday to Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Please contact project consultant, Dale Lyle at dale.lyle@waytogoconsultinginc.ca if you have any further questions.

HyLife is a global leader in food processing. Our mission is to be the best food company in the world. To achieve this, we need talented people to join our HyLife team as the company continues to grow. HyLife is committed to our employees and we have an exciting new career opportunity in the beautiful town of Neepawa, MB for you to explore! As a Meat Cutter/Production Personnel you will be a critical member of our team in the creation of our world class product. Our positions range from working on our production floor to shipping the final packaged product, with everything in between! Responsibilities and duties include but are not limited to: • Slaughter and eviscerate hogs for further processing • Harvest and package edible offal • Process pork carcasses into primal cuts • Butcher and package pork primal cuts into value added specifications for local, national and international premium markets • Carry out other tasks related to processing of meat for shipping to customers or storage • Sanitation People who will succeed as members of our team will: • Enjoy working in a fast paced, stable long-term work environment • Appreciate working in a culturally diverse workplace. We employ people from all over the world! • Treat people with dignity and respect • Open to working in colder/warmer environments • Physically Fit • Experience as an industrial butcher or trimmer is an asset

Current starting wage is $15.45/hour plus $1.00/hour perfect attendance bonus! Wage scale extends to $23.05 per hour In addition to HyLife’s benefits, vacation time and competitive salary our company also offers a $500 dollar employee referral bonus program! HyLife is here to support you on building an exciting career with our team! If you have the qualifications and the passion to meet this challenge then we would like to explore your potential. Please apply online at http://hylife.com/current-opportunities/ or email to jobs@hylife.com or mail to PO Box 10,000, 623 Main St E, Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0.

We want it to be YOU! Come join our HyLife team. We thank all applicants, however, only those under consideration will be contacted

Thanks for reading the Banner & Press


NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021 A17

For Sale

Announcement

Trucks, Trailers, Truckbeds & Tires

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• GET SEEN by over 340,000 Manitoba Homes! • Use your LOGO! • Create instant top of mind awareness • Showcase your info, business, product, job, announcements or event • We format it, to make it look great! • Starting at $339.00 (includes 45 lines of space) • The ads blanket the province and run in MCNA’s 37 Manitoba community newspapers • Very cost effective means of getting your message out to the widest possible audience

• Full Repair & Safeties • Vehicle Parts, Tires & Wheels • Trailer Parts & Batteries • Sales, Financing, Leasing & Rentals EBY Aluminum: • Gooseneck and Bumper Pull Cattle & Equipment Trailers • Truck & Service Bodies • Generation Grain Trailers

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Help Wanted

Contact this newspaper NOW or MCNA at 204.947.1691 or email classified@mcna.com www.mcna.com

Help Wanted PLEASANT VALLEY GOLF CLUB

ASSISTANT GOLF SUPERINTENDENT

SUMMARY: This position reports directly to the Golf Superintendent. Under the superintendent’s supervision, the assistant directs and participates in the maintenance of all golf course features, equipment, and facilities. The Assistant Superintendent may serve in the Golf Superintendent’s capacity in the event of their absence. MAJOR DUTIES: • Assist in the daily operations of Pleasant Valley Golf Course • Aids in planning and supervising the maintenance of greens, tees, fairways, roughs, bunkers, etc... • Programming, repair, and maintenance of irrigations systems. • Assists Superintendent in the implementation of an overall turf health program. This includes aeration, topdressing, and the application of pesticides, fertilizer, & chemicals to golf course turf. • Operates an assortment of golf course equipment, including but not limited to: mowers, utility vehicles, sweepers, brooms, rollers, rakes, utility vehicles, loaders, compressors, trenchers, automobiles, etc… • Mows golf course turf and performs daily course setup duties. • Maintains and repairs golf course equipment. • Trims and removes trees and brush. • Performs any and all golf course tasks as required by superintendent. KNOWLEDGE REQUIRED BY THE POSITION: • Working knowledge of the maintenance of golf course tees, fairways, roughs, bunkers, and greens; seeding and maintenance practices for golf course turf; planting, cultivating, pruning, and caring for plants, shrubs and trees; characteristics and proper use of various fertilizers and soil conditioners; herbicides and pest control methods and materials • Irrigation system operation, repair, and maintenance • Maintenance of golf courses and facilities • Equipment operation and maintenance procedures SKILLS REQUIRED BY THE POSITION: • Operation of light and heavy equipment • Ability to keep and maintain daily records QUALIFICATIONS: • Possess, enrolled or seeking a degree in a turf grass management related field or applicable past experience (2 to 3 years of past golf course experience may be an applicable substitute). • A valid driver’s license • Must have or be prepared to obtain the following: Core, Landscape, IPM (Integrated Pest Management) Certification Licenses Submit resume to: Pleasant Valley Golf Club Box 490, Glenboro, MB. R0K 0X0 OR email: pleasantvallygolf@gmail.com

BATTERIES FOR EVERYTHING! 50, 000 BATTERIES IN STOCK *Auto *Farm *Marine *Construction *ATV *Motorcycle *Golf Carts *Rechargeables *Tools *Phones *Computers *Solar Systems & design * Everything Else!

