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Autumn Art Auction Volume 19, 2017

North Dakota Museum of Art


The North Dakota Museum of Art is grateful to our sponsors who have given generously to guarantee that the arts flourish

North Dakota Museum of Art Board of Trustees

North Dakota Museum of Art Foundation Board of Directors

Julie Blehm

Julie Blehm

Ann Brown, Secretary

Nancy Friese

Ashley DiPuma

Bryan Hoime

Kristin Eggerling

Laurel Reuter

Susan Farkas Annie Gorder, Treasurer Darrell Larson Sally Miskavige Carson Muth Natalie Muth Jim Poolman Nicole Poolman Lynne Raymond

The 2017 Autumn Art Auction is underwritten by

Lois Wilde and

Laurel Reuter, Director Tammy Sogard Linda Swanston Kesha Tanabe Kelly Thompson, Vice President Lois Wilde Joshua Wynne, Chairman David Hasbargen, Emeritus Kim Holmes, Emeritus Douglas McPhail, Emeritus Gerald Skogley, Emeritus Anthony Thein, Emeritus Wayne Zimmerman, Emeritus

North Dakota Museum of Art Staff Matt Anderson Sarah Bowser Sungyee Joh Greg Jones Laurel Reuter Heather Schneider Gregory Vettel Matthew Wallace Brad Werner Part-time Staff Madeleine Ardelean Wyatt Atchley Payton Cole Sheila Dalgliesh Olivia Gaikowski Errin Jordan Kelly Kennedy Kathy Kendle Wayne Kendle Zephaniah Pearlstein Marie Sandman Curtis Longtime Sleeping

Front cover: Eleanor McGough, Billowing, 2013, acrylic on panel, 30 x 40 inches Back cover: Arduino Palanca Caponigro, Red Dress Jump, 2017, pigmented ink on archival rag paper, open edition, 12 x 12 inches

and over fifty volunteers


North Dakota Museum of Art

AUTUMN Art Auction Saturday, October 28, 2017 Wine and hors d‘oeuvres at 6:30 pm Auction begins at 8 pm

Auction Preview Thursday, October 26, until the auction in the Museum. Hours: 9 to 5 pm weekdays and 1 to 5 pm weekends. All works to be auctioned will be on display.

Autumn Art Auction is

sponsored by the following businesses, not-for-profits, and individuals:

Patrons — $1,000 All Seasons 62 Altru Advanced Orthopedics 65 C&M Ford 74 HB Sound and Light 52 Hugo’s Family Marketplace 71 Minnesota Public Radio 61 News Radio 1310 KNOX 69 Plains Chiropractic & Acupuncture P.C. 48 Rhombus Guys 72 William F. Wosick, MD 49

Auction Walk-about Laurel Reuter, Auction Curator, will lead an informal discussion about works in the Auction Thursday, October 26, 7 pm, in the galleries.

Supporters — $500 Acme Tools 54 AE2S 66 Avant Hair and Skin Care Studio 64 Badger-Tanabe Dental Group 56 Blue Moose Bar & Grill 59 Bremer Bank 50 Crary Real Estate 77 Edgewood Healthcare 56 Empire Arts Center 53 First State Bank 68 Grand Forks Country Club 66 Ground Round 51 Helix Wine & Bites 73 Icon Architectural Group 67 Julie Blehm 58 Little Bangkok 57 Auction Supporters continued on next page

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Supporters — $500 Julie Blehm 58 Museum Cafe 80 North Dakota Eye Clinic 55 Prairie Public 59 Reichert Armstrong Law Office 63 River City Jewelers, Inc. 50 Sky’s Cloud 9 68 Trojan Promotions 70 Truyu 76

Buy local. Read the sponsor pages to learn about those who invest in the Museum. Almost all are locally owned and operated.

Walls Medicine Center 75 Waterfront Kitchen and Bath 60

Contributors — $250 Alerus 77 Capital Resource Management 70 Dakota Commercial 55 Dimensions Photography 75 Family Day at the Museum 80

Advertisers — $125 ArtWise 64 Brady, Martz & Associates, P.C. 64

Family Institute, PC 75

Coldwell Bankers Forks Real Estate, Sarita Bansal 76

GFK Flight Support 77

Cornerstone Mortgage 54

Grand Forks Park District 73 Greenberg Realty, Inc 63 Inna Sumra 73 Meggen Sande, Greenberg Realty 57

Demers Dental, Chelsea R. Eickson, D.D.S. 64 Economy Plumbing 76 Elite Carpet Cleaning 60 Grand Forks Republican Women 54

Myra Presents: Sunday Concerts in the Galleries 80

Hillary Kempenich 58

Opp Construction 67

HUB International 76

Oxford Realty 53 Salon Seva 51 Salvation Army 55 Scan Design 70 Simonson Station Stores 54 Swanson & Warcup, Ltd. 60

Invisimax 53 Kevin Hruska, Grand Forks Subaru 67 Kelly Thompson, Oxford Realty 60 Kuhlen Cryotherapy Center, LLC 76 Marco’s Pizza 63 Shaft Law 53

The Lighting Gallery 51

Step Out & Stay Out 58

UND Theatre 57

Susan Nord Designs 63

Xcel Energy 58

Urban Stampede 67 Vilandre Heating & Air Conditioning, Inc. 64

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Mike Jacobs, Auctioneer

Auction Committee

Mike Jacobs calls himself “the garlic king.” He planted his

Special appreciation

first garlic crop in 2013, in anticipation of retirement to a life as

to our committee for

a gentleman gardener. Today, vegetables from his garden,

raising over $25,000,

including garlic, appear frequently in dishes served in the North

breaking last years

Dakota Museum of Art Café.

advertising sales.

Jacobs was associated with the Grand Forks Herald for 36 years, first as a reporter and later as editor and publisher. The Herald won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service in 1998, when he was

ANUBHA BANSAL

editor. The award was for the uninterrupted publication of the Herald despite the 1997 flood and fire. The same year, he was named editor of the year by the National Press Association and won the editorial writing award from the American Society of Newspaper Editors. His association with NDMOA began more than half a century ago, when the gallery was located in the Student Union building. He recalls the controversy surrounding an early exhibit that

THERESA GARBE

ANNIE GORDER

MIKE LITTLE

SARA NARVESON

MEGGEN SANDE

TYLAH WILDEY

included a male nude. Even more vividly he remembers the visit of painter Donald Roller Wilson, who declared in a gallery talk that he created phantasmagorical images including pickles and chimpanzees “for the greater glory of God.” Jacobs and his partner, Suezette Bieri, have filled their home with art purchased at NDMOA events. In 2009, they chaired the annual dinner. When he retired from the Herald in 2014, a community reception was held in the Museum. Mike and Suezette live on fifty acres west of Gilby, North Dakota, with their collections. They share the house with cats and the property with snakes, ground squirrels, salamanders, frogs, and more than 100 species of birds. The mosquitos they export to Grand Forks on the northwest wind. In addition to art, Jacobs maintains a long time interest in birds and politics. Despite his retirement, he continues to write about both in columns printed in the Herald—plus garlic.

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Rules of the Auction

Each registered guest will receive a bidding card as part of

Welcome to North Dakota’s Premier Autumn Art Auction. The

the price of admission. Upon receiving the bidding card

Museum originally started the auction hoping to build a regional

each guest will be asked to sign a statement vowing to abide

support system for artists who live in our region. Galleries were

by the Rules of the Auction listed in this catalog.

few and far between; there wasn‘t an established regional

Absentee bidders will either leave their bids on an Absentee Bid Form with Museum personnel in person or by phone, or arrange to bid by phone the night of the Auction. Absentee bidders, by filling out the form, agree to abide by the Rules of the Auction.

From the Museum Director

market. Thankfully, this has changed in North Dakota, especially in Grand Forks and its surrounding communities. Auctions and sales have become commonplace. Original art is the norm in locally owned restaurants. Young people are filling their homes with art from our own artists. The event has grown into the Premier Art Auction in North Dakota, to be replicated by many.

Each bidder will use his or her own bidding number during the Auction.

This Auction set the regional precedent for paying artists before

All sales are final.

paying ourselves. We never ask artists to donate art—although

In September 2002, the Office of the North Dakota State Tax Commissioner determined that the gross receipts from the sales made at the Auction are subject to sales tax of 6.75%. This does not apply to out-of-state buyers who have works shipped to them.

In the event of a dispute between bidders, the auctioneer

some do. For the first seventeen years of this auction, we allowed artists to set a minimum price, which they were guaranteed to receive. Work that didn’t reach the artist’s minimum was brought in and returned. Any amount over the reserve was split 50/50 between the artist and the Museum. Finally, we feel confident that the prices for art have stabilized. The artists and the Museum will split the sales 50/50 in the 2017 Art Auction.

shall either determine the successful bidder or re-auction

the item in dispute.

Others in the region have adopted our policy of paying artists.

Purchasers may pay for items at any point following the

Instead of always being asked to donate, artists can expect actual

sale of a work but must pay for all artwork before the

income from auctions sponsored by art entities. And, bless you

conclusion of the evening unless other arrangements are

buyers for not forgetting that this is also a benefit for the Museum.

in place. Absentee bidders will be charged on the evening of

We notice and value your generosity.

the Auction or an invoice will be sent the next business day. •

Proceeds from the sale of works of art will be split between the Artist and the Museum 50/50. At times, the House will bid if representing absentee buyers. The range indicates artist’s established price for similar works.

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Remember, when you buy through the Auction, the price includes frames, which are often custom made by the artists or built by the Museum staff with archival materials. This adds significant value to most artworks, often as much as $400 in the Grand Forks market but considerably more elsewhere. Please


The Artists

The Museum

note that sales tax is charged on all art that stays in North Dakota.

