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Touring and Travel Photography ONLINE magazine for Australian Writers and Photographers Volume 1, Issue 2, September/October 2013

• READERS’ PHOTO PORTFOLIOS • TOURING TASMANIA’S SOUTH EAST • TIME LAPSE MOVIES FROM STILL PHOTOS • TOURIST HOT SPOTS HELP IMPROVE PHOTO SKILLS • STRANGE ENCOUNTERS ON THE TANAMI TRACK • JOURNEY TO VICTORIA’S NORTHERN BORDER


Volume 1, Issue 2, September/October 2013 The concept, design and layout of this publication is © Roger Neal Photography. All rights reserved. No content can be reproduced, re-purposed or re-used without prior written permission from the publisher. Opinions expressed in Out and About around Australia, are those of the individul authors and not necessarily those of its editors or publisher. Contributors do not accept free or sponsored travel for their reviews. They pay their own way so as to have the same experience our readers would, enabling Out and About around Australia to maintain editorial and content independence. Published by Roger Neal Photography 32 Kielli Drive Warrnambool VIC 3280 Australia. Telephone: +61 3 5561 6312 Email: rnp@iinet.net.au http://www.rogernealphotography.com.au The online interactive experience. All web addresses (URLs) are hyperlinked to allow quick viewing of web sites mentioned throughout this publication. Readers wishing to buy Photo Art or Digital Downloads of images featured in this magazine may do so by simply clicking on the button applied to the image. Buy Photo Art Out and About around Australia, invites contributions featuring travel and vacation stories and tourism photography of places and locations throughout Australia. Contributions should be forwarded via email to rnp@iinet.net.au Copyright ownership of manuscripts and images always remains with the author. Manuscripts should be supplied as Word (.doc) or Text (.rtf) documents. Images should be supplied as sRGB (.jpg) files. Get PDF (143kb) of Contributor’s Guidelines - click here Out and About around Australia, regrets that it is not able to accept responsibility for the safe arrival of any transmitted files whatsoever. Please note: Contributions will be acknowledged but will not be returned to the author. Non-acceptable works:
 We do not accept any work that is abusive or vilifies anyone, or that may expose the author and/or publishers to suing for defamation or similar legal proceedings. Images must be tasteful, therefore nudity (explicit or implied), will not be displayed. By submitting works for publication in Out and About around Australia, authors agree to abide by these conditions. Indemnity:
 All works submitted to this publication must be the sole creation of the author. Accuracy of facts and information contained in articles and reviews are the sole responsibility of the author and the administrators of Out and About around Australia accept no responsibility whatsoever for the accuracy or authenticity of works submitted. By posting works on this site, authors agree that they indemnify the administrators against any legal action which may arise.


Cover Photo: “Princess Pier Melbourne”. Piles of the old pier preserved as a heritage sculpture. Photograph: © Hans Kawitzki - http://www.redbubble.com/people/hanskawitzki BUY PHOTO ART - CLICK HERE Photo this spread: “The other side”. Taken across the river at Anglesea, Victoria, close to sunset. Photograph: © Hans Kawitzki - http://www.redbubble.com/people/hanskawitzki BUY PHOTO ART - CLICK HERE


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ell, here we are with the second issue of Out and About around Australia online magazine. Thank you to all those readers who offered their congratulations, and words of encouragement for us to continue publishing the works of Red Bubble authors and photographers. Dont forget, this is the magazine where travel writers and photographers can display and share their works for the promotion of tourism and travel photography within Australia. Readers wishing to buy Photo Art or Digital Downloads of images featured in this magazine may do so by simply clicking on the Buy Photo Art button applied to an image. As always, please feel free to share this issue of Out and About around Australia with all of your family and friends. Roger Neal rnp@iinet.net.au Out and About around Australia

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TRAVEL & TOURING

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Hobart city is not the only place to visit...

Cambridge, Richmond, Eaglehawk Neck, etc

There are many reasons to visit the south east of Tasmania, without going into or through Hobart. Most sights worth visiting are less than two hours ...

11 Strange encounters on the Tanami Track. Alice Springs, The Kimberlies, West Australia

Sometimes, taking a ‘short cut’ in Australia’s outback can provide some most unexpected encouters. Terry Everson recalls one such experience.