THE BATTERY MAN 1390 St. James St., WPG 1-877-775-8271 www.batteryman.ca

Find what you need in the classifieds!

Auction Sales Meyers Online Auction Antique & Collectibles Curved Front China Cabinet Royal Albert China Vintage Toys, Ducks Unlimited

Bradley Meyers Auctioneer

204-476-6262 McSherry Auctions 12 Patterson Dr. , Stonewall, MB

Online Timed Auctions @ iCollector.com Consignment Auction

Closes Wed June 30 @ 7:00 PM

Estate & Moving

Closes Wed July 14 @ 7:00 PM

Consignments Welcome! (204) 467-1858 or (204) 886-7027

www.mcsherryauction.com

MCNA Provincewide Classifieds NOTICES Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement, and the Manitoba Community Newspaper Association and membership do not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements. For greater information on advertising conditions, please consult the Association’s BlanketAdvertising Conditions on our website at www.mcna.com. URGENT PRESS RELEASES - Have a newsworthy item to announce? Having an event? An exciting change in operations? Though we cannot guarantee publication, MCNA will get the information into the right hands for ONLY $35.00 + GST/HST. Call MCNA (204) 947-1691 for more information. See www.mcna.com under the “Types of Advertising” tab or Email classified@mcna.com for more details. FOR SALE Advertise in our blanket classifieds program in MCNA’s 37 Weekly Manitoba Community Newspapers and GET SEEN! Want the province to know about something? Traditional advertising works and it’s affordable! Need to sell something? Doing curbside pick-up, on-line ordering, or hosting an on-line seminar or meeting during COVID? Let people in Manitoba know. Each week our blanket classifieds could be helping your organization get noticed in over 352,000+ homes! Get your message out for as little as $189.00 + GST! To learn more, Call THIS NEWSPAPER or email classified@mcna.com for details. MCNA - Manitoba Community NewspapersAssociation (204) 947-1691. www.mcna.com WANTED WANTED: 80-160 acres of recreational/hunting land. If it has an old yard site, that would be great. Call 204-771-3399 or email samedwardsen@live.ca EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Federated Co-op is Hiring! Class 1A & 3A Seasonal Propane Drivers. Apply Today! www.fcl.crs

SERVICES GUIDE Construction

Birnie Builders

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Seeding

Lakeside Septic Service

Potable water delivery. Book your portable toilets!

ErlE Jury Family

and

204-867-2416 204-867-7558

TAC

Nylen

Hydroseeding

• New Lawns • Overseeding • Utility Repair • Erosion Control • Golf Courses • Sports and Recreation Areas

Don Nylen

204-867-7585

Steve Friesen

204-476-0284 steve.woodisan@outlook.com @WOODisan.2019

Rough Lumber

Garbage Bin Rentals Roll Off Bins

Custom Cabinetry Fine Woodworking Trim Carpentry

Full dimension Corral Planks and Windbreak

Firewood Sales Slabs $60/cord Cut and Split �� Round Wood

We buy Scrap! Phone 476-0002 for more information

For all your residential and farm building needs

NEW HOMES | RENOS | ICF BASEMENTS CONCRETE PADS | DECKS | FRAMING

Mike Ellis 204-841-4244 Dave Leflar 204-841-0025 Visit us on Facebook.com

204-966-3372

�us��in��le ����es�n� We buy standing Spruce and Poplar �mber

Cut and split firewood - Poplar and Spruce/Pine �� firewood - 10 cord load delivered to your yard

JOHN’S

ELECTRIC LTD ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 476-3391 Neepawa

Serving the Westman and Parkland Regions for over 45 years. Call us for all of your electrical needs from service work to new construction.

Neepawa, MB 204-476-3391

Dauphin, MB 204-572-5028

F. KOZAK & SONS LTD.

McSherry Auction Service Ltd. Online Timed Out Estate Auction For Walter Charney

Stuart McSherry 204-467-1858 or 204-886-7027 www.mcsherryauction.com

Woodlot Management

john@trijindustries.com

Auction Sales

Case IH 9330 4WD Tractor PS, 4364 Hrs * JD 8440 4WD 1000 PTO, 4880 * Case IH 585 Dsl 3PH, FEL, 3500-4000 Hrs * CO-OP Volvo 650 Dsl, 7420 Hrs w FEL * CO-OP Volvo 800 Dsl, 6692 Hrs * Case VA – Motor Siezed * Hesston 8100 Dsl Cab Swather 21’ -919 Hrs * AC Gleaner L2 4WD Dsl Combine * NH TX68 Combine * GMC Top Kick Gas 6.0L w Grain Master 16’ B&H , 25,000 True KM’s w Safety * 3 More Older Trucks * JD 635 Tandem Disc 28’W* Harmon Rock O Matic 5800 Stone Picker * Rite Way RW120 12’ Rock Rake * Allis Chalmers HD5 Crawler * Int TD6 Crawler * Flexi Coil Air Seeder 800 36’ Cultivator & Flexi Coil 1610 Tank * 35 Pc Medium Size Grain Equip* Smaller Haying Equip * 3PH Equip* Granaries* Quad * Snowmobiles * Vehicles * Antique Equip * Farm Misc * Tools * Some Household

you’re missing out on a lot!

