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Friday, November 1, 2019 • Vol.124 No. 14 • Neepawa, Manitoba

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‘Basketball is really part of the Filipino culture’ Neepawa Filipino Basketball League tips off for another season

By Eoin Devereux

Neepawa Banner & Press

It’s fair to say the Philippines has a true passion for basketball. That passion was on full display on Sunday, Oct. 27 at the NACI gymnasium, as the Neepawa Filipino Basketball League (NFBL) kicked off its new season with opening ceremonies and a pair of games. Though some form of the league has been in operation locally since 2008, this is officially the fifth season for the NFBL since it was reorganized into its current, multi-tier configuration. The NFBL has grown into a 20 team league, with just over 300 players. It is split into a Junior Division, featuring players age 35 and under and a Senior Division for 36 and over. Both divisions consist of 10 teams, who play a schedule from October, to late March or early April. Continues to grow NFBL spokesperson Van Valdellon Afuang told the Banner & Press that while

the majority of teams in the league are local, there are outlying communities that are also involved. Clubs from Gladstone and Virden will participate this year, while teams based out of Portage la Prairie and Hamiota have also been members of the NFBL in the past. Afuang added that the start of the new season is something that everyone really looks forward to. “Basketball is really part of the Filipino culture. So we grew up and we were playing it on the streets, in school. We encourage our children to be involved in sports, specifically basketball,” noted Afuang. “Everyone is excited to see the season start up again.” An incredible atmosphere Afuang said that while the majority of teams consist of Filipino born or raised players, the league is open to anyone from anywhere, who has a love of the game. Though it was only the first day of the new season, there was still the type of raucous atmosphere in the

31st Anniversary

PHOTO COURTESY OF NCSA PORTAL

The opening tip off for the game between Bikdak and The Land.

PHOTOS BY EOIN DEVEREUX

Above left: A group of players from Cavitenos and Oragon battle for the basketball under the net at the NACI gymnasium. Above right: Representatives from all 20 teams participated in the opening ceremonies on Sunday, Oct. 27 in Neepawa.

stands that you’d expect from an intense playoff game. The opening game featured Oragon facing Cavitenos in a Senior Division showdown. This game proved to be a tight back-and-forth battle,

with Cavitenos claiming a 45-42, last minute victory. The unofficial game-sheet indicated that Robinson Kabigting led Cavitenos in scoring over the course of the game, with nine points,

NFBL games will be played every Saturday and Sunday at the NACI gymnasium. All members of the public are invited to come out and watch.

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while Paulo Naparate had eight for Oragon. In the Junior Division game, it was Bisdak defeating Aces/The Land. The final score and player stats were unavailable.

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Neepawa business collects more accolades Farmery Brewery claims two titles at Manitoba Business Awards

By Kira Paterson Neepawa Banner & Press A Neepawa based business has taken home two top distinctions from the Manitoba Business Awards, held on Friday, Oct. 25. The event, put on annually by Manitoba Chambers of Commerce, gives businesses within Manitoba a chance for provincial recognition. Farmery Estate Brewery claimed the Outstanding Small Business Award, which is given to a business in Manitoba with less than 30 employees. Criteria for the award is based on success in company growth, advances and development within the business, which are all things Farmery continually works towards. “Our intention is to obviously grow Farmery and make it viable and relevant in the years to come. So, we’re working on a lot of stuff that I think they recognized,” said Lawrence War-

waruk, co-owner Wa r wa r u k of Farmery Estate stated that they Brewery. “We’ve were “ecstat ic, m o s t r e c e nt l y over whelmed, [expanded] into very appreciative other provinces, and humbled,” to we have extended win both of these our product line, awards. “Manilike our sodas. toba Chambers of We’re work ing Commerce repreon other product sents 10,000 busilines, [such as] nesses in Manihealth and welltoba and so, that’s nes s product s , a big deal,” Warso we add extra waruk expressed. value from, say, He added that they the hops that we didn’t even know grow on the farm. Business of the We extract essenYear was on the tial oils for use in program, so when our health and that award was anPHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID MODER PHOTOGRAPHY wellness products. nounced, it was a We’ve been do- Brothers and Farmery Estate Brewery co-owners, Chris and Lawrence complete surprise. ing experimenting Warwaruk accepted two accolades at this year’s Manitoba Business “I think what and studies on the Awards on Friday, Oct. 25, hosted by the Manitoba Chambers of probably stood out product lines too, Commerce. is, we come from to add extra emwon was Business of the the Year is chosen from the very humble roots, phasis and quality on the Year, which, according to winners of each category farming background. We’re product so, in the future, the Manitoba Chamber and is determined by which the only brewery that is kind if we want to make claims, website, is “the pinnacle of business had the highest of bucking the trend by bewe can.” Manitoba business success.” overall score in the judging ing in a non-urban area,” The second award they The winner of Business of process. War waruk noted. One

of the things that he said makes Farmery different is that they want to make a difference in the rural communities, while the trend of late has been more and more people moving into the cities. He added that Farmery also emphasizes their rural roots by growing their own ingredients for their beers. “That really does, I think, lend itself to not only our philosophy, but to the end consumer too. More people are seeking to understand and to know where [their] product is coming from.” This has been very eventful for the brewery, which also gained recognition from winning two World Beer Awards earlier in the year, for their Great White North wheat beer and their Northern Light Lager. As well, they were approved for licensing to sell their products in Ontario in July.

Arden craft sale gives head start to Christmas shoppers

DR. R. P. ASHCROFT OPTOMETRIST

DR. K. VANDERHEYDEN OPTOMETRIST

PHOTOS BY DIANE WARNER

On Saturday, Oct. 26, the Arden Hall was home to the community’s annual craft sale, from 10:30 am to 2 pm. Artisans, crafters, bakers and vendors from all over the province came together to offer a one-stop-shop to local shoppers. There was a wide variety of products, including jams (pictured right), fudge (top right), woodwork, plants, pottery, clothing and much more.

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Travel & Entertainment Deja Vu donates a total of $3,000 NOVEMBER 1, 2019

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS A3

[ A Living Sacrifice ] Therefore, I urge you, brothers and sisters, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and pleasing to God—this is your true and proper worship.

Romans 12:1 (New International Version)

NEEPAWA ACCESS 12

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Proceeds from the Deja Vu concert, organized by the local band, Lunchmoney, were split between ArtsForward and Budz ’N Bloom Early Learning Centre. Each organization received $1,500 from the event held on Oct. 19. Pictured here are Greg Fleck, Hughie McLaughlin, Jim Danino and Ron Nordstrom, of Lunchmoney; Rrain Prior of ArtsForward, and Dana Menzies of Budz ’N Bloom.

Bag tree helps Country Meadows shoppers, businesses to host X-mas sale

Banner Staff Neepawa Banner & Press

The Minnedosa Fun Fest committee has found a unique way to promote local businesses, while also helping shoppers. This summer’s Street Market featured a bag tree, which offered shoppers reusable bags to use for their purchases, at no cost. The bags were donated by businesses, as well as members of the public. With the committee’s annual Christmas Craft and Gift sale coming up on Nov. 2, the committee was

looking for bags to add to those remaining from the summer. Not only is it a great way for local businesses to advertise, it’s also good for area residents who have too many bags and are looking to find a use for them. The sale will have over 40 vendors and include hourly draws and a Christmas Café. In addition to the sale, Valley Life Beginnings, a new daycare in Minnedosa, will also be doing a mini photo session fundraiser. People hoping to take part in this event need to pre-book

Submitted Country Meadows

The Resident and Family Council at Country Meadows Personal Care Home will be holding their Annual Christmas Shopping Spree on Tuesday, Nov. 12. There will a variety of vendors selling their items in the Multi-Purpose Room from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome to come and get a start at their Christmas

shopping. There will also be a bake sale and prize table as well and the council will be serving complimentary coffee. Come out for some shopping, coffee and visit with the residents. All money raised from this event goes to Resident Family Council, who in return, purchases items for the residents at Country Meadows! Hope to see you there!

Frank Porada Gerry & Jean Gatey Ellen Sinclair R. & S. Hayward

$50 winner $50 winner $50 winner $50 winner

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November 1, 2 & 3 • SHOWTIME: 7:30 pm

Wednesday nights at 7 P.M.

Channel 12, MTS 30, Bell ExpressVu 592 or online at nactv.tv

NACTV Bingo cards are available for $12 each at: Harris Pharmacy • Neepawa Pharmacy • Dollar Store Neepawa Legion • Tim Tom’s

Downton Abbey

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Nov. 18 at 8:00 pm at the Roxy Theatre Everyone Welcome

November 8, 9 & 10 • SHOWTIME: 7:30 pm November 9 • MATINEE SHOWTIME: 2:00 pm

Abominable

Submit your photos, news tips, stories, letters to the editor, thumbs-ups or thumbs-downs to: news@neepawabanner.com or sports@neepawabanner.com

Want to book an ad? Contact us at: ads@neepawabanner.com

The continuing story of the Crawley family, wealthy owners of a large estate in the English countryside in the early 20th century. Rated: PG Starring: Matthew Goode, Tuppence Middleton, Maggie Smith.

Nov 2: Downton Abbey Theme Night! (costumes welcome!)

Times and programs are subject to change without notice

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Bonanza $4,990 • X $150 • Blackout $2,557 Loonie pot is $189 and goes up weekly www.neepawaroxy.ca

Thurs. Nov. 7 10:00 ............ Good Morning Canada 10:03 ..........Neepawa Natives Game 12:20 ....Community Announcements 12:25 ...........Resource Centre Demo 1:30 ............... Sherlock Holmes -#33 2:00 .......... Selkirk Aboriginal Church 4:00 ........Dan Mazier- Election Night 4:40 .... Chamber of Commerce AGM 6:00 .........ROTARY AUCTION- LIVE 11:00 ....Community Announcements Fri. Nov. 8 10:00 ............ Good Morning Canada 10:03 ... Kevin Roy & Logan McKillop 11:20 ..........Hobbies with Carla Dyck 12:00 ...........................Town Council 1:00 ............Story Behind the Stories 1:30 ......Community Announcements 1:35 ..................... Roxy Open House 2:00 ............. Harry’s Classic Theatre 3:35 ......Npa Chamber of Commerce 4:00 ........Kid’s Story - Fairy Tales #4 4:25 .............. BPCF Grant Luncheon 5:00 ..............Expressive Dancing #2 7:00 .......... NAC TV Reads the News 8:15 ............................Terry Fox Run 8:45 .........Come Together Jamboree 10:00 ....Community Announcements Sat. Nov. 9 10:00 ............ Good Morning Canada 10:03 ........ NAC TV Reads the News 11:20 . Land Titles 100th Anniversary 12:00 .War Amps: Hong Kong Veterans 1:00 .Classic Cartoon - Tom and Jerry 2:15 ......Community Announcements 2:20 .Val’s Adventure: CM Car Show 3:00 .......... NAC TV Reads the News 4:15 ......Girl Guide Crafts- Rem. Day 4:20 ....................Dauphin Street Fair 5:30 .............................Town Council 6:30 ..................................Herb Dock 7:00 ............Story Behind the Stories 7:30 .The Beverly Hillbillies - S01E02 8:00 ............Neepawa Natives Game 10:15 ....Community Announcements Sun. Nov. 10 10:00 ............ Good Morning Canada 10:03 ..........Neepawa United Church 11:15 . ... Calvary Church, Minnedosa 12:00 .. St. Dominic’s Church Service 1:00 ................... First Baptist Church 2:15 .. Remembrance Day Ceremony 3:15 .........Manitoba Tourism Awards 5:05 .Author Reading Dianne Brydon 6:00 ..... Neepawa Children’s Theatre 7:00 ................... First Baptist Church 8:15 ............... Sherlock Holmes -#34 8:45 ...Men’s Veterans Tribute Game 10:00 ....Community Announcements

Channel 12 | MTS 30 | Bell Express Vu 592

Saturday, October 26, 2019 $50 winner $50 winner $50 winner $50 winner $50 winner $50 winner

NACTV programming is done by volunteers and substitutions are sometimes necessary. Programming may also be seen livestreamed at www.nactv.tv/live .

NACTV 476-2639

Gladstone Elks Lodge #317 - 200 Club Draw Delayne Evenson Brian & Fran Clayton Betty Wickstead Louis Bokor Kevin Love Dwayne Brown

Mon. Nov. 4 10:00 ............ Good Morning Canada 10:03 .LVJ - Geoffrey Gilmore & Friends 11:10 . ............................Cape Breton 11:15 . .........................Terry Fox Run 11:45 .. ArtsForward Cultural Concert 12:05 .Crown Heads of the Wilderness 1:40 ..................Fall Colours (No. 19) 2:00 ............. Harry’s Classic Theatre 3:35 ..... live test - Artsforward gallery 4:00 ........Kid’s Story - Fairy Tales #3 4:30 ........................................ Rotary 5:15 ......Community Announcements 5:20 ........................Val’s Adventures 6:25 ......... Neepawa Farmers Market 7:00 ..The Beverly Hillbillies -S01E01 7:30 ...................Greece March 2009 9:25 .......... LVJ: Lazy Creek Express 10:00 ....Community Announcements Tues. Nov. 5 10:00 ............ Good Morning Canada 10:03 ......Dan Mazier- Election Night 10:45 ................Dr. T’s Nature Notes 11:00 .Classic Cartoon - Tom & Jerry 12:15 ....Community Announcements 12:20 ................What’s the Big Idea? 12:40 ......... Burrows Trail Art Council 12:50 .............NACI Chorale Concert 1:40 .MB Hort. Assoc. - Sarah Williams 2:45 ............Neepawa Natives Game 5:00 .......... Selkirk Aboriginal Church 7:00 ............Story Behind the Stories 7:30 ........................Val’s Adventures 9:00 ..........................Today’s Church 10:00 ....Community Announcements Wed. Nov. 6 10:00 ............ Good Morning Canada 10:03 .Val’s Adventure: Co-op Demo 10:35 .... Showcase: Ed & Alice Sklar 10:50 ................What’s the Big Idea? 11:30 ..........Story Behind the Stories 12:00 ....Figure Skating-Make a Wish 2:00 ................... First Baptist Church 3:15 ............................Terry Fox Run 3:45 ......Community Announcements 3:50 ........ Legion Cannon Dedication 5:10 .............. Traveller’s Day Parade 6:00 .. Val’s Adventures- Around Npa 6:20 ...........Showcase: Debra Garcia 6:30 ..................................Herb Dock 7:00 ..............NAC TV BINGO - LIVE 8:00 .............................Town Council 9:00 .War Amps: Don’t Call it a Failure 10:00 ....Community Announcements

MTS Channel 30 • Bell ExpressVu 592 • Cable 12 www.nactv.tv

The Banner & Press can also be reached at: 204-476-3401 or by dropping in at the office, located at 243 Hamilton Street!


Perspectives

A4 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS

NOVEMBER 1, 2019

More important than ever

Tundra by Chad Carpenter

T

Western separation unlikely to happen, but...

I

n the days following the Oct. 21 federal election, the results graphically showed that the Liberal Party did very poorly west of the Ontario-Manitoba border. In fact, they didn’t do all that great in Quebec either. For a federal party to be shut out of Saskatchewan and Alberta states loudly that their message is not going over well in those two provinces. The Liberals also lost seats in Manitoba and B.C. The cries of western separation came out loud and clear. There are rallies and conferences planned all over Alberta to discuss the steps toward separation. The anger felt by westerners is not unfounded. The Liberals have been trying to crush the Alberta and Saskatchewan oil industry for decades. Two generations of the Trudeau family have openly expressed their disdain for western oil. Quebec refuses to allow a pipeline to the east and seems to favour Saudi oil for some strange reason. I suspect it has a lot to do with the idea that the Irving refineries are heavily invested in oil tanker ships and their refineries reportedly can’t refine oilsands oil. I don’t know for sure, but it does make sense, I guess. How all this will turn out is anybody’s guess. Alberta and Saskatchewan are pretty upset about the equalization payments going to Quebec, all the while, not being able to ship oil to that province. The rallies and conferences will be wild and woolly affairs this winter. There are some things, though, that make a person wonder. Like why does the media, and Elections Canada, allow the Bloc Quebecois to even participate in the leaders’ debates? They have no intention of being a national party, so why neepawa

Banner & Press

STAFF

RIGHT IN THE CENTRE

Ken Waddell are they even allowed on the stage? That’s a mystery to me. Another thing is how the media can get their election coverage so wrong. Trudeau loses seats and it is called a victory. Singh loses seats and it’s called a victory. Scheer wins back more seats than either the Liberals or NDP lost and it’s called a loss. For the most part, the mainstream media has had a longstanding bias in favour of the Liberals and NDP. There are several reasons for that. One, journalism schools are geared to socialism, or at least to a strong government intervention model. They are generally opposed to people expressing their faith and would be more comfortable if “religious” people would just stay quiet. The biggest media outlets are being subsidized by government. The Liberal government put up a huge amount of money for media this year and the CBC has been receiving huge government subsidies for decades. When journalists are trained to be biased and negative and many of them know their industry depends on government hand-outs, it’s pretty tough for the “smaller government, tighter spending theories” put forward by conservatives to get a foothold. Separation isn’t likely to fly,

because Canadians are generally loyalists and the constitution doesn’t really allow for it. Manitoba premier Brian Pallister has come out against separation. He is strong in his views on that and Manitoba does get $2 billion in equalization payments, but I don’t think that is why Pallister is against separation. Hopefully, Pallister is seeing the bigger picture, whereby prairie oil could reach export markets by way of an energy/transportation corridor to the only deep sea port on the prairies, the Port of Churchill. If that corridor were to be developed, the economic development problems for all three prairie provinces might be solved. It’s a project that won’t likely see support from Quebec, but do we care? It may not make sense or be feasible for the prairies to separate, but it is time for the three prairie provinces to get their economic act together. Waiting on federal fairness has not worked for the past 150 years, so why would we wait for that to change? Disclaimer: The writer serves as a volunteer chair of the Manitoba Community Newspaper Association. The views expressed in this column are the writer’s personal views and are not to be taken as being the view of the MCNA board or Banner & Press staff.

243 Hamilton Street, Box 699, Neepawa, Manitoba R0J 1H0 Telephone: (204) 476-3401 Fax: (204) 476-5073 Toll-free: 1-888-436-4242 (within Manitoba) www.neepawabanner.com

Owners/Publishers Ken and Chris Waddell

his week, the Neepawa Banner & Press is publishing our annual Remembrance Day feature. While we’re still about 10 days away from Nov. 11, since the feature includes information about area services, we wanted to make sure readers had plenty of time to make their plans. When I first started at the MY Banner 13 years PERSPECTIVE go, each year, we would try to find community members to interview about Kate their first-hand Jackman-Atkinson experiences. We tended to focus on World War II, but also covered those who served in the Korean and Afghan conflicts. We talked to area residents who fought on land, on the seas and in the skies and who worked for the armed forces in Canada, as part of the war effort. The stories included not only those of service people, but also those at home. We talked to those who remembered being children while Neepawa hosted pilots in training as part of the Commonwealth Air Training Plan. We talked to those who remembered the anxiety at home, waiting for news, good or bad, from overseas. We talked to those who lived in Europe and remembered both occupation and liberation. When memories faded, we used interviews previously recorded as part of NACTV’s programming in order to tell people’s stories. It’s been 80 years since World War II started and each year, fewer and fewer first-hand memories remain. Over the years, I’ve seen the names of people I’ve interviewed show up in obituaries. The good news is that these people’s stories do live on. There have been official and organized efforts to document the memories and experiences of Canada’s veterans, such as Veterans’ Affairs Heroes Remember projects. In addition to those recorded in our pages, the memories have also been shared with families and friends. We also have a new source of first hand accounts, one not influenced by the filter of time. The purchase of the Neepawa Press in 2015 has given us access to a huge trove of newspapers published while Canada was at war, every time since in 1896. This year, we dove into World War II. The stories include those of heroism and loss and highlight the role those who called the Neepawa-area home played in the war effort. In 1933, the international news talks of the gathering storm, as Europe inched closer to war. The numbers are hard to grasp, the only way to understand them is to bring them down to the individual level. The stories include both the big picture headlines, the estimated 2 million Jewish people killed by the Axis before WWII had even officially started, as well as the particular, the death of one local soldier or pilot. Beyond the coverage of the major events, the war was everpresent, from obituaries, to ads for Victory Bonds. It’s something that’s hard for us to imagine. The stories include the sad and tragic, as well as the borderline humorous– one Neepawa Press reader had an idea of what should be done with Hitler once the war was won. Those who don’t know history are doomed to repeat it and this seems especially true in today’s political climate. Across the world, we see rising levels of nationalism, we see certain groups of “others” being branding as the enemy, we see big talk and bluster from world leaders, we see lots of talk about the things that make us different instead of those that unite us. We have forgotten where these steps can lead and it’s not a place we want to go. We have become complacent, thinking that it couldn’t happen again. As the first hand memories fade, it’s more important than ever to remember.

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Perspectives

Unsung heroes

NOVEMBER 1, 2019

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ithin seven days, roughly most of the snow that fell on my yard from Oct. 11 and 12 had melted. From what I have read and heard, we were fortunate. We got less snow than other parts of the province. No trees in my yard were damaged. Our streets were sloppy, but passable, and our hydro service was not disrupted. But places within a 30 minute drive of my house were not so lucky. Road closures left thousands stranded in different parts of the province. Emergency shelters were opened in many communities. Schools were closed, planned activities were canceled and some places of business even sent their workers home early and shut down for the day. We all knew better than to tempt fate in the face of Mother Nature’s fury. But there were those among us who had to be out in the worst of the weather. They had no choice. To them and to their acts of heroism, I dedicate this column. As the sun set on Oct.