Listed by lot number

#31. Adam Kemp

We could not publish this catalog without the underwriting of

#1. Emily Lunde

#32. Zhimin Guan

our sponsors. Please take your business to these companies and

#2. Jon Offutt

#33. Kelli Nelson

individuals, thank them for their significant contributions, and

#3. Lisa York

#34. Kelli Nelson

#4. Mollie Douthit

#35. Kelli Sinner

#5. Mollie Douthit

#36. Kelli Sinner

#6. Ned Krouse

#37. Albert Belleveau

#7. Lynne Allen

#38. Alexander Hettich

#8. Pirjo Berg

#39. Alexander Hettich

#9. Pirjo Berg

#40. Jessica Matson-Fluto

#10. Pirjo Berg

#41. Eleanor McGough

#11. Megan Duda

August 2017, we opened a splendid exhibition Into The Weeds

#42. Paul Gronhovd

#12. Brock Davis

#43. Rena Effendi

that was curated and mounted by the Museum staff. Nine artists

#13. Bill Harbort

#44. Rena Effendi

celebrated the tenacity and exuberance of common weeds.

#14. Vivienne Morgan

#45. Chris Walla

Margaret Wall-Romana made a new series of paintings including

#15. Dan Jones

#46. Mélanie Rocan

the bath of gold above. When asked, “Why should I bring my

#16. Jack Dale

#47. Gretchen Kottke

kids to see this exhibition?” Our Education Director Matt

#17. Marley Kaul

#48. Milena Marinov

Anderson replied, Into the Weeds is a splendid show for anyone

#18. Lewis Ableidinger

#49. Milena Marinov

#19. DeborahMae Broad

#50. Butch Thunderhawk

#20. Arduina Palanca Caponigro

#51. Walter Piehl

#21. Arduina Palanca Caponigro

#53. Carlos Rene Pacheco

note how most are locally owned and operated. Sometimes they say, “I don’t care if I get an ad, I just want to give to you guys.” Supporting cultural life is not in the interest of most chains but rather has become the business of the butcher, the baker, and the keeper of bees: that is, those who live among us. Thank you. The Museum’s programming continues to enrich and expand. In

because it expands our concepts of what art can be. Botanical bouquets that came from a farmer’s bone pile. Immense, detailed drawings next to a room lifted from a Honduran jungle— immersive, colorful, accessible, a wonderment. It engages most of our senses—but don’t lick the floor to make it all. The show has been extended through the New Year so more families and school groups can visit. —Laurel Reuter, Director

#22. Arduina Palanca Caponigro

#52. John Lembi #54. Carlos Rene Pacheco #55. Carlos Rene Pacheco

#23. Dyan Rey

#56. John Miyazawa

#24. Catie Miller

#57. Lin Hao

#25. Eve Sumsky #26. Marlon Davidson & Don Knudson #27. Amenda Hiedt

Above: Margaret Wall-Romana, Sprout & Wing, 2017. Oil on birch panel with cutwork and metal leaf. 23 x 67 inches. Included in Into the Weeds exhibition.

#28. Guillermo Guardia (Memo) #29. Tim Schouten #30. Christopher Benson

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All proceeds from the Emily Lunde sale go to the North Dakota Museum of Art for enhancement of its collection.

Lot #1

Emily Lunde (1914 – 2003) One Room Schoolhouse, c. 1980 Acrylic on canvas 23.25 x 29.25 inches Range: $500 – 800

Emily Lunde’s father died when she was five years old, and she and her two sisters were raised by her immigrant grandparents on a farm near Oslo, Minnesota. Memories of those days are the inspiration for much of her painting. Emily left home at the age of eighteen and went to work as a maid in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Although always interested in art, Emily first married and it wasn’t until 1974 that she raised four children was finally able to begin to paint seriously. Emily Lunde is one of North Dakota’s eminent folk artists and unofficial cultural historians. She has recorded the life of the Scandinavian immigrants who started coming in the late eighteen-hundreds and settled the prairies and small towns of the Red River Valley She categorized her work as a satire of human nature as I alternately toast and roast those I love. Lunde said, There was a time when I would paint on anything I could get hold of. Any piece of board or paper. It was fun to see what things looked like. Then I‘d take a painting somewhere and I’d be too bashful to go back and pick it up. My first art exhibit was at the University; I never did find out what happened to the painting. One of my first endeavors was to paint the farm home. I 6 gave it to my mother and she hid it in the attic. So I guess

it wasn‘t too good, at least she didn‘t think so. My husband didn‘t like my work in the beginning either. We got back from Fargo one time and he said, ‘Nobody is going to buy that stuff.’ So I stuck them in the attic. I thought I was never going to paint again. But then I got some calls for the paintings and from then on he would help me frame them. One time I painted a threshing machine and after I got my horses all harnessed and everything my husband looked at it, and he said, ‘the horses are going the wrong way. ‘ He could have told me that before. I paint things I’d seen at grandma’s or in my own home, things I have attended—weddings, carnivals, threshing gangs, things like that. It’s sort of a satire of the old days, some of it’s affectionate but some of it’s also a put-down. So there’s some kind of bite in The Gossips and there’s a little bit of hypocrisy in the one where the preacher comes unexpected. The people weren’t supposed to do any of the things they do in the painting, but they did them when nobody was looking. I don’t know if that is the thin line between comedy and tragedy. When I sit down and paint I laugh at my characters. They were like company. It was quiet here at home, my husband didn‘t talk much and we didn‘t go anywhere, so I painted. I don’t know what I would have done if I hadn’t painted. That and the library. Paintings is getting to be work now. But then there are times when there is something I’d like to do. I’d like to do something entirely different once. But when I do that it isn‘t what people want because they have an idea in their mind about what I do. So then you go back and make it. I don’t care if I never make a country store again. I have hundreds of them out, all to different persons. But they‘re so tedious. I wouldn’t sell one for under $100 now.

Emily Lunde, “Amazing Emily: Reminiscences of a Folk Painter,” Border Crossings, September 1985.


Jon Offutt is North Dakota’s leading glass blower, working out of his Fargo House of Mulciber Glass Studio. Named after the Roman god of fire, Mulciber, Offutt can be found most winter months in the studio with the 2,000degree furnace blasting away as the artist transforms molten glass into one vase form after another, interspersed with occasional sculptures. He closes down during the heat of summer to travel to art fairs and to demonstrate glass blowing from his Mobile Glassblowing Studio. Jon is currently known for his Dakota Horizons Series which celebrates the landscape of the region’s prairie horizons. Whereas works from that series can be found in the Museum’s Shop, the enormous bowl in the auction celebrates the glory of glass blowing. The bowl first appears to be clear glass. However, as light gleams through the glass, glints of violet swirl around, a reminder of Offutt’s physical act of blowing glass through, a long pipe, usually made from clay. The molten glass is collected at one end and from the other Offutt blows air through while spinning the mouth-pipe. In this free blowing method, the molten glass twirls outward into vase forms, seemingly under Offutt’s complete control. Jon Offutt was an instructor and studio coordinator with the glass program at Minnesota State University Moorhead, where he earned his BA in studio art with a concentration on glass and ceramics (1991). He also took a residency at Smoky Hills Artisan Community in Osage, Minnesota; was a studio assistantship at the Penland School of Crafts, North Carolina; and acquiried an MFA from Southern Illinois University Carbondale (1996).

Lot #2

Jon Offutt Fargo, North Dakota Handblown Glass Bowl, 2017 Size: 6.6 inches high by 18.25 inch diameter Range: $300 – 400

Lot #3

Lisa York Frederick, Maryland Ceramic and wood Bowl Set, 2014 6 x 24 x 7 (depth) inches Range: $400 – 600

Lisa York: Working primarily with forms finished in the soda kiln, Lisa York creates ceramics that are mounted on wood structures also made by York. She says, I use bold line and circle motifs to capture the viewer’s eye. I believe my work has a sense of natural and raw beauty. There is a weight to the ceramics as they are meant for everyday use without the fear of breaking them. The tactile surfaces enable the hand to discover smooth, or mottled, or rough surfaces. The range of texture varies depending on the amount of soda deposited on the pot during the firing. Areas with heavy soda have an aged weathered look, which relates to the details I so often notice on rocks and plants, rust, and decay. The palette is earthy, with some colors relating to nature. The pottery is a living record of my experiences and values distilled into a moment. Currently, York is an instructor and ceramic technician at Hood College. She studied art at University of North Dakota; Hood College; Houghton College, Houghton, New York; and apprenticed at Tye River Pottery, Amherst, Virginia. She was an artist-in-residence at Sanbao Ceramic Art Institute in Jingdezhen, China; the International Ceramics Studio in Kecskemet, Hungary; and the Residency for Ceramics, Berlin, Germany. In Tanzania, she started a ceramics program at Neema Crafts, an organization that trains people with disabilities to become skilled artisans. Likewise, she worked with a similar program in Chichi, Guatemala for a short-term project. Her functional ceramics have been exhibited nationally and internationally, and are represented in collections in the Fargo Plain Arts Museum and numerous universities. 7


Lot #4

Mollie Douthit Grand Forks, North Dakota Joey, 2016 Charcoal on paper 9.8 x 7.8 inches Range: $200 – 250

Above right, Lot #5

Mollie Douthit Grand Forks, North Dakota BV Cow, 2016 Pencil on paper 9.8 x 7.8 inches Range: $200 – 250