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A journey to Victoria’s northern border.

Grampians, St Arnaud, Wedderburn, Mildura

A few years ago when retirement arrived, my wife and I decided to see why so many grey nomads were excited by their lifestyle ...

PHOTO LOCATIONS

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... improve your shooting skills.

Photo location shooting at Ballarat’s Sovereign Hill

Shooting in different lighting conditions provides many challenges to keen photographers... Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2, September/October 2013


© Roger Neal

READERS PORTFOLIOS

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David Murphy - mono images

Stanley, Tasmania photographer

A collection of David’s mono works featuring locations near his hometown of Stanley in Tasmania.

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Hans Kawitzki

Beautiful scenic photos from near Geelong, Victoria.

A collection of Hans’ favourite scenics from around Barwon River, Jan Juc and Corio Bay.

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Sonia Ellem (earthgipsy) - Vanuatu

Beaches, volcanoes, mountains and canoeing.

A few examples of places to go, things to see on Sonia’s Oceanic Escapes 2014 tour of Vanuatu.

PHOTO IDEAS

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Time Lapse movies from still images

Use a Timer Shutter Release on location to create movies

Expand your photographic interests by having a go at making movies from still images. Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2,September/October 2013

© Roger Neal 5


Reader’s Portfolio

Mono works by David Murphy

© David Murphy

© David Murphy

Buy Photo Art

Buy Photo Art

© David Murphy

Images on these two pages were made by David Murphy from Stanley, north west Tasmania, Australia. View more of his exceptional work and his ‘The Cow and Calf Gallery’ at: http://www.davidmurphyphotography.com/

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Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2, September/October 2013


© David Murphy

Buy Photo Art

© David Murphy

Buy Photo Art

Buy Photo Art

© David Murphy

Buy Photo Art

Clockwise from top left: “dawn NUT” Stanley; “Weathered”, Arthur River mouth, Tarkine; “Cracked”, Godfreys Beach, Stanley; “Log Jam”, Dip Falls, Mawbanna; “The Stanley Nut”, Stanley; “five”, Montagu Jetty, Tasmania. Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2,September/October 2013

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Travel and Touring

© Roger Neal

Hobart city is not the only place to visit in Tasmania’s south east

Above: View from Mt Rosny of Derwent River and Tasman Bridge with norther suburbs of Hobart in background

There are many reasons to visit the south east of Tasmania, without going into or through Hobart. Most sights worth visiting are less than two hours drive from the city. BY ROGER NEAL

side of Derwent River. This route offered many amazing views of the upper Derwent valley, with lots of quality homes located to take full advantage of the views. Many of the homes we saw used coloured corrugated iron as exterior wall cladding – so many, we wondered if this was a new Tasmanian architectural style? Without warning we found ourselves enclosed by suburbia, so decided to get to Barilla Holiday Park at Cambridge and set up camp in time for lunch. A quick detour into Rosny Park shopping centre to stock up on supplies was not a great idea as on returning to our car, some

© Roger Neal

Two fishermen were already there with their motor home, un-hitching and launching a motor boat for a couple of days fishing. Apparently this lake provides good bag limits of trout and these blokes regularly get good catches there. We were quite happy just to take in the peace and serenity of the place for a few minutes. Moving on, it wasn’t long before we were at New Norfolk, a really pretty town on the banks of Derwent River. Being too early for lunch and not sure how long it would take us to get to Cambridge we kept moving on through Bridgewater and down the eastern

Above: Rolling hillsides surround the upper Derwent Valley

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© Roger Neal

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ith the sun shining, we had a relaxing drive down and out of the southern mountains on the Lyell Highway as we headed for Cambridge, east of Hobart, for a two or three night stop-over as our base for touring the south east of Tasmania, including visits to Richmond in the north and Port Arthur to the south. After a short time our route appeared to be following a large lake. Always on the lookout for scenic locations to photograph, we took the first turn off we could find and within minutes arrived at a boat ramp and off-road parking area. A sign said Meadowbank Lake.