T

FAITHFULLY YOURS Neil Strohschein 11, one quote on Manitoba Hydro’s website revealed the ominous challenge that lay ahead: “As of noon Oct. 11, 2019, we are no longer to provide estimated times for restoration (of power service) due to the extremely high volume of calls and worsening weather conditions.” But despite the horrid conditions, Hydro crews were out in the field, locating downed lines and restoring power. They were supported by provincial and municipal road crews, often following snow plows to the site of a broken line, getting it fixed and then moving on to the next break. Service was restored one break at a time, one customer at a time. Some repairs were simple. Some will take many days before all repairs are made and service is fully

restored. Hydro and Highways crews weren’t the only ones who were out in that storm. Police and emergency services personnel were on standby. So were tow truck operators, tree cutters and heavy equipment operators. All were ready to spring into action as soon as their services were required; and they did their work well. So did home care workers, health care professionals and all others who provide regular care to those who cannot fully care for themselves. They fulfilled their obligations to the best of their abilities and for that, they deserve our gratitude and respect. Then we must not overlook the many who went out of their way to ensure that their neighbours and friends were safe. Sidewalks

were cleared, necessary supplies were picked up and those who required transportation to appointments received it. We were in this together, we stuck it out together, we looked out for each other and we survived. Every person who, in any way, helped a neighbour or friend in need during that storm is an unsung hero to someone. Your acts of kindness may not have opened miles of roads or restored hydro service to hundreds, but you made a difference in the lives of one or two people who could not help themselves. And for that, we thank you. It is often said that hard times bring out the best in people. We have certainly seen that in southern Manitoba over the past few days. My hope and prayer is that this spirit of generosity will continue. This current crisis will pass, just as previous ones have passed. But others will come in time; and then we will all have the opportunity to be an unsung hero to someone.

A ‘me’ day

he fall has been a busy season, by choice. This week, I set aside a day to get caught up with those little things we plan to do someday. I did not take long to fill my day. To be truthful, my day did not start early, or in fast forward. A second cup of coffee, a talk show and a warm white dog on my lap. Oh, and pyjamas till nearly noon. My mind was gently perking while I did nothing. There was a set of pillow protectors six inches too long for the pillows I wanted protected. Shortening them and getting them onto the pillows took 15 minutes. And they have been sitting and waiting for weeks. Through the years, I have created wool comforters. Twin size, double size, queen size. Many duvet covers have been worn thin, discarded, replaced and now, there were comforters without a cover that came

HOMEBODIES Rita Friesen

close to fitting. I found one, in remarkably good condition! A double size, and don’t you know, the double size already has a good cover. So I modified the double to a twin and won that round. In the hunting and rooting, I realized that there are a number of items that are fit only for rags. No longer needing rags here at home, out they go. My linen closet shelves heaved deep sighs of relief. End of the comforter story is that only one hand made wool comforter now needs a new cover. Much better than I had imagined. I like the look of tidy closets, so it is a winning situation. Several years ago, I bor-

rowed an electronic keyboard from my grandsons. My intentions were noble and high. Reality is that I very seldom simply sit and play, even though I resurfaced my favourite pieces. I did use the keyboard to check if a hymn I was choosing was doable. Long story short, I wanted that space for the spare table. My goals for this winter include jig saw puzzles and quilting, and a table is much more serviceable than a keyboard. Here, I enlisted the assistance of a grandchild. We dismantled the unit, carefully carried it out to the garage, where, lo and behold, a truck is stored going to the very town the

keyboard wants to go! Problem solved! And the table. It belonged to my parents, maple, jack knife leaf extension, and had been stored, used, moved and reused countless times. Just the right size. A feeling of satisfaction for repurposing and cherishing. Walked the dogs. Down east of the cemetery, happy as our feet raced through the fallen leaves. Continuing along the trail, up the 72 steps, and then, for good measure, the loop below the hospital. Taking advantage of the mild temperature and fantastic trail right outside our door. Limited days left before the snow settles in. To complete my me day, coffee with a friend. Laughter, freedom to express frustrations and fears, safety and darn good coffee! I don’t take these free days frequently. And every time I do enjoy one, I resolve to take them more often. Yes…

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS A5

Observation

By Addy Oberlin he elections are over and done with. So now we can read all the complaints and disagreements with what has happened and what is still going to happen. All Canadian adults, young and old, had opportunity to present their vote in this democratic country. Maybe it did not all go as we had wished, but we are to have peace with the decisions that were made and show respect for authority, as the Bible tells us in 1 Timothy 2:1-3: “I exhort therefore, that, first of all, supplications, prayers, intercessions and giving of thanks be made for all, for kings and for all that are in authority, that we may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty. This is good and acceptable in the sight of God our Saviour.” We need to pray each day that those in authority over us will seek the Lord in their decision making. We should also be very thankful that we live in a free country where we can confess and live what we believe.


T

Letters

D-Day at Normandy

It was my pleasure and honour to make a presentation on behalf of Virden, Legion Branch #8, to the recipient of the French Legion of Honour decoration (Knights Class). However, as I stated in my introduction, 50 years “too late,” as there are so few remaining; time and age takes its toll. At one time, I have been told, the Government of Canada did have intentions of awarding a Canadian decoration to those who were involved with Operation Neptune, as it was titled, but what happened to those plans is anyone’s guess. The French console member, Bruno Burnichon, who pinned the medal, had this to say, as he explained the decision to honour those who liberated France: “Two years ago, at one of our meetings, the question was asked, ‘What can we do ?’ I said, ‘What do we lose by giving them the highest honour? Ifwe are here today, it is because of them.’” If we are here today, “it is because of them”. Somber, grim words, indeed. Sadly, our Government of Canada hasn’t recognized “their contribution” in a similar manner; nor have they recognized the contributions of the Cold War veterans, who proudly served from 1945 to 1990. All responded to roll call when Canada needed them, but now they are forgotten. Approximately 45,000 members did not return home. “The most deadly poison of our time is indifference” – St. Maximillian Kolbe. Lest we forget !   A cold war veteran, John Fefchak (CWO. Ret.) Virden,MB

Thumbs up, thumbs down

Would you like to send a thumbs up or thumbs down to an individual or group in the community? Please send it our way. Submissions must include a name and must be under 100 words. We want to hear from you! In person: 243 Hamilton St. Neepawa By fax: 204-476-5073 By email: news@neepawabanner.com


A6 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019

Helen Drysdale out of helen’s kitchen

Guyana

Guyana is a small country, located in the northeastern corner of South America. Geographical regions include a narrow and swampy coastal plain, a hillier sandy region, the Rupununi Savannah and the tropical rainforests. The climate is tropical with two rainy seasons (May to August, November to January). Guyana’s rainforest is one of only a few on the planet that has not been damaged by humans. It is home to a host of deadly creatures, including electric eels, flesh eating piranhas, poison dart frogs, venomous snakes and jaguars. Guyana has several giant species: giant river otters, giant anteaters, giant lilies and the giant South American Goliath Birdeater spider. Birdlife is plentiful in the country, with some 1,600 bird species. One of Guyana’s most famous sites is Kaieteur Falls. Located in Kaieteur National Park, the single drop falls are 226 metres high, nearly five times as high as Niagara Falls. It is one of Guyana’s most popular tourist destinations, however, it is a fly-in only location. Another attraction is Shell Beach, which stretches for 145 kilometres along the Atlantic coast. From March to August, four species of marine turtles come ashore to lay their eggs. Guyana attracts just a few thousand tourists a year. If it’s an off-the-beaten-path travel adventure you seek, then Guyana is it. Guyana is the only South American nation with English as the official language, however other languages are spoken. Indigenous peoples inhabited Guyana prior to European settlement and their name for the land, guiana, “land of water”, gave the country its name. Christopher Columbus sighted the Guyana coast in 1498, but it was the Dutch who began settlement. The indigenous peoples, who did not want to work on plantations and suffered from diseases introduced by the Europeans, scattered throughout the forested interior to live in peace. The Dutch began importing slaves from West Africa to cultivate the sugarcane. In 1814, the Dutch ceded three separate colonies to the British and the three were united under one flag and renamed British Guiana. Over the years ,the fertile lands initiated a tugof-war between major powers that resulted in the creation of three separate modern-day countries: Guyana, French Guiana and Suriname. In 1966, Guyana gained independence from Britain and became a republic in 1970. Since then, the political history of the country has been stormy at times. In 1978, Georgetown Guyana became international news due to the mass murder/suicide of a religious cult group led by American sect leader, Jim Jones. Jones and his 900-strong congregation committed suicide by poisoning. Not the best way to make headlines. Guyana has many natural resources, mainly its pristine rainforests, sugarcane plantations, rice fields and gold reserves. Despite all this, Guyana remains one of the poorest countries in South America. Influenced by the Spanish, the Dutch, the British and the French during the colonial conquest, their own indigenous peoples, the African slaves and the many more that arrived on their shores, Guyana has a melting pot of cuisines. Guyanese Pepperpot is the national food of Guyana. Pepperpot is a stew made of meat (usually beef, mutton, or pork), potatoes and peppers laced with cassareep (a sauce concocted from cassava juice and spices) and served with rice or roti. With water all around, one of the staples in Guyanese cuisine is fish. All fish are used, including piranhas and vampire fish. The Guyanese are very fond of fried chicken and lucky for them, KFC is in Guyana! From the Portuguese comes garlic pork, a variety of curries from the West Indies and from China comes Guyana style chow mein. They have many street foods for snacks. With “Chicken Foot”, there is actually no chicken in this snack. These are fried strips of a dough, made with flour, curry and cumin, formed into long sticks resembling chicken feet. Methai sticks are prepared by mixing flour, sugar, butter and baking power. They are fried in oil and coated in custard powder. The most popular fast food in Guyanese cuisine is egg balls. A boiled egg is covered with a mix of boiled, mashed cassava and raw eggs, butter and pepper and then fried. This country produces a multitude of exotic fruits that we have never seen or heard of in Canada. Limes grow everywhere in Guyana and this cookie recipe features them. Enjoy. Lime cookies 2 cups white flour 1 cup white sugar 1 tsp. baking powder 1 1/2 tsp. grated lime zest 1/2 tsp. salt 3 Tbsp. lime juice 1/2 tsp. nutmeg 1/4 cup white sugar 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1/4 tsp. nutmeg 3/4 cup butter, slightly softened 1/4 tsp. cinnamon In a medium bowl, stir together flour, baking powder, salt, nutmeg and cinnamon and set aside. In a bowl, cream together butter, sugar, lime zest and lime juice until fluffy. Add flour mixture and stir to combine. In a small bowl, combine 1/4 cup sugar, nutmeg, and cinnamon. Roll the dough into 30 to 36 balls and roll in sugar mixture. Place on lightly greased cookie sheets and flatten balls with the bottom of a glass that has been dipped in the sugar mix. Bake at 350°F for 10-12 minutes, or until lightly browned. Let cookies rest for 5 minutes before transferring to a rack to cool completely.

Think the Banner & Press only has local news? Think again! You can pick up the paper to get your weekly news, find a new recipe, look for jobs, go house hunting, even scout out upcoming events or sales in the area!

Central School Memories: The timeline of Central School

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BEAUTIFUL PLAINS ARCHIVES

Central School teachers ca. 1900: Mr. Cram, Mr. Stevenson, Miss Yemen, W.S. Shipley

By Rick Sparling Neepawa Banner & Press The Neepawa Press archives notes these milestones in the history of Neepawa’s Central School. The Neepawa Press, 1898 The town school board decided at its meeting on Monday evening last, to accept the plans and specifications prepared for the new Central School building by Messrs. Jones and Fusee. It was also decided to advertise for tenders for construction of the building according to these plans and also to offer debentures for sale. The Neepawa Press, January 1899 There was a formal opening of the new Central School on January 13th, when all parents or guardians and taxpayers were asked to inspect the new building and the teaching arrangements. A school entertainment was held in the Opera House at night. The Neepawa Press, 1906 Alterations are being made to the central school which not only add two rooms to the teaching capacity but 100 per cent to its appearance. The Neepawa Press, Friday, July 29, 1921 Renovations of the Central School are proceeding daily, but not rapidly, because of inability to induce any of the unemployed in Winnipeg to come hither to earn something. However, it is expected that new ceilings and floors, and what-

ever other repairs are to be made, will be completed in ample time for the reopening of the school. The Neepawa Press, Friday, August 9, 1940 The school board has approved of a plan submitted to them by the collegiate girls, whereby all the girl students are to wear uniforms to school this year. School opens on Sept. 3, so girls, be there wearing your navy-blue serge tunic, white cloth shirt, with black tie, black shoes and stocking.

The Neepawa Press, 1954 Neepawa Town Council at the regular meeting Monday night accepted the tender of $400 from Hiebert and Hannah of Portage la Prairie for the sale and demolition of the Central School building… The building was demolished in 1954. Memories of Central School runs every second week. If you have memories to share of Central School, please contact Rick at rickbarb@shaw.ca.

19111HH0


NOVEMBER 1, 2019

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS A7

TV AUCTION - Nov. 7, 2019 A Major Fundraiser of the

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Donor

NEEPAWA ROTARY CLUB Item

Retail Value

Sprucewoods Colony 50lb bags of Potatoes ($10 each) Tim Hortons - Neepawa Coffee Lovers Package + Wheat Kings Tickets Neepawa Tire 4 wheel alignment Clean Conscience Duct & Carpet Cleaning $100 Voucher for Couch + Chair Shannon Desjardins Framed Oil Painting “Winter Retreat” Hymie the Hair Cutter 4 - $17.00 hair cuts Chicken Corral 3x $25 Gift Certificates Westward Ford Sales (Neepawa) Full Vehicle Detailing + 4 Oil Changes NAPA Autoparts Mazergroup Npa Electric pressure washer and car cleaning kit Neepawa Vet Clinic $50 credit voucher Bamboo Garden Restaurant $40 Gift Certificate Camp Wannakumbac 1 Week Summer Camp at Clear Lake 7-Eleven Basket of Goodies Guinn Bros. Memorials Memorial Vase + Install Performance Exhaust & Brake Service $60 Gift Certificate Helen Drysdale Cooking Package 4U Home Decor & Consulting Mixed Media Art P. Baker Backhoe Service 20 yards screened gravel Sutton -Harrison Realty (Nikki Harvey Ashley) Restaurant Tour in Neepawa Neepawa Golf Club 4 Green Fees - no cart The Lily Nook $50 Gift Certificate Daughter On Call $50 Certificate Whitey’s Fitness Body Shop 3 months membership Enns Bros. Equipment Childrens FXR Winter Gear Mar Dee Enterprises 12 volt Deep Cycle Battery Farmery Estate Brewery 1 Gift Package of Farmery Products Kristy Sprik - Tupperware Consultant Bowls and Speedy Mando Slicer Nick’s Repair Service $100 Gift Certificate Studio One Jade - Hair Cut and Style Chalet Flooring and Window Fashions Area Rug (approx 5’ x 8’) Mazergroup-Neepawa New Holland CR9080 Model Combine McLaughlin GM GMC Mate Folding Chair w/Side Table McDonalds Restaurant 10 Extra Value Meals Marijka’s Therapy Clinic and Day Spa 1 hour Massage Orv’s Appliance Sales + Service 2 Throw Pillows + Basket + $75 Gift Certificate Yellowhead Physiotherapy 10 Pilates Classes Mowat Livestock / Jarvis Meats (Gladstone) Side of Beef (cut & wrapped) Northstar Seeds 10kg Northstar Instagreen lawn seed This N’ That Mfg 8 Sliding Shelves Installed Neepawa Pharmacy Men’s Gift Package Dreger’s Plumbing & Heating Milwaukee Compact Drill Set Springhill Hutterite Colony Case of pork back ribs - 10 Kg Jennifer Enns Photography Family Portrait Session Venus Hair and Body Care (Kelsey/Lori) Kid’s Hair Package Neepawa Drycleaners and Laundromat $120 Laundry Certificate SQ One Home Construction LED Patio Light Tree Bayhill Inn and Suites One Night Accommodation Gardewine North $250 freight voucher Lansdowne Recreation Commission 1 day rental of Arden Curling Rink Neepawa Natives 10- Pack Natives Game Tickets REMAX Prairie Mountain Fire Pit Becky Jury Hair Cut and Brow Wax Ag-West Equipment 1 Bag of Dog Food Leslee’s Esthetics Facial 1 week Campground fees + 1 week Family Swim Pass Town of Neepawa Boston Pizza 100 Gift Card Neepawa Vet Clinic $50 credit voucher Arden Dinner Theatre Group Table for 8 (Dec 6th or 7th) Shur-Gro Farm Services 50 Acres Custom Dry Application Herbs for Health $25 Gift certificate It’s Time Apparel & Promotions 6 - $50 Cert. (use in “even” months) Sista Thyme and PIY Paint Products(Ginny) Homemade Chocolate Package Neepawa Home Hardware & Thomas Window and Glass Pellet BBQ Yellowhead Windows CAT Professional Power Station Neepawa Motel 1 night stay - 2 people Venus Hair and Body Care (Kelsey/Lori) Hair Product and Hair cut with Lori MNP Chartered Accountants Lawn Chair Rolling Acres Redi-Mix Concrete $500 concrete delivered to Neepawa PromoTime Winter Survival Kit Studio One Allison - Hair Cut and Style Nutrien Ag Services - Franklin and Gladstone 1 Bag Round Up Ready Corn Seed Mowat Livestock / Jarvis Meats (Gladstone) Side of Beef (cut & wrapped) Val’s Pies voucher for 5 pies (baked or unbaked) Rotor’s Bakery Certificate for 2 large pizzas Studio One Naida - Hair Cut & Style Gladstone Auction Mart Certificate $100 booking in cattle Kinley-Thomson Chartered Accountants Inc. $200 Credit on accounting services Kulbacki Seeds 1 bag Grain Corn Seed Stella Jones $750 Voucher for Wood Products Shur-Gro Farm Services Lawn Care Package Betty Walker Acrylic painting Bank of Montreal Travel Bag and Matching Duffle Bag Gwen Myker Baryla Abstract Art Val’s Pies voucher for 5 pies (baked or unbaked) H & R Block - Minnedosa Office $50 Certificate (Neepawa or Minnedosa tax prep Neepawa and District Drop-in Centre 2 Annual memberships Lola’s Bakery $25 gift certificate Gill & Schmall Agencies/ Harris Pharmacy/John’s Electric/Hylife Travel Voucher Valley Optical Bolle Sunglasses Anonymous Paint a Pillow Package T.I.C. Parts & Service Gas Powered Leaf Blower Rocky Mountain Equipment Echo Gas Grass Trimmer A&L Get Active Sports Package Neepawa-Gladstone Coop Bulk Fuel 20 L synth winter oil + Hat + Jacket Ben’s Auto Repair $100 Certificate towards Labour Century 21 - Westman Realty Ltd (Troy Mutch/ Craig Frondall) 7 Day Accomodation Voucher Stoney Creek Transport Voucher - Livestock or Other Transportation Creative Memories Karen Ferguson Creative Memories Album

$10.00 $125.00 $105.00 $100.00 $480.00 $68.00 $75.00 $413.00 $200.00 $50.00 $40.00 $320.00 $50.00 $300.00 $60.00 $35.00 $30.00 $160.00 $75.00 $160.00 $50.00 $50.00 $150.00 $175.00 $140.00 $40.00 $68.00 $100.00 $29.00 $329.00 $150.00 $100.00 $75.00 $75.00 $125.00 $120.00 $60.00 $500.00 $130.00 $259.00 $100.00 $150.00 $50.00 $125.00 $369.00 $129.00 $250.00 $250.00 $100.00 $80.00 $35.00 $45.00 $62.00 $220.00 $100.00 $50.00 $240.00 $450.00 $25.00 $300.00 $60.00 $450.00 $150.00 $100.00 $60.00 $218.00 $500.00 $120.00 $29.00 $275.00 $60.00 $40.00 $29.00 $100.00 $200.00 $300.00 $750.00 $160.00 $125.00 $75.00 $150.00 $60.00 $50.00 $60.00 $25.00 $1,600.00 $174.00 $100.00 $190.00 $620.00 $100.00 $185.00 $100.00 $1,500.00 $330.00 $117.00

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Item

Retail Value

Manitoba Liquor & Lotteries $25 Liquor Mart Gift Cert White’s Funeral Home Taylor Made Golf Bag Angie’s Cutting Edge Ladies hair cut and products Neepawa Banner & Press $500 Advertising or Print Credit Penno Machining and Manufacturing Fire Pit Farmery Estate Brewery 1 Gift Package of Farmery Products Joyce Friesen Framed Oil Paintng called “Sunflower and Chickadee” Chicken Corral Sunday Breakfast Buffet for 6 Ag-West Equipment 1 Bag of Beef Feed McLaughlin GM Chevrolet Vintage Cooler Performance Exhaust & Brake Service $60 Gift Certificate Piston Ring Neepawa Car Care Package Springhill Hutterite Colony Case of pork back ribs - 10 Kg Kristy Sprik - 31 Gifts Consultant Thermal Tote Diamond Water Works Wine Making Kit Package Neepawa Pharmacy Women’s Gift Package Neepawa Shop Easy $50 Gift Certificate Neepawa Natives 10- Pack Natives Game Tickets Neepawa Gladstone Co-op & Beautiful Plains CU $1000 Gift Card for fuel Redfern Farm Services 40 acres Dry Floater custom application Roxy Theatre 12 month Stud. Pass (No 3D’s) Arts Forward (VCC) Rental of North Rm. & Kitchen Boston Pizza $100 Gift Card Team Electronics TV Wall Mount Neepawa Safeway 3- $25 Gift Cards Kelli Smith Homemade Afghan S-Mart 2 Boxes of Cup Soup Landon Cameron Golf Men’s Sweater and Golf Shirt Aleksio Tomoniko 2 - 10 litre jugs of VP480 Dairy Queen Vouchers for 2 - 10” Ice Cream Cakes Neepawa Engraving Services/ Neepawa Ink + Toner Printer + Ink Neepawa Natives 10- Pack Natives Game Tickets Brew’s Bros. $25 Gift Certificate Beautiful Plains Ag. Society Family riding membership in B.P.A.S. Ag Complex Neepawa Chiropractic Centre Chiropractic Pillow + Ice Pack Neepawa Tire 4 wheel balance + rotate It’s Time Apparel & Promotions 6 - $50 Cert. (use in “odd” months) Farm Credit Canada Gift Basket Northstar Seeds 10kg Northstar Instagreen lawn seed Mary Murray Husky Stuffed Dog Dr. Gerard G Murray Sun Glasses Westway Inn One Night Accommodation Yellowhead Centre Gift Certificate toward Yellowhead Hall Rental Gardewine North $250 freight voucher J.C. Lavich Construction (2010Ltd) Gun Cabinet Ben’s Auto Repair Formula Drift Model Car Middleton (Cory) Ent. $100 Gift Certificate for Tree Removal Anonymous 50’ Extension Cord and Jumper Cables H & R Block - Neepawa Office $50 Certificate (Neepawa or Minnedosa tax prep) Step-Into Action Physio & Wellness Ergoback Backrest Giant Tiger $50 gift card Town of Neepawa 1 week Campground fees + 1 week Family Swim Pass Studio One Sandra -Hair Cut & Style Nick’s Repair Service $50 Gift Certificate Neepawa-Gladstone Coop Ag-Petroleum 20 L Liberty Herbicide Nutrien Ag Services - Franklin and Gladstone 1 Bag Round Up Ready Corn Seed Taylor Jackson Financial Services Inc. Knife Set Manitoba Hydro Home Safety Kit NACTV Credit for 3 DVD’s Whitemud Watershed Conservation District Gift Basket Farmers Edge Cooler Package Giant Tiger $50 gift card

$25.00 $175.00 $100.00 $500.00 $300.00 $40.00 $200.00 $85.00 $45.00 $160.00 $60.00 $120.00 $100.00 $66.00 $75.00 $75.00 $50.00 $100.00 $1,000.00 $340.00 $250.00 $120.00 $100.00 $120.00 $75.00 $60.00 $25.00 $175.00 $130.00 $56.00 $221.00 $100.00 $25.00 $250.00 $85.00 $135.00 $300.00 $60.00 $65.00 $50.00 $200.00 $100.00 $350.00 $250.00 $269.00 $50.00 $100.00 $75.00 $50.00 $75.00 $50.00 $220.00 $29.00 $50.00 $240.00 $275.00 $85.00 $150.00 $45.00 $75.00 $50.00 $50.00

Rotary Also Thanks the Following Cash Donors J.B. Photography RM of Rosedale Rob Smith and Son Trucking Beaut. Pl. Community Medical Centre Mountain Dental Dr. C Fedorowich Brydges & Taylor Vet Clinic Taylor Law Office Neepawa Banner & Press

$50.00 TAC Ventures $550.00 Cozee Cornucopia B&B $100.00 FJ’s Building $200.00 Jed’s Repair $100.00 RBC Royal Bank (Neepawa) $100.00 Your Dollar Store with More $100.00 CIBC In Kind Advertising

$50.00 $50.00 $100.00 $60.00 $300.00 $100.00 $75.00 $1,000.00

All items purchased must be paid for and picked up (at ArtsForward) by noon Friday November 8, 2019.