Mollie Douthit lived primarily in Burren, a tiny village in Ireland, from 2013 to summer 2017. Born and raised in Grand Forks, Douthit had already spent years studying to be a painter. This included taking her MFA from Burren College of Art, Ballyvaughan, Ireland (2014); a Post BAC Certificate from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (2011); and a BFA from the University of North Dakota (2009). While living alone in a small apartment in Burren, Mollie Douthit would set out from her home and walk a mileand-a-half to spend Sundays with a rabbit. I would sit in the shade with a white rabbit named Joey, said Douthit. Sometimes I would have to wait a few hours before Joey would be calm enough to sit for a few moments. The pressure of not knowing when she would 8 move allowed me to draw her and put paint on canvas in

a very direct, honest manner. When she was ready, I was ready. Then I painted and she rested. Paintings of Joey, the rabbit, and her pal Ginger, a guinea pig, were among the many pieces featured in the Art Makers Series exhibition at NDMOA in the summer of 2017. Launched in 2015 and underwritten by Grafton native, Dr. William Wosick, Fargo, the Series introduces regional artists who seem to be on the edge of a breakthrough in their work, according to Museum Director Laurel Reuter. Douthit imbues single objects with significance by situating them in isolation, to a remarkably evocative effect. It may be her connection with the subject, coupled with her exacting technique, that draws one in and evokes a sense of familiarity. She chooses to paint common items or scenes that have caught her attention and sparked a desire to document them in still life. Among the numerous awards and honors she has received, Douthit is most pleased with the 2013 Hennessy Craig Award from the Royal Hibernian Academy in Ireland. The $10,000 award kept me financially afloat so I could pursue painting, she said. In 2014, Douthit’s work was advanced to Stage II of the John Moores Painting Prize, and was included in Saatchi Art’s New Sensation Prize.


Lot #6

Ned Krouse Haslett, Michigan Ride the Badlands, 2017 Wheel thrown, slip decorated, raku fired 8 x 6 x 6 inches Range: $350 – 450 Detail below

Ned Krouse was born in Ft. Wayne, Indiana in 1946, and taught fifth grade until 1975. While teaching elementary, Krouse began taking night classes in ceramics. I reached a point where I decided I wasn’t going to teach spelling and handwriting for the rest of my life, Krouse said. His education in clay started at the Ft. Wayne School of Art. He also spent three years in Fine Arts at Indiana University, Bloomington. In the summer of 1978, he was a Monitor at Penland School of Craft. He received his MFA from Tyler School of Art in 1981. In 2014, he exhibited his work at Minot’s Taube Art Museum. His teaching career spanned over forty years and included public schools, colleges and universities, and art and craft centers around the country. He maintains a studio in Haslett, Michigan where he offers raku workshops to local potters. At age seventy, he retired from teaching to devote his time to pottery, golf, gardening and cooking, “all of which influence my artwork.” According to the artist, In 1990, I taught in the Art Department at Minot State University. When Krouse first started at Minot, he said he heard Walter Piehl walk down the hallway, stop at his office and toss a pair of cowboy boots in, telling him to wear them.

I’ve returned many times as a visiting artist to teach workshops and exhibit my work, and have a long friendship with Walt and his family. One of my favorite things to do is ride horse with Walter and his son Shadd. A photo I took when we were riding in the Badlands near

Medora was the inspiration for the title of my piece, Ride the Badlands. My work is slip decorated and raku fired. While the piece is leather hard, I brush on layers of colored slip and carve and etch through the layers to reveal the colors underneath. Today raku pieces are fast-fired to 1900 degrees, removed while red hot, and placed in a barrel of combustible material such as straw, sawdust, or newspaper. The rapid cool down crazes the glaze, enhanced by the smoke from the combustible. The multiple colors of slip allow me to alternate colors in the 9 layering and produce many different combinations.


Lynne Allen’s Wind Woman is sponsored by HB Sound and Light

Lot #7

Lynne Allen Brookline, Massachusetts Wind Woman (Ita ta win), 2006 Digital print, woodcut (printed intaglio style) 22 x 22 inches

Lynne Allen: Empathy is the power to imagine a world outside your own experience. The matriarchs in my family have all been members of the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in South Dakota. I can trace my Native heritage back five generations to Wastewin (Good Women) in the early 1800s. As a visual artist, I incorporate the passions that drive me personally into a bigger reality—the world is full of threats and rewritten histories. The history of my art -making has referenced the homeless, prisoners, police, hyenas, unsavory characters that pose a threat or danger, lead fishing sinkers that look like bullets, fish hooks, facts and myths about how the west was won, porcupine quills, and squashed and rusted beer caps. All of these are linked, either through metaphor or an insane compulsion to collect. My goal is to create a space where the viewer has a chance to imagine a world other than their own. Ita ta win (Wind Woman) is a portrait of Allen’s greatgreat- grandmother, born in Indian Territory in 1830. Her 10 daughter Josephine, Allen’s great-grandmother, became

Range: $800 – 1,200

the tribal historian of her Lakota people. Allen was instrumental in the publication of Josephine’s manuscript, written in the 1920s–1940s, published in 2013, edited by Emily Levine. Witness: A Hunkpapa Historian‘s StrongHeart Song of the Lakotas won the 2013 Nebraska Book Award. Allen has made many images to honor the matriarchs in her family, depicting their struggle, their undying spirit and grace in a turbulent time in our history. The red circles on this print could represent bullet holes, or small pox, both which ran rampant in the early years of our nation. Born in Trenton, New Jersey, Allen has an MFA from the University of New Mexico, a Master of Arts for Teachers from the University of Washington, and a BS in Art Education, Kutztown University, Pennsylvania. She currently resides near Boston.


Lot #8

Lot #9

Lot #10

Pirjo Berg

Pirjo Berg

Pirjo Berg

Grand Forks, North Dakota

Grand Forks, North Dakota

Grand Forks, North Dakota

Left Behind, 2017

Passes #1, 2017

Spring Memory, 2017

Oil on paper on board

Oil on paper on board

Oil on paper on board

6 x 6 inches framed

6 x 6 inches framed

6 x 6 inches framed

Range: $200 – 300

Range: $200 – 300

Range: $200 – 300

Pirjo Berg is interested in studying the experience of space, place, and landscape. The childhood visual world defines what one considers to be familiar. As an immigrant Berg feels in between her new and old countrys. The stripes in her paintings are inspired by Finnish traditional rag rugs and wall hangings, which filled the floors and walls at her childhood home. Even today those striped designs remind her of childhood. There is the longing for the old places and times which don’t exist anymore. The stripes have skewed away from an orderly grid. Pirjo’s paintings are based on color, texture, and shape. The stripes, repetition, and texture are found not only in the familiar textiles, but also in geological formations. Her recent paintings have layers (or beds) of landscapes, which are squeezed by time and “flattened.” One can recognize the landscape in them, but they are in motion all the time, as if you were watching a movie where you can slide back and forward in time and space. Pirjo was born in Helsinki, Finland. She received her MA in Regional Planning at the University of Tampere, Finland, before moving to the United States in 1991. In 1996, she moved back to Finland to attend the School of Art and Media in Tampere. There she concentrated in painting but also enjoyed making installations in collaboration with other students. The years at the Art School meant considerable traveling, not only between Tampere and

Seattle, but also painting trips to Norway, Estonia, Italy, and Nepal. She moved back to Seattle in 2000 and established a studio in Ballard at Building C. In 2005, she graduated from the Artists Trust EDGE-Program. She moved to Grand Forks, North Dakota in 2008 and established a studio here. Over the years she has travelled with her geologist husband all over the world (Nepal, Greenland, Arctic Spitsbergen in northern Norway, Baja California, Alaska, Southwest Canyon Lands in Utah, Sierra Nevada, and so on) as his field assistant. The landscape, especially the sedimentary rocks, and layers (or beds as geologists call them), are elements which have became familiar to her. She has participated in many group and solo exhibitions. Her career highlights include the six-person exhibition Paint Local at the North Dakota Museum of Art; Art on the Plains XI at the Fargo Plains Art Museum; the solo shows at Grand Fork’s Third Street Gallery; a solo show in Gallery 63Eleven in Seattle, (reviewed on NPR’s Washington affiliate by art critic Gary Fagin); a solo show and a threeperson exhibit at the Nordic Heritage Museum in Seattle; and a solo show at Gallery Jangva, Helsinki, Finland. She has been awarded artist residencies at Vermont Studio Center; NDMOA’s McCanna House; Washington’s Willapa Bay Air; and in Berlin; Marbella, Spain; and Serlachius, 11 Finland.


Lot #11

Megan Duda Fargo, North Dakota Hatbox Studies, 2016 Silver gelatin photograph 6.5 x 24 inches, 11.25 x 29 inches framed Range: $200 – 300

Below, Lot #12

Brock Davis Fargo, North Dakota Firepit, 2017 Steel 33 x 28 x 28 inches Range: $400 – 650

Megan Duda was born in Massachusetts and raised in South Carolina. Today she is a fine art photographer living in Fargo. She took a degree in architecture from Virginia Tech (a terminal, professional degree, including a fifth year thesis project). The thought of working in an office was unappealing, so she opted instead to travel the country driving twenty-foot trailers and selling pizza at music festivals and Nascar races, while making photographs of architecture in her spare time. In 2007, she and her architect husband settled in Fargo and Duda returned to school for her MFA from the University of North Dakota. Between 2009 and 2016, Duda taught a range of photography courses at North Dakota State University and Minnesota State University Moorhead. She mainly works in abstract black and white pinhole photography, designing each camera to suit the subject matter. She is most inspired by explorations of vantage point and perspective, as well as the many ways in which the camera perceives light. Hatbox Studies is part of a series of images exploring space with a homemade, 360-degree pinhole camera. The photographic impression is a true representation of an abandoned apple grove, yet the final image is drastically different from experienced reality, presenting an existence 12 that only the camera can perceive, as if it were a dream.