Above:Derwent estuary as seen from Rosny Hill lookout Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2, September/October 2013


© Roger Neal

© Roger Neal Above: Serenely still waters of Meadowbank Lake near New Norfolk

Above:Tasman Arch near Eaglehawke Neck on the Tasman Peninsula

senseless lout had ‘keyed’ the entire passenger side of our car. Fortunately, the gouging was not deep and I was able to remove it after we got home again. But, not a very ‘welcoming’ experience. Barilla Holiday Park is a very nice, clean and well set up park with sheltered sites for tents, caravans and motor homes. There is an on-site licensed restaurant, ice cream shop, and gourmet pizza shop, plus mini golf course and spa pool (open to the public). Amenity blocks are many and well located throughout the park. Internet access can be had for a small fee. Our first tour was down to Port Arthur intending to spend a day at this historical site. But, it was not to be. For the first time on our journey we were met with non-stop pouring rain. We got soaking wet just getting from the car park to the reception centre. After a half hour of hot drinks and snacks, and perusing the souvenir shop the rain showed no sign of letting up so, reluctantly, we chose to leave and visit again some time in the future.

So, with time on our hands we headed north along Tasman Peninsula, home to many rugged coastal views and seaside villages. A nice little detour on the eastern coast is near Eaglehawk Neck to view and photograph Tasman Arch and the Devils Kitchen. Millions of years of wave action has created these awesome cliff side formations. Fortunately the cliff edges are fenced in, as you would not want to fall off here. The next day we awoke to a mild, sunny day. Deciding to do a bit of sight seeing we drove to the top of Rosny Hill lookout. 270 degrees views are possible from up here, covering Derwent estuary to the south, Hobart city to the West with Tasman Bridge and Derwent River to the north. On returning to camp neither of us felt like preparing lunch so I went to investigate the park’s pizza shop. Fortunately Nate, the resident professional chef, was preparing the day’s supplies so I was able to discuss with him which gluten-free foods he could provide. He offered to make a gluten-

Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2,September/October 2013

free pizza especially for us if we were happy to wait a little while – and he would personally deliver it to our tent! An offer we couldn’t refuse. True to his word a delicious steaming hot, gluten- free pizza was delivered to our tent less than an hour later. It was the best pizza we had enjoyed for several weeks so we recommend anyone in the area or in the park drop into Nate’s Gourmet Pizza and Restaurant for an enjoyable lunch or dinner. Just 15 minutes drive north is Richmond – reputed to be the best-preserved Georgian village in Australia. Set in the heart of Coal River Valley, once a key military post and convict station, the town commands views of hillside vineyards and sandstone cottages. Richmond’s most recognised icon is its historic sandstone bridge built in 1823 using convict labor. There are several heritage-listed buildings in the town and it’s worth allowing at least two hours to view all points of interest. One must-see attraction here is Old Hobart Town. This historically accurate model village took more than 4 years to build, working from plans and drawings researched from archived records. It’s an amazing look at the early days of Hobart. Our five minutes of fame happened while we were there. A Japanese film company was making a tourism documentary during our visit and we were asked to ‘play the tourists’ while their camera’s rolled. Returning to the normality of our camp we prepared for the « next phase of our journey. Key Links for further information Barilla Holiday Park, Cambridge http://www.barilla.com.au/ Old Hobart Town, Richmond http://www.oldhobarttown.com/ Hobart and surrounds Accommodation http://www.discovertasmania.com/hobart_ and_surrounds/where_to_stay

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Photo Idea

Time Lapse movies from still images

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y photographic interests have recently turned toward making movies using sequences of still images to create video footage. As part of the ‘learning curve’ associated with this new found interest I arrived at Warrnambool’s Pickering Point about a half hour before sunrise was due. Setting up in darkness was a bit of a challenge but it was just possible to make out a glow on the horizon. It looked like the sun would rise just above the building complex of Lady Bay Resort, so at least I was able to include a point of interest in the frame. I aimed the camera, as best as I could judge it, for the resort to be as close as possible to a ’rule of thirds’ intersection and hoped that other content within the frame would not detract from the final result. Focus was set manually using ‘Live View’as there was nothing close enough for auto focus to lock on to. Equipment used was Canon EOS 650D, Sigma 10-20mm wideangle lens, Timer Shutter Release and a Tripod. The timer was set to

continuously release the shutter every 5 seconds for 100 shots, then I set it to run for additional 100 shot sequences. (Refer the Timer Shutter Release below) Initial camera settings were – ISO 1600, Auto white balance, Av mode (so that shutter speed would be set automatically) set to f5.6, and jpeg file size of 1920×1280 pixels – same as full HD video resolution. The first 200 frames were shot with these settings. Final camera settings were as above, but, with ISO reset to 800 - just in case the required shutter speed climbed to something higher than the camera was capable of. It took about 45 minutes to record 400 frames. I have made business card size charts to keep in my wallet, to help me choose timer settings to use when out in the field - refer to example below. The final production process I used was -
 1. Run a Photoshop action over all images to slightly increase saturation and sharpness (about 5 minutes).
 2. Convert all still image files to