Thank you to all our Donors and Buyers.

Proceeds towards equipment for Seedz N Sprouts Early Learning Center and Neepawa Middle School, along with other community projects, exchange programs and international projects

Thursday, November 7, 2019

The Auction is at the ArtsForward and Broadcast on NACTV. Starts at 6 p.m. TV viewing available at Neepawa Curling Club Lounge

Bidding: On Site • 12 Westman, 592 Bell, 30- MTS & Antennae Phone bidding 204-841-1647 & 204-476-0355 Text bidding 204-476-6214 & 204-476-0420


Looking Back 1989: RCMP women celebrate 15 years of service A8 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS

By Cassandra Wehrhahn Neepawa Banner & Press

110 years ago, Tuesday, November 2, 1909 A Winnipeg woman had her husband arrested for vagrancy last week. He is in the last stages of consumption and is being cared for by a sister. When the poor man answered his call in the police court, the lawyer was as much startled as the magistrate and declined to prosecute. 100 years ago, Friday, November 4, 1919 There are still 3,000 soldiers in England. We now have the opinion of Lord Beoverbrook that inflation is the real cause of the present financial troubles in Europe and the high cost of living everywhere. It is the duty of the government to grab every dollar of inf lation and reduce the public debts by that amount.

has enjoyed its last quiet weekend. The British have issued a white paper giving the details of Nazi tortures of Jews in concentration camps. The Nazis are said to have purged Ger ma n prisoners who are enemies of the regime. Since Oct. 12, as many as 1,000 have been executed. Mussolini has shaken up the Italian cabinet, replacing the chiefs of staff of the army and air force, six ministers and the secretary-general of the Fascist Party.

90 years ago, Friday, November 1, 1929 Prem ier A nderson announces t hat a l l semblance of sectarianism mu st d i sappea r f rom S a s k at c he w a n publ ic schools.

70 years ago, Thursday, Nov 3, 1949 The first flight to the North Pole was made in 1926 from Spitsbergen, Norway, by Floyd Bennet and Richard Byrd. Parents of children in the Neepawa town area have been warned to be on the watch for symptoms of measles by Dr. W. Watt, medical director of the Neepawa Health Unit… The d isease has an incubation period of about 10 to 14 days. That is to say, the child is usually infected and therefore carrying the germs 10 days before the cold appears and 14 days before the rash appears.

80 years ago, Friday, November 3, 1939 It is planned to operate fifty air training schools in Canada. Germany is now believed to have 2,000,000 troops on the western front. A dancer of Italian birth is being tried in Geneva as the leader of a spy ring. French troops fought off 1,000 Germans who tried to capture a French village this week. Na zi s pokesma n i n Berlin said this week that t he Un ited K i ngdom

60 years ago, Tuesday, November 3, 1959 The annual Hallowe’en Party sponsored by the Neepawa Lions Club for the kiddies and young people of the community was held Saturday night in the West Park School auditorium and was, as usual, highly successful. The appointment of Errick French Willis, 63, Q.C., M.A., LL B, as Manitoba’s new Lieutenant Governor was officially announced in Ottawa Friday by Prime Minister

NOVEMBER 1, 2019

J. G. Diefenbaker. Mr. Willis, who will become the first Manitobaborn Lieutenant Governor in t he h istor y of t he province, will succeed the Hon. J. S. McDiarmid. E f fect ive date of t he appointment is January 15, 1960.

50 years ago, Thursday, November 6, 1969 John Harvard, popular and controversial announcer who conducts a byline show on radio station CJOB Winnipeg, w i l l b e i n Ne e paw a Saturday afternoon to attend the formal opening of the House of Hobbies, wh ich is now located on Mountain Ave. Mr. Harvard will be on hand to talk to visitors during the afternoon, following the ribbon-cutting ceremony at 2:30 p.m. Mayor Harry Smith will off iciate at the ceremony. Proprietor David Cater moved his store to the new location last weekend. 40 years ago, Thursday, November 1, 1979 Beautiful Plains Credit Un io n i n d ow nt ow n Neepawa is t r y ing to conduct business as usual, but it’s a bit more difficult these days as workers lay Tyndall-stone on the new block wall. Construction cont inues on the new por t ion of t he Cred it Union, where the cement has already been poured. This new section features a basement meeting room and lunch room, and on the main level, expanded teller’s counters and offices. The existing building will be used as office space by the Credit Union. 30 years ago, Tuesday, November 7, 1989 The image is of men

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

Pictured is Constable M. C. Gillingham of the Neepawa RCMP, hard at work in 1989. Fifteen years prior, a group of 32 women were the first to enter the RCMP force, which had consisted only of men for the past 100 years.

dressed in scarlet red coats, with shiny, high brown boots and broad brimmed stetsons. For over 100 years, this was the traditional dress of the RCMP, a traditionally ma le frater n it y. T hat tradition was broken 15 years ago when a group of 32 women nervously began training in Depot Division, Regina’s RCMP training headquarters, on Sept. 23, 1974. Today, about 1,30 0 members of the 15,000 strong force are women. Seventy-four females are actively serving the force

TAYLOR LAW OFFICE

269 Hamilton Street

in Manitoba in all aspects of the force from highway patrol to administrative dut ies. Fema le pol ice officers are also in the Musica l R ide, RCM P Band, Air Division and as instructors at the Training Academy in Regina. “I like the risk, the more the risk, the better,” says M. C. Gillingham, the lone female officer in the Neepawa detachment.

“I like change and new challenges, so I joined the RCMP. 20 years ago, Wednesday, November 3, 1999 Ghast ly ghou ls and goblins of every description took to the streets of Neepawa last Sunday night to collect sugar-laden bounty from willing town folk.

Dr. Derek Papegnies Optometrist

Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0 Charles D. Taylor B.A., LLB.

499 Mountain Avenue

Sarah J. Fast, B. Comm. J.D. PH: (Hons), 476-2336

204-476-2002

Charles D. Taylor B.A., LLB. Michael J. Davids, B.A., LLB. Michael J. Davids, B.A., LLB.

204-476-2336

For Appointment

191116M0 191116M1


NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019 A9

Home Improvement Increase comfort, save energy windows may only need minor repairs, upgrades, or air sealing, while others may need to be replaced entirely. If it’s time to replace the windows, consider: • window type: while fixed windows have lower air leakage and are less expensive, operable windows allow for ventilation and emergency exit; • options such as triple pane, low emissivity (low-e) coatings and insulating spacers will minimize heat loss and condensation problems; • frame materials affect the insulation value, strength, maintenance requirements, and longevity of a window and can include wood, metal, fibreglass, or PVC; • overall window Energy Rating (ER) includes heat flow, air tightness, and solar gain; a higher ER is better; • “gas fillsâ€? with inert gases, such as argon or krypton, can be used to fill the space between the glass panes to reduce heat loss; • spacers are the material that separates the panes when making a sealed glass unit; low-conductivity (warm edge) spacers keep the glass around the edges of the window warmer, reduce condensation and improve energy performance; • warranties differ from supplier to supplier and window to window; compare before you purchase.

Submitted Manitoba Hydro

Windows and doors can account for up to 25 per cent of total house heat loss. If they are in poor condition, they can add even more to your home’s heating and cooling bills. By repairing or replacing your windows and doors you can increase comfort by keeping out cold winter drafts and making your home more comfortable and save money as exterior doors and windows that are in poor condition can add needlessly to your home’s heating bills. In addition to these benefits, a wellexecuted door and window retrofit can improve the appearance and value of your home, reduce the potential for a condensation problem, reduce outside noise and reduce fading of furniture and carpets due to UV rays. If you are looking to upgrade windows or doors, choose products that meet ENERGY STARŽ Zone 3 requirements, which are best suited for our climate. Windows Check the condition of your windows to determine if they should be repaired or replaced. They should open and close easily. Check the condition of the panes of glass, frames and hardware. Some

TA C

Ventures Inc.

Waste Management & Contracting Locally owned and operated

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Sports

A10 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS

MJHL Standings

(To Wednesday, Oct. 30)

Team

1. Wayway Wolverines 2. Portage Terriers 3. Steinbach Pistons 4. Winkler Flyers 5. Selkirk Steelers 6. Swan Valley Stampeders 7. Virden Oil Capitals 8. Dauphin Kings 9. OCN Blizzard 10. Winnipeg Blues 11. Neepawa Natives

Game results Wednesday, Oct. 23

Neepawa 3-2 SO Steinbach

First period No scoring Second period 05:02 NEEP Malchuk (1) ASST: Highet (2), Robin (3) Third period 09:54 STEIN Bettens (5) ASST: Naaykens (7), Loney (8) 07:31 NEEP Lapointe (2) ASST: Lieffers (5) 10:08 STEIN Bettens (6) Unasssited Overtime No scoring Shootout: NEEP: Lieffers - no goal; Carlson - no goal; Malchuk - no goal; Marshall - no goal; Bremner - no goal; Lapointe goal; Morrison - goal. Total - 2. STEIN: Purcell - no goal; Bettens - no goal; Behun - no goal; Loney - no goal; Clemons - no goal; Naaykens - goal; Neill - no goal. Total - 1. Goaltenders NEEP- Peterson 35/37 saves (W), STEIN - Anderson 27/29 saves (L) Attendance: 877 at T.G. Smith Centre

Saturday, Oct. 26

Winkler 6-5 Neepawa

First period 01:37 WINK Tookenay (2) ASST: Townsend (4), Kletzel (1) 03:48 NEEP Lieffers (6) Penalty Shot 07:01 WINK Cattani (3) ASST: Lamoureux (2), Albinati (10) PP 09:50 NEEP Gudnason (3) Unassisted 15:05 WINK Townsend (3) ASST: Arpin (1), Tookennay (2) 18:07 NEEP Smith (1) ASST: Lieffers (6), Morrison (2) Second Period 11:15 WINK Townsend (4) ASST: Albinati (11), SamBrook (2) 14:33 NEEP Smith (2) ASST: Carlson (2), Mowbray (3) 16:15 WINK Pawlenchuk (1) Unassited 18:17 WINK Cattani (4) ASST: Burgin (11), Albinati (12) Third Period 08:21 NEEP Carlson (3) ASST: Morrison (3), Mowbray (4) PP Goaltenders NEEP- Peterson 29/35 saves (L), WINK - Luding 18/23 saves (W) Attendance: Unavailable

U-18/U-16 Hockey U-18 AAA Yellowhead Chiefs (Boys)

Oct. 26. Chiefs 6-1 Wpg Bruins Oct. 27. Chiefs 8-0 Central Plains

U-18 AAA Chiefs (Girls)

Oct. 27. Westman 3-2 Yellowhead

U-16 Chiefs (Boys)

Oct. 26. Chiefs 7-1 Interlake Oct. 27. Chiefs 2-2 Southwest

U-16 Chiefs (Girls)

Oct. 25. Wpg Titans 2-0 Oct. 26. Chiefs 5-2 APHA

U-18 AAA Central Plains Capitals (Girls)

Oct. 25. Eastman 7-0 Central Plains Oct. 26. Wpg Ice 4-0 Central Plains

G W

17 15 13 15 15 13 18

14 14 15 15

10 10 9 9 9 8 7 7 6 4 3

L OT/SO PF

4 4 2 5 6 4 8

3 1 2 1 0 1 3

6 7 10 12

PA Pts

60 51 40 59 53 45 66

1 1 1 0

48 36 31 51 49 40 75

50 40 40 33

23 21 20 19 18 17 17

45 46 59 60

15 13 9 6

Points G 1. Hunter Cloutier (Vdn) 9 2. Nakodan Greyeyes (Daup) 7 3. Kolten Kanaski (Vdn) 11 4. Baron Thompson (Daup) 10

A 13 15 10 11

Leading scorers (Natives) G

A Pts

Leading scorers (MJHL)

5. Tanner Andrew (Vdn)

11 7

1. Eli Lieffers 2. Cooper Morris 3. Konnor Carlson

6 2 3

5 5 2

Pts

22 22 21 21 18

11 7 5

Goaltenders 1. M. Lenz (Stein)

W 9

L SV% GAA 2 0.923 2.15

2. C. Johnston (Port)

4

1 0.913 2.22

4. N. Moore (Port)

6

4 0.900 2.49

5. D. Rodrigue (OCN) 2

2 0.920 2.67

3. T. Phinney (Way)

8

5 0.912 2.43

Tiger Hills Hockey East G W 1. Neepawa 1 1 2. Minnedosa 1 1 3. Cartwright 0 0

L ETL Pts 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0

5. Gladstone 1 0 6. Pilot Mound 1 0

1 1

4. MacGregor

0 0

West 1. Hartney 2. Boissevain 3. Killarney 4. Melita 5. Wawanesa 6. Deloraine 7. Souris

G W 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0

0

0

0

0 0

0 0

L ETL Pts 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0

ETL refers to extra time losses (Overtime and shootout losses)

THHL scoring Leading scorers (THHL) 1. Matt Lowry (Neep) 2. Lance Nugent (Neep) 3. Del Cowan (Hart) 4. Matt Saler (Minn) 5. Riley Bodin (Hart)

G 3 2 1 3 2

A Pts 2 5 2 4 3 4 0 3 1 3

High School JV Girls Volleyball

Oct. 28. NACI 2 games to 0 Erickson Oct. 28. NACI 25-14, 25-10 Minnedosa Oct. 30. NACI vs. MacGregor

NOVEMBER 1, 2019

Neepawa Farmers win home opener Tiger Hills Hockey League season gets underway

By Eoin Devereux

Neepawa Banner & Press

The Neepawa Farmers got off to a bit of a sluggish start in the first two periods of their home opener for the Tiger Hills Hockey League (THHL) regular season. Fortunately, the team more than made up for that in the third period, on the way to a 7-3 win over the Pilot Mound Pilots. The game was played on Friday, Oct. 25, at the Yellowhead Arena in Neepawa. For the opening period, it was Pilot Mound who appeared to have all the momentum, outshooting Neepawa 6-2 in the first five minutes of action. One of those shots appeared to be a goal by the Pilots on a power-play. After a referees’ conference at centre ice, however, that apparent goal was waved off, as the play was whistled dead, just before the puck passed the goal line. Pilot Mound would make up for that by scoring a pair a little later in the first, to take an early lead. Neepawa’s Ben Rainka would score just before the end of the first period, making it 2-1 for the Pilots. Dawson Waddell and Matt Lowry assisted on the goal. In the second period, it would be Pilot Mound collecting the next goal, as Brett Pinkerston scored on a short-handed chance, just 8:27 into the middle frame. That third Pilots’ goal seemed to spark Neepawa’s competitive fire, as they started pushing back hard for a goal of their own. They’d find it relatively quickly, as Rainka picked up his second of the night on a power-play. Bret Levandoski and Kyle MacDonald

Attention coaches, parents and supporters! The Banner & Press needs your help to highlight our figure skaters and gymnasts! Send us your competition photos and results to be included in our sports section! Anything from Neepawa, Minnedosa, Gladstone and elsewhere around the region is appreciated. Send submissions to sports@neepawabanner.com

PHOTO BY EOIN DEVEREUX

Ben Rainka (#23) scored a pair of goals for Neepawa during the Farmers’ home opener on Saturday, Oct. 26.

picked up the helpers on this one. Then, just before the end of the second, Lowry tied things up at 3-3. Robby Moar and Lance Nugent had the assists. In the third, it was all Farmers, as the team scored four unanswered goals, to put the game away. Nugent and Lowry both ended up with a pair in the final 20 minutes, to seal the win for the home side. Layne Anderson earned the win in net for Neepawa, while

Keegan Blehm got tagged with the loss. Matt Lowry led the way in points with five (3 goals - 2 assists), while Lance Nugent was close behind, with a four point performance (2G - 2A).

scored for Minnedosa on the night, with Ryan notching a pair and Dayton collecting one. For Gladstone, Jesse Toth (2G - 1A) and Sean Kubas (1G - 2A) were the leading scorers.

Minnedosa defeat Gladstone A three goal night from Minnedosa’s Matt Saler led to a 6-3 win for the Bombers over the Gladstone Lakers on Saturday, Oct. 26. Ryan and Dayton Heino also

Other action Elsewhere around the league, the Hartney Blues defeated the Deloraine Royals 4-2 on Friday, Oct. 25. The next night, Hartley returned to the ice, beating the Souris Elks 8-3.

11th Annual Community

SPORTS DINNER & AUCTION Please join us

Saturday, November 9th, 2019 Yellowhead Centre Hall, Neepawa, MB.

$80 per person • Cocktails 5pm ~ Dinner 6pm Sports Person of the Year Award Presentation Live Auction Sports Memorabilia

Guest Speaker: Hockey Night in Canada, Sportsnet & ESPN Broadcaster

LEAH HEXTALL

Hockey comic:

KELLY TAYLOR Tickets Available at: The Neepawa Banner & Press, Harris Pharmacy, Team Electronics, and the Neepawa Natives Store at the Yellowhead Centre during all home games Proceeds from this event benefit the community owned Neepawa Natives Junior ‘A’ Hockey Club. As well, a portion of the proceeds will be donated to Miles for Mental Health.


Sports

NOVEMBER 1, 2019

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS A11

NACI advances to Murray Black Cup Tigers defeat Moosomin in Rural Manitoba Football League semi-final

By Eoin Devereux

Neepawa Banner & Press

The Neepawa Tigers are one step away from claiming the Rural Manitoba Football League’s (RMFL) Murray Black Cup, after scoring an impressive 61-20 win over the Moosomin Generals. The game, which was played in Neepawa on Saturday, Oct. 26, proved to be a real offensive showcase for the Tigers, both in the air and on the ground. Quarterback Ward Brister went 7-for-14 in passing, with five of those completions going for touchdowns. Braden Haslen caught three of those scores (45, 41 and 50 yard TD catches), while Ryan Bellisle wrangled one touchdown and a two-point conversion. The other touchdown was caught by Rylan Bradley, who also collected a two-point conversion. The Tigers also came up big on the ground, with Conner Kasprick rushing eight times for 166 yards, including a 50, 85 and two yard TD run. Robby Salta also contributed, with eight rushes for 56 yards. The NACI defence did its part to ensure victory as well, with three sacks, a fumble recovery and three interceptions. Two of those three picks were made by Haslen, who turned one of them into a 100 yard touchdown reception. Angelo Verbo had

the other INT. Riley Neufeld, meanwhile, had 11 tackles and a pair of sacks. In the other semi-final game, the Dauphin Clippers defeated ParkWest 18-16. The Murray Black Cup final will now be played on Saturday, Nov. 2 at 2:00 pm in Neepawa, and will feature the NACI Tigers facing the Dauphin Clippers. On the Doug Steeves side of the playoffs, Swan Valley defeated Virden 28-6 and SouthWest upset Interlake 35-34, to set up the championship on Saturday, Nov. 2 in Swan River. NACI Tigers game statistics Offence: Passing - Brister (7-for-14; five touchdowns, 272 yards). Receiving - Haslan (four receptions, three TDs, 139 yards); Bellisle (two receptions, one TD, 125 yards); Bradley (one catch, one TD, eight yards); Guilbert (one 2-point conversion catch). Rushing - Kasprick (eight rushes, 166 yards including 50, 85, and 2 yard TD runs); Salta (eight rushes for 56 yards). Defence: Neufeld (11 tackles, two sacks), Martin (5T), Birnie (5T), Falk (5T), Kasprick (4T), A. Willerton (3T, one fumble recovery), Verbo (3T, one interception), Bellisle (3T, one sack), Haslan (1T, two interceptions, including a 100 yard TD interception), Jakubowski (2T), Guilbert (2T), Magwood (2T), Maddever (1T).