Construction

Ventures Inc.

AGRICULTURE www.ehail.ca - Crop Hail Insurance. Compare lowest prices & all options. Call 844-446-3300. ehail@ehail.ca - www.ehail.ca

Riverton, MB - Junction 329 & 8 – 2 Miles West on Hwy 329 Then 3 Miles North on Road 17 E Contact: 1-204-806-0987 Bidding Closes Thurs July 15th at 7:00 PM

If you’re not reading

WE OFFER:

R

olling Acres eady Mix

Certified Batch Plant and Cement Trucks Concrete • Gravel Sales • Rebar Sales Custom Hauling

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• Redi-Mix Concrete & Concrete Pumping. • Sand, Gravel & Aggregate • Skid Steer & Equipment Rental • Snow removal

WE ARE A CERTIFIED BATCH PLANT.

204-476-5432

135 Boundary Street, Neepawa, MB

Find us on Facebook:

www.facebook.com/neepawabanner

Follow us on Twitter: @NeepawaBanner


A18 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021

Thumbs down to the ‘Powers That Be’

MJHL releases 2021-2022 regular season schedule

By Eoin Devereux Neepawa Banner & Press

SUBMITTED PHOTO

This photo was submitted by Edith Burnside to go along with her thumbs down message on Page A5, in regards to the weeds at Riverside Cemetery in Neepawa.

neepawa

Liz Sumner 204-476-6362

Advertise your listings here! ads@neepawabanner.com

Titans 2021-22 home games Sept. 17 Dauphin at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Sept. 25. Dauphin at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Oct. 2. Virden at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Oct. 8. Virden at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Oct. 17. Swan Valley at Neepawa. 6:30 pm. Oct. 22. Swan Valley at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Nov. 5. OCN at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Nov. 6 OCN at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Nov. 13. Wayway at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Nov. 19. Wayway at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Nov. 28. Steinbach at Neepawa. 6:30 pm. Dec. 4. Wpg Blues at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Dec. 10. Winkler at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Dec. 18. Wpg Freeze at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Jan. 4. Selkirk at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Jan. 15. Portage at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Jan. 28. Swan Valley at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Jan. 29. Swan Valley at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Feb. 4. Virden at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Feb. 12. Virden at Neepawa. 7;30 pm. Feb. 18. OCN at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Feb. 19. OCN at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Feb. 21. Dauphin at Neepawa. 3:00 pm. Mar. 4. Dauphin at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Mar. 8. Wayway at Neepawa. 7:30 pm. Mar. 11. Wayway at Neepawa. 7:30 pm.

Real Estate

Banner & Press

Trying to sell a property?

The Manitoba Junior Hockey League (MJHL) has unveiled its full regular season schedule. For the upcoming year, the 12-team league will have each club playing 52 games in total. For this season, there will be two divisions, with a heavy emphasis on playing clubs within your own division. For example, the Neepawa Titans, who will be in the Western Division, will face each of their division rivals a total of eight times (four home and four road games) for 40 games in total.

Neepawa will just face members of the East Division in a total of 12 games (one home and one road) over the course of the year. The Western Division will consist of the following teams: The Dauphin Kings; Neepawa Titans; OCN Blizzard; Swan Valley Stampeders; Virden Oil Capitals and Waywayseecappo Wolverines. The Eastern Division, meanwhile, will be comprised of: The Portage Terriers; Selkirk Steelers; Steinbach Pistons; Winkler Flyers; Winnipeg Blues and Winnipeg Freeze. The full schedule can be found at mjhlhockey.ca.

Ang bahay mo, para sa bagong simula

Lisa Adams

call or text

Phone: 204-476-2345 Toll Free: 1-877-476-2345 www.gillandschmall.com Follow us on Facebook for our listings and more!

Welcome

GRACE BIRNIE

204.841.4385 graceb@sutton.com

Grace is a young, kindhearted and bubbly individual with a passion for real estate. Grace’s focus is to provide her clients with professional and attentive service. Grace is eager to help you with your home buying and selling needs as a proud member of the Sutton-Harrison Realty family. She is committed to hard work, integrity, and excellent client service in all that she does. Grace grew up on a small farm just outside Eden, Manitoba. A few of her hobbies include spending time with her family, going to the gym, and hiking with her dog.

204- 841-0741

www.lisaadamswillmoveyou.ca

Rodney White 204-841-4800

Ready to Make a Move. Maintenance Free Lifestyle. 00 9,9 $24

00 9,9 $23

MLS #202007825 #1 326 Brown Ave

MLS #202024738 #4 344 1st St.