.mov format using Quick Time Pro’s “Open Image Sequence” feature, at 12 frames per second (fps) setting (about 2 minutes).
 3. Export QT result as final .mov (H.264, 25 fps PAL format) movie (about 10 minutes).
 Total production time – 15 to 17 minutes. I’m happy with that. The final footage runs for 33 seconds and can now be used in any video-editing program for other movie projects that I might want to do in future.

Above: This is the Timer Shutter Release used with my Canon 650D. It has a self-timer, interval timer, long-exposure timer, and exposure-count setting features. Timing can be set anywhere from 1 second to 99 hours. A new dial enables easy entering of numeric settings and the LCD panel can be illuminated. Approximately AUD$16.00 on eBay. Click here to check out eBay listing.

Above: This is one of seveal charts I’ve made to quickly tell me how many frames I need to shoot for any length of final Play Time footage that I want to end up with. For example: 40 seconds of final footage at 25 fps =1000 images to be shot. If I shoot them at 5 second intervals, total shooting time = 83.33 minutes. Each image is 2.2mb file size, so I will need 2.2gb of space remaining on my camera card. Very helpfull when out in the fiield!

Click here to view final MOVIE in a new window.

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What would I do better next time? 1. Take more care and time to achieve a better composition. 2. Plan to use ISO 1600 for entire sunrise or sunset sequence. Perhaps choose ISO 200 or 400 for capture during normal daylight shooting. 3. Capture at least 700 frames to achieve more ‘versatile’ final footage. Time Lapse movies are challenging but can be fun and offer exciting results. Get out there and do some experimenting of your « own. Roger Neal

Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2, September/October 2013


Travel Snapshot

© Terry Everson

Strange Encounters on the Tanami Track

Above: At the Western Australia and Northern Territory border where Tanami Track becomes the McGuire Track

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t was 1988 and my workmate Ben and I were on one of many excursions around Australia. Leaving Alice Springs there is a 1040km ‘short cut’ to the Kimberleys in Western Australia via the Tanami Track, past the aboriginal settlement of Yuendemu and the lonely roadhouse of Rabbit Flat approximately 600km distant. The present Tilmouth Well roadhouse didn’t exist in those days. Shortly before reaching Yuendemu we encountered the first strange incident. Up ahead an old Holden car was parked sideways across the road with the bonnet up and surrounded by a few aborigines. We approached slowly in case they needed help but were waved on. Glancing back we noted that the car did not have an engine. Perhaps they were waiting for the RAA to bring them a new engine! About 100km east of Rabbit Flat we could see in the distance another car parked on the side of the road, again with the bonnet up, and from its confines out stepped a man who walked into the middle of the road and flagged us down. I approached cautiously but as we got closer his presence prompted us both to lock our doors.

He was a giant of a man with a mop of bushy unkempt hair and a thick beard, just as bad. This wasn`t the only reason that I wound my window down a only short way, as he was dressed in army camouflage and shirt and trousers that were ripped to pieces and looked like he had been in a fight with a tiger (for that reason, Ben and I refer to him as the tiger man when reminiscing). He said he was broken down and could we take him to Alice Springs. We could not have taken him even if we’d wanted to, as my short wheelbase Nissan Patrol was packed to the roof with all our gear for a couple of months on the road. We told him he should wait for someone going his way but we would take a message to Rabbit Flat and advise people there of his plight. He said if we know someone, (if we know someone ????) who

would take him to Alice Springs he would give them two 44 gallon drums of fuel and pointed a little way up the road, to what we hadn`t yet seen, a trailer in the bush, just off the road with two 44 gallon drums on board. Before departing we enquired as to whether he had food and water and he assured us he did but made one more request. “Did we have any smokes?” Unfortunately for him, neither of us smoke so he wasn’t having much luck. As we departed we were in for one more surprise. Passing by the open door of the car, an early model Range Rover, (I guess that explained all the fuel) we could see that the drivers seat was slashed to pieces, just like his clothes. A strange encounter indeed. « Terry Everson