Neepawa and OCN make a deal

By Eoin Devereux

Neepawa Banner & Press

PROMOTE YOUR FARM-RELATED BUSINESS Our Nov. 29 Ag section is a great way to help your customers wrap up 2019 and get the start on 2020! Advertise your end of season or pre-booking specials!

November 29 (deadline Nov. 13) Colour prices: FILE PHOTOS

Bill Hilhorst (left picture) has been traded to the OCN Blizzard in exchange for forward Matthew MasonVandel (right picture).

Neepawa Natives Junior “A”

Hockey team Neepawa Natives home games

Nov 3 at 7:30 p.m. vs Winkler • Nov 17 at 6:30 p.m. vs OCN Nov 20 at 7:30 p.m. vs Dauphin Parents Weekend November 8-11 Friday, November 8 - vs Virden - 7:30 p.m. Saturday, November 9 Sports Dinner & Sports Person of the Year awards Remembrance Day Game - Honoring area Veterans Monday, November 11 - vs Portage - 4:00 p.m.

Club 55 Bowling

Oct. 18: Ladies’ High Single & Triple - Barb Grumpelt 203 & 540. Men’s High Single - Frank Porada 258. Men’s High Triple - Len Pritchard 623. Other Scores to Note - Marion Single 160; Gail McGregor 165; Doreen Smith 165, 150; Vivian Oswald 154; Darrell Gabler 188, 182, 195; Pauline Hailstone 159, 177; Jim King 156, 170; Frank Porada 200; Judy Gabler 172, 154; Doug Pettigrew 170; Muriel Porada 153, 153; Lawrence Smith 179, 169; Don Denoon 184, 179, 234; Len Pritchard 228, 247; Barb Grumpelt 193. October Bowlers of the Month: Gail McGregor & Frank Porada.

Business card: $83.19 1/8th page: $196.88 1/4th page: $348.83 1/2 page: $571.97 Full page: $990.94

Banner B & Press Spring Ag Issue Ch 2019 • Vol.123 No. 33 • Neepaw

a, Manitoba

SECTION

ore time on the Kreiser farm

Checking cows

Contact Ken or Kate at 204-476-3401 ads@neepawabanner.com

Friday, March 15,

neepawa

The Neepawa Natives have traded 19-year-old defencemen Bill Hilhorst to the OCN Blizzard, in exchange for 17-year-old forward Matthew MasonVandel. Hilhorst had been with the Natives since the 20162017 MJHL season, playing 99 games with the team and garnering10 points (one goal - nine assists). Mason-Vandel, meanwhile, played 10 games last season for OCN and had four points on the year. (two goals - two assists). He is currently playing with the Interlake Lightning.

PHOTOS BY CASSANDRA WEHRHAHN

Ryan Belisle (#53) advances the football for NACI, during the Murray Black Cup semi-final game on Saturday, Oct. 26. NACI would eventually win this game over Moosomin 61-20, moving them into the championship game against Dauphin.

and doing chores

around the farm.

It must be warming

up, some kids wore

ski pants and some

did not.

PHOTO COURTESY

OF TINA KRIESER

We’d love feature pictures of local farms. If you have a photo you’d like to share, please send it to us at news@neepawabanner.com


A12 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019

Arden haunted house brings the Halloween spirit From Oct. 23 to 25, the Arden Curling Rink put on its annual Halloween costume, transforming into a haunted house. People of all ages from the surrounding area visited the spooky site for a good scare.

Le f t: A c ur sed skele ton pir ate crept up on unsuspecting passers-by from his ship, hoping to get a good scream out of them. Right: A giant spider must be living in the curling rink. It spun a tangle of cobwebs to entrap visitors for its next meal.

PHOTOS BY DIANE WARNER

Above: A one handed, one eyed pirate beckoned visitors into the haunted house, right into her terrifying trap.

Fuel Good Day 2019!!! Neepawa-Gladstone Co-op raised over

$5600

for the fire departments in our communities.

Preston Jarema presents a cheque to Neepawa Fire Chief Yves Guillas

Josh Guillas presents a cheque to Gladstone Fire Chief Lorne Hunt.

Neepawa

Gladstone

204-476-2267

204-385-2908


NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019 A13

Neepawa Natives laun

Plumas UCW update Neepawa Natives launch Ha

Banner area pups donate blood

NEEPAWA, MB. Aug 19, 2015 - A new initiative Natives board member C from the Neepawa Natives junior ‘A’ hockey club is the next few days, farms w reaching out to the region’s agricultural industry. Har- of Neepawa will receive a www.neepaw vest for Hockey is a project where local farm families for Hockey concept. are being asked to donate a portion of their crop to “This is something the help support the operations of the club. We’ve mailed out details As part of the donation, all participating farmers and Neepawa and surrounding their immediate families would be recognized on sig- community, so it’s very im nage at the Yellowhead Arena, as well as online on the plore options for making team website. The Neepawa Natives are also planning said Tibbett. NEEPAWA, MB. Aug 19, 2015 - A new initiative well. Natives board member Cam Tibbett said that w Thanks toTeam those whomanager a Harvest for Hockey game night early in the 2015general M from the Submitted Neepawa Natives junior ‘A’ hockey club is the next few days, farms within a 20 kilometre r 2016 MJHL regular season, where the club would important for the hockey on the tables – it was reaching out to the region’s agricultural industry. Har- worked of Neepawa will receive a letter outlining the Ha Plumas UCW recognize its contributors andfamilies extend afor free gate concept. ad- connection to the region’s vest for Hockey is a project where local farm Hockey great to have so many young area stronga mission of upatoportion six tickets to crop all oftothe participating are being asked to donate of their “This is something“The the team is has very aexcited for Hockey farmers families. Neepawa Natives are the look We’ve mailed details to farms re help supportHarvest the operations ofgroup the club. people helpout with this task.across Our UCW metand onfarming

As part of the donation, all participating farmers and Neepawa and surrounding area has a vibrant far Under socorrespondence Oct. families 15, with thebefour memtheir immediate would recognized on sig- community, it’s NEEPAWA very important for the team PRESS nage at the Yellowhead Arena, as well as online on the a plore options for making partnerships note from Laurel was with farm bers present, reporting four R0011063026 team website. The Neepawa Natives are also planning said Tibbett.

and manager a report to those shut in.2015- shared a Harvestvisits for Hockey game sick night or early in the Team general Mylesfrom Cathcart said it’s 2016 MJHL regular season,opened where thewith club would importantfor for the hockey team read to establish a str Hope Healing The meeting a recognize its contributors and extend a free gate ad- connection to the region’s agricultural base. financial prayer mission of up to sixfrom tickets Wendy. to all of the participating (CBMI). “The areaLaurel’s has a strong farming heritage an Harvest for Hockey farmers and farming families. Neepawa Natives are looking forward to making report was read by Norma inNEEPAWA her absence. PRESS R0011063026 Pollyanna gave her report, stating that there is $158.50 in this account as we approach Christmas. Nov. 21 will be our annual meeting – reports need to be prepared for this meeting. Laura adjourned this meeting and the Mizpah benediction was repeated.

Minutes were adopted as corrected. The church will be decorated tomorrow in time for our fall supper (due to the storm, there was no Thanksgiving service). Everything is in place for the fall supper and on that note, we would like to thank the generous donors, the kitchen helpers, those who worked in the cutting room and those who cleaned up so

The

The

N N

e Wan &

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ALUMINUM REPAIR CENTER Dr. Gerard Murray On Tuesday, Oct. 1, the first ever Animal Blood Donor Clinic took place at the Neepawa Veterinary Clinic. Dr. Gerard Murray Dealer Permit #0054

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Michael Philippot, of the Canadian Animal Blood Bank in Winnipeg, was present to draw blood from a number of dogs, whose owners had pre-booked. The animals did not experience any discomfort during the procedure and received treats and a bandana afterwards. The donations were delivered to the blood bank for use in future surgical veterinary operations. Top photo: Canadian Animal Blood Bank technician inserts a needle in the jugular vein of Chase, a Belgian Malinois. Above left: Michael Philippot from Canadian Animal Blood Bank in Winnipeg, who came to Neepawa to help with the blood drive in Neepawa. Above right: Tori, a Belgian Malinois, proudly displays a blood donor bandana after donating blood at the Neepawa Vet Clinic.

Whe alig


A14 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019

United Church brings glimpse of Residential Schools to Neepawa

The Brandon Indian Residential School Mobile Learning Centre has stopped at the Neepawa United Church for a little over a week. The display opened on Oct. 25 and will be at the church until Monday, Nov. 9. PHOTOS BY KIRA PATERSON

Gladstone Auction Mart Cattle Market Report October 29, 2019 Steers

3-400 lbs. 4-500 lbs. 5-600 lbs. 6-700 lbs. 7-800 lbs. 8-900 lbs. 900+ lbs. Bulls

$2.00 - 2.73 $1.90 - 2.58 $1.74 - 2.20 $10 - 2.11 $1.55 - 2.00 $1.50 - 1.92 $1.75 - 1.82 $0.85 - 1.04

Heifers

One reason the Neepawa United Church brought this display into its foyer was to give people a glimpse of what life was like for the students of the Residential School in Brandon through photographs. Another reason the church is hosting this display is to share why the United Church of Canada apologized for their part in Canadian Residential Schools. When the schools first started, the government asked Anglican, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic and Methodist churches to run the schools, however, in 1925, the United Church took over 16 of the schools for the Methodist and Presbyterian churches. In addition to photographs, the display features lots of information, including a map of all the Canadian Residential Schools (above left), copies of the United Church’s official apology to the First Nations and stories from those who attended a Residential School.

RCMP arrest male for multiple offences Submitted RCMP Media Release On Oct. 25, at approximately 8:10 p.m., Amaranth RCMP received a call from a concerned citizen reporting a dangerous driver on Highway 16, near Highway 50. The caller advised that she was driving west on Highway 16 when she noticed an eastbound vehicle driving dangerously and swerving all over the road. The caller pulled onto the shoulder to avoid the vehicle, however, the east-

bound vehicle continued towards her, which forced her to drive into the ditch. The suspect vehicle then drove to a residence along Highway 16. The driver of the vehicle exited and approached the homeowner, pointed a firearm in his direction and stole his truck. The suspect then drove the stolen truck into a ditch, got stuck, at which time the driver and passenger fled on foot. Amaranth RCMP, who were en route to the erratic driver call, as well as Police Dog Services, immediately

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attended the scene of the armed vehicle theft and successfully tracked down the driver and passenger. Both were arrested and after further investigation, it was determined that the female passenger was a victim of assault and kidnapping. She was known to the driver. The driver, a 31-yearold male, was arrested and charged with Kidnapping, Robbery with a Firearm,

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Breaking and Entering, Forcible Conf inement, two counts of Assault, two counts of Uttering Threats, Dangerous Operation of a Motor Vehicle, Theft and Mischief. He has been remanded into custody. RCMP continue to investigate.

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NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019 A15

Neepawa Rotary Club and DQ team up for World Polio Day

PHOTOS BY JOHN DRINKWATER

World Polio Day was on Thursday, Oct. 24 and the Neepawa Rotary Club and Dairy Queen partnered to raise money for Rotary International’s work to eradicate polio. From 4:30 to 7:30 p.m., Dairy Queen donated half of the proceeds of their sales to the initiative, while members of the Neepawa Rotary Club volunteered their services at the restaurant. The total amount raised on World Polio Day, including personal donations, was $1,591.76. Pictured left: Rotarian Wayne Jacobsen cleans tables at Dairy Queen during the fundraiser on Thursday, Oct. 24. Pictured above: Miranda, Anne and Seth Leybourne receive their meal from Rotarian Berg Wopnford during the World Polio Day fundraiser.

You and your health

advice for a healthier lifestyle

Rotator cuff injuries

By Dr. Mark Perrett BSCs DC Chiropractor The rotator cuff of the shoulder is made of four muscles that attach onto the humerus from the scapula (the shoulder blade). Their main purpose is to stabilize the shoulder joint and scapula and help you move your arm at the shoulder joint. This group of muscles is often injured at its insertion on the arm, where they join together. Cuff tears are the most common shoulder disease in patients with shoulder problems and is prevalent in 21 per cent of the general population and estimated to affect 50 per cent of people over 50 years old. These statistics make cuff injuries a very common presentation in my office. Rotator cuff tendinitis and tears Tendinitis: A tendinitis injury is due to overuse of the muscle, repetitive micro injuries, or secondary to trauma. The junction of the muscle tendon to the humerus bone gets inflamed and irritated, causing stiffness, pain, loss of joint motion and joint crepitus.  Tears: There are two

types of rotator cuff tears: full thickness and a partial thickness tear. A partial tear occurs when one of the muscles is partially torn and a full thickness tear occurs when a tear occurs through the whole muscle attachment or it gets pulled off of the bone. Acute tears most commonly are caused when a fall occurs with an outstretched arm and the ball of the humerus forcefully stretches the rotator cuff. Chronic tears come from repetitive actions, like throwing a ball, rotation of the arm and overhead work that can cause fraying and damage to the muscle overtime. Often inactivity and age leads to muscle wasting and the odds of injury increases.  

Symptoms Symptoms of a rotator cuff injury include: 1. Trouble lifting your arm forward or to the side. 2. Give away weakness when using the arm. 3. Pain around the shoulder joint, mainly on the side. 4. Clicking or popping when moving your arm. 5. Trouble sleeping on your shoulder. 6. Pain stretching your arm

across your chest. 7. Acute pain and swelling.

managing the inflammation and irritation at the injury site. The use of ice and antiDiagnosis inflammatory medication is A thorough physical exam your first line of treatment. involving muscle testing, The second goal is to regain range of motion testing proper range of motion of and examination of your the joint and thirdly strength neck and mid-back will be work is needed.   performed. The doctor is Manual therapy: Conlooking for weakness, muscle servative, manual therapy is activation pain, decreased appropriate for partial tears range of motion and muscle or tendonopathies of the tenderness.  rotator cuff. Conservative Another common symp- care with the use of manual tom is the impingement sign.  therapies including masThis occurs when tissue is sage, ultrasound, current, pinched between the ball acupuncture, chiropractic of the humerus and the care, and strength training. roof of the shoulder joint. The proper stretches and A pinching feeling occurs exercises will be given  so when lifting your arm to 90 that you can decrease indegrees. The cuff muscle is flammation and regain responsible for helping the proper movement. Rotator ball of the humerus move cuff injuries can result in through the shoulder socket.  compensatory movement When the cuff is damaged patterns, where the muscle or inflamed, there is an im- of the neck and mid back proper movement pattern are engaged to help move and an impingement occurs.  the shoulder. This results in If an exam reveals suspi- neck and back pain that can cion of a tear, diagnostic im- be treated with chiropractic aging is needed. Ultrasound care.  can be used to compare both Injections: Sometimes, shoulders, but most often, an your medical doctor might MRI is the test of choice.  suggest a steroid injection to help reduce chronic inTreatment flammation. This is often Treatment of a rotator suggested if the injury is cuff injury always starts with interfering with sleep and

causing a lot of pain. The research shows that often injections provide temporary relief and should be used conservatively, as they can contribute to weakening of the tendon. Surgery: Full thickness tears and some partial tears require surgery. There are three main surgical procedures, including: open repair, arthroscopic repair and mini-open repair. The choice of surgery largely depends on degree of the tear and the structural integrity of the joint. Your surgeon will discuss what option is best for you.  Surgery is usually a quick procedure and you will be home the same day.  The rotator cuff is a common muscle group to get

injured. Overuse or trauma can cause damage to the muscles and result in a lot of shoulder pain. If you are worried about a rotator cuff injury, visit our office for an evaluation and a receive a treatment plan that will help your shoulder. We will be able to determine if you need a surgical consult or if you are a candidate for conservative care. Activity fact: Factors that increase your chances of having a rotator cuff tear include: being male, having a job that requires repetitive physical work, age and if you have arthritis in your shoulder. Get active and keep your shoulders strong to avoid injury!! For more health related articles, visit neepawachiropractic.com/ blog


A16 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019

Classifieds –––––––––– Thank You

A big THANK YOU to Norm and the family for arranging the Celebration 75. Thanks to everyone who came and/ or wished me happiness, for the cards and gifts, and to the band for the good music. Good food and great people made for a good party. Thanks from Pearl. _____________________ The family of Edna Rosling of Gladstone would like to express our thanks to the friends and neighbours who reached out to offer support and condolences. The donations, food, flowers, cards and visits were greatly appreciated. Thank you to the staff and volunteers of Third Crossing Manor for the care you administered. To Wendy Denbow for the service and the UCW for the lunch, and to Clarke’s of Gladstone for the arrangements.

Searching for something? Discover it in the classifieds!

–––––––––– Coming Events

A 100th Birthday Party is being planned for the Franklin Memorial Hall on July 18, 2020. The committee is looking for past/present families/ school friends that used to call the Franklin area home so we could send them invitations to come help us celebrate. If you can help us, please call 204867-3431 or send an email to thefranklinmemorialhall@ gmail.com with a name, phone number or address. _____________________ Minnedosa Fun Fest's Annual Christmas Craft & Gift Sale Saturday, November, 2, 2019 from 10 am-3pm. Held at the Minnedosa Community Conference Centre (63 Main Street). Shop from over 40 crafters, artisans and homebased businesses! Find unique Christmas gifts and something for yourself! There will be a raffle, hourly draws for gift certificates to be used at the sale and more! Lunch will be available.

Please check your ad when first published

Obituary Ruth Adeline Mauthe With her husband John and daughter Joanne by her side, Ruth Adeline Mauthe (Single) passed away peacefully on Tuesday, October 22nd, 2019 at Third Crossing Manor in Gladstone. Adeline was born on March 28th, 1930 on the family farm at Waldersee. Mom was blessed to be a part of a family of 13 siblings, so life was never boring. She attended Cory School, which was across the road from the farm. So, no excuse that you couldn’t make it to school! On October 24th, 1948, John and Adeline were married and began their life together. They worked hard at farming to provide for their family. Mom loved gardening and preserving food for the winter. She also took delight in her flowers and there were always many to admire! She worked alongside Dad, whether it was milking cows, gathering the eggs or driving the tractor and binder. She was active in the community, being part of Ladies Ministry at church, and was a leader for 4-H Garden and Sewing Clubs. She passed her gardening, sewing and knitting skills down to her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. In fact, she continued to knit until only recently. Mom and Dad also enjoyed their many years of bowling. In May of 2016, due to Adeline’s health, Mom and Dad moved from the farm to Plumas. Then, in Oct. of 2018, they moved to Centennial Apts. in Gladstone. Mom became a resident of Third Crossing Manor in Dec. 2018. Adeline was predeceased by her parents, 9 siblings and son-in-law Ron Fehr. She is survived by her husband John; daughters Carol Mauthe, Joanne Fehr, Alice Mauthe, Sally Rossnagel; and son Larry Mauthe; Joanne’s children: Shelley (Brian) Hamm, Jennifer (Murray) Hiebert, Michael (Janice) Fehr and great grandchildren Joshua, Natasha, Lauren, Nahum, Caleb and Jocelyn. She is also survived by sisters Martha, Erna, Elsie and brother Alfred, as well as numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. Her family extends heartfelt thanks to the TCM staff and Dr. Laurelyn Juadiong for their kind, compassionate care. Their dedication is much appreciated. Funeral Service was held on Saturday, October 26, 2019 at the Christ Lutheran Church, Waldersee with Interment in the Waldersee Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Seven Regions Health Foundation (to go towards Third Crossing Manor Courtyard Fund) or to a charity of one’s choice. Clarke’s Funeral Home, Gladstone~MacGregor www.clarkesfuneralhome.com

Classified Ad Deadline:

To place an ad:

Tuesday Noon

• Cancellations and corrections only within business hours and corresponding deadlines • Please check your ad when first published the Neepawa Banner & Press will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. • All copy is subject to approval by the Neepawa Banner & Press. • We reserve the right to edit copy or to refuse to publish any advertisement we deem illegal, libelous, misleading or offensive

–––––––––– Coming Events

Minnedosa Adult Learning Centre’s November registrations start Fri., Nov. 1st. Contact: Val Gawel at 131 Main St. South. 204-8672519 alc@rrsd.mb.ca _____________________ St Dominic’s Bazaar, 416 1st Ave, Neepawa, Sat. Nov. 9, 10:30-1:30. 15 vendors, including cookies, perogies, spring rolls, jewellery, baby clothing, socks, oils, woodwork, bags (31) and Tupperware. Lunch available. BBQ hamburger or smokie plus perogies, coleslaw, dessert and beverage for $10. 12 and under $5. Free admission. Come join us!