Prairie Mountain 204.476.2287 272 Hamilton St. Neepawa remax-prairiemountain-npwa-mb.com EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

MLS# 202113160

Historical Classic Character home features 3 bedroom, 1 full and 2 half baths. Recent updates include new electrical panel, spray foam insulated basement. Has newer windows, deck and more. $285,000

Lesley Skibinsky 204-476-6999

MLS# 202027229

Sow this 1/4 section to grain or keep as fenced and cross-fenced pasture. It has a beautiful 1,700 sq. ft. house, a 2,800 sq. ft. heated shop, a larger and smaller cattle shelter, 2 wells and is along Hwy 261 just NE of Riding Mountain.

Kristy Sprik

204-212-4892

Rosemary Parrott 204-212-5037

MLS# 202025752

There are 20 acres of farmyard and 60 acres of grainland on this beautiful acreage with 2 houses, a heated and plumbed shop, a barn, biotech shelters, and a mill. This property is just off of Highway 5 NE of Riding Mountain.

RESIDENTIAL • FARMS • RECREATIONAL • COMMERCIAL

Looking to the future?

Be sure to book your ads and submit all necessary info and materials

W W W. S U T T O N H A R R I S O N . C O M

438

MOUNTAIN

AVENUE,

NEEPAWA

|

204.571.5900

prior to the deadline!

Ad booking deadlines are Tuesdays at noon!

To book an ad, contact us at: 204-476-3401 or ads@neepawabanner.com


NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021 A19

Kin Club kicks off online Annie Gladden celebrates fundraising with 100th birthday donation to Roxy Theatre

PHOTOS BY CHRISTINE WADDELL

On Monday, June 21, friends and well-wishers drove by to help Annie Gladden celebrate her 100th birthday. Her birthday was on Saturday, June 19. Gladden also received a number of birthday cards for the occasion. Above: One of the passers-by holds up a sign wishing Gladden a happy birthday. Other cars had balloons, block letters and other decorations attached to form wishes for a swell birthday.

PHOTO BY KIRA PATERSON

On Friday, June 18, the Neepawa Kin Club presented a $200 donation to the Neepawa Roxy Theatre. Pictured, from left: Leslee Strelczik, Neepawa Theatre Centre (NTC) vice president; Debbie Strelczik, NTC treasurer; Amanda NaughtonGale, Kin Club incoming president; Dennie Phillips, Kin Club president; and Shelly Foxton, Kin Club treasurer.

By Kira Paterson Neepawa Banner & Press The Neepawa Kin Club just wrapped up their first of what will be multiple online fundraisers, with the Roxy Theatre as their first recipient. A $200 cheque was presented to the Roxy on Friday, June 18. Dennie Phillips, president of the Neepawa Kin Club, explained that fundraisers are harder to organize with the COVID-19 restrictions, but the club still wanted to do something to support the community. The online fundraiser has proven to be a fun and relatively easy way to do that. The Kin Club has created a Facebook group called Fundraising Games by Neepawa Kin Club, where their f irst game sold out at the end of May. Phillips noted that they are planning another game to start at the beginning of

July, but haven’t decided on which local organization will benefit this time. T he f irst ga me ran throughout the month of May, with contestants choosing numbers between one and 400. Half of the numbers would be revealed as free, while the others cost $2 each. In the end, one winner was drawn to receive $200, while the other $200 went to the chosen organization, which was the Roxy, in this case. Phillips stated that because they haven’t chosen a recipient for the next game, the Kin Club is encouraging local organizations to reach out and request they be considered. The club plans to run several more games, so even if a specific organization is not chosen this time, they may have a chance to benefit from a future fundraiser. Those interested in par-

ticipating in the next Kin Club fundraising game can join the Facebook group and keep an eye out for when it starts.

Right: Annie Gladden sits outside the Yellowhead Manor, watching the parade as it goes by. It appears the parade put quite the smile on her face!

Call (204) 476-3401

Move With A Star!

Let us put you in the driver seat!

We are looking for a few good company drivers who can go to the United States and have a good driving abstract. We offer above average compensation package along with a benefit package.

Monday to Friday: 8AM - 4PM Saturdays: 8AM - 3PM

204-867-7161

Visit us at evergreentech.ca

Please fax resume to: 204-239-0150 or email dyacucha@dallastransport.com

Dallas Transport Ltd. Box 1087 • Portage la Prairie, MB • R1N 3C5


A20 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021

Celebrating graduation in different ways

PHOTOS BY JOHN DRINKWATER

Lef t: William Mor ton Collegiate (WMCI) graduate Ysabelle Centeno. Above: WMCI valedictorian Eryza Collado. Right: WMCI grad Rylan Denbow. The Gladstone school’s celebration took place on Friday, June 18.

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

Above: One of the graduation signs for Carberry Collegiate. Below, from left: Carberry Collegiate valedictorians Griffin Adriaansen and Zara Dickson. Carberry’s ceremony will be Monday, June 28.

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

Above left: Neepawa Area Collegiate (NACI) graduate Bailey Enns. Above right: NACI graduate Cole Guilbert. NACI’s graduation ceremony will take place on Saturday, June 26.

Congratulations Class of 2021!