© Terry Everson Above: Ruins of The Granites on the Tanami Track

Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2,September/October 2013

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Reader’s Portfolio

Buy Photo Art

© Hans Kawitzki

Buy Photo Art

© Hans Kawitzki

Buy Photo Art

© Hans Kawitzki

Buy Photo Art

© Hans Kawitzki

Buy Photo Art

© Hans Kawitzki

A collection by Hans Kawitzki

Images featured on these two pages were made by Hans Kawitzki who resides in Bell Post Hill, Victoria. View his extensive galleries of Photo Art at: http://www.redbubble.com/people/hanskawitzki 12

Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2, September/October 2013


Buy Photo Art

© Hans Kawitzki

Buy Photo Art

© Hans Kawitzki

Clockwise from top left: “In morning light”, Barwon River waterfalls; “Free as a bird”, You Yangs in fog; “Half Moon Bay” at Jan Juc beach; “Bollards at Sunrise”, Corio Bay foreshore; “We are sailing”, Corio Bay Regatta; “Embracing” at Dog Rocks, the most photographed tree near Geelong; “Day Break”, frosty early morning over Corio Bay. Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2,September/October 2013

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Travel and Touring

© Roger Neal

A journey to Victoria’s northern border

Above: Buronga Riverside Caravan Park as seen from George Chaffey bridge which crosses the Murray River at Mildura.

We were completely ignorant of anything to do with caravanning. But, a few years ago when retirement arrived, my wife and I decided to see why so many grey nomads were excited by their lifestyle. I had never, ever towed anything during more than 40 years driving experience.

e live in Warrnambool on Victoria’s far south west coast and one day we noticed a rather cute single axle caravan parked in the lot at our local dealership. It had everything we thought we needed for life on the road. More important, it was within the weight specifications that our mid size SUV could legally tow. So we bought it. A few weeks later after much planning we decided we would have ourselves a five week holiday touring Victoria and New South Wales. A quite ambitious plan for raw novices but who cares, we only live once. Do we need this? Do we need that? Where do I put this? Have we got everything? Loading the van took much longer than expected. Eventually we took off and headed north-west aiming for Halls Gap via Woolsthorpe, Caramut, Penshurst and Dunkeld. Lush green pastures all the way, no signs of drought, great dairy country. Good roads. Easy driving with the van running comfortably behind us. Bellfield Lake provides much

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of the water supply for Halls Gap and surrounding area. As with most water storages in Victoria at this time it was at dangerously low levels, due to the on-going drought. Consider the effects of the drought in the attached photo. All grasses and rocks in the foreground area would normally be under water. The uphill run through the

Grampians to Halls Gap was quite easy going. Having been warned that everything in Halls Gap is more expensive than any where else we chose to continue down the mountain to Wartook in the foothills. The road from Halls Gap to Wartook twists and turns continuously. Drivers need to be on constant alert for on-coming

© Roger Neal

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© Roger Neal

BY ROGER NEAL

Left: Wheat fields near St Arnaud. Right: Bellfield Lake, Grampians, showing drought water level. Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2, September/October 2013


traffic, particularly motorbike riders who drive like they’re practicing for a hill-climb rally. Roadside signs warned that the road was not suitable for caravans but as our unit was just 15 feet long we made the tight turns without any problems. Vans over 17 or 18 feet long might have difficulties. We checked into a resort at Wartook and set up for our first overnight stay. What a shock this turned out to be! The ‘resort’ was at least 5 years overdue for routine maintenance. Toilet and shower blocks were poorly converted workmen’s cabins. BBQs rusted up, no gas supplied. No working hot water to shower in. We were relieved to be on our way again early in the morning wondering if caravanning was for us after all? Our original plan was to head north to Hopetoun for an overnight stop. As it looked like a very small town on our map and not wanting to risk repeating our Wartook experience, we decided to go to Horsham then east through St Arnaud and on to Wedderburn on the Calder Highway. This section of the journey was wide open plains with pastures stretching all the way to the horizon, flowing with wind swept fields of wheat and other crops. For us city slickers it was an awesome sight. Recent rains had bought welcome relief from years of drought for the farmers. Hopefully, these crops kept their bank managers away for another year or two? Residents of St Arnaud are obviously very proud of their town. Carefully restored and maintained historical buildings with manicured parklands and clean, tidy streets. The Botanical pub served a delicious lunch too. The road to Wedderburn detoured through the one-pub town of Logan in the middle of nowhere. It must be doing something right as the car park out front was full.