–––––––––– Notice

Alcoholics Anonymous meets at the Neepawa Hospital boardroom (downstairs), Thursdays, 7:30 pm

–––––––––– Notice

Arden Hall, cap. 255. Park, camping and sports facilities, rink, curling ice, kitchen and lounge. Call Jody 204368-2202 _____________________ Drug problem? Narcotics Anonymous can help. Meetings on Sat at 7 p.m. and Tues at 7 p.m. at Calvary Chapel, 221 Hamilton St. Neepawa

–––––––––– Personal

Crisis Pregnancy Centre Winnipeg: Need to talk? Call our free help line, 1-800-6650570 or contact our Westman office: 204-727-6161

–––––––––– For Sale

1/4 section grain land for sale. NW 15-14-14 W, 6 miles east of Neepawa. 1-431-758-1937 _____________________ Oak stove wood and flax straw bales. Call 204-8410843

Obituary Sigridur “Marjorie” Rhodes Peacefully, Marjorie passed away at the age of 79 years at Gladstone, MB, on October 21, 2019. Marjorie was born August 2, 1940 in Winnipeg, MB to Sveinn “Swannie” and Sigridur “Sigga” Egilson. She attended school at Big Point and Langruth schools. After leaving school, she went to work at the Royal Bank in Langruth for a few years and later on worked in homecare. Marjorie and Harold were married October 24, 1959 and resided at Big Point, near Lake Manitoba, on Bar VI Ranch. Together, they raised three children, Tracey, Shelley and Wesley. Harold and Marjorie farmed alongside Marjorie’s father and brother. Marjorie was a homemaker, had a big garden and was always busy with berry picking, preserving and canning. She loved to sew and shared her talents, teaching sewing and crafts at the local 4H clubs for many years and making wedding dresses and bridesmaid dresses. When the girls were small, she made them matching dresses and there was always enough fabric left over for a matching vest for Wesley. She was active helping in the community and a member of the Lutheran Ladies’ Aid. Marjorie helped Harold with his craft and carpentry business and always had plenty of candy and cookies on hand for her grandchildren and niece and nephews when they stopped in. The coffee was always on for friends and family, with lots of visiting had by all. She was a very active Amma – the grandchildren and great grandchildren held a very special place in her heart. In 1998, Marj and Harold retired. They remained on the farm until 2009, when they moved to Gladstone. Marjorie was predeceased by her husband Harold; parents Swannie and Sigga; two infant children, baby Harold and baby April. Left to cherish her memory are her children Tracey (Dennis), Shelley (Darin) and Wesley; grandchildren Corissa (Shawn), Andrew (Jena), Brady and Steven; great grandchildren Tristan, Logan and Cassidy; brother David (JoAnn) Egilson and their children Kristopher, Kelly, Alan and Jayme; sister in law Wynne and numerous nieces and nephews. Thank you to the staff of Third Crossing Manor for all their care over the past years, and to family and friends for their kind words and visits. Cremation has taken place and a private graveside service will be held at a later date at Big Point Cemetery, east of Langruth. If one so desires, donations may be made to Big Point Cemetery, Box 81, Langruth, MB R0H 0N0 or Seven Regions Health Foundation (to go towards Third Crossing Manor Activity Fund) Box 1000, Gladstone, MB R0J 0T0. Clarke’s Funeral Home, Gladstone~MacGregor www.clarkesfuneralhome.com

Thanks for reading the Banner & Press

–––––––––– For Rent

Apartment for rent. Bri-Mont apartments, 331 Mountain Avenue. Phone 204-2125014 _____________________ For rent in Neepawa, 3 bedroom, 1 bath, living room, dining room. Includes 4 main appliances and available anytime. Phone 204-212-2331 or 204-476-2331. _____________________ Large apartment for up to 4 people. Available immediately. Text or leave message 204-476-0263.

–––––––––– For Rent

TRAILER RENTALS: cargo, dump, equipment, auto, livestock/horse. FORK LIFT TELEPORT 729-8989

–––––––––– For Sale or Rent

Storage vans (semi trailers) for rent or sale. Anderson's 204-385-2685, 204-3852997 Gladstone.

–––––––––– Real Estate

Farm land for sale Plumas area. 160 acres, SW 13-1612. Call 841-841-4148

Hey! you!

If you’re reading me that means others are too! place your Classified here!

Telephone: Fax: Email:

204-476-3401/ 888-436-4242 204-476-5073 ads@neepawabanner.com

All word classifieds must be prepaid before printing

–––––––––– Vehicles

Budget Tire Co. We buy and sell good used tires. 7268199, Brandon

–––––––––– Livestock

Purebred Polled Hereford bred heifers. Phone Vern Kartanson in Minnedosa, 204-867-2627 or 204-8677315

–––––––––– Auctions

Meyers Auctions & Appraisals. Call Brad at 368-2333. www.meyersauctions.com

Coming Events DEKALB SuperSpiel welcomes the World

November 1-4, 2019 Morris Curling Club and Morris Arena Women’s and Men’s teams from around the World. Come celebrate 12 “Super” years of DEKALB Curling

Coming Events Neepawa Choraliers Present A POP 50's Concert & Sing – A – Long Nov. 3, 2:30-4:30 pm at ArtsForward - 293 Mountain Ave. Refreshments & Fun • Come & Enjoy Silver Collection - a fund raising event for ArtsForward

Brookdale Fall Supper Brookdale Community Centre November 10th, 2019 Continuous seating 4:00-6:30 PM Adults $15 6-12 years $8 5 & under free

Health Auxiliary Annual Fall Tea October 30, 2019 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm

at the Neepawa Legion Hall Tea, Coffee & Dessert Silent Auction Raffle Prize Draw Silver Collection

www.dekalbsuperspiel.com

Obituary Ruth Eveline Mulligan

With family by her side, Ruth Eveline Mulligan, of McCreary, MB, passed away at Ste. Rose Hospital on Friday October 18, 2019, at the age of 78 years.

Ruth was born December 2, 1940 to Jim and Mary (Walker) Whyte on their farm, in what was known as the Glencairn District, now McCreary Municipality. Ruth was the 2nd of 4 children. Ruth attended Turtle Plains School, finishing her High School at McCreary, followed by Business School in Winnipeg. On September 28, 1958, Ruth married Melvin Marshall and they had 4 children; Kim, Rory, Darcy and Trudi. Their time together included living and working in McCreary, Ethelbert and Edmonton, before purchasing the Reeve Store in 1963. Following Melvin’s passing, Ruth married Roy Mulligan on December 2, 1978, combining their families to include Roy’s children, Ron, Charlotte and Crystal. They began their life together on “the farm” 10 miles East of McCreary and as a family, developed it into a beautiful homestead. Many hours were spent maintaining the lawn and large garden, as their yard was a huge source of pride / badge of honour. In the summer of 2012, they moved into their house in McCreary and continued the pattern of pride of ownership. With the help of many family and community members, they had an instant lawn and always were seen outside planting, watering and maintaining their new home. Ruth’s working career included being the PostMaster at Reeve, working at the Post Office in McCreary and then working at the Royal Bank in McCreary for over 30 years. After working full days, she still would work deep into the night baking, cooking and canning and providing for her family and friends. Ruth was fun loving, outgoing, forthright and determined. She loved to dance, play ball, curl and her sharp mathematical mind allowed her to excel during her working career and at playing cards. Ruth enjoyed life to the fullest and never backed down from a challenge or project - always finding a way to get things done. She was dedicated to her family, employers and her community. She was known to be a great hostess for any family, extended family and community gatherings.

Ruth was predeceased by her parents, her first husband Melvin Marshall, second husband Roy Mulligan, and son Ron Mulligan. She leaves to mourn her passing her children and their families: Kim Vandaele (Cal, Andrea Wales, Devon and Ella Heil, Brock, Sabrina and Nash Wales) ,Rory Marshall (Bev, Harley, Kassidy, Finley and Roman Marshall, Jay Marshall and Melissa Marchi), Monique Mulligan (Cody, Beth and Willow Mulligan, Katie Mulligan and Theodore Funk), Darcy Marshall (Lori, Bryce Marshall and Samantha Langer, Erika and Luke Marshall), Charlotte Delaurier (Todd, Cole, Tiffany, Charlee and Jameson Delaurier, Maggi Delaurier and Devan Decroliere), Trudi Musgrave (Vince, Chandler, Gina and Liam Musgrave), Crystal Ryzner (Chad Ryzner) and her constant companion Paddy dog. Her siblings Jean Buchanan, Betty (Mervin) Dunning, Allan (Joan) Whyte, their children, grandchildren and numerous friends. Funeral Service was held Saturday, October 26, 2019 at 4:00 p.m. at the McCreary Community Centre, McCreary, MB. Norma Windle officiated, with interment following in the McCreary Municipal Cemetery. Music provided by Wendy Williams. Pallbearers were Ruth’s grandsons: Brock Wales, Cody Mulligan, Cole Delaurier, Harley Marshall, Jay Marshall, Bryce Marshall, Chandler Musgrave, Luke Marshall and Liam Musgrave. Poem “To Those I Loved and Those Who Loved Me” read by Ruth’s granddaughters: Andrea Wales, Katie Mulligan, Maggi Delaurier, Erika Marshall and Gina Musgrave. Eulogy provided by Ruth’s children: Kim Vandaele, Rory Marshall, Darcy Marshall and Charlotte Delaurier. Poem “The Rose Beyond the Wall” read by Ruth’s children: Trudi Musgrave and Crystal Ryzner. The family would like to thank Norma Windle for officiating the service, Wendy Williams for providing the music, McCreary Legion Branch 173 and the McCreary Hall Committee for catering lunch following the service. A special thank you to all the staff at the Ste. Rose Hospital, Ryan Raffray of Sneath-Strilchuk Funeral Services and all of our family and friends for their support during this time. Those wishing to honour Ruth’s memory may donate to a charity of one’s choice. Sneath-Strilchuk -McCreary Chapel 204-835-2004 • www.sneathstrilchuk.com


NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019 A17

Thank You JEAN CASSELLS Many thanks to all for the tremendous comfort, cards, condolences and various expressions of sympathy extended to Herb Cassells & Family during the recent loss of our Mother, Wife, Grandmom and GreatGrandmom, Jean. Your presence and compassion were deeply comforting and sustained us through this difficult time. Special thanks to White’s Funeral Chapel and to our Church Family at First Baptist for your support, caring, generosity and prayers, and for your many deeplyappreciated contributions to Jean’s Celebration of Life service. May God richly bless you all.

Obituary Dorothy Eileen O'Donnell Peacefully, with her family by her side, Dorothy Eileen O'Donnell passed away on Monday, October 7, 2019 at the Country Meadows Care Home. Dorothy was born in Gladstone on August 3, 1920. At an early age, they moved to Arden, where she went to school. After school, she went to Vancouver, to explore life. After a short stay there, she moved back to Manitoba and resided at Dauphin, where she was employed at the Dauphin Herald. Then she went to Winnipeg, where she got a job with the government. Dorothy retired in 1986. She moved to Neepawa, where she would be closer to family. She was predeceased by her mother Mary Ann McConeghy, brothers Bob and Morris, nieces Melveen, Elaine, nephew Bobby and great-niece Angela. Left to mourn are her sister Edythe and many nieces and nephews. Funeral service was held on Thursday, October 17 at the Riverside cemetery, with Rita Friesen officiating. White's Funeral Home was in care of arrangements.

Ernest Robert Millan October 16, 2019 marked the passing of Ernest Robert Millan, following a lengthy illness. Ernest was born in McCreary, Manitoba, June 10, 1937, the eldest son of Steve and Mary Millan. Ernest attended school in McCreary and remained on the farm until 1979. Ernest was a young teenager when he started working for the railroad, lifting track. Being a very hard worker and a quick study, he soon was put in charge of the heavy equipment used to lift the rails and compact the rock for the ties. After a few years, he started working construction in many northern communities. As construction was seasonal, he was hired on to haul freight across the frozen Northern Manitoba lakes in the winters. He was still a teenager when he was promoted to Swing Boss of crews. When the contractor decided to change from cat trains to rubber tired trucks, Ernest decided it was time to leave that job. After leaving the farm, Ernest moved to Neepawa and worked at the Neepawa and Area Collegiate Institute as custodian until he retired. He continued to live in Neepawa until he passed away, spending the last 2 years of his life at Country Meadows Personal Care Home. Ernest is pre-deceased by his Father, Stephen Lucien Millan and his Mother, Mary Millan (nee Sul), and a sister Shirley, who passed at a very young age. Ernest is survived by his long time friend Eva Beere (Neepawa); his older sister Gladys Longmuir (Ray Longmuir), of Warman, Saskatchewan; and younger siblings Allen (BettyAnn) of Okotoks, Alberta; Murray (Darlene) McCreary; Valerie (Neepawa); Norm (Calgary);Garth (Frances Reeves), Hornby Island BC; Gerry (Calgary), and Quentin (McCreary). Also numerous nieces, nephews, grand nieces and grand nephews. Ernest is remembered as a strong, capable, honest, hard working individual. He often said, “You have to learn to try anything and if you don’t put your money in the bank, you will spend it and you won’t have it.” Ernest’s family thanks the staff at Country Meadows Personal Care Home for all of their support and for the excellent care they provided. Ernest’s wishes were to be cremated with no services. His ashes will remain in a niche in Neepawa. The family will honour his requests.

Thank You The family of Ruth Adeline Mauthe thank the many family and friends for their condolences on her recent passing. We appreciate your expressions of sympathy, loving thoughts and prayers, flowers received or donations made. Heartfelt thanks to Third Crossing Manor staff, Dr. Laurelyn Juadiong, home care workers, pallbearers, Pastor Jim & Hilde Vickers and ladies who provided lunch. Special thank you to Clarke's Funeral Home for your compassionate care shown in making all arrangements. “The LORD is my shepherd, I lack nothing. He makes me lie down in green pastures, he leads me beside quiet waters.” Psalm 23: 1,2 John Mauthe & family

The family of Dorothy O'Donnell would like to thank Dr. Krzyzaniak and Dr Cram for their care of Dorothy. To the staff of Country Meadows for passionate and wonderful care. To Rita Friesen for her lovely servies and to the UCW women for the lunch. I would like to thank Kelli’s children Kassidy, Kammi, Jacey, Joey, Juli and Kardy for their many visits. Dorothy enjoyed them so much. Thanks to the neigbours that were so super to her. She was blessed to have you. To White's Funeral Home for their excellent service. The Dixon Family

Help Wanted

FOODS Meat Cutters/Production Personnel Our people, perseverance, integrity, and exceptional partnerships have led HyLife to becoming Canada’s leading pork producer and global exporter of high quality pork products. The growing demand for our pork in Japan and China means we need exceptional people to help deliver our company vision. We have expanded our Neepawa facility to increase our overall production by 15% and in turn created new jobs throughout the company. As a Meat Cutter/Production Personnel you will be a critical member of our team in the creation of our world class product. Our positions range from working on our slaughter production floor to shipping the final packaged product, with everything in between! With our wide variety of jobs, excellent people, and our drive for innovation you will certainly find a job that suits you! Responsibilities and duties include but are not limited to: • Slaughter and eviscerate hogs for further processing • Harvest and package edible offal • Process pork carcasses into primal cuts • Butcher and package pork primal cuts into value added specifications for local, national and international premium markets • Carry out other tasks related to processing of meat for shipping to customers or storage • Sanitation People who will succeed as members of our team will: • Enjoy working in a fast paced, stable long term work environment • Appreciate working in a culturally diverse workplace. We employ people from all over the world! • Treat people with dignity and respect • Open to working in colder/warmer environments • Physically Fit • Experience as an industrial butcher or trimmer is an asset

Current starting wage is $14.85/hour plus $1.00 per hour perfect attendance incentive! Wage scale extends to $22.10 per hour We believe that our success is founded on the strength of our team. As such, we place a great deal of emphasis on attracting, developing and retaining good people, and consider every one of our employees to be a highly-valued member of the HyLife family. To that end, we are committed to providing a working environment that not only fosters personal growth, but also recognizes our employees’ contributions towards the common goal of our company’s success because of this HyLife has been recognized as a Platinum Member of Canada’s Best-Managed Companies. If you have the qualifications and the passion to meet this challenge then we would like to explore your potential. Please apply online at http://hylife.com/current-opportunities/ or email to jobs@hylife.com or mail to PO Box 10,000, 623 Main St E, Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0. We thank all applicants, however, only those under consideration will be contacted

Announcement

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Financial

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Health HIP/KNEE Replacement? Other medical conditions causing trouble Walking or Dressing? The Disability Tax Credit allows for $2,500 yearly tax credit and $20,000 Lump sum refund. Expert Help:

204-453-5372

Help Wanted We are looking for a responsible Administrative Assistant to perform a variety of administrative and clerical tasks. Duties of the Administrative Assistant include providing support to our managers and employees, assisting in daily office needs and managing our company’s general administrative activities. Please stop by for an application or to drop off resume.

BIG RIDGE FOODS

103 Kinosota Road South. Amaranth, Manitoba 204-843-4101

TURTLE RIVER SCHOOL DIVISION Invites Applications for the following position:

Head Custodian at McCreary School Applications close when position is filled. This is a permanent position at 8 hours per day. The salary for this position is $18.03 per hour. Further information regarding duties and qualifications may be obtained by contacting the Transportation/Maintenance Supervisor. All employees of the Division must provide a satisfactory Criminal Record and Child Abuse Registry check. Please forward all applications complete with 3 references to the undersigned. Dean Bluhm Transportation/Maintenance Supervisor Turtle River School Division Box 309 McCreary, Manitoba R0J 1B0 Phone: 835-2067 or Fax: 835-2426 deanb@trsd.ca Although all applications are appreciated, only candidates who are selected for an interview will be contacted.

Help Wanted RURAL MUNICIPALITY OF ROSEDALE UTILITY OPERATOR The Rural Municipality of Rosedale is inviting applications for the position of a part-time operator for the water supply and treatment system located in the Village of Kelwood. The Kelwood Water Treatment Plant is a 1.0/ lps chlorination process which supplies potable water to residents in the Village of Kelwood. Duties include: • Operation and maintenance of the water treatment plant and water main infrastructure • Meter reading, water meter maintenance, measuring chlorine residuals, flushing main lines, flushing hydrants (spring & fall), operating and maintaining valves and curb stops and operation of emergency fire pumps. • Respond to emergency call-outs when required • Assist in leak detection and repairs to equipment as required • Record keeping, daily logs, work orders • Follow guidelines, policies, by-laws in compliance with appropriate safety and security standards • Decommissioning of old meters & installation of new water meters when required • Working in adverse weather conditions with minimum supervision • All other duties as required Qualifications: • Experience or certification in Small Water Systems Treatment/Distribution would be an asset • Valid Class 5 Manitoba Driver’s License and own transportation • Mechanical skills required • Able to work unsupervised or as part of a team • Able to deal with the public in a polite and professional manner Applications must be received by 4:00 p.m. November 15, 2019 in person, by mail, fax or email Persons possessing the necessary qualifications are asked to submit their resume along with three work related references to: Rural Municipality of Rosedale Attention: Kara Sylvester, CAO Box 100 Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0 Telephone: (204) 476-5414 Fax: (204) 476-5431 Email: rosedalecao@mymts.net The RM of Rosedale wishes to thank all applicants for their interest; however only those individuals considered for an interview will be contacted

Rolling River School Division Cleaner at

ELTON COLLEGIATE Forrest, MB

This is a full-time, 12- month position for a 7.0 hour per day evening shift. Start date to be arranged.

Qualifications Required: • Ability to take initiative and work unsupervised • Ability to work as effectively with others as a member of a team • Ability to communicate effectively with people both orally and in writing • Physically fit and capable of performing physically demanding work. Preferred: • Current WHIMIS training and certification • A working knowledge of and experience with commercial cleaning equipment • Valid Class 5 Drivers License

The incumbent is required to work effectively under pressure, within defined timeframes and with a variety of people in a team environment. He/she must be able to work well independently, be flexible, adjust to changing work assignments And deal with and maintain confidential information. A willingness to complete and maintain WHMIS certification is a job requirement. Salary as per C.U.P.E. Collective Agreement For further information please contact Mr. Fred Scott, Maintenance Supervisor at 867-2754 Ext 239. Applicants are requested to submit a covering letter with a comprehensive resume addressing the stated qualifications and naming three work related references to the following by Friday, November 8, 2019 at NOON. Please submit applications to: Sarah Woychyshyn Administrative Assistant, Human Resources Rolling River School Division PO Box 1170 Minnedosa, MB R0J 1E0 Phone: 867-2754 Ext 244 Fax: 867-2037 E-Mail: swoychyshyn@rrsd.mb.ca

The Rolling River School Division thanks all applicants for their interest. Applicants selected for interviews will be contacted.


A18 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019

Manitoba Community Newspaper Association Province-wide Classifieds NOTICES Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement, and the Manitoba Community

Help Wanted CLASS 1 TRUCK DRIVER

To run Canada - must have BC experience - Paid pick, drops, layovers and stat pay - Multi drop runs - Cell usage - Benefi t package - Dedicated truck - Sign on bonus - Quarterly and annual bonus - Reset at home - Weekend home time - Paid training - Referral program

Derek (204) 793-7465 CENTENNIAL TRANSPORT & LEASING LTD.

Newspaper Association and membership do not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements. For greater information on advertising conditions, please consult the Association’s Blanket Advertising Conditions on our website at www.mcna.com. Do you have a PRESS RELEASE / MEDIA ADVISORY that needs to go out? Let us help you with that! Though we cannot guarantee publication, MCNA will get the information into the right hands for ONLY $35.00 + GST/HST. Call MCNA (204) 947-1691 for more information, or email classified@ mcna.com for details. www. mcna.com FOR SALE BATTERIES FOR EVERYTHING. Automotive, farm, construction, ATV, marine, motorcycle, golf carts, phones, tools, radios, computers etc. Reconditioned, obsolete and hard-to-find batteries. SOLAR equipment. The Battery Man. Winnipeg.

1.877.775.8271 www.batteryman.ca WINTER IS COMING! Are you ready? The Classifieds reach over 400,000 Manitoba readers weekly. Do you need CLASS 1 Drivers or Staff for your business? Are you having a SALE, a Community Supper or do you have a Winter Craft Show to promote? Want to sell something before Winter? Get results. For as little as $189.00 + GST, you could book now! People rely on these classifieds to find what they need in your area and across the province. Catch them looking at YOUR material in our 48 Weekly Community Newspapers. Call this newspaper NOW or email classified@mcna. com for details. MCNA (204) 947-1691. www.mcna.com HEALTH GET UP TO $50,000 from the Government of Canada. ALL Ages & Medical Conditions Qualify. Have a child under 18 instantly receive more money. CALL MANITOBA

Help Wanted

Auctions

Jarvis Trucking Ltd,

Meyers Fall Gun Auction

Gladstone, MB.