Brock Davis designed and made this custom fire pit for the Autumn Art Auction. He started welding in high school and never looked back. He welded professionally on oilfield trucks, trailers, and tankers for thirteen years until in 2016 when he decided to follow his dream and start Davis Designs. Brock enjoys


Lot #13

Bill Harbort Minot, North Dakota Bingo, 2017 Mixed media collage on panel 32 x 48 inches Range: $650 – 800

Bill Harbort, or William Charles Harbort, also known as Billy Chuck, is represented in the Auction with Bingo, a saturated and vibrant painting that explores luck and synchronicity. Science currently explains attraction between human beings with biology and pheromones. This visual exploration spotlights a nostalgic moment with bright colors, the rhythmic use of circles, a spontaneous use of paint and a couple close to kissing. The art celebrates the coincidental occurrence of events that defy logic and odds. Bill Harbort is a professor in the art department at Minot State University where he teaches foundation art classes, graphic design and illustration courses. He is a co-founder and co-organizer of NOTSTOCK, MSU‘s signature live arts event that spotlights the arts at MSU and in the community. Prior to teaching, he worked as a package designer for a major cosmetics company, an art director for a children’s educational software company, and built a reputation as

Brock Davis continued welding both abstract and figurative sculptures. He also creates furniture, wall art, and anything to do with steel. Recently, Davis Designs acquired a CNC Plasma Table that will allow Brock to do anything from mass-producing parts to custom sign work, and everything in between. He currently lives in Fargo with his wife and two daughters.

an award winning automotive artist. Today, Bill Harbort is best known for his pop art, mixed-media collages that celebrate calendar girls, clip art, advertisements, and ephemera from pop culture. These are just a few of the ingredients often found in popular culture landfill, according to the artist. I am fascinated with each individual ingredient and the infinite messages that can be expressed by combining and juxtaposing them. It is through this process that I discover meaning and express thought. Allusion, suggestion and investigation become an important part of the viewing experience. He continues, Love, true-love, lust, temptation, luck, loss, and life and death are recurring subject in my work. Harbort also brings good humor, wit, flexibility, an egalitarian spirit, energy, and joy to his teaching, collaborations, and art making. And the art he makes is of and for the people. Harbort was one of six artists commissioned by the North Dakota Museum of Art to work with the people of North Dakota’s Spirit Lake Reservation to create a body of artwork about contemporary life on the Reservation. An exhibition of the first round of art was shown at the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Project Space in New York’s prestigious Chelsea Art District in June 2013, followed by a tour to Fort Totten on Spirit Lake, and finally to NDMOA. Twice Harbort has returned to Spirit Lake to create additional works which are permanently installed in Spirit Lake’s Cankdeska Cikana Community College at Fort Totten. His subjects include North Dakota’s seasons, basketball, and the buffalo as a mystical presence. 13


Lot #14

Vivienne Morgan Bemidji, Minnesota Bladder Campion, 2017 Tea toned cyanotype photogram 30 x 22 inches Range: $ 400 – 500 Installation below

English wildflower even though it originated in North Africa and Asia. It was one of my favorite flowers as a child, called Tom Thumb by my mother, because it’s so small, and I picked posies of them, they were magical. Once used as livestock forage and for erosion control, Birdsfoot Trefoil is now considered an invasive plant, to be eradicated. It grows in our ditch and the county tries to spray it every year, so I say a few choice words.

Vivienne Morgan: Silene vulgaris. Bladder Campion, or Maidenstears European origin, common in England, Finland, considered a weed in America. Medicinal use of Bladder Campion: The plant is said to be an emollient and is used in baths or as a fumigant. The juice of the plant is used in the treatment of ophthalmia. Edible parts of Bladder Campion: Young shoots and leaves, raw or cooked. The young leaves are sweet and very agreeable in salads. The cooked young shoots, harvested when about 5 cm long, have a flavor similar to green peas but with a slight bitterness. Picking and blanching the young shoots as they poke through the ground can reduce this bitterness. When pureed it is said to rival the best spinach purees. The leaves should be used before the plant starts to flower. Contains saponins. (Plants for a Future database) In August 2017, the exhibition Into the Weeds opened at the North Dakota Museum of Art. Organized by NDMOA, nine artists created diverse work. Morgan was among them and the work Bladder Campion grew out of her weed installation (right). I‘ve been thinking about how when you immigrate you take with you the things that you know, the food, medicines, and animal feed that you are used to. Birdsfoot Trefoil with its bright little orchid-like flower, for 14 example, is so common in England that it’s considered an

Before Coca-Cola really hit the U.K. market, I used to drink pop made from dandelion and burdock. It was sweet and fizzy and considered medicinal, so okay for children. Burdock roots are long, edible, tasty even. Burdock would have been brought from England for its medicinal properities, and edibility. The burs, or cockleburs, that come from the plant and attach to sheep and ruin the wool, and the plants are spread by wild animals and are hard to contain.


All proceeds from the sale of Still Life with White go to the Museum of Art, a gift of appreciation from Dan Jones Dan Jones is best known as a painter of the landscape of western Minnesota and southeastern North Dakota. This Red River Basin provides Jones with endless subjects,. but every now and then he creates a work of another kind in his studio. This lovely vase of flowers bathed in the palest of blues is such an example. In 2013, the North Dakota Museum of Art published the book Dan Jones: Charcoal written, and the accompanying exhibition curated, by NDMOA Director Laurel Reuter. The following are excerpts by Jones: Realism: I went to parochial schools. No art education either there or in public schools. But my mother loved art and always had reproductions. Poster of Miro painting in my bedroom. Posters of Picasso but also Rembrandt. Michelangelo’s David reproduction was on the library table. All the religious stuff illustrated by old masters. Story about Lazarus . . . . My earliest exposure was to old masters. Norman Rockwell always fascinated me with his drawing ability to illustrate something almost photographically. Kind of like golf. It’s a game you can never win; all you can do is play. Draw and draw and draw. Jacque David said that in order to learn to draw you have to do 10,000 drawings but they are never good enough. I haven’t completely shaken off the yoke of realism but I am less concerned than I used to be. Milton Avery helped me out of that. A big black shape on a canvas can read as a big plowed field. Sometimes I still wonder if I am a painter. I didn’t start until late, maybe in the early 1980s when I quit construction and enrolled in architecture at NDSU. I didn’t care for it; I was always a little ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) but I had to take a drawing class so ADD was almost instantaneous with starting class. My drawing instructor was Catherine Mulligan and I couldn’t understand anything she said. Picture planes, chiaroscuro, oblique angles. I knew nothing about art. She taught me how to see things differently, things I never would have noticed. Wayne Tollefson‘s enthusiasm about art was catching,

Lot #15

Dan Jones Fargo, North Dakota Still Life with White, 2017 Oil on linen Image 14 x 11 inches framed Range: $650 – $1,000

infectious. He would get so excited talking about art. Jerry Vanderlin was head of the department. He had all the technical information. I wanted to learn how to paint. The obstacles accumulated. Jones didn’t quite see eye to eye with faculty at the University of Minnesota (“a bunch of abstract expressionists from New York”). He worked as a janitor at Fargo South High School, the school he attended, for a time while trying to make ends meet and had a former teacher tell him that he knew Jones would never amount to anything. In order to complete a degree at MSUM, he had to take a class that he had once taught as an adjunct instructor. And after a severe aneurysm five years ago, Jones wasn’t sure if he’d ever paint again. (Kris Kerzman, ARTSpulse, 4/7/2014)

Dan came back and his work is stronger than ever, the paint application looser, the themes more varied. Bravo! 15


Lot #16

Jack Dale St. Paul, Minnesota The Sun in Winter, 2015 Oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches Range: $500 – 800

Jack Dale went to college at the University of Minnesota on a hockey scholarship, played on the 1968 United States Olympic Hockey Team, and three years as a professional before an injury ended his career. The good fortune is that he turned to his art and has been painting ever since. I am an abstract expressionist painter who primarily works with oil on a variety of surfaces—the painting in the Auction may be among the most figurative I have ever made. My process is spontaneous, intuitive, and reactive. My work is the result of this process coupled with a lifetime of experience. Painting, for me, is all about texture, color, composition, line, movement, positive/negative space, etc. All the elements that go into making a painting that “works,” whatever your style might be. It’s not about landmarks, narrative, or recognizable imagery. It’s about creating something that viewers can relate to on an emotional level through their visual experiences. I want the viewers to remember my paintings for the feelings that they evoke rather than for what they might represent. The chaos that I experience while painting is like being in the painting. Being surrounded by paint, brush strokes, 16 scrapings, and layers in an environment that is ever

changing. I have learned to exist calmly within this chaos, which allows me to interact with the painting as it pulls and pushes me along the path to completion. I have always thought that there is a connection with my past life as a hockey player and my present life as an artist. The connection became more real when I embraced the idea of “calmness within chaos.” As a hockey player, one wanted to get to this psychological state as soon as possible during a game. The sooner you reached this state, you stopped worrying about what you wanted to do on the ice, what opposing players had on their agenda. You forgot about the crowd, the possibility of making mistakes, and the significance of the game. You, in effect, removed yourself from these distractions. You were then able to play in a completely spontaneous and reactive way. All your talents were then manifested. Painting is similar for me. Once I envelop myself psychologically in a painting, my abilities all seem to come out naturally.