Wedderburn Pioneer Caravan Park proved to be everything that Wartook’s resort was not! Clean facilities, hot showers, and electric bbqs that worked - all in an attractive setting. Right at the park entrance is Nancy Stokes house. Mr and Mrs Stokes arrived in Wedderburn in 1933 and early the next year Mr Stokes died leaving Nancy to live in a home made tent beside the reservoir drain. A hand sewn bag tent plastered with flour and clay to help water run off was her accommodation. Rain left equal amounts of water inside and out of the tent. A local 11 year old named Bruce Robinson suggested to Nancy that they build her a mud brick cottage. She agreed and the two of them set about making bricks by hand. Bruce worked after school and when ever he had some free time. Mrs Stokes mixed the mortar and Bruce laid the bricks. The house had a double fireplace for cooking and heating, a dirt floor, windows and a door made from any timber they found lying around. Mrs Stokes lived in the house until 1979. She died aged 93, in 1982. In 1983 the house was moved from its crown land site and re-erected by the Shire at its present location.

After a pleasant, restful night we set off north-west across the wide-open country of Victoria’s western plains to make sure we got to Mildura before night fall. Mildura is surrounded by the Fruit Fly Exclusion Zone to protect local grape, olive and orange producers. No fresh fruits what so ever can be taken into this area. You face a $300 on the spot fine if caught trying to carry fruit in, so we stood at a collection bin in the middle of nowhere and ate four bananas rather than throw them into the bin - the last of our fresh fruit supply. The rest of our journey into Mildura was uneventful. As we headed for Buronga Riverside Caravan Park across the mighty Murray River we felt we had become confident caravanners and were beginning to understand just how exciting an onthe-road lifestyle can be. One week down we were looking forward to any adventures which might come our way during « the next four weeks. Key Links for further information St Arnaud tourist region http://www.travelvictoria.com.au/starnaud/ Wedderburn Pioneer Caravan Park http://www.pioneercaravanpark.com.au/ Buronga Riverside Caravan Park http://www.burongacaravanpark.com.au/

© Roger Neal Above: Nancy Stokes’ House, Wedderburn.

Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2,September/October 2013

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Vanuatu by Sonia Ellem

© Sonia Ellem

Reader’s Portfolio

Buy Photo Art

16

© Sonia Ellem

Buy Photo Art

Buy Photo Art

Buy Photo Art

© Sonia Ellem

© Sonia Ellem

Images on these two pages represent places to go and things to see, included in Sonia’s Oceania Escapes tour to Vanuata in April 2014. Oceania Escapes website is currently under development. In the meantime check out and Like her “Facebook page”: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Oceania-Escapes/149492285248993 and follow her “Blog”: http://oceaniaescapes.blogspot.com.au/ To view Sonia’s galleries of Photo Art go to: http://www.redbubble.com/people/earthgipsy

Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2, September/October 2013


© Sonia Ellem

Buy Photo Art

© Sonia Ellem

Buy Photo Art

Buy Photo Art

© Sonia Ellem

© Sonia Ellem

Buy Photo Art

Clockwise from top left: “Paddling the Metavulu River” - through jungle; “Port Orly” - paradise at the end of the road; “Safety Rails” - Mt Yasur, Tanna island; “Yasur Loo” - Toilet at the base of Mount Yasur; “Swimming with turtles” - Efate Island; “Blue Hole” - checking depth before jumping in; “Beach Boys”- Timanu Beach ni-van boys; “Crater’s Edge” - Mt Yasur, Tanna Island. Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2,September/October 2013

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Photo Location

© Roger Neal

Tourism hot spots can help improve your shooting skills.