Early Deadline!

Deadline for July 2 issue: 12 noon, Monday, June 28th nd

Now in Neepawa Now in Neepawa and Serving Minnedosa and Serving Minnedosa Local Lawyers in Portage la Prairie, Local Lawyers in Portagefor la Prairie, MacGregor & Gladstone 50 Years MacGregor & Gladstone for 50 Years 225B Ellen Street, 225B310 Ellen Street, Box Box 310 Manitoba Neepawa, Neepawa, R0J 1H0 Manitoba R0J (204)1H0 704-4000 (204) 704-4000

Manitoba’s Law Firm: 10 Offices Across Manitoba’s Law Firm: the Province 10 Offices Across the Province

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Sherry Francis sfrancis@tdslaw.com Sherry Francis sfrancis@tdslaw.com


Farmers’ Advocate

Banner & Press

neepawa

Friday, June 25, 2021 • B Section

RiveRs BanneR

Open for business

PHOTO BY JOHN DRINKWATER

Jamie Porrok (centre), his wife Ashton and their children Adley and Beau, along with their dog Bailey, showed off the shop for the Porroks’ new agricultural equipment repair business. See the full story about the new business on Page B2.

500 PTH #5, Neepawa, MB For Take Out or Delivery call:

204-704-5000 BostonPizza.com


B2 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021

New ag equipment repair service operating in Eden By John Drinkwater Farmers’ Advocate There is a new mobile agricultural equipment repair service in the area. Owned and operated by Jamie Porrok, the business is located northwest of Eden, MB. Porrok is no stranger to the farming community, having spent 10 years with Rocky Mountain Equipment in Neepawa, as a mechanic and “road tech.” He is a Red Seal mechanic, receiving training at Assiniboine Community College (ACC) in Brandon. Porrok said, “We commenced operations three months ago, with requests for service increasing on a regular basis. The repair shop was erected three years ago, as part of long term dream to have my own business. Here, I have the option to prov ide equ ipment repairs. Presently, the bui ld ing houses a T7 185 New Holland tractor, dismantled into four sections, awaiting parts

PHOTOS BY JOHN DRINKWATER

The T7 185 New Holland tractor that Porrok dismantled to fix a transmission issue, at his shop in Eden.

to fix transmission issues. Reassembly is expected to take two days. The bulk of my business is my ability to reach out to farmers using my mobile service repair truck. It’s a

2015 fully equipped vehicle with a crane, tool storage, welder, laptop and diagnostic tools for all major brands.” Porrok commented that he is able to provide service

repairs to a wide variety day to Friday, weekend of ag equipment, includ- service can be arranged. Porrok mentioned that ing tractors, combines, air seeders, swathers and trucks. He can be contacted by phoning 204841-0874. Operating Mon-

he recent ly became a supplier of 40 North Oil, a lubricant for all types of agricultural equipment. His family comprises of his wife Ashton, daughter Adley and son Beau. The Porroks have a hobby farm on their property, with a cat, dog, donkey, miniature pony, two horses, two llamas, ducks and a goose. Jam ie concluded by saying, “I am able to respond to calls from areas including Ste. Rose, MacGregor, Carberr y, Neepawa, Minnedosa and Parkland. It’s been my experience that farmers are able to explain equipment problems and I can plan accordingly. Sometimes a visit to a client necessitates ordering a part and installing it at a future date. My ultimate goal is to look after the farmer and get them up and running as soon as possible. I give them another option beside the dealer.”

Penno’s Machining & Mfg. Ltd. Ph: 204-966-3221 Eden, MB Fax: 204-966-3248 www.pennosmachining.com

Rebuilt concaves • Combine and Tractor parts Table augers rebuilt, new sections up to 10 feet Grain rolls regrooved

WE STOCK

Bearings, seals, sprockets, chain, pulleys, belts, PTO, et Complete constant velocity PTOs • Bale prongs

WELDING, repair, and custom fabrication, Aluminum wire or TIG

MACHINE SHOP

Turning, milling, bearing surfaces rebuilt, etc. Drive shafts rebuilt Hydraulic Cylinders rebuilt and repaired Line boring and welding • MFWD castings repaired

NEW CNC Plasma Cutting Ashton Porrok (right) and two-year-old daughter Adley on the family’s hobby farm, petting Nudge the horse.

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NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021 B3

McCain’s jumping on regenerative ag bandwagon What does that mean for consumers and suppliers?