Lot #17

Marley Kaul Bemidji, Minnesota Out of the Sun, 2016 Egg tempera on panel 15.5 x 27.5 inches framed Range: $2,700 – $3,200

All proceeds from the sale of Out of the Sun go to the Museum of Art, a gift of appreciation from Marley Kaul Marley Kaul: The Auction painting Out of the Sun is based on an actual event that occurred in early morning as I sat in my reading chair at home. A hawk, flying “out of the sun,” attempted to capture hummingbirds and small songbirds. It flew by me with great speed, and I could not record it easily, so I waited each morning for it to revisit. It flew the same route three mornings in a row, each time providing me with information to draw from. Once the drawing was complete, the painting was a challenge to do. The light, textures, and patterns all became vital elements to work with. Predator/prey is a theme that I have studied over the years. I create narratives in my paintings and delight in sharing them. Over the years the North Dakota Museum of Art has included and exhibited my work and I am so grateful for that opportunity. My work can now be found all over the state of North Dakota. To have others enjoy my work is most satisfying and I thank all of you for the privilege. Most of my recent paintings uses the processes of an ancient media called egg tempera, which reached its height in the 14th and 15th centuries. I am a 21st century artist who respects the tradition but I have pushed my own understanding by utilizing more opaque renderings than earlier art. I love the application of color to emphasize my expressions and the brushwork becomes a meditative process for me. My 2015 book Letters to Isabella contains seventy-seven of my tempera paintings and the letters that accompany them. I am currently working on a second book of works on paper. Quoted from Helen Dumont, Midwest Book

Review by Helen Dumont, Midwest Book Showcasing the paintings of Marley Kaul, Letters to Isabella is a fine art book that features seventy-seven vivid color plates on the highest quality archival paper. Each of the tempera paintings is accompanied by a letter written to his granddaughter. The book offers stunning full color reproductions of his paintings and is an intimate look at his artistic process and the unique personal and professional influences reflected in his work. In 2003, Marley learned he would become a grandfather. He thought about his granddaughter to be and wondered if he would still be around years from now to tell her about himself in person, or if she would have to speculate about his life and art after he was gone. He decided that in case he was unable to be there when she grew up, he would compose a letter to her so she could read it later and know a little more about him. As time went on, Marley got to know his granddaughter quite well, but he continued writing her the letters, filling them with his advice, insights and descriptions of his painting techniques. A unique and absolutely fascinating art book, Letters to Isabella presents and showcases a truly impressive body of work and commentary. Very highly recommended for personal, community, and academic library Contemporary Art collections, it should be noted that Letters To Isabella would also aptly serve as an example or template for other artists to similarly present their own life, work and insights to a grateful and appreciative readership. The book was the Total Book Design winner and a finalist in the Memoir category of the 2016 Midwest Book Awards. Book available in NDMOA’s Museum Shop. 17


Lot #18

Lewis Ableidinger Harvey, North Dakota Ice Fishing near Eckelson, North Dakota 2016 Archival inkjet photograph 24 x 30 inches framed Range: $300 – 500

Lewis Ableidinger is from the small town of Kensal (pop. 163), located in the east-central part of North Dakota. Early on he developed an appreciation for the subtleties of a region most people dismiss as “boring.” In 1998, he picked up a camera for the purpose of photographing old elevators. This led to day trips to find ghost towns with old elevators and eventually he started pointing his camera at other subjects. Soon it became a nearly obsessive passion to visit every corner and every town in the state, just to see what’s there. This grew into his current documentary-like focus, “Driving Through Flyover Country,” an area of land that is viewed as boring and just flown over to get to the coasts where more interesting things happen. This project looks at what is in Flyover Country and how it’s not a boring place where nothing exciting happens. There are plenty of facinating things to photograph if you take the time to slow down and look at what’s around you. I prefer to drive to my destinations so that I may make pictures along the way. The title evolved out of that. The project is far from complete but I‘m starting to develop some ideas I like. In my work I am trying to make a statement about a place using what already exists in the landscape but my work is not purely documentary. What I choose to include or exclude from a photograph can change what I‘m saying about a particular place, so though my work is generally ‘straight‘ photography I‘m still including my own personal 18 views in the work. Where I grew up in North Dakota there

were a lot of things rapidly disappearing from the small towns around me and I wanted to make a record of what was there before it was gone. In college I was fortunate enough to take some classes with Wayne Gudmundson, a Fargo photographer who primarily worked in the same plains landscapes I was working in. In addition to his own work he introduced me to Robert Adams and Frank Gohlke and I began to think perhaps my pictures could be more than just a dry history lesson but actually say something. Wayne shifted my course in photography more toward the art side, and since then I have continually worked to educate myself to what other photographers are doing and saying. Lewis Ableidinger graduated from Minnesota State University Moorhead in 2007 with a BS in Graphic Communications and a BAMus in Jazz Performance. Though photography was never his primary focus of study, he continued shooting and was able to take a few classes that helped broaden his photographic horizons. Since 2008, Lewis Ableidinger has had a “day” job as a locomotive engineer that echoes his second photographic focus on the railroad. Since graduation, he has worked as a conductor and later an engineer for Wisconsin and Southern Railroad and Canadian Pacific Railway in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota. Quoted in part from an interview with PhotoArtMag, a contemporary art and photography blog that showcase the work and projects of very talented professional and amateur artists and photographers.


Lot #19

DeborahMae Broad Hawley, Minnesota Without You, 2016 Wood engraving Edition 7 of 15 24 x 18 inches 31.5 x 25.5 inches framed Range: $600 – 900

DeborahMae Broad is one of the top practitioners of wood engraving in the United States, according to Museum Director Laurel Reuter. She makes large-scale wood engravings with screenprinted colors, copper plate etchings, and stone lithographs. This master printmaker retired from teaching from Moorhead State in 2003 to work as a full-time artist. She works in a renovated granary and chicken coop (Prairie Press) on her farmstead in Hawley, Minnesota. She earned her BFA from Virginia’s Hollins College in Roanoke County, and her MFA in printmaking from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. For Broad, animals serve as stand-ins for human beings and their foibles. This is a device as old as Aesop. The animals are pictured in clear relief against neutral backgrounds. She says, We are meant to examine and interpret their attributes as universal characteristics. She continues, My work started with a love for animals, which has been a constant influence throughout my life. I am grateful to now live among the animals I draw and have the luxury of time to observe them. Some subjects have continued to interest me over the years. Many times my animals do simple things in daily life, which gives me ideas. Every animal is an important individual to me. I believe that they have emotions and abilities beyond our imagination. I like the idea that the animals who live here

on my farmstead with me give me a way to do my work full time and I am able to give them a good home because of my work. Horses: Broad’s father Richard Broad was a strong influence throughout her life. He insisted that she take art lessons as a child instead of riding lessons until her art instructor told him to let her learn to ride and spend time around horses since they were all she seemed to draw. At twelve-years of age her father gave her a horse, Joanie, who went to college with DeborahMae. DeborahMae has worked with horses throughout her life. She trained two-year-old thoroughbreds for Rosalie Plantation in Alexandria, Louisiana; worked as an exercise girl at Evangeline Downs in Louisiana and Delaware Park, Delaware; exercised polo ponies in Virginia; reining horses in Pennsylvania; and galloped race horses in Fargo. As a child, her father gave her The Visible Horse toy to satisfy her curiosity about how animals were put together so she would stop bringing home dead animals she found and taking them apart. This taught her to draw animals from the inside out, but it also upset her mother terribly. 19 The Visible Horse was a great gift.


Lot #20

Lot #21

Arduina Palanca Caponigro

Arduina Palanca Caponigro

Cushing, Maine

Cushing, Maine

Tree and Flock, Open edition

Red Dress Jump, Open edition

Pigmented ink on coated archival rag paper

Pigmented ink on coated archival rag paper

12 x 12 inches, 22 x 22 framed

12 x 12 inches, 22 x 22 framed

Range: $1,000 – 1,500

Range: $1,000 – 1,500

Arduina Palanca Caponigro is a first generation American raised by Italians who immigrated to North Dakota. Her appreciation for the arts grew out of a childhood that was spent equally between Europe and the United States. Her father, with a PhD in Latin, was a Professor of Languages at the University of North Dakota from 1960 to 1988. He took study groups to Europe for all twenty-eight years. He emphasized not only the importance of languages, but also of philosophy, mythology, and art. As Arduina’s understanding of the creative process developed, she began to recognize art as a way of life for much needed social connection and personal expression. Arduina helps other artists see their computers and software as simple artistic tools. She shares her craft internationally through private consultation, personal mentoring, and by leading workshops for diverse organizations including The Maine Media Workshops, The Santa Fe Workshops, and Rockport College. She has worked extensively in all areas of fine art photography, graphic design, pre-press, and print, and is most recently 20 excited by fine art bookmaking. Her images evoke a

dreamlike timelessness with no trace of the high-end technology used to create it. Grateful to be living in a family of artists and surrounded by an inspirational creative community, she works alongside her husband John Paul Caponigro, and is currently the CFO for Caponigro Arts in Cushing, Maine. Artist’s Philosophy: Like yoga and meditation, making images is a practice of self-discovery, connection, and acceptance. Photography helps me shine a light on the world around me—and to connect with the world within me.My work begins with an effort to quiet the mind, making it possible to feel and capture the moments of beauty and wonder that break through every day. Our lives are saturated with so many important moments of growth, intimacy, joy, beauty, humility, and courage. They offer insight, and I feel are deserving of more time for contemplation and exploration. By following the feelings, images, and ideas that resonate most deeply, my images have become a visual journal. The interplay of rich colors and velvety shadows are intended to create a timeless quality, and express the magic of our humanity.