Above: General view of pit-head and mining company buildings. Natural daylight. ISO 400, f14.0, 1/500 second.

When traveling Australia’s wide countryside there are hundreds of locations considered to be tourism hot spots. Each one presents different lighting conditions to challenge keen photographers - lessons worth learning. BY ROGER NEAL

D

uring a recent school holiday period we visited Ballarat’s Sovereign Hill with our daughter and two grandsons. We had a lot of fun. Not only did we get wonderful family memories to keep, I found every photo opportunity presented unique photographic exposure challenges. The day became an exercise in constantly adjusting ISO, aperture and shutter speed settings in order to get acceptable results. Lighting conditions were mainly bright sun from cloudless skies, which created high contrast conditions for outside shots. Interiors were mostly dark and lit with tungsten lights. Tours down the mine and many other interior demonstrations were often in partial or complete darkness. To make a photographers life more difficult, the use of flashlight was banned in many locations where you’d automatically want to use your flash to capture something of the environment. To give some idea of the variety of lighting

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conditions encountered, images on these pages are a few examples of results from many of the challenges faced. All shots were made hand held as I had thought that a tripod would have been too tiring to carry around for nearly eight hours. White balance was set to Auto for later adjustment in Lightroom. All images were captured as RAW files. None of these images can be considered ‘professional photographs’. But, having put myself through a mixed bag of lighting conditions I feel that I learnt a lot more about how to achieve acceptable exposures, for the next time when I’m faced with similar tricky lighting conditions. I recommend everyone finds a tourism hot spot to practice their photographic skills under a variety of lighting conditions. It’s a worth while learning curve. « Key Links for further information -

Sovereign Hill - family tourism attraction http://www.sovereignhill.com.au/ City of Ballarat, Victoria http://www.ballarat.vic.gov.au/

Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2, September/October 2013


© Roger Neal

© Roger Neal Above: Close up view of equipment inside the printer’s workshop. Daylight mixed with tungsten light. ISO 400, f3.5, 1/20 second.

© Roger Neal

Above: Grand old stagecoach pulled by a team of Clydesdales. Natural daylight. ISO 400 f11.0, 1/320 second.

© Roger Neal

Above: Snow falling over crowds of happy tourists in the main street. Natural daylight. ISO 400, f9.0, 1/250 second.

Above: This cage was used for lowering miners 100 feet down to the first mine level. Lighting from old lanterns. ISO 12,800, f4.0, 1/20 second.

© Roger Neal

© Roger Neal

Above: Inside the haberdashery and general store. Tungsten lighting only. ISO 400, f3.5, 1/13 second.

Above: Inside the Chinese temple where a multi-screen, audio/video presentation depicting the conditions under which Chinese miners lived, plays continuously. Tungsten lighting. ISO 6400, f3.5, 1 second.

Out and About around Australia - Volume 1, Issue 2,September/October 2013

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Useful links to sites featured in this issue Roger Neal’s Photo Art products: Greeting Cards, Postcards, PhotoPrints, Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters, Mounted Prints, Matted Prints. http://rogern.redbubble.com/works

David Murphy Photography and The Cow and Calf Gallery http://www.davidmurphyphotography.com/

Hans Kawitzki’s Photo Art products: Greeting Cards, Postcards, PhotoPrints, Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters, Mounted Prints, Matted Prints. http://www.redbubble.com/people/hanskawitzki

Sonia Ellem (earthgipsy) Photo Art products: Greeting Cards, Postcards, PhotoPrints, Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters, Mounted Prints, Matted Prints. http://www.redbubble.com/people/earthgipsy Barilla Holiday Park, Cambridge http://www.barilla.com.au/ Old Hobart Town, Richmond http://www.oldhobarttown.com/ Hobart and surrounds - accommodation http://www.discovertasmania.com/hobart_and_surrounds/where_to_stay St Arnaud tourist region http://www.travelvictoria.com.au/starnaud/ Wedderburn Pioneer Caravan Park http://www.pioneercaravanpark.com.au/ Buronga Riverside Caravan Park http://www.burongacaravanpark.com.au/ City of Ballarat - tourism http://www.ballarat.vic.gov.au/ Sovereign Hill - family tourism attraction http://www.sovereignhill.com.au/


Out and About around Australia - issue No 2