By Sylvain Charlebois Dalhousie University Regenerative agriculture is making some noise of late – so much so that some companies are making it a priority. McCain Foods, the world’s largest producer of french fries, just committed to limiting its climate footprint, saying all its french fries will come from farms using regenerative agriculture by 2030. For consumers, this is supposed to mean that within nine years, McCain will only be buying potatoes from farms that use more sustainable agricultural practices. McCain commits to farming techniques that promote biodiversity and more plant cover on fields. Those practices minimize soil disturbance and maximize crop diversity to increase water efficiency, protect against erosion, capture more carbon, and create greater resilience to droughts and f loods. Six principles were presented by McCain. Farmers will also be expected to minimize soil disturbance and use less fertilizer and pesticides. In the potato business, these would be significant steps. This could reduce yields for partnering farmers and increase the cost of products. And as these shifts require some form of accounting, it could mean more paperwork for McCain’s suppliers. Changing practices for a stronger planet is where we all are these days and McCain is trying to make its contribution. No problem there. On the surface, it may sound like a bold move from the french fry king, but very few details were given as far as specific targets go. Without any specific metric to make the company more accountable, McCain’s announce-

ment reads very much like those of other companies that have jumped on the regenerative agriculture bandwagon. PepsiCo, Nestle and General Mills are some companies that have committed to specific initiatives like McCain’s. These companies mean well and generally want to make a difference, but they all face more well-deserved skepticism. Canadians are growing impatient with bold promises made by the food industry. Most recently, the Retail Council of Canada backed away from its promise on cage-free eggs by 2025 and the phasing out of gestation stalls for pregnant pigs by 2022. It argued this couldn’t be done, even though a promise was made a few years ago. Other companies, like Starbucks, have also failed to deliver on environmentally focused objectives in recent years, giving way to more collective cynicism. In agriculture, it’s the same thing. The pandemic got people thinking differently about food supply chains. Most Canadians went from wanting a transparent food industry to wanting one in which they could understand how it functions. One piece is certainly how and where agricultural commodities are grown, here and elsewhere. McCain, and other companies, are fully aware that Canadians don’t expect private land managers to act in the best interest of society without the proper incentives to encourage that action. Making ecological stewardship the norm is a top priority for many anti-big-agriculture interest groups, as we get closer to the United Nations Food Systems Summit later this year. The focus will be to set a path to reach the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals by 2030. Major agribusiness companies like McCain are expected to provide some answers – and quick. This

is likely why many companies, including McCain, are choosing 2030 as a target. It’s all about the UN goals. But skepticism is a two-way street. For some, regenerative agriculture is a feel-good slogan that’s flexible enough to bend to a listener’s preconceived environmental biases. As the term regenerative agriculture has only been thrown around for a few years, it clearly has set the record for rapid eco-stewardship watering-down of what it really means. Principles can be set in many ways, without specific, measurable goals. Despite all that, McCain’s move isn’t trivial. Such a call will resonate with consumers and within the company’s network. The company is known for skilful methods within its supply chain. It understands it quite well. Farmers and its broader network were likely consulted thoroughly before the announcement. The regenerative agriculture call is very much about setting the field up for some new collaborative work with partners, with a different focus on natural resource management. In doing so, inputs, actions and performances will all need to be measured, and McCain knows more work is needed on that front. Extraordinary claims will always require extraordinary evidence. So if you’re not buying McCain’s commitment, you’re likely not alone. But this call isn’t just about consumers. It’s more about preparing its ecosystem for changes in years to come. As McCain befriends the concept of regenerative agriculture, it will also need to define what this means for its network. Dr. Sylvain Charlebois is senior director of the agri-food analytics lab and a professor in food distribution and policy at Dalhousie University.

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B4 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021

Canada receives negligible risk for BSE International beef export opportunities now expanding

Increase in program payments Direct program payments rose 10.8 per cent in 2020 to $3.5 billion, following a 40.6 per cent increase in 2019. Crop insurance payments rose 21 per cent, largely the result of payments related to crop damage in 2019, when growing and harvest conditions were especially poor in the Prairies. Farm operating expenses (after rebates) increased 1.3 per cent in 2020 to $54 billion— the smallest increase since 2016 (+0.8 per cent). Machinery fuel expenses decreased 16.4 per cent in 2020 and lower prices pushed fertilizer expenses down six per cent. Total farm expenses, which include operating expenses and depreciation, increased 1.6 per cent to $62.3 billion in 2020.

By Shawn Cabak Manitoba Agriculture

The Canadian beef industry is moving forward as the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) recognized Canada as negligible risk for Bovine Spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). This change in risk status will help facilitate expanded access to foreign markets for various beef products currently limited by BSE era restrictions.