Dyan Rey: In this Chinese Vase Series I am referencing the bronze vessels I saw during a visit to China in 2009 with my husband Eliot Glassheim. We joined a group led by the UND China Studies Program. The images were included in Foreign Exchange: American Encounters with China, a book of poetry written by Eliot and published by the North Dakota Museum of Art. The images reflect the shapes of Chinese bronze containers that often reoccur in ceramics. The collages are cut from abstract ink paintings that I had made years earlier. At the time I was influenced by the calligraphic brushwork of Abstract Expressionism, a style that itself was originally influenced by Chinese calligraphy. Just as Eliot took the form of the Tang Dynasty poems and put his Western content into it, I put the painting style of Western Abstract Expressionism into the forms of Asian vessels.

Lot #22

Originally from Grand Forks, Dyan Rey has lived in many other places in the States. She received a BFA from the University of Oregon and an MFA from the University of North Dakota.

Arduina Palanca Caponigro Cushing, Maine Tree and Boat, Open edition Pigmented ink on coated archival rag paper 12 x 12 inches, 22 x 22 framed Range: $1,000 – 1,500

All proceeds from the sale of Arduina Palanca Caponigro’s three photographs go to the North Dakota Museum of Art, a gift from the artist who worked at the Museum as a UND student.

This series of over forty works has been exhibited at the North Dakota Museum of Art, the Northern Art Gallery at Mayville State University, and has toured at other venues through the North Dakota Art Gallery Association. Rey currently teaches at Northland Community and Technical College, East Grand Forks.

Right, Lot #23

Dyan Rey Grand Forks, North Dakota Chinese Vase, 2017 Collage on paper 29.5 x 21.5 inches framed Range: $700 – 800

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Eve Sumsky began as a young girl to learn needlework techniques and to sew. Since 1995, however, she has been making baskets and by 1999 she was selling her baskets.

Lot #24

Catie Miller West Fargo, North Dakota Temptation, 2016 Clay and paint 9.5 x 14 x 5 inches

Sumsky attended the Sievers Fiber Arts School in Wisconsin, and took in-depth workshops whenever she could, including at the National Basketry Organization’s Bi-Annual Conference. She is also a member of the Headwaters Basketmakers Guild. She enjoys exploring different techniques of weaving and uses a variety of materials in her work. The more she weaves and masters the traditional styles and techniques, the easier it becomes for her creativity to take over and make “new” or contemporary baskets using the old ways. When not involved in basket weaving, she taught music to kindergarten through fifth grade students until her retirement in 2013. She continues to play the French horn in the Bemidji Symphony Orchestra.

Range: $200 – 400

Catie Miller’s Cone Series is the product of her celebration of wonderful times, of joy, of filling the table with gorgeous flowers. The cones are left with their unglazed, aged, and weathered surface to contrast with the flowers they might contain and the gay images that dance across the base. As she explains, In connecting surface and form, I balance densely filled graphic areas with simple raw clay surfaces. Similar to a monoprint process, I draw on newsprint with underglaze and paint the designs with colored slips. The slip-covered newsprint is then pressed and transferred to the clay surface. This method results in diverse representation of my drawings, creating a timely, aged, and weathered appearance on the red clay foundation. After the first firing, the drawings are set so the pieces can be sanded and glaze fired to be functional and food safe. After graduating from Minnesota State University Moorhead with a BFA in ceramics and a BS in art education, Miller was chosen for a two-year artist residency at Red Star Studios in Kansas City, Missouri, where she refined her ceramic practice. Her artwork has been exhibited nationally and internationally, and included in publications such as Ceramics Monthly. Since her return to North Dakota, she continues to embrace many opportunities to work within the art community. She currently works as a studio potter from her West Fargo 22 home studio.

Lot #25

Eve Sumsky Tenstrike, Minnesota Nantucket Style (medium canister), c. 2016 Rattan reed, walnut wood 6.75 inches high x 6.5 inches in diameter Range: $200 – 400


Lot #26

Marlon Davidson & Don Knudson Bemidji, Minnesota Polycitrome Pipes, 2017 Acrylic and uretatin on wood 42 x 56 x 2.5 inches Range: $800 – 900

Marlon Davidson & Don Knudson are collaborative artists who have lived in the Bemidji area for three decades. They have individual art careers but have been producing collaborative work for about thirty years. Their art is in private and public venues and they are represented in collections across the United States and Europe. Their collaborative wall work, Great Wave, hangs in the commons area of the University of Denmark. Both artists were educated at Bemidji State College (now Bemidji State University), and at the Minneapolis School of Art (Minneapolis College of Art and Design). Marlon has had a long history in the area of art education, as a teacher in the public schools of West St. Paul and later as a fixed-term instructor at Bemidji State University. Don worked for some years as a display artist for the Emporium Department Store in St. Paul. He is also a furniture maker and sculptor who makes assembled works for the wall as well as standing objects. The artists once owned and operated a bed and breakfast, Meadowgrove, in the Bemidji area but they now devote full time to art production. They are life partners who have lived together for fifty-seven years.

The artists feel that their primary inspiration derives from nature. They attempt to combine natural elements with contemporary design concepts. They both are perpetual students of art history. They read and listen, they travel and they look at art. Marlon says, We are a collection of influences from our mentors, from other artists, and from the wide world of fine arts. The artist must absorb and then select, finding a voice that speaks for him or her, hoping to achieve some universal truth in seeking perfection throughout a lifetime. According to the artists, We are especially grateful to the North Dakota Museum of Art, to the director, and to the community which offer us an opportunity to have our work seen. We have gained new friends, and have been thrilled by the warm reception our collaborations have received among area people.

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Lot #27

Amanda Heidt Fargo, North Dakota Still, 2010 Lithograph on Kitakata paper Edition 2 of 10 22 x 16 inches Range: $300 – 400

Amanda Heidt: I have so often dreamed of you,

According to Heidt, while taking a month-long crash

walked, spoken, slept with your phantom that perhaps I

course in lithography, this image marks the first of many

can be nothing any longer than a phantom among

created while experimenting in the fine art of lithography.

phantoms and a hundred times more shadow than the

The whole idea behind lithography is water repelling

shadow which walks and will walk joyously over the

grease. In this figure you will find the beginning of

sundial of your life.

exploration of various grease contents that can be etched

—Robert Desnos, I Have So Often Dreamed of You So powerful is memory that it connects us to the things we care about, even across time. Using form, color, and photography as a vehicle for expression in printmaking, I find harmony between naturally occurring shapes and replications of sacred spaces that are found in my own mythology, muses the artist.

into a lithographic limestone to create an edition. Amanda Heidt graduated from Minnesota State University Moorhead in 2013 with a BFA emphasis in printmaking. A native of Bismarck, she resides in Fargo. In the past seven years, Heidt has taken on various internships in printmaking, including at Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop in New York City. Currently she is the manager of Hannaher’s Inc. Print Studio inside Fargo’s Plains Art

It is a fact that myths work upon us, whether consciously

Museum. While managing the Print Studio, Heidt also

or unconsciously, as energy–releasing, life–motivating, and

holds a residency at North Dakota State University

life directing agents. —Joseph Campbell

through PEARS: Printmaking Education and Research Studio working through a book project under master

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printer Kent Kapplinger.


Lot #28

Guillermo Guardia (Memo): Princess Ocllo is the Quechua name for the first female that the Inca’s god Wiracocha created. Legend says Wiracocha created the first two human beings, female and male: Mama Ocllo and Manco Capac. They emerged from the Titicaca Lake with the mission to found the Inca Empire’s capital city of Cuzco. Princess Ocllo continues the series of Baby Devils, which I originally started as a reaction to the war in Iraq. They began as a duality idea: good and evil. Babies are pure, no sins yet, but mine have those little horns on their heads that make them devilish. The early baby devils were painted wearing military camouflage. The series evolved and became more intricate, especially with the use of surface designs. Now they are covered with Mochica designs. Mochica is a Peruvian Pre-Columbian culture that flourished in Northern Peru from about 100-900 AD. Princess Ocllo is also holding two samurai swords. In the early twentieth century a large number of Japanese citizens migrated to Peru. So today Peru is home to one of the biggest Japanese descent communities outside Japan. One of those Japanese immigrants was my maternal

Guillermo Guardia St. Paul, Minnesota Princess Ocllo, 2016 Painted stoneware 24 x 14 x 12 inches Range: $2,500 – 3,500

grandfather. He came to Peru when he was about five years old. Princess Ocllo exposes my two cultural heritages; the Peruvian side with the Mochica designs and the Japanese side with the two samurai swords. Guillermo Guardia is originally from Lima, Peru. Guardia obtained an MFA in Ceramics and an MS in Industrial Technology from the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks. He worked at the North Dakota Museum of Art as artist in residence until 2015, when he resigned to become a full time studio artist. His sculptures deal with personal, social, and political ideas and have been in exhibits around the country. Currently Guardia lives and works in Saint Paul, 25 Minnesota.


All proceeds from the sale of Jackson and Queen go to the Museum of Art, a gift of appreciation from Tim Schouten

Lot #29

Tim Schouten Winnipeg, Manitoba Jackson and Queen, 2016 Oil, pigment, beeswax, microcrystalline wax, dammar resin on birch panel 48 x 36 inches Range: $800 – 1,200

Tim Schouten‘s painting is from a series titled Horse Songs, created for the exhibition Songs for Spirit Lake II at the North Dakota Museum of Art, the culmination of a three-year collaborative project with six international artists sponsored by the Museum and Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Fort Totten. Jackson Dion lives in Fort Totten on Spirit Lake Dakota Nation, 100 miles west of Grand Forks in North Dakota. Queen was Jackson‘s late grandfather Hubert Thomas‘ horse. Schouten met Jackson on a Memorial Horse Ride at Spirit Lake in 2013 that had been organized by Darla Thiele, Director of the Sunka Wakan Ah Ku Program. It was a diversionary project within the Spirit Lake Juvenile Court system designed to reduce juvenile delinquency and the likelihood of repeat offenders through caring for horses. The painting is based on a photograph Schouten took on that ride. In Tim Schouten‘s North Dakota landscapes, the ground is anything but solid. Made with gestural swipes of encaustic (a mixture of molten beeswax, resins, oils, and pigments), Schouten’s paintings are emphatically “physical,” even as 26 the scenes he depicts seem ready to dissolve in front of us.