Class 1 drivers & Owner Operators Operating super B grain hoppers, prairie provinces only. Contact Steve, 204-385-3048 or 204-871-5139 Email kjarvisfarms@gmail.com

invites applications for the following position:

Casual Educational Assistants

at all schools within Beautiful Plains School Division See Division website for more details on this position at www.beautifulplainssd.ca click on Job Postings.

Real Estate

BENEFITS 1-(800)-2113550 or Send a Text Message with Your Name and Mailing Address to 204-808-0035 for your FREE benefits package. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES / HELP WANTED HOMECARE WORKER NEEDED to care for a female stroke patient. Duties to include bathing, dressing, light housekeeping and meal preparation. $14.00 per hr + meals. Located 5 miles North of Austin in the Pine Creek Area. Call (204) 872-0031 or (204) 872-7877. References Required. LAND FOR RENT / PASTURES FOR RENT AGRICULTURAL CROWN LANDS are presently available for rent for hay or grazing or cropping. These

For Sale Integrity Post Frame Buildings SINCE 2008

Built with Concrete Posts Barns, Shops, Riding Arenas, Machine Sheds and More

9 am Sat Nov 9, 2019 Arden, MB

Craig.c@ Integritybuilt.com 1-204-596-8620 www. integritybuilt.com

Winchester Alberta Diamond Jubilee 3 Lugar Pistols, Rifles, Shotguns Lg Amount of Ammo Archery & Hunting Supplies

To consign with worldwide exposure on Icollector.com Call Brad at 204-476-6262

Vehicles

Bradley Meyers Auctioneer

McSherry Auction

Doctor Dent

12 Patterson Dr. , Stonewall, MB

Vintage Service Stn & Coca Cola Auction Sat Nov 9 10 AM

Gladstone United Church

FOR SALE BY TENDER

Residential Property 17 Brussels Street Gladstone, Manitoba

1,360 square feet, attached garage, 3 bedroom, upstairs and downstairs bath with finished basement. electric heat. frontage 100’ Gladstone United Church reserves the right to reject any or all tenders, not necessarily accept the highest tender, or to accept any tender which it may consider to be in its best interest. For more information or to view contact: Wilmot at 204-385-2486 Glen at 204-385-2645 email gladuc@mymts.net Written tenders may be submitted by November 12, 2019 to: The Trustees of the United Church of Gladstone c/o Wilmot Milne PO Box 258 Gladstone, Manitoba R0J 0T0

Estate & Moving

Sat Nov 16 & Sun Dec 1 10 AM Yard * Recreation * Tools * Misc Antiques * Furniture * Household

Consignment Auction Sat Nov 23 10AM

Consignments Welcome! (204) 467-1858 or (204) 886-7027 www.mcsherryauction.com

located in Armstrong, Grahamdale & West Interlake. December 6, 2019 (Dec. 16) - 10:00 am & 2:00 pm - Dugald Community Club, 544 Holland Street, Dugald, Manitoba – Auctioned lands located in Alexander, Armstrong, Cartier, City of Winnipeg, Coldwell, Headingley, La Broquerie, Lac du Bonnet, Morris, Ritchot, St. Laurent, Stuartburn & Springfield. A complete listing of Agricultural Crown Lands available for rent can be found online at: https://resd.ca/leases_and_ permits/LPproperties.aspx or at any Manitoba Agriculture, RM, or First Nation Band office. Bidder registration opens 45 minutes prior to the

auction start time. Successful bidders will be required to pay via cheque the day of auction. If translation or accommodation services are required at auction, please contact us at least 5 days in advance of the auction. For additional information, please contact your nearest Manitoba Agriculture Crown Lands District Office (or via email at agcrownlands@gov.mb.ca) or call Real Estate Services Division at 1-866-210-9589. A listing of Manitoba Agriculture Crown Lands District Offices can be found online at: https:// www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/ contact/index.html

SERVICES GUIDE Clean Up

TAC

Ventures Inc.

Garbage Bin Rentals Roll Off Bins We buy Scrap! Phone 476-0002 for more information

Professional

Lakeside Septic Service

Potable water delivery. Book your portable toilets!

ErlE Jury and Family

204-867-2416 204-867-7558

Did You Know...

110B Main St S Minnedosa

(Facing Main Street in the Co-Op Administration Building)

News, especially local, is the most read newspaper content, followed by arts/entertainment and health

867-3981

http://www.ajaxlaw.ca

Construction PAINTLESS HAIL REPAIR

Sat Nov 2 9:30 AM

3 bedroom - 2 bathroom - 24 by 24 garage 100 by 100 lot - please call 204-872-1133

11) - 10:00 am & 2:00 pm Provincial Building, 27 2nd Ave SW, Dauphin, Manitoba – Auctioned lands located in Alonsa, Dauphin, Indigenous & Northern Relations, Gilbert Plains, Grandview, Lakeshore, Mossey River, Riding Mountain West & Roblin. December 3, 2019 (Dec. 12) - 1:30 pm - War Veterans Community Hall, 119 6th Ave N., Swan River, Manitoba – Auctioned lands located in Ethelbert, Minitonas-Bowsman, Mountain North, Mountain South & Swan Valley West. December 5, 2019 (Dec. 13) - 10:00 am - Manitoba Agriculture Office, 43 Railway Ave., Ashern, Manitoba – Auctioned lands

www.meyersauctions.com

Gun Auction

2018 - 1430 sq ft home Gladstone

lands will be available for rent through in-person auctions. In the event that a scheduled auction is cancelled due to inclement weather, alternate auction dates are listed in parentheses: November 27, 2019 (Dec. 9) - 10:00 am Manitoba Agriculture Office, 1129 Queens Avenue, Brandon, Manitoba – Auctioned lands located in Cornwallis, Ellice-Archie, Pipestone, Victoria & Wallace-Woodworth. November 28, 2019 (Dec. 10) - 10:00 am - Ukrainian Hall, 202 5th Street NW, Minnedosa, Manitoba – Auctioned lands located in Alonsa, Glenella-Lansdowne, Rosedale & Westlake-Gladstone. November 29, 2019 (Dec.

• • • • • • • •

No painting or fillers Only 1 to 2 days Free loaner car Free car detailing Insurance approved Environmentally friendly 30 years of perfect repairs Call now to book In Winnipeg: West 204-786-DENT East 204-661-DENT

Tender

Truck For Sale by Tender 2000 FL106 Freightliner fuel truck

Tandem, not in running condition motor is gone. 10 speed transmission. All tender items will have both PST and GST added to the tender price. All items must be removed from site prior to the end of November 2019. All items are sold as is where is. Please drop off sealed tenders to the Neepawa Agro site or mail to: Neepawa Gladstone Coop, Box 879, Neepawa, MB, R0J 1H0 attn: Tracy Wehrhahn re: Tender 204-476-6908 Tender closes November 9th, 2019 at 4:00 p.m. Highest, or any tender will not necessarily be accepted.

Birnie Builders

Redi-Built and and on site Redi-Built onhomes, site Huron PVC Windows

homes, cottages, Ph/Fax: huron PVC Windows 204-966-3207

Birnie BirnieBuilders Builders

Redi-Built and Phone/Fax Redi-Built andon onsite sitehomes, homes, Harold Klassen Huron PVC 204-966-3207 HuronMB PVCWindows Windows Birnie, Ph/Fax: Cell Ph/Fax:

“Let Us Custom Design A 204-966-3207 204-476-6843 204-966-3207 Home For You”

Harold HaroldKlassen Klassen harold.birniebuilders@gmail.com Birnie, Birnie,MB MB “Let Us Custom Design A “Let “LetUs UsCustom CustomDesign DesignAA Home For You” Home HomeFor ForYou” You”

harold.birniebuilders@gmail.com harold.birniebuilders@gmail.com

nder i m e R ta

For all your residential and farm building needs

Jus

AD DEADLINE

12:00 NOON TUESDAY

NEW HOMES | RENOS | ICF BASEMENTS CONCRETE PADS | DECKS | FRAMING

Mike Ellis 204-841-4244 Dave Leflar 204-841-0025 Visit us on Facebook.com Rough Lumber

Full dimension Corral Planks and Windbreak

F. KOZAK & SONS LTD. WE OFFER: • Redi-Mix Concrete & Concrete Pumping. • Sand, Gravel & Aggregate • Skid Steer & Equipment Rental • Snow removal

WE ARE A CERTIFIED BATCH PLANT.

204-476-5432

135 Boundary Street, Neepawa, MB

Firewood Sales Slabs $60/cord Cut and Split �� Round Wood

204-966-3372

john@trijindustries.com

Woodlot Management

�us��in��le ����es�n� We buy standing Spruce and Poplar �mber

Cut and split firewood - Poplar and Spruce/Pine �� firewood - 10 cord load delivered to your yard

R

olling Acres eady Mix

Certified Batch Plant and Cement Trucks Concrete • Gravel Sales • Rebar Sales Custom Hauling

Irvin 204-476-6236


NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019 A19

PAGE 1 OF 3

NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION SALE OF LANDS FOR ARREARS OF TAXES RURAL MUNICIPALITY OF ALONSA

Pursuant to subsection 367(7) of The Municipal Act, notice is hereby given that unless the tax arrears for the designated year and costs in respect of the hereinafter described properties are paid in full to the Municipality prior to the commencement of the auction, the Municipality will on the 20th day of November, 2019, at the hour of 10:00 AM, at Rural Municipality of Alonsa, 20 Railway Avenue, Alonsa, Manitoba, proceed to sell by public auction the following described properties: Roll Number

Description

Assessed Value L -$4,800

Amount of Arrears & Costs for Which Property May be Offered for Sale

Roll Number

$12,339.69

235400

PARCEL 1 THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 18-24-10 WPM EXC ALL L -$12,800 MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT

$1,663.99

235750

PARCEL 2 THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 18-24-10 WPM EXC L -$10,100 FIRSTLY: PLAN 56567 PLTO SECONDLY: ALL THAT PORTION COVERED BY THE WATERS OF LAKE MANITOBA AS SHOWN ON TOWNSHIP DIAGRAM APPROVED JUNE 08, 1895 THIRDLY: ROAD PLAN 25867 PLTO AND FOURTHLY: ALL MINES AND MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN THE ORIGINAL GRANT FROM THE CROWN

$1,596.29

236200.109

LOT 9 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$24,300 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$3,248.44

236200.12

LOT 20 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,100 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$7,432.62

236200.132

LOT 32 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$26,300 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$8,019.62

236200.203

LOT 3 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$15,800 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$2,530.22

236200.207

LOT 7 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$15,800 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$2,530.22

236200.208

LOT 8 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$15,800 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$2,530.22

236200.209

LOT 9 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$15,800 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$2,530.22

236200.210

LOT 10 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$15,800 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$2,530.22

236200.211

LOT 11 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$15,800 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$2,530.22

236200.212

LOT 12 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$15,800 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$2,530.22

236200.213

LOT 13 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$15,800 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED) - LOT 13 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48615

$2,530.22

236200.214

LOT 14 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$15,800 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$2,530.22

236200.215

LOT 15 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$15,800 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$2,530.22

236200.216

LOT 16 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$16,700 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$2,607.13

236200.217

LOT 17 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$17,800 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$2,699.12

236200.226

LOT 26 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$19,100 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$5,564.79

32000

PARCEL 1 PLAN 1157 PLTO IN NE 1/4 35-18-10 WPM

235201

LOT 1 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$24,900 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,133.37

235202

LOT 2 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,057.06

235203

LOT 3 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,057.06

235204

LOT 4 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,057.06

235205

LOT 5 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,057.06

235206

LOT 6 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,057.06

235208

LOT 8 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM - SNOW GOOSE DR

$7,929.23

235210

LOT 1 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,057.06

235211

LOT 2 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$11,199.31

235212

LOT 3 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,057.06

235213

LOT 4 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM - GREY GOOSE DRIVE

$3,057.06

235214

LOT 5 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,057.06

235226

LOT 1 BLOCK 3 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,400 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,211.95

235228

LOT 3 BLOCK 3 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$24,100 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,107.87

235229

LOT 4 BLOCK 3 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,600 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,034.24

235236

LOT 11 BLOCK 3 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,600 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,064.51

235240

LOT 15 BLOCK 3 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$28,800 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,442.22

235241

LOT 1 BLOCK 4 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,057.06

235242

LOT 2 BLOCK 4 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,057.06

235244

LOT 4 BLOCK 4 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,057.06

235245

LOT 5 BLOCK 4 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,057.06

235246

LOT 6 BLOCK 4 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,057.06

235251

LOT 11 BLOCK 4 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$23,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$3,892.78

235277

LOT 5 BLOCK 5 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$41,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$10,407.13

235279

LOT 7 BLOCK 5 PLAN 48614 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$41,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC NW 1/4 16-24-10 WPM

$6,606.28

Description

Assessed Value

Amount of Arrears & Costs for Which Property May be Offered for Sale


NOVEMBER 1, 2019 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS A20

PAGE 2 OF 3 Roll Number

Description

Assessed Value

Amount of Arrears & Costs for Which Property May be Offered for Sale

Roll Number

237156

LOT 7 BLOCK 5 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$19,400 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$6,849.56

237157

LOT 8 BLOCK 5 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$19,400 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$2,833.93

237158

LOT 9 BLOCK 5 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$19,400 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$10,768.91

237159

LOT 10 BLOCK 5 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$19,400 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$11,808.42

237165

LOT 6 BLOCK 6 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$5,568.76

237173

LOT 14 BLOCK 6 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$8,479.61

237193

LOT 11 BLOCK 8 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$26,000 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$15,272.12

237196

LOT 14 BLOCK 8 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$29,900 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$17,632.50

237214

LOT 1 BLOCK 10 PLAN 48616 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW L -$240,700 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED) SUBJECT TO A RIGHT-OF-WAY AS APPURTENANT TO LOT 2 BLOCK 10 OF SAID PLAN OVER THAT PORTION OF THE LAND ABOVE DESCRIBED WHICH LIES SOUTH OF THE PRODUCTION ELY OF THE NLY LIMIT OF SAID LOT 2

$21,508.39

239000

THE NE 1/4 OF SECTION 22-24-11 WPM EXC ALL MINES, L -$19,800 MINERALS AND SPECIAL RESERVATIONS AS RESERVED IN THE ORIGINAL GRANT FROM THE CROWN

$3,565.21

239300

THE SW 1/4 OF SECTION 22-24-11 WPM EXC FIRSTLY: ALL L -$6,800 THAT PORTION COVERED BY THE WATERS OF EBB & FLOW LAKE ACCORDING TO A TOWNSHIP DIAGRAM APPROVED AND CONFIRMED AT OTTAWA ON SEPTEMBER 16, 1922 BY T. SHANKS FOR THE SURVEYOR GENERAL OF DOMINION LANDS AND SECONDLY: ALL MINES, MINERALS AND SPECIAL RESERVATIONS AS RESERVED IN THE ORIGINAL GRANT FROM THE CROWN

$2,855.21

239440

THE NLY 1600 FEET PERP OF THE NW 1/4 OF SECTION L -$5,900 23-24-11 WPM EXC FIRSTLY: THE WLY 940 FEET PERP AND SECONDLY: ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER RESERVATIONS AS CONTAINED IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT

$2,768.61

239694

LOT 1 BLOCK 1 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$8,200

$3,440.15

239695

LOT 2 BLOCK 1 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$8,400

$3,501.40

239698

LOT 5 BLOCK 1 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$8,300

$5,136.81

239700

LOT 7 BLOCK 1 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$117,000 B -$189,500

$32,645.97

239701

LOT 8 BLOCK 1 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$7,100

$4,864.45

239702

LOT 9 BLOCK 1 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$6,800

$4,920.74

239703

LOT 10 BLOCK 1 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$11,900 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$6,304.45

239704

LOT 11 BLOCK 1 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$11,900 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$6,309.12

239705

LOT 12 BLOCK 1 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$12,800 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$6,549.30

236200.326

LOT 26 BLOCK 3 PLAN 48615 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$37,400 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC SE 1/4 21 AND FRAC SW 1/4 22-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$13,584.41

236610

PARCELS A, B, C AND D PLAN 28833 PLTO IN W 1/2 22-24-10 L -$1,400 WPM

$1,256.57

237100

LOT 1 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48616 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW L -$62,600 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$6,479.20

237101

LOT 2 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48616 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW L -$25,500 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$3,349.69

237102

LOT 3 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$15,452.07

LOT 5 BLOCK 1 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$7,086.37

LOT 1 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$5,572.36

LOT 2 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$5,572.36

LOT 6 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$3,349.69

LOT 7 BLOCK 2 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$8,479.61

237132

LOT 9 BLOCK 3 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED) -

$8,479.61

237134

LOT 1 BLOCK 4 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$3,349.69

237135

LOT 2 BLOCK 4 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$3,349.69

237138

LOT 5 BLOCK 4 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$3,349.69

237140

LOT 7 BLOCK 4 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$25,500 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$3,349.69

LOT 13 BLOCK 4 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$24,200 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$8,162.41

LOT 4 BLOCK 5 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$19,400 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$11,080.42

LOT 5 BLOCK 5 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$19,400 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$11,080.42

LOT 6 BLOCK 5 PLAN 48616 PLTO EXC ALL MINES AND L -$19,400 MINERALS AS SET FORTH IN TRANSFER 1124139 PLTO IN FRAC N 1/2, FRAC SW 1/4 22, THE SW 1/4 AND FRAC SE 1/4 27-24-10 WPM AND GOVERNMENT ROAD ALLOWANCE (NOW CLOSED)

$6,795.36

237104

237114

237115

237119

237120

237146

237153

237154

237155

Description

Assessed Value

Amount of Arrears & Costs for Which Property May be Offered for Sale


A21 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019

PAGE 3 OF 3 Roll Number

Description

Assessed Value

Amount of Arrears & Costs for Which Property May be Offered for Sale

Roll Number

Description

Assessed Value

Amount of Arrears & Costs for Which Property May be Offered for Sale

239706

LOT 1 BLOCK 2 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$2,600

$3,618.88

239737

LOT 29 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,200 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,065.13

239707

LOT 2 BLOCK 2 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$2,500

$3,377.13

239738

LOT 30 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,500 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,166.80

239708

LOT 3 BLOCK 2 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$2,500

$2,105.44

239739

LOT 31 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,900 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,304.55

239709

LOT 1 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$5,200

$4,186.53

239740

LOT 32 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$6,300 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,425.18

239710

LOT 2 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$5,100

$4,147.80

239741

LOT 33 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,900 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,291.94

239711

LOT 3 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$5,000

$4,134.36

239743

LOT 35 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,200 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$2,930.18

239712

LOT 4 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$5,000

$4,104.03

239744

$4,414.93

239713

LOT 5 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$5,000

$4,134.36

LOT 36 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$6,300 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM - LOT 36 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700

239745

$4,157.91

239714

LOT 6 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$5,000

$4,032.03

LOT 37 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,400 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

239746

$4,048.19

239715

LOT 7 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$4,900

$4,102.55

LOT 38 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,200 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

239748

$4,172.10

239716

LOT 8 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$5,400

$4,916.15

LOT 40 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,000 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

239749

$4,016.54

239717

LOT 9 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

L -$5,400

$4,243.59

LOT 41 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,100 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

239750

$4,071.06

239721

LOT 13 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,000 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,133.35

LOT 42 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,100 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

239751

$4,121.91

239722

LOT 14 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,000 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,032.03

LOT 43 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,400 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

239752

L -$2,100

$3,181.80

239723

LOT 15 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,000 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,098.36

LOT 1 BLOCK 4 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

239753

L -$2,300

$1,865.15

239724

LOT 16 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,000 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$3,996.03

LOT 2 BLOCK 4 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

258600

239725

LOT 17 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,100 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,118.88

THE SE 1/4 OF SECTION 30-24-13 WPM SUBJECT TO THE L -$24,000 RESERVATIONS AND PROVISOES CONTAINED IN THE GRANT FROM THE CROWN

239726

LOT 18 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,300 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,092.18

239727

LOT 19 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,900 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,388.51

239728

LOT 20 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,000 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$3,996.03

239729

LOT 21 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,000 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,092.65

239730

LOT 22 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,400 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,117.40

239731

LOT 23 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$4,900 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,066.55

239732

LOT 24 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,400 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$2,593.60

239733

LOT 25 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,100 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,021.08

239734

LOT 26 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,000 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,007.25

239735

LOT 27 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,100 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,021.08

239736

LOT 28 BLOCK 3 PLAN 54700 PLTO EXC ALL MINES, L -$5,300 MINERALS AND OTHER MATTERS AS SET FORTH IN THE CROWN LANDS ACT IN FRAC E 1/2 24-24-11 WPM

$4,102.30

$4,219.71

The tax sale is subject to the following terms and conditions with respect to each property: • The purchaser of the property will be responsible for any property taxes not yet due. • The Municipality may exercise its right to set a reserve bid in the amount of the arrears and costs. • If the purchaser intends to bid by proxy, a letter of authorization form must be presented prior to the start of the auction. • The Municipality makes no representations or warranties whatsoever concerning the properties being sold. • The successful purchaser must, at the time of the sale, make payment in cash, certified cheque or bank draft to the Rural Municipality of Alonsa as follows: i) The full purchase price if it is $10,000 or less; OR ii) If the purchase price is greater than $10,000, the purchaser must provide a non-refundable deposit in the amount of $10,000 and the balance of the purchase price must be paid within 20 days of the sale; AND iii) A fee in the amount $309.75 ($295 plus GST) for preparation of the transfer of title documents. The purchaser will be responsible for registering the transfer of title documents in the land titles office, including the registration costs. • The risk for the property lies with the purchaser immediately following the auction. • The purchaser is responsible for obtaining vacant possession. • If the property is non-residential property, the purchaser must pay GST to the Municipality or, if a GST registrant, provide a GST Declaration. Dated this 10th day of October, 2019. Managed by:

Pamela Sul Chief Administrative Officer Rural Municipality of Alonsa Phone: (204) 767-2054 Fax: (204) 767-2044


A22 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019

Real Estate

neepawa

Banner & Press Five tips for getting home buying done right By Carla Staresina Canada Mortgage and housing Corporation Few events in life are as significant as walking through the door of your new home for the first time. Are you prepared? Do you fully know what you’re getting into?   CMHC  recently did a survey of more than 2,500 prospective home buyers – 60 per cent of them first time buyers – to shed some light on their thoughts, behaviours and actions. From our results, we’ve gleaned five tips to help you make a smooth transition to homeownership. Tip #1: Pre-qualify for a mortgage first and then start

house hunting. According to the survey results, many homebuyers pre-qualify for a mortgage well after they begin the house hunting process. The risk here is that you might find your ideal home only to discover you can’t qualify for the mortgage. To avoid disappointment, pre-qualify first and then start house hunting with clearly defined expectations.  Tip #2: Understand the opportunities and risks of home equity lines of credit. You should also know that if you have a down payment

of more than 20 per cent, your bank will likely offer you a home equity line of credit (HELOC) linked to your mortgage. Be sure to understand both the opportunities and risks to your long-term financial well-being that come with HELOC products. Tip #3: Find out if you’re financially ready to own a home. One third of first-time buyers admit they don’t have a good understanding of the full cost of homeownership. Owning a home goes well beyond the mortgage payments. Property taxes, condo fees, utilities and maintenance costs all

need to be factored in. CMHC’s  Homebuying Step by Step gives you access to calculators, checklists and an online workbook to help you find out if you’re financially ready to own a home.