 The attainment of negligible risk puts Canada at the lowest level of risk for the transmission of BSE alongside the U.S., which attained their status in 2013. The control of BSE across the globe is a remarkable achievement for the membership of the OIE. To achieve negligible risk, a country must Canadian beef demand increases demonstrate the last case of classical Statistics Canada released the 2020 food BSE was born more than 11 years consumption data and after seeing a 0.7 per ago and effective control measures cent increase in 2019, per capita consumpPHOTO BY JOHN DRINKWATER and surveillance systems are in place. Opportunities are opening up more for beef export from Canada, now that the World tion of red meat and poultry was down 4.5 Canada’s last case was born in 2009. Organization for Animal Health has recognized Canada as negligible risk for BSE. per cent in 2020 at 73.3 kgs (retail weight). Canada’s first case of BSE was This is down from 2019 and the lowest discovered in May 2003 and led to international borders Market receipts rose 8.2 per cent to $68.7 billion in 2020 since 2017. Reduced meat consumption is not surprising, closing to Canadian beef, a significant impact, as 50 per on higher crop receipts, while livestock revenues were given supply shocks in the second quarter, the economic cent of Canadian beef is exported. The direct economic down 1.1 per cent. stressors of COVID-19, unemployment and the shift from impacts of BSE, between 2003 and 2006, were estimated Crop revenue rose 14.8 per cent from a year earlier to food service to retail purchases as consumers adjusted to to be between $4.9 to $5.5 billion. $42.4 billion in 2020, with higher canola, lentil and can- cooking at home. Following the economic hardship from BSE, 26,000 nabis receipts. Excluding cannabis, crop receipts would What is surprising is how well beef performed combeef producers exited the industry between 2006 and have increased 11.7 per cent— the largest gain since 2012. pared to pork. Pork consumption was the hardest hit in 2011. Along with their exit from the industry, more than Canola receipts were up 19 per cent and wheat, excluding 2020, down 15 per cent to 14.3 kgs, the lowest since 1982. 2.22 million acres of pasture lands, and since that time durum, increased 10.8 per cent. Poultry consumption was also down 2.4 per cent to 40.9 further losses, were converted to other uses, marking BSE kgs. In contrast, per capita beef consumption was up 0.3 as both a detrimental economic and environmental event Livestock receipts lower per cent at 18 kgs (retail weight), the highest level since for Canada. Livestock receipts declined 1.1 per cent in 2020 to $26.3 2014. Slightly larger supplies were offset by an increase in billion, as the pandemic disrupted supply chains associated ending stocks on Dec. 31 and an increase in population. Farm income higher in 2020 with meat processing. Temporary closures of processing Domestic beef production was down 2.1 per cent with a 2.9 Realized net income for Canadian farmers rose 84.2 per facilities presented challenges for the red meat sector. Cattle per cent reduction in cattle slaughter, while beef imports cent to $9.9 billion in 2020, as strong growth in receipts receipts were down five per cent in 2020 on lower prices were up 23 per cent and exports down 2.2 per cent. 2020 outpaced slightly higher expenses. Excluding cannabis, (-3.1per cent) and marketings (-1.9 per cent). Cattle revenue beef demand was up 5.5 per cent. realized net income was up 71.9 per cent to $9.5 billion. was particularly affected in the second quarter, falling 19 Rising crop receipts fuelled by strong export demand, per cent from the previous year, as meat processing capacity Come see us for all your tools and rental needs combined with lower machinery fuel and fertilizer prices, was severely limited during the first wave of the pandemic. We have rental equipment for the contractor, farmer or homeowner pushed realized net income higher. Hog receipts rose one per cent in 2020, as strong export Farm cash receipts, which include crop and livestock demand for pork pushed hog marketings higher (+5.7 per revenues, as well as program payments, rose 8.3 per cent cent). For the year, hog prices decreased 4.4 per cent but to $72.2 billion in 2020— the largest gain since 2012. showed some strength later in the year. serving

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NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021 B5

Ducks Unlimited Canada makes more land available for producers for hay

By Ian Hitchen Ducks Unlimited

As Manitoba cattle producers prepare for what looks like another dry year, Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) is making more of its land available to hay through its Hay Tender Program to try and help producers facing shortfalls in their forage production. The Hay Tender Program is popular every year with producers, but there has been increased interest the past few years, as many have struggled to grow enough hay to sustain their cattle through drought conditions. “We plan to open up around 4,000 acres of hay this year, and we worked with 59 producers last year, which was up quite a bit from previous years” said Cam Ross, who administers the Hay Tender Program. “I think we are probably going to have the same response this year.”

to $110 / acre assistBeef producer ance in seeding forKyle McPhail, of age this year should Glenboro, has used call Alex Griffiths at the program several 204 848-0514. times and plans to A nother DUC bid again this year. initiative is Mani“ We h a v e a toba Grazing Clubs, marsh on part of our which now offer rehay land that hasn’t sources for improvf looded in a few ing management of years, so production pastures through on that ground is not its new YouTube as good as it should channel. The imbe,” he said. “If I can portance of good get hay at a reasonpasture manageSUBMITTED PHOTO able cost through the program it helps Cam Ross administers Ducks Unlimited Canada’s Hay Tender Program ment becomes esfinancially, and has in Manitoba. He says DUC is making more of its land available for pecially evident in worked well for me.” haying to help producers who face a forage shortage due to drought. years when drought or excess moisture Manitoba Beef and Forage Initiatives detailed maps and aerial for us and helped us out in impede forage production, which Brandon area produ(MBFI) also accessed the imagery. a pinch.” Hay Tender Program a “You can see the parcels, Ducks Unlimited Canada cer, Brian Harper, who has couple of years ago, when what’s in your region, get also works with 15 to 20 adopted a multi-paddock, its Brookdale Farm was a sense of approximate producers each year who adaptive grazing system, short on feed coming out of acres, and the type of forage graze about 3,000 acres of knows only too well. “We graze intensively winter. General Manager stands,” she said. “Usually, DUC land, and offers a ForMary-Jane Orr said DUC the bids aren’t due until the age Program in southwest and then rest for longer after does a great job of providing end of June, so by mid-June Manitoba, which last year grazing,” Harper noted. information on its website to you can get a good idea of assisted 75 producers with “That’s key for setting yourhelp producers prepare their what you are bidding on costs to seed more forage self up to be resilient in times bids, including legal descrip- when you go and check the acres on their farms. Produ- of both excess moisture and tions of parcels available, fields. It was a great asset cers interested in getting up drought, by having deep