Their surfaces churn with layered encrustations of highly textured, richly hued wax, giving equal weight and substance to land and sky. Meanwhile, ghostly telephone poles and rough outlines of buildings hover like mirages in the narrow space between. Though the views themselves are calm, the Winnipeg artist’s frenzied handling suggests an underlying turbulence, something the clean boundaries of the picture plane and the stark prairie horizon can‘t quite contain. Despite their pastoral beauty and seductive surfaces, many of the paintings seem on the brink of rupture, as if threatening to cast up buried trauma. Given the land in question, it seems possible. Schouten invites us to admire the landscape of Spirit Lake, but he asks us to consider from what vantage point we do so — and at what cost. Schouten is a Canadian artist, curator, writer, and educator based in Winnipeg, Manitoba. From 1978–1980, he studied at Art‘s Sake Inc. in Toronto. He has exhibited his work across Canada and in the United States, and his paintings reside in private and public art collections including the those of the Winnipeg Art Gallery, North Dakota Museum of Art, and Cankdeska Cikana Community College in Fort Totten on the Spirit Lake Dakota Nation.


Lot #30

Christopher Benson Santa Fe, New Mexico Broadside: Standing Rock, Coming of the Black Snake, 2017 Archival color ink print made on an Epson printer reproducing the image of Christopher Benson’s painting. Letterpress text of a Sitting Bull quote designed and printed by Peter Kock Printers of Berkeley, California. Edition 75 28 x 18.75 inches Range: $400 – 600

Christopher Benson & Peter Koch created this broadside to be sold to benefit the legal defense fund of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in their protest of the Dakota Access Pipeline project. Christopher Benson’s large painting, Standing Rock, Coming of the Black Snake (54.125 x 64.25 inches) is reproduced on the broadside. The artist, seeking no personal gain from the painting, has given it to the North Dakota Museum of Art. Christopher Benson: I was born in Rhode Island and grew up in Newport till I went to school in Vermont as a teenager to study painting and later to RISD where I did the same. I moved to the west (to Santa Fe) in 1988 at age twenty-eight. I also lived and exhibited for many years in the San Francisco Bay Area, in Berkeley. I’ve been painting for over forty years and have work in private collections all over the US, including at several museums and universities. My limited edition Fisher Press books are also in many top special collections libraries. I studied photographic book printing with my late uncle, the photographer Richard Benson, and book design with Eleanor Caponigro [a book designer who is currently collaborating with Museum Director Laurel Reuter on a book about photographer Lynne Geesaman]. Like Mr. Koch, I too am having a mid-career retrospective this year of my oil paintings which will take place in October 2017 at the Newport Art Museum in my home town of Newport, Rhode Island. According to Christopher Benson, his collaborator Peter Kock is a bit of an institution in the Bay Area. He originally came from Montana and does many western state themed book and print projects, often with a bit of a raw political edge. He and his wife, the paper conservator Susan Filter, are two of the founding board members of the CODEX Foundation, which hosts a big biennial rare book fair in

Richmond, California. Just this summer, Stanford hosted a forty-year retrospective of Peter’s print work. The text is Sitting Bull’s 1877 famous speech given at the purely Indian Powder River Council. Behold, my brothers, the spring has come; the earth has received the embraces of the sun and we shall soon see the results of that love! Every seed has awakened and so has all animal life. It is through this mysterious power that we too have our being and we therefore yield to our neighbors, even our animal neighbors, the same right as ourselves, to inhabit this land. Yet hear me, my people, we have now to deal with another race—small and feeble when our fathers first met them, but now great and overbearing. Strangely enough they have a mind to till the soil and the love of possessions is a disease with them. . . They claim this mother of ours, the earth, for their own, and fence their neighbors away; they deface her with their buildings and their refuse. They threaten to take [the land] away from us. My brothers, shall we submit, or shall we say to them: “First kill me before you take possession of my 27 Fatherland.”


Adam Kemp’s painting is sponsored by Rhombus Guys

Lot #31

Adam Kemp Grand Forks, North Dakota Lincoln Park, 2017 Acrylic on canvas 72 x 52 inches Range: $2,000 – 2,400

Adam Kemp’s paintings are highly biographical. He paints the landscape because he is out-of-doors much of the time and often in Lincoln Park. He also paints buildings and bridges in Grand Forks because that is where he lives. Some years he paints swimmers because he and Hanna swim all summer long. Hanna is the little girl he latched onto when she was tiny and in need of him. He says, I find myself reaching out as well as reaching in. You don’t want to be a total clown but I can still enjoy wearing clown’s shoes. I primarily paint straight from the tube rather than mixing paint. Or I will mix on the canvas. It is a fair criticism to say I could be a more accomplished painter if I went back to mixing paint on the pallet. I like the elasticity and urgency of painting direct from the tube with acrylic paint. If I make a mistake, I can paint over it in fifteen minutes. I 28 like painting fast and painting messy.

According to Museum Director Laurel Reuter, When kids enroll in Adam’s workshops they are covered in paint the first day, just as Adam is when he paints. Adam exudes joy and heightened energy both when and in his paintings. Simply put, he is a natural painter with rigorous European schooling under his belt. He is also Grand Fork’s unofficial painter-in-residence: teaching workshops and passersby, working with special needs kids, talking about their art with younger artists, giving paintings away, fighting with the powers that be whenever he finds too many rules and regulations for his version of a proper life, selling a painting whenever he can, and turning friends and strangers into collectors. Our region is blessed to have such a force living among us. Kemp was born in Ugley, Essex, England. In 1986, he received a BFA from Newcastle-upon-Tyne where his studies were based in the intense study of technique and


Adam Kemp continued art history. He came to Grand Forks to cast the sculpture located on the southwest corner of University Park, having studied bronze casting in Italy. He stayed to earn his MFA from the University of North Dakota in 1989. Adam continues to actively work within the regional arts community, generously showing his work on the streets and in local galleries. His workshops with teens and children are in great demand throughout the region, including the weeklong sessions through the Museum’s Summer Art Camps. He is particularly praised for his work with troubled and disabled youngsters. He often says, I still look at the landscape around here as a pleasantly surprised outsider.

Lot #32

Zhimin Guan Fargo, North Dakota Waterlilies, 2013

Zhimin Guan strives in his paintings to have an equal balance of traditional and experimental, as well as figurative and abstract in his art. In the past twenty-years, he has created six series of paintings which include: Fossil Series (1995-2000), Landscape Series (1999-2002), American Dreamers Series (2002-2006), Abstract Series (2006-2007), Landscape on Metal Painting Series (20072012), and the Summit Series (2012-2014). The Summit Series is a body of abstract paintings portraying mountains and water, subjects that visualize the opposite roles of Yin and Yang, solid and void, energy and charm. Guan made these paintings with large gestural marks, creating harmonious landscapes through form, color, and shape. His process also allows for chance happenings as his runny painting materials and gesture marks transform each other into a spiritually and physically integrated autonomy. He continues to explore his new subject matters, inspirations, and expressive painting methods in his abstract and realistic work. Waterlilies continues in the abstract Summit Series. Born in Anhui, China, Guan received a BFA in painting in China 1984. He earned his MFA in painting and drawing from Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas, in 1998. Since graduating, he has been a professor of art at Minnesota State University Moorhead. Over the past eighteen years, Guan has presented twenty solo exhibitions and appeared in more than 200 selective

Watercolor on paper 42 x 62 inches Range: $1,200 – 1,500

professional exhibitions. He received twenty-five art awards throughout the United States and abroad. In 2010, Guan received a McKnight Fellowship from the Lake Region Art Council, Fergus Falls, Minnesota, with funding from the McKnight Foundation in Minneapolis. Guan participated the 2012 Contemporary Chinese Art Invitational residency and exhibition at the Blue Roof Gallery in Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China. He also was awarded The Art Partnership’s Individual Artist Grant in Fargo in 2015. Guan has exhibited his art throughout the United States and China in museums and galleries including the China National Art Gallery in Beijing; China Academy of Fine Arts Museum in Hangzhou; Singapore Asian Artist Gallery; The Salmagundi Club and the Asian Cultural Center in New York City; CCC/USA, Philadelphia; The Minneapolis Institute of Arts; Museum Services, Minneapolis; the Minneapolis Foundation; The Fraser Gallery in Washington DC; Murphy Hill Gallery in Chicago; and the Museum of the Southwest in Texas, among others. 29


Lot #33

Kelli Nelson Minneapolis, Minnesota

Virga, 2017 Oil on canvas 28 x 22 inches Range: $1,200 – 1,400

Kelli Nelson is a Minneapolis-based painter and educator. Her work rests precariously between reality and imagination, evoking familiar, yet enigmatic images of plant life, horizons, and figurative forms. The paintings are made from memory and invention, resulting in a spectrum of abstraction and fragmented realism. Over the last two summers, Nelson has spent time as artistin-residence at NDMOA’s McCanna House. The two works in the Auction are among those she created during her last stay. The paintings were influenced by the transformative beauty of the rural North Dakota landscape, biking with her twelve-year-old son through the wooded valley of Turtle River State Park, time spent in solitude on the McCanna grounds, and endlessly engulfed in the vast library of Marjorie McCanna. 30 She considers these paintings meditations on the grace and

beauty of form. Yet, there exist elements which cause disruption, alluding to the uncertainty and uncontrollable power present in nature. Salient themes of serenity and turbulence are evoked in the painting Virga, which refers to a shaft of rain that evaporates before it reaches the ground. Thin veils of paint create atmospheric qualities where light is permitted to bounce through the layers. The subtle transitions of color suggest slowness and rest, while other dense paint strokes float on the surface creating tension and a jarring effect. Found in her favorite book at the McCanna house, Shepardess was a response to the Rococo painting Lady Mary Leslie created by Joshua Reynolds in 1764. Drawn to the idyllic pastoral scene, she felt an existential kinship to the portrait of the lone woman in the peaceful countryside. The pale pinks, soft peaches, and subtle grey shadows on the figure mirror the tranquil sky, while the crimson-tinged dark hair mimics the background trees, provoking feelings of harmony and unity between humans and nature. Nelson, a Grand Forks native, earned her BFA in Visual Art with a minor in Art History from the University of North Dakota. She received her MFA in Visual Studies with a concentration in Painting and Drawing from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. Nelson’s work is in the University of North Dakota’s Permanent Collection, numerous private collections, and has been exhibited at the State Capitol Building in Bismarck. Currently, she teaches drawing at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and painting at the College of Saint Benedict.