Tip #4: Make sure you’ve got a home that meets your needs without compromising your financial situation. More than 90 per cent of surveyed first time buyers plan to spend the maximum amount they can afford on their new home. Buying a home is a complex decision with many considerations, including the neighbourhood, the lot and the size and type of home. At the end of

the day, you want to make sure you’ve got a home that meets your needs without compromising your financial situation.

Tip #5: Set aside 5 per cent of your income as an emergency fund to be ready – just in case. Good planning can help you prepare for unexpected costs, but no one has a crystal ball. Almost four in 10 of those surveyed say they’re either uncertain or unlikely to have a financial buffer should they face surprise costs. To give yourself some peace of mind, it’s good practice to set aside five per cent of your income as an emergency

fund to be ready – just in case. The process can be overwhelming but seeking the advice you need, arming yourself with the right tools and asking the right questions will help you feel comfortable both in your decision and your new home. Consult CMHC’s Homebuying Step by Step for more information.

Don’t forget!

Our advertising deadline is Tuesday at noon!

Your Home... Your Future... Our Commitment!

Lisa Adams

Troy Mutch Sales Associate Cell: 204-212-1010

204- 841-0741

Craig Frondall Sales Representative Cell: 204-476-4777

lisaadamswillmoveyou.ca

DUPLEX $183,000

78 Crawford Ave. Neepawa, MB. $335,000 • MLS#:1925699 Open Concept 1360 sqft home with 3+2 Bedrooms 2-4pc Bathrooms plus a 3pc En-Suite, Fully Finished Up and Down, Large Fenced in Yard, an Attached Insulated Garage. The Eat In Kitchen provides Ample Storage, Stainless Steel Appliances. This Youthful, Quality Built Home is waiting for you.

Gill & Schmall Agencies

311-5th St, Neepawa. MLS#1929942, MLS#1929935, $25,900 Two lots ready for construction! 33’x99’, fully serviced w/sewer, water, lane.

358 Mill St, Neepawa. MLS#1927067, $259,900 Excellent family home in prime location! 1100 sf, 2 bdrm, 2 bath.

351 Emma Street Neepawa, MB

MLS#: 1929528

MLS#: 1926041 $279,000

New Listing

Prairie Mountain 204.476.2287 272 Hamilton St. Neepawa remax-prairiemountain-npwa-mb.com

Diane Martin 204-841-0932

NEW LISTING

Neepawa, MB

Liz Sumner 204-476-6362

John Nelson 204-476-6719

EACH OFFICE IS INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

Lesley Skibinsky 204-476-6999

Kristy Sprik

204-212-4892

Rosemary Parrott 204-212-5037

CED REDU

MLS# 1916368

GLENELLA - this 3 bed, 1.5 bath bungalow was moved onto new foundation in 1997 when an att. garage was added along with exterior & elec. updates. Large lot. Partly finished basement. Now $ 66,500.

MLS# 1922129

This 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom home has main floor laundry, a 24’x 16’workshop, a garden shed and a finished basement that could have 2 more legal bedrooms if the windows were enlarged.

MLS# 1916972

BIRNIE - only 15 minutes to Neepawa. Well worth the drive for this 2 1/2 storey character home. Recent dormers added and attic beautifully finished. 4 bed, 2 baths. Make your move!

CED REDU

375 Mcgill St, 344 & 350 Adelaide Cr, Neepawa. MB MLS#20929842, #20929841, #20929839 New builds, still time for customized finishes! Contact Rodney White or John Nelson for more info!

122137 Hwy#5, McCreary. MB. MLS#1923388, $203,000 Excellent family home on 13 acres! 1596 sf bungalow, 3 bdrms, 2 bath.

Thinking about selling? We will be happy to provide a FREE Market Evaluation!

www.facebook.com/gillandschmall

Rodney White 204-841-4800

Erin Woodcock 204-868-5559

MLS# 1909961

Are you looking for recreational, development land, or pasture/hay land near Clear Lake? These two beautiful quarters are situated near Onanole, not far from Riding Mountain National Park. This fenced land is presently used for pasturing cattle.

www.gillandschmall.com

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www.facebook.com/neepawabanner

MLS# 1919200

This family-sized home in McCreary was built primarily on one level, keeping practicality in mind. Just two steps down, enjoy the warmth and intrigue of the wood stove in the family room. This property also features a huge lot with two storage sheds and a detached 26’x 34’garage.

MLS#Lanes 1920208 2 acre lot in Strawberry Estates Welcome to this private sanctuary on the north-west corner of Arden. Enjoy a view from every window of this brick character home with a spacious entryway, four bedrooms, two bathrooms and a formal dining room. There is lots of room for a family to run and play on this huge lot.

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NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019 A23

Government grant to help local TV station NACTV receives funds from Local Journalism Initiative

By Kira Paterson Neepawa Banner & Press Neepawa Area Community Television (NACTV) has received a boost from a government project aiming to help supply underserved communities with civic journalism. Local Journalism Initiative (LJI) is a program launched by News Media Canada and the Government of Canada to help local news organizations hire a reporter to provide more local civic news stories and programming to communities. Rrain Prior, NACTV board secretary, noted that they only found out about this initiative a couple months ago. “It’s been a very fast process,” she said. “Usually, you hear about grants like the year before and you start preparing for them and this one happened very quickly.” Prior explained that the grant must be used to employ a journalist that will cover local civic matters, such as council meetings in the area, school board meetings and other happenings going on in the community. “It’s just a wonderful opportunity. NACTV has always run on a shoestring budget and we rely on community volunteers for all of our content. And in the last while, we really have been trying to get the local news content out there... This gives us the opportunity to get a journalist employed by

the station to really get those kind of stories about the community and out to the community,” Prior said. The board found out that they had been approved for the LJI grant a few weeks ago and are now in the process of looking for a journalist to hire. “The grant is specifically for a professional journalist, so we’re looking for either someone who has an education in journalism– maybe they’re looking for the first job but they have that degree– or they have experience in journalism, like professional experience working as a journalist,” Prior explained, adding, “The grant is really partly about making good jobs for journalists available and partly for making sure those journalists can come to these smaller communities.” For the grant application, the board had to explain why they need a journalist, how long they want to employ one, the amount of hours the journalist would generally work and if there is any equipment they would need to supply for the journalist to do their work effectively. “[The grant administrators] do some calculations from there to see what we would be awarded for that. I don’t actually know the dollar amount exactly, but it is enough to sustain a journalist for 17 months,” Prior noted. Along with hiring a journalist, part of the criteria for grant recipients is that they develop some new programming. “There’s a minimum amount of new programming

Harvest while the sun shines

that will be produced each week and the grant is for 17 months, so this is going to be over a year of content that we’re getting out of this,” said Prior. “And part of the process of having this journalist is sort of a training period, with us and also the other recipients of the grant getting together and doing some one-on-one sessions and really developing what this new content will look like. So it may not all just be on the NACTV station; a lot of it may be through the website as well, there’s an option of doing things like podcasts. So it’s sort of in development right now, we’re really excited to have a lot of possibilities about where this can go.” The LJI grant is administered through five different organizations for different modes of media, such as television, radio and several varieties of print. NACTV is receiving their grant through the Canadian Association of Community Television Users and Stations (CACTUS). Prior noted there are about 20 other recipients she’s heard of across the country. There is still time to submit an application for the LJI grant, the deadline for submissions is Nov. 15. Anyone who is involved with a local media organization and would like to apply for a grant, visit nmc-mic.ca/lji for details on eligibility and how to apply.

Shoot your sports stories our way to get some media coverage! sports@neepawabanner.com 204-476-3401 243 Hamilton Street, Neepawa neepawa

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2020 Calendars are in! Get them while supplies last!

Dr. Gerard Murray Optometrist 418 Mountain Ave. ~ Neepawa •Evening Appointments Available•

Remembrance Day Specials Remember those who served Cooked Ham ............................ 3.49 per lb Frying Chicken ......................... 3.20 per lb Lean Ground Beef 10lb or more ..... 3.79 per lb Whole pork loin ........................ 3.59 per lb Family pac chops 10lb or more- .... 3.69 per lb Center cut loin chops.................. 4.09 per lb Pork shoulder roast.................... 2.39 per lb Potato fries ............................. 3.55 per lb

PHONE: 476-5919

www.mywestman.ca

Gladstone, MB 204-385-2506

(Formerly Jarvis Meats)

Mon. - Fri. 9 am - 6 pm • Sat. 9 am - 5 pm Closed Daily 12 noon - 1 pm

Banner & Press

neepawa

PHOTO BY DIANE WARNER

On Oct. 29, a crop of corn was being harvested east of Eden, MB. The rainy, wet fall weather has delayed much of the harvest in the Neepawa area, as farmers waited for the crops and fields to dry.

243 Hamilton St. Neepawa, MB 204-476-3401


A24 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019

BUILDING FOR TOMORROW...TODAY RCMP Gala

On Sept. 21, the Neepawa RCMP detachment and the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation celebrated the 50th anniversary of the RCMP in Neepawa. The event was a fundraiser for the BPCF, a throwback to the foundation’s first ever major fundraiser, which celebrated the RCMP’s 25th year in the community. Pictured: Superintendent Darcy Fleury (left) and Staff Sgt. Mark Morehouse preparing to cut the cake

SAVE THE DATE •NHL Hat Auction Feb. 1, 2020 •25 Anniversary 2020

The 24 Hour Giving Challenge gives Manitoba community foundations the opportunity to leverage their donations. That day, each $5 donation to the BPCF’s Community Fund will become $7, thanks to funding from the Winnipeg Foundation and the Manitoba Government. Donations must be made that day, either at the Foundation office or online at www.endowmanitoba.ca.

In the Community

SuSan DraySon DONOR SPOTLIGHT

Susan Drayson has supported the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation since before it even existed. A member of the group that established the foundation, Drayson and her late husband, Elgin, have supported the foundation in numer- Susan Drayson and ous ways over the years. “It’s the commu- the late Elgin Drayson nity supporting itself for the future,” she said of the Foundation. From individual donations, to family funds, to memorial contributions, to donations of an event’s excess funds, “There are so many different ways to contribute,” said Drayson. “It doesn’t need to be a big amount, other [donations] can generate more and more,” she added. “When you look at what has been achieved, it’s mind-boggling,” said Drayson of the Foundation’s success. Though no longer actively involved, she continues to follow the organization’s growth, as well as supporting it through donations, in particular as a way to memorialize those who have passed. “It’s a vehicle to honour someone,” she explained.

“It’s the community supporting itself for the future”

In memoriam

BPCF says farewell to these community-minded individuals who recently passed away and chose to have donations made in their memory support the BPCF.

Elgin Drayson

Clifford Ross Birch

On Nov. 16, you can help the Community Fund GROW

From left: BPCF board members Mark Morehouse, Jack Falk, Shelley Graham and Jeff Miner presented a cheque to Landon Cameron, of the Neepawa Golf and Country Club. The $8,000 grant was used to reshingle the clubhouse.

What is the Beautiful Plains Community Foundation?

The Beautiful Plains Community Foundation (BPCF) is a non-profit organization whose goal is to preserve and advance the quality of life in the community. Individual donations are pooled and invested and a portion of the interest is given out in annual grants– your original donation is never spent. Each year, the Foundation distributes grants to organizations in the Town of Neepawa, the Village of Brookdale, Rural Municipalities of Rosedale and Glenella-Lansdowne and the Langford area of North Cypress-Langford. 2019-2020 board: President Brad Walker, Vice President Keith Jury, Treasurer Ian Thomson, Ann Kuharski, Shelley Graham, Ashley McCaughan, Marilyn Crewe, Mark Morehouse, Jack Falk, Brent Sorenson and Jeff Miner. a

Are you involved with local not-forprofit? Contact us about some special grant opportunities as part of our 25th Anniversary

Box 486, 487 Walker Ave. Neepawa, MB, ROJ 1HO phone: 204-476-2681 info@beautifulplainscf.ca www.beautifulplainscf.ca


Banner & Press

neepawa

Friday, November 1, 2019 • Vol.124 No.14 • Neepawa, Manitoba

B

SECTION

Remembrance Day 2019

This year, the Banner & Press relives stories, moments and events during and leading up to World War II

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

Pictured left: Somewhere in France or Belgium, Neepawa lad Spr. R. Cathers, nicknamed “Frogs” by his home pals, posed for a photo in 1945. Listed as the second son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Cathers, “Frogs” was with the 1st Canadian Railway Operating Corps. Pictured right: Gnr. Emlyn Dunbar on his motorcycle in 1945. Gnr. Dunbar was listed as the son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Dunbar, of Neepawa. At the time of this photo, Gnr. Dunbar was over in Holland with the Canadian army.

Gladstone Legion # 110

Remembrance Day Service in Gladstone Monday, November 11 10:00 a.m. Service at the Gladstone and District Community Centre Lunch to follow Everyone welcome!

Plumas Legion # 189

Remembrance Day Service in Plumas Monday, November 11 March from Plumas Community Hall to the Cenotaph at 10:45 a.m. Lunch at the Plumas Community Hall.

Erickson Legion # 143 Remembrance Day Service in Erickson Monday, November 11 10:45 a.m. Erickson Legion Hall Service at Clanwilliam Cenotaph 2:00 p.m.

We will Remember them! Neepawa, MB

Stella-Jones wishes thank and remember all our Canadian Veterans who sacrificed so much so that we might live and work in freedom


B2 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019

Sgt. G. S. Thomas Airman tells of experience while prisoner of Germans Killed Led Dieppe troop farthest into France

By Cassandra Wehrhahn

Neepawa Banner & Press

T h e r e w e r e m a ny casualties during World War II (WWII)– both civilian and soldiers. According to the Banner & Press’ archives for 1945, Sgt. George S. Thomas– son of Mr. and Mrs. George Thomas, of Neepawa– was accidentally killed overseas. Born in Neepawa on Dec. 12, 1916, Sgt. Thomas was employed with the C.N.R. and the Neepawa Power Plant, following his education in town. On Sept. 5, 1939– two days after the official start of WWII, he enlisted with the Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders, training at Shilo and Quebec. In 1940, he went overseas on Christmas Day. During the raid on Dieppe in Aug., 1942, he had the distinction of leading the section that penetrated farthest into France, and helped to shoot up a German battery on the road. During that time, Sgt. Thomas held the rank of Lance Corporal. He was married in England on Jan. 20, 1944, to

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

Sgt. George S. Thomas.

Betty Maddock, of Grimsby, England. At the time of his death, he was survived by his wife, parents, two brothers, two sisters, Sgt. Jack, R.C.A.F.,

Haggersville, Ont.; Able Seaman Roy, R.C.N.V.R., overseas; Mrs. Compton, of Brandon; and Mrs. Wm. Grant, of Winnipeg.

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

Hitler became chancellor on Jan. 30, 1933. Shorlty after, he would become dictator and carry out his heavily anti-Semitic campaign in full force.

McCreary Legion # 173 Remembrance Day Service in McCreary Monday, November 11 10:45 a.m. Service at McCreary Branch Hall Lunch to follow

“To Honour Our Veterans”

MUNICIPALITY OF McCREARY 204 835-2309

www.exploremccreary.com

“We Must Remember Those Who Have Fallen”

MINNEDOSA CREDIT UNION 204-867-6350

1945 Archives

Neepawa Banner & Press

Interviewing Vernon Lyle Mc K i n non, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernie McKinnon, who served two months in various German Prison camps, a person can understand the feelings, the bravery and the anxiety that the boys have undergone and displayed during the European war. Vernon’s story is no doubt similar to others, filled with many exciting moments. Serving on H a l i f a x b omb er s as a bombardier F.O., McKinnon was listed as missing last spring, the first bit of hopeful news coming some time later from one of the crew that had arrived back in England. Later, he was reported prisoner, and on Apr. 29, was liberated by the Third Army. His story follows: On his third trip over enemy territory, Vernon experienced his first close call, the plane that he was serving in, running into bombs from another Allied plane. Two of the bombs tore through their plane, a thousand pounder between the two port motors and a five hundred pounder through the tail assembly. Due to the combined efforts of the crew, the plane crippled back to safety, the skipper being awarded the D. F. C. and the engineer the D. F. M. Thirty more raids took place over many of the larger German cities before the Halifax was put out of service.Participating

General Hugh Dyer Branch # 138

Remembrance Day Service in Minnedosa Monday, November 11 10:45 a.m. Service at Minnedosa Conference Centre Lunch to follow at Legion Club Room 12 noon

“Remembering Our Fallen Heroes”

Saler’s Backhoe & Trucking ltd 204-867-0180

“Remember Those Who Served”

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

Bombardier F.O. Vernon Lyle McKinnon.

in a bombing raid over C he m n it z , t he y h a d disposed of their missiles and, three minutes later, were attacked by an enemy fighter. All instruments were shot away and one motor was gone. Two of the crew bailed out over target, the remainder carrying on. The tail assembly was badly shot up and the mid-upper gunner was badly wounded. A cannon shell exploded in the nose immediately below Vernon and the navigator. In addition to putting 27 fragment holes in the navigator’s leg and 5 in McKinnon’s, the blast sealed the hatch that most of the crew would use for bailing out. The hour and a half that the craft kept flying permitted the removal of the wounded

More Vernon on Page 3

Carberry Legion # 153 Remembrance Day Service in Carberry Monday, November 11 10:30 a.m. Carberry Community Hall Lunch and refreshments at the Legion following the service

“Lest we forget”

Falk Pharmacy

Town of Minnedosa

to the rear exit and bailing out. Had the plane gone down at once, they would not have been able to make it to the rear while carrying the wounded. The plane went out of control just about five miles from the city of Worms and about fifteen minutes flying time from their own lines. It was about 11:30 at night when Vernon jumped out into the darkness from a height of 7,000 feet. The first thing he noticed was the opening shock, then the painful quiet that surrounded him. Coming down, he could not see the ground and was filled with anxiety as to when he would hit it and what would be there to meet him.

135 Main Street, Carberry 204-836-2426

“Saluting Our Veterans”

SPUD CITY FOOD MART LTD. 140 Main Street, Carberry, MB

1-204-834-2003


NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019 B3

Neepawa airman’s Liberated from Stalag 7 cameras aid in invasion 1945 Archives Neepawa Banner & Press

Out with cameras, F/Lieut. W.N. (Bill) Harris, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ainsley Harris, formerly of Springhill, gave valuable aid to the Allies in the Normandy invasion and in the fight against rocket bombs. Holder of the D.F.C. for the reconnaissance work over Norway, Harris was the pilot of a camera equipped Mosquito taking photographs of enemy installations. He has flown approximately 1,000 hours and on four occasions brought his plane home on one engine. He has completed two tours of operations in three years overseas. Taking to the air despite low clouds he carried out the first reconnaissance made on enemy railway lines on D-Day, taking pictures of every station and every train for a certain distance behind the enemy lines. The pictures brought back revealed to the Allied commanders the lack of German opposition and helped them in planning their next moves. Last August, Harris was on a mission to the Nazi rocket bomb citadel on the Peenemude Isthmus, where the Nazis established an experimental base housing at one time between three and four thousand scientists who worked on developing the rocket bombs. Just as their cameras started to operate, a Focke Wulfe showed up on Harris’ tail. He opened up his throttle and cork-screwed off toward the south, and in a few minutes found himself over Stetin and all their heavy flak opened up on him. The fighter wouldn’t follow through the flak and they managed to get home without any more trouble. Born at Springhill, he was educated there and at Neepawa as well as the General Wolfe school in Winnipeg,

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

F/Lieut. W. N. (Bill) Harris.

being active in hockey, tennis, baseball and softball. Leaving school, he took a business course at Dominion Business College, and prior to enlistment was employed by United Cigar Stores in Winnipeg and Saskatoon. He enlisted in October, 1940. After the war it is his desire to take an engineering course at the University of Manitoba. While in Winnipeg, he was the guest of his brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. G. Wallace.