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roots to give better water infiltration, and lots of plant diversity in the ground to ensure something will grow whatever the conditions.” Because of his management, Harper was grazing by midApril this year, even with extremely dry conditions. Orr says DUC is an excellent partner for beef producers because it strikes a good balance between utilizing its lands for agricultural purposes and habitat conservation. “DUC limits the start of cutting the hay until mid July so that the nesting birds have already moved out, but producers are still able to get a good cut of hay,” she noted. “They are producer-focused and supportive.” The Hay Tender Program closes on June 30. Producers can get more information at DUC’s new agricultural website at ag.ducks. ca, watch for a postcard in the mail, and for ads in local newspapers that list available parcels in their area.

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B6 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021

How farmers use drones Virtual Youth Beef Roundup to take place in August

FILE PHOTO

The 2019 Manitoba Youth Beef Roundup took place at the agricultural fairgrounds in Neepawa (pictured). This year’s Roundup will take place virtually on Aug. 1. PHOTO COURTESY OF METRO CREATIVE CONNECTIONS

decisions in regard to irrigation and fertilization. Reduce waste: SenseFly notes that data gathered by drones can help farmers determine the vigor of their crops at various stages of growth. Such information can prevent overfertilization and overwatering, thereby reducing waste and runoff, benefitting the planet as a result. Planning: Drones can be used to collect data on crop growth and health at various times throughout the growing season. That can help farmers develop accurate predictions regarding harvest quality and crop yield, making it easier for them to plan ahead. Agricultural drones are one of the many examples that illustrate how technology has changed and will continue to change the ways modern farmers conduct business.

The Roundup Committee is excited to announce that Manitoba Youth Beef Roundup 2021 will be held Aug. 1, with winners announced that day. Instead of a three day event with the restrictions, it will be a virtual event, with many interesting and exciting classes to participate in. All Junior members up to age 25 are eligible from purebred or commercial beef herds in the province. The committee has come up with classes

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The farmers of yesteryear might not be too familiar with their surroundings if they were to visit a modern farm. While the men and women who made their livings as farmers decades ago would no doubt still recognize certain farm features that have withstood the test of time, they might not understand the inner workings of the modern farm, particularly in regard to the role technology now plays within the agricultural sector. Technology has changed ag r iculture in my r iad ways. The methods farmers employ to produce food and improve the efficiency of their operations has changed as technology has evolved. One of the more noticeable changes that’s hard to miss on modern farms is the use of agricultural drones.

Drones have been around for decades. Sometimes referred to as unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs, drones can be utilized in ways that can save farmers money and protect the planet. Monitor crops: According to senseFly, the commercial drone subsidiary of Parrot Group, drones can help farmers effectively monitor their crops. With a drone flying overhead, farmers can spot and quickly identify issues affecting their crops before those issues escalate into something larger. Soil analysis: Another potential benefit of agricultural drones highlights their role in analyzing soil. Agricultural drones utilize complex mapping functions to gather data about the soil, including areas where it might be stressed. That enables farmers to develop accurate soil samples that can be used to guide

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Submitted Metro Creative

of heifer calves, bull calves, bred heifers, cow and calf along with a steer class. Many of you had made videos for your 4-H programs, so the work is already done. Cash prizes will be awarded. Along with the cattle events will be a select group of competitions, like speeches, judging and more. Watch for more details coming soon on our Facebook page or www.mbyouthbeefroundup.weebly.com Entry deadline is July 2, 2021 and entry forms will be online as of June 21.

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Sometimes referred to as unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs, drones can be utilized in ways that can save farmers money and protect the planet.

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NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021 B7

Agricultural scenes from the past

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE BEAUTIFUL PLAINS MUSEUM

Though these photos have no names, information nor dates to go with them, both provide a look at agricultural scenes from years past. Above: A group that appears to be transporting their goods– perhaps to storage or to trade. The bags inside the carts are likely to be full of grain, which was once hauled by that method. Each bag was to hold a specific amount. No less, and no more! Right: Well, this is a puzzler, isn’t it? What story do our readers suppose might be behind the photo of this individual standing upon the cow, shoe-less and bright smiled?

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B8 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS JUNE 25, 2021

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Friday, June 25, 2021 Neepawa Banner & Press  

In this week's paper, read about the big grant that WestLake-Gladstone received for some of their recreational spots, see the new project Th...

Friday, June 25, 2021 Neepawa Banner & Press  

In this week's paper, read about the big grant that WestLake-Gladstone received for some of their recreational spots, see the new project Th...

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