Left, Lot #34

Kelli Nelson Minneapolis, Minnesota Shepardess (after Joshua Reynolds, Lady Mary Leslie, 1764), 2017 Oil on linen 16 x 12 inches Range: $700 – 800

Kelli Nelson’s paintings are sponsored by Hugo’s

Lot #35

Kelli Sinner Moorhead, Minnesota Cloud Vase, 2013 Stoneware 9 x 8 x 4 inches Range: $150 – 250

Kelli Sinner’s vases included in the Auction are part of a series called Clouds and Consequences, inspired by a year spent traveling. The artist believes that choosing to be an artist is a political act. Every piece that I make is a manifestation of the experience of growing up a woman in a world where I have to work twice as hard as my male peers. This experience has instilled in me a desire to promote justice and equality for everyone, regardless of race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, etc. I am an educated, white woman, and that has afforded me privilege. With that privilege comes a duty to use my voice. I believe in equality, education, and civility. I believe we need to make choices based on how our actions impact a global community. I believe we need to take care of our planet, because there are too many warning signs to ignore. I believe there is power in thoughtfulness, labor and skill. I

Lot #36

Kelli Sinner Moorhead, Minnesota Cloud Vase with Purple Handles, 2013 Stoneware 11 x 9 x 6 inches Range: $150 – 250

make artwork that has a strong historical connection because I believe we need to learn from the past in order to create a quality of life for everyone that is guided by integrity and respect. The pieces are made of stoneware clay, thrown on the potter’s wheel. The glazes are hand painted and fired to Cone 6. Originally from Utah, Kelli obtained her MFA in Ceramics from Penn State University and her BFA in Ceramics from Utah State University. Before moving to Minnesota, Kelli worked in New York City where she taught ceramics at Marymount College Manhattan, the 92nd Street Y, and the Educational Alliance. Kelli has completed artist residencies at the Zentrum fur Keramik in Berlin, Germany, and at Penland School of Craft in Penland, North Carolina. Sinner is a Professor of Art at Minnesota State University Moorhead where she teaches ceramics, papermaking, and foundation design. In 2015, she received MSUM’s Excellence in Teaching Award. 31


to depict humorous life forms, unique functional furniture, art structures, and decorating accoutrements. During frequent kayaking trips on Lake Superior I collect the windand-wave softened stones and turn them into sculpture at my Puposky studio. I thrust the stones into cages of steel, formed and tightened under enormous pressure. Then I weld them into sculpture. The finished piece is sand blasted to even the surfaces and sealed with two coats of lacquer to accentuate the stone’s beauty and protect the steel from rust. Lot #37

Albert Belleveau Puposky, Minnesota Red Rock Turtle, 2017 Stone and steel 5 x 10 x 14 inches Range: $200 – 400

Albert Belleveau: We make art to see more clearly. Born in Minneapolis in 1959, I moved to my grandparents’ farm in 1970 and continue to roam the hills and valleys of Maple Ridge Township. I live in a log house surrounded by the fullness of nature that inspires many of my works. I have primarily created with metals in my mature years, but before I had the technology to weld I would collect sticks and stones and steel and glue them together to create my little sculptures—I did this primarily between the ages of seven to sixteen. After joining the work force as a welder at seventeen, I often spent my coffee and lunch breaks at my various places of employment welding sculptures, having always been haunted by the shapes and possibilities of cast off materials.

I have been using this process for ten years, but only recently have come to understand its significance. The stone—as recognized by the indigenous peoples—is Grandfather or Spirit and the steel is temporary flesh. Thus through this parallel of steel wrapped stone and flesh wrapped spirit, I am coming to better understand myself and others and how we are related.

Alexander Hettich was born in Tajikistan, the southernmost republic in the former Soviet Union. He grew up in a valley surrounded by the Soviet Union’s tallest mountains. In 1993, a civil war forced him to flee to a small collective farm in Belarus where the climate and scenery were quite different from what he was used to. During long Belarusian winters—cold like those here in North Dakota—as he struggled to settle into a new place, he started taking painting lessons from a local artist. He fell in love with the process of creating art, from stretching a canvas to the final steps of framing a painting. His works are images of nature—the beauty he has learned to see in the many landscapes where he has lived.

In the last few years I have begun to re-explore the materials of my youth and compose them in more mature themes. What I’m really feeling with my stick and stone and steel sculptures is the merging of the human spirit with the organic materials of our creation. The human form, shaped of the stuff we often overlook, leads us to the excitement of “seeing the new in the familiar” and all art is simply “SEEING” better.

After several years of looking for a new homeland and unable to return to Tajikistan, Alexander settled in Grand Forks where he lives with his wife and three children. He works in information services at Altru Health System. His wife, Bella, is Director of the ESL Language Centers (English as a Second Language). Importantly, he continues to paint.

My Rock Iron Art is the synthesis of a life-long love affair that I have had with two of northern Minnesota’s most 32 plentiful resources. I use rocks and metal in sculptural form

The Grand Forks community is fortunate to have artists such as Hettich living here. Rather than academic formalism, his truthful honesty is dominated by warm emotions when painting the natural world.


Above, Lot #38

Alexander Hettich Grand Forks, North Dakota Long Horns, 2017 Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Range: $500 – 700

Alexander Hettich’s paintings are sponsored by C&M Ford

Right, Lot #39

Alexander Hettich Grand Forks, North Dakota Trees, Trees, 2017 Oil on canvas 36 x 24 inches Range: $500 – 700

All proceeds from the sale of Long Horns goes to the Museum of Art—as is Alexander Hettich’s generous habit.

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Lot #40

Jessica Matson-Fluto West Fargo, North Dakota Disperse, 2015 White charcoal on paper 18 x 29 inches framed Range: $400 – 500

Jessica Matson-Fluto: The term ‘passage’ reflects the process of moving through, under, over, or past something on the way from one place to another. Through this particular body of work, incorporating drawings and prints, artist Jessica Matson-Fluto expresses her recent passages—the continuance of self-discovery as a female artist and more recently as a mother. The artist has long explored themes related to the female form, whether working in detail or in abstraction. In this series, the females are both subject and voyeur. Their obscured faces, body language, and positioning within the picture frame leave us wondering just who is looking at whom. Masking these female forms in abstraction, and the lack of detail signifies a state of isolation from others as well as from one’s own physical persona. Repetition of, or a new physical relationship between, individual figures creates a sense of disconnection from one another, amplifying the sense of isolation. Matson-Fluto has presented the viewer with a series of works that are not easily categorized. The images are both haunted and haunting. 34 Born in Spokane, Washington in 1980, Jessica Matson-

Fluto studied painting at Minnesota State University Moorhead, earning her BA in 2006. In 2008, she received her MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts where she studied with Bruce Samuelson, Dan Miller, William Scott Noel, Sydney Goodman, and Vincent Desiderio, among others. The artist continues her artistic education by enrolling nationally in workshops and master classes. Active in the Fargo-Moorhead Metro arts community, Matson-Fluto teaches as an adjunct professor at her alma mater, Minnesota State University Moorhead. She has exhibited her paintings, drawings, and prints in group and solo exhibitions nationally. Her work can be found in public and private collections throughout the Midwest. She is currently employed as an adjunct professor at Minnesota State University Moorhead. She resides in West Fargo with her husband and twin sons.

Note: White charcoal on white paper results in the palest of drawings, but ones that are mysteriously beautiful. —Laurel Reuter


Lot #41

Eleanor McGough Minneapolis, Minnesota Billowing, 2013 Acrylic on panel 30 x 40 inches Range: $550 – 650

All proceeds from the sale of Eleanor McGough’s Billowing are a gift from the artist to the Museum of Art.

Eleanor McGough: My paintings and paper cut-out installations explore insect migrations, climate change, and vanishing habitats. Commingling information from biology, textile patterns, and maps, the paintings combine layers of atmospheric depth with flat pattern. The result is often a blending of landscape, microscopic slide, and aerial view. The paper cut-out installations explore the concept of multiples in endless variation, and the role of collections in natural history. Some of these paper installations include air movement from fans to facilitate a subtle fluttering motion, and are inspired by the astonishing fact that billions of insects are swept up and carried in air currents through the layers of our atmosphere. I am drawn to insects for their elegant engineering, metamorphosis, crucial role in pollination, and their alienlike otherness that both captivates and repels us. I am fascinated with the idea that insects are messengers whoconvey information about