‘What to do with Hitler’

By Cassandra Wehrhahn Neepawa Banner & Press

There was some speculation going on regarding what to do with Hitler, particularly for the future, when the war was hopefully won. A snippet in 1945 from the “Note and Comment” section touched on this subject, and shared an idea brought forward to the paper. The snippet reads: “What to do with Hitler? This question has been

Kelwood Legion # 50

Remembrance Day Service in Kelwood Monday, November 11 10:30 a.m. Kelwood Legion Hall A meal will be served following the service

“A Time to Remember”

Troy Mutch & Craig Frondall at

“Remember Those Who Served”

Neepawa Legion # 23 Remembrance Day Service in Neepawa Monday, November 11 10:45 a.m. Service at the Yellowhead Centre Lunch and refreshments to follow at the Legion Memorial Hall

“Lest we forget”

“Remember Those Who Served”

Comfort Electric

Experience, Quality, Integrity

Shawn Nugent

Journeyman Electrician Neepawa 204-476-3331

asked and answered by many people through daily papers recently. Each one has given his own idea of what punishment would be inflicted if he had the opportunity of handing it out; all of which is interesting. But one local resident has come forward with a novel suggestion which we think is the best one offered yet. It is: That Hitler be taken over to the hot desert sands of North Africa, stripped naked, bound securely to a stake driven into a large anthill, and let the ants go to work on him.”

1-204-476-6730 comfortelectric@hotmail.com Box 2518 Neepawa, MB R0J 1H0

Dairy Queen Neepawa 204-476-2663

Dr. Gerard Murray Neepawa 204-476-5919

Continued from Page 2 Suddenly the ground came up and hit him hard, spraining the one good leg. Picking himself up, he at once began to look for the wounded gunner (who passed away in a hospital the next day) but could not find any trace of him. Despite the sprained ankle and the wounded leg, he walked until 3 a.m., then laid up until 6 o’clock. At 6 o’clock, he started out again and went on until noon, when he was picked up by the enemy. Taken to Mitteldeutsch, he was photographed and gave his identity, then [ he wa s] t r a nspor ted around Germany, finally landing at [the] Frankfort interrogation centre. Here, he spent five days in solitary conf inement, seeing no one, and talking to no one, the enemy trying to obtain information from him. The food wasn’t good here, but it was enough for him to live on, the confinement hurting the most. His next move was to Wetzlar for a two day stay to pick up Red Cross clothing, then on to Stalag 3. A fter t hree weeks internment at Stalag 3, they marched for sixteen days with full pack to Stalag 7, at Moosburg. Food was better on the

march than in camp. Late in the evening of April 8th, the boys in the prison could hear the roar of of the Allied guns and see the flashes in the distance. They were filled with anxiety and hope, and about 8 o’clock in the morning saw their liberators storm the camp. The river Danube ran along one side of the camp and the Germans managed to blow up one of the bridges, but the third army crossed the other and liberated the camp at 12:35. T he pr isoner s were given all the Red Cross food available and some army food. This was the f irst time Vernon had seen real white bread since leaving Canada. He remained in the camp until VE-Day, then he was taken to a nearby aerodrome and flown to England. “If it hadn’t been for the Red Cross,” Vernon told us, “many of the boys wouldn’t be here today. It was a marvellous organization, and everything we got, games, reading material, clothing and food, we got from them.” Returning to Winnipeg Tuesday morning, F.O. McKinnon will receive an additional medical and may go to the Pacific as a volunteer.

“Lest we forget.”

GUINN BROS. MEMORIALS QUALITY AND CRAFTSMANSHIP SINCE 1905

“Caring for all your cemetery needs.”

260 MOUNTAIN AVE. NEEPAWA

guinnbros.com PH. 476 - 2903 204-476-2903

“Remember Those Who Served”

HARRIS PHARMACY

424 Mountain Ave. Neepawa, MB. 204-476-2888 or 204-476-3157 Toll Free: 1-888-798-9378

“Remember Our Heroes”

Gill & Schmall Agencies 300 Mountain Ave. Neepawa 204-476-5164

Neepawa 204-476-2345 McCreary 204-835-2501 www.gillandschmall.com


B4 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019

First Nations volunteer for duty These photos from 1942 show some of the First Nations people who signed up for army service with the Canadian forces. Pictured left: Private Mary Grey-eyes, Cree, 21, of the Canadian Women’s Army Corps., from the Muskeg Reserve near Leask, Sask., receives blessings from Harry Ball, Cree, who lost a leg at Vimy Ridge in the Great War. Pictured right: 26 Cree Canadians and an army sergeant, who introduced them to army life. The First Nations folks travelled more than 400 miles by boat from Norway House to Winnipeg, where they were inducted. All were fishers, trappers and guides in the Norway House and Cross Lake Areas. They were the first Indigenous people to join the army as a group. One of their number, John R. Robertson, first in second row, served in the last war with the Engineers. No other information or names were listed. NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

World news from 1933 highlights tragedy early on

Lest We Forget

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

Although World War II officially started in 1939, trouble in Germany– particularly for her Jewish residents– and the surrounding areas began years earlier. AntiSemitic sentiments, myths and stereotypes were already present prior to World War I (WWI), and had grown further during WWI times. This paved the way for the tragedies of the Holocaust, which would result in the persecution and death of an estimated 17 million Jewish people and others, in total. The above news snippets are all occurrences from the first few months of 1933. “Remember Our Heroes”

“Remember Those Who Served”

HILLER HILLER HILLER ELECTRIC ELECTRIC LTD ELECTRIC

268 Hamilton St. Neepawa 204-476-2333

476-6571 476-6571

“In Memory of Those Who Lost Their Lives, So That We Might Be Free”

White’s Funeral Home Serving Neepawa and Area since 1935

Neepawa,MB 204-476-2848 www.whitesfh.ca

“That We May Remember”

R.M. of Rosedale 204-476-5414

Eileen CLARKE

MLA for Agassiz

agassizmla@outlook.com

204.385.2469

“A Time To Remember”

RM of Minto-Odanah 204-867-3282

“Remembering Our Fallen Heroes”

Mountain & Ellen, Neepawa

204-476-5931


NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019 B5

Women join World News from 1942 industrial parade Found in the 1942 archives, this photo depicts one of the thousands of women who joined the industrial parade during World War II. This unnamed woman, seen utilizing a file, was in the midst of aiding in the production of parts at an airplane factory. At that time, it was etsimated that between 50,000 and 75,000 women were employed, and that thousands more would be required to cope with workforce requirements as d e m a n d s g re w and men enlisted to serve in the war. According to Veterans Affairs Canada, a total of 439,000 women worked in the service sector, 373,000 in manufacturing and 4,000 in construction in 1943-44.

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

Put a sock in it! Księga Imion (The Book of Names) By Cassandra Wehrhahn Neepawa Banner & Press

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

Much like with the first World War, there was a call for support in the form of victory bonds and savings certificates throughout the duration of World War II. Folks at home were encouraged to purchase these items to help the Allies “sock” Hitler and his ideals. Pictured above are just a couple samples of such ads, retrieved from the 1942 archives.

“We Remember”

“We Must Remember Those Who Have Fallen”

Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum, former Nazi Concentration Camp in Poland, is a holocaust memorial site. Inside, the atrocious acts of Hitler’s fascist regime and those lost to it are remembered. The museum contains many items, including items confiscated at Auschwitz– which had been found after liberation. In one room, part of the Shoah exhibition, is an unimaginably large book. Printed on the front is “Księga Imion”– The Book of Names. Inside, the names of those murdered in camps during the Holocaust are inscribed as an eternal memorial. The book contains 4.2 million names. At the opening of the Shoah exhibit in 2018, Israel President Reuven Rivlin– who was present there– shared some words following the March of the Living. The following is a snippet of his address, recorded on the Auschwitz-Birkenau Museum’s website: “The Nazi death machine would not have been able to achieve its terrible vision, if it had not received

“In memory of those who lost their lives, so that we might be free”

neepawa

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FOODS

Fashions & Gifts

263 Hamilton Street, Neepawa

204-476-5986

243 Hamilton St. 204-476-3401

help; if it had not found a fertile ground of hatred for Jews, in which to take root. True, it was Germany that established the Camps, but our People were not murdered only in the camps. The members of our nation were betrayed by the people amongst whom they lived… Germany did not purchase the forgiveness of the Jews, just as no nation can legislate their forgetting. For no legislation can cover over the blood. No selfinterest can cover over antisemitism, racism, hatred of the other… But those who are willing to bravely look straight into their past, those who are willing to bravely deal with the antisemitism and the racism that continue to raise their heads even today will find in us allies, determined, true partners to pave the way that leads from remembrance to the future…” According to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, a recorded 6 million Jewish people and 11 million others were murdered by the Nazis and their supporters. However, it is impossible to know a true count of those killed both inside and outside the camps throughout the duration of the Holocaust.

“Honour Our Veterans”

“Remember Those Who Served”

Neepawa-Gladstone Co-op Ltd.

NEEPAWA MOTEL Highway #16 West

Phone: 204-476-2331 www.neepawamotel.com

“Remember Our Heroes”

Neepawa Pharmacy Neepawa 204-476-2315


B6 NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS NOVEMBER 1, 2019

Remembering the Christie Pits riot

By Cassandra Wehrhahn

Neepawa Banner & Press

Anti-semitic rhetoric and discrimination– both openly spoken and relayed through veiled or more subtle terms– played a key role in the tragedies of the holocaust that would unfold overseas, and the years leading up to it. However, discriminatory ideals or ways of thinking are not bound by a nation’s borders. At home in Canada, anti-semitism was rearing its head more prominently. Some incidents would be recorded in brief in the Neepawa Press archives. One such passage would appear in the Aug. 18, 1933 edition of the paper, just seven months after Hitler took over as Germany’s chancellor. The passage reads: “A large Swastika emblem painted on a white quilt and displayed on the side of a hill was the signal for a wild riot between Jewish and Gentile youths, in which approximately 10,000 persons took part in Willowvale Park, near Toronto, on Wednesday night.” This clash would later be known as a significant event in Canadian, specifically Torontarian, history– The Christie Pits riot.

Before the riot Hitler’s rise to power was regularly chronicled in Canadian papers; and an air of anti-semitism and resentment for any “foreigners” was present. It was no secret what significance the swastika holds as a symbol of hatred. Reports were printed and readily available, detailing how Jewish people were being dismissed as lawyers, doctors, professors and more in Germany, as well as acts of violence against them. Additionally, the KKK– a whitesupremacist group– were already active in areas of Canada as well, such as southern Ontario. According to Toronto newspaper The Star, “anti-Semitism was a boorish and normal part of Toronto life.” In fact, many businesses, such as summer resorts, banned Jewish people. Attempts were also made to ban Jewish people from public beaches, but failed. Then anti-Jewish gangs were formed, including the Swastika Club. As recalled in The Star, many Swastika Club members slinked around at beaches and parks, picking targets and boldly displaying the

white-supremacist symbol to intimidate Jewish patrons. Mass anti-fascist protests were carried out by Jewish Canadians at The Beaches. These protests were met with white-supremacist counter protestors from the Swastika Club. According to a passage in The Province from Aug. 2, 1933, the anti-semites attempted to claim that their

leadership of the Swastika Club was now participating in meetings for the Kitchener Swastika Club, where an openly anti-Semitic agenda was pursued. That same day, a quarterfinals baseball game was being held at Christie Pits– then known as Willowvale Park–between two local clubs, Harbord Playground,

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES, AUG. 18, 1933

actions “had nothing to do with Hitler” and that they “simply wanted to keep the beach clean.” The Canadian Jewish Congress held meetings with city officials and the leadership of the Swastika Club in an attempt to have the Swastika Club members cease the anti-Semitic activities and disband. Details relayed in the Windsor Star on Aug. 14– two days before the riot– stated that a stalemate had been reached, and the

which consisted predominantly of Jewish and Italian players; and the St. Peter’s Church, a Catholic church at Bathurst and Bloor. A group of people in attendance of the game made a bold and disquieting move to wave a white t-shirt with a black swastika sewn into it. The rest of the night was tense, and police were warned in writing that trouble might arise at the next game as a result of anti-Semitic actions. However, those warnings

were reportedly ignored.

The Riot On Aug. 16, it was time for the second game. According to the book, The Riot of Christie Pitts, the six hour riot broke out after members of the Pit Gang (Swastika Club) displayed a blanket with a large swastika painted on it. Upon seeing the whitesupremacist symbol, a number of Jewish boys and young men that were aware of the previous incident– including Italians who supported the Jewish folks– rushed the Swastika to destroy it. Other supporters in the surrounding area came to help. Unfortunately, the same was said for the anti-semitic gang and a fight broke out as a result. According to an account from the Toronto Daily Star, a crowd of 10,000 people were drawn to Willowvale Park by the commotion, which included cries of “Heil Hitler” by the swastika flyers and their supporters. The Riot of Christie Pitts states that though there were injuries as a result of the conflict, there were no deaths. Following the event, police received criticism for not

being ready to intervene, as they had been for other previous potential problems in the Beach area. William James Stewart, mayor at the time, also warned against further displays of the swastika and there were no further riots in the area. However, the riot had fully revealed the xenophobic attitudes towards Jewish people and other non-Anglo Canadians, such as those of Italian ethnicity. In 1933, Jewish people represented the largest minority in Toronto, and as such were a common target of xenophobic residents. According to The Star, the Christie Pitts riot was Toronto’s first and largest ethnically based riot. A Heritage of Toronto plaque was installed to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the riot in Aug., 2008. “Although history never repeats itself to the letter, we can draw lessons from the past. A culture of hate always precedes real violence. The Christie Pits Riots offer lessons that are depressingly topical, but no less relevant today than they were in 1933.” –Jamie Michaels and Doug Fedrau, co-producers of historical comic entitled Christie Pits.

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Camps, ghettos and prisoners By Cassandra Wehrhahn

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The Nazi regime had a staggering number of victims– prior to and during World War II– in Germany and other Nazi occupied territories. The sheer amount of which can still not be determined today. On Dec. 7, 1944, a passage appeared in the Neepawa Press telling of a deadly incident, relayed in a single sentence: “Forty thousand Jews from the Warsaw ghetto have been gassed by the Germans.” Large on its own, that number would be found to be only a fraction of the total victims researchers estimate today. Dachau established Hitler was made chancellor on Jan. 30, 1933. Despite not holding the title of dictator at this time, Hitler already held a significant amount of power. The very first concentration camp– Dachau– was established in March, just two

months after Hitler was put in that position of power. It was then that the Nazis began imprisoning people in camps and categorizing them using various badges. Prior to this, the Nazis held society’s socalled “undesirables” in jail. Prisoner identification In addition to the Star of David for those imprisoned for being Jewish, prisoners were identified by an assortment of coloured, primarily inverted triangles. These badges allowed the Schutzstaffel (SS), known as stormtroopers in English, to easily identify a person’s alleged grounds for incarceration. Based on the coding used before and during the early stages of war at Dachau, the system worked as follows: •Red, inverted: political prisoners– social democrats, socialists, communists, an-

archists, rescuers of Jewish people, trade unionists and freemasons. •Red, uninverted: enemy

(ex: bisexual men and transgender women). In the early years, those incarcerated for being LGBT+ were made to

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES, DEC. 7, 1944

prisoners of war, spies, traitors and military deserters or criminals. •Green: convicts and criminals. •Purple: Jehovah’s Witnesses. •Brown: Romani males. •Black: “asocial” and “work-shy” people– Roma, Sinti, mentally ill and mentally disabled people, alcoholics, drug addicts, homeless people and beggars, pacifists and conscription resisters, prostitutes, some anarchists, and lesbians, as lesbians were typically not detained with homosexuality charges for a variety of reasons. •Pink: gay men and those the Nazis mis-labelled as such

Noel Panter, in brief

wear a green or a red triangle. If a prisoner wearing any of these badges was also Jewish, a yellow triangle was combined with it to resemble the Star of David. Badges were also accompanied by numbers and letters for various purposes, such as denoting nationality or in-camp functions, if applicable. Symbols today Some of the symbols used to identify Nazi prisoners remain in use today, though with a positive context. They have been reclaimed and repurposed, or continue to be an important symbol within a culture. The Star of David re-

mains an important symbol within the Jewish community, alongside the menorah– a much older Jewish symbol. The black triangle has been reclaimed by two groups. Lesbians now use it as a symbol of pride and solidarity, and to remember the lesbians who suffered and died at the hands of the Nazis. Some UK groups concerned for the rights of disabled people have also adopted the symbol for usage in their campaigns. The pink triangle has been reclaimed and repurposed by the LGBT+ community, as a whole, for positive uses following the Holocaust. These uses include raising awareness of LGBT+ persecution during the Holocaust, human rights activism and marking LGBT+ safe spaces. How many camps and ghettos? According to the Jewish Virtual Library ( JVL), a

recorded 23 main camps were established– each accompanied by an array of sub-camps. Some of these camps were established under euphemistic names, such as “care facilities for foreign children.” One hundred and ten camps would be established in 1933 alone. According to the JVL, researchers found that the Nazis established about 42,500 camps and ghettos between 1933 and 1945. That figure includes 30,000 slave labour camps, 1,150 Jewish ghettos, 980 concentration camps, 1,000 prisoner of war camps, 500 brothels filled with slaves, and thousands of other camps utilized for euthanizing the elderly, mentally ill, disabled and otherwise infirm. It also includes those used for “Germanizing” prisoners or transporting victims to kill centers. Today, some of the centres are active as museums; places to remember those tragedies, learn and reflect.

Canadians at Vaucelles

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS 1933 ARCHIVES

By Cassandra Wehrhahn Neepawa Banner & Press It is no secret there was a suppression of truth throughout the duration of Nazi rule. In Nazi held territory, laws and the threat of harm kept newspapers from reporting accurately. Additionally, any critical reports would not be tolerated and propaganda chief Joseph Goebbels would lead efforts to influence and pressure the presses, including the foreign press. According to an article on History Extra, sources reporters relied on for information started to fear for their lives as well. As a foreign correspondent for British newspaper the Daily Telegraph, Noel Panter was face to face with a dangerous reality: Follow along and remain safe, or tell the truth. Panter chose the latter. The 31-year-old writer, who had also reported on Hitler’s election as chancellor in January 1933, was arrested by the Nazis in October that same year. Panter had made a move that the Nazis did not like– he accurately reported the march of 20,000 stormtroops (SS soldiers) in Munich and the “militaristic fervour” displayed there. He was imprisoned by the Gestapo under accusations of espionage and other anit-Nazi activities as a result. The Telegraph reports that Panter’s flat was raided, personal papers were confiscated and he was held in prison for 10 days. The British government placed intense pressure on Hitler’s regime for Panter’s release. Later, Panter was granted just that– and expelled from Germany. Will Wainewright, an author who published a book about British reporters telling the world of the rise of fascism prior to World War II, believes Panter would have faced a much worse fate if the government had not applied that pressure. Note: It is also important to acknowledge activity outside of Nazi occupied territory. According to History Extra, there were newspaper owners and editors (outside of those for established pro-Nazi papers) who were Nazi sympathizers. For example, British Daily Mail reporter Rothy Reynolds– well known for similar reasons as Noel Panter– was in a difficult position in Britain. His boss, Lord Rothermere, supported Hitler. Words from Rothy Reynolds’ articles would be excluded, making Reynolds’ originally critical pieces appear as though they were his own, pro-Nazi, opinions.

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

This photo from the 1944 Banner & Press archives depicts the Canadian crew of a Universal carrier as they locate their position in the bombed city of Vaucelles, Normandy, after the British and Canadian troops fighting south of Caen had taken the town.

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Meakin brothers murdered

‘S’ for Sugar

1944 Archives Neepawa Banner & Press

M r s. J. Mea k i n, of Bir n ie, received word last Wednesday that her two sons, Cpl. Frank and Cpl. George had been murdered in cold blood by the Germans after having been t a ken pr isoners. Previously having been reported killed in action on June 8th, this last word was delivered direct to Mrs. Meakin by Major Smith, army representative. Both boys were born at Hamiota, Frank twentyone years ago in July, and George twenty-two years ago on April 30th. They lived at McConnell for a few years prior to moving to Birnie in 1932. George

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

Pictured are Cpl. George Meakin (left) and Cpl. Frank Meakin (right).

enlisted in the Winnipeg R if les June 14, 194 0, and Frank the same unit February 23, 1942. Both boys trained at Winnipeg, Shilo and Debert, George going overseas four years

ago in September and Frank two years ago this month. They are survived by their mother, two brothers, Walter, of Neepawa; and Bill, overseas; and f ive

sisters, Mrs. R. E. Wilson, and Mrs. Wm. Johnson, Neepawa; Mrs. A. Stace, Decker; Mrs. L. Pitman, Minnedosa; and Mrs. H. Marsh, Birnie.

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVES

O.P.S. Pilot Officer Scholefield gives a thumbs up as he’s about to leave with the “S” for Sugar on the plane’s 97th raid. This was the first time he had ever flown the famous machine. According to the information that accompanied the photo, the plane had dropped a million pounds of bombs and fifty thousand gallons of petrol. It served earlier as a Pathfinder and was previously known as “Q” for Queenie.

Soldiers in action and ‘what ifs’

NEEPAWA BANNER & PRESS ARCHIVE PHOTOS

Pictured left: This photo appeared in the Banner & Press’ 1942 archives with the following caption: “A few seconds after this picture shot was taken, the trail was on the ground, the rubber tired wheels up on their platform, the gun traversed into line and the first round was on its way.” Pictured right: This photo appeared in the Neepawa Press on Feb. 19, 1942, in a special section entitled “If” Manitoba Were Occupied. According to the cutline from that time, the photo depicts Nazi soldiers rounding up civilians to be taken to a concentration camp. The section warned that the place depicted could be any Manitoban town, and that Canadians must not let Nazis take hold in Canada. “Remembering Our Fallen Heroes”

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Friday, November 1, 2019 Neepawa Banner & Press  

In this week's paper, read about the Neepawa Filipino Basketball League starting up for the season, a local business that's claimed some maj...

Friday, November 1, 2019 Neepawa Banner & Press  

In this week's paper, read about the Neepawa Filipino Basketball League starting up for the season, a local business that's claimed some maj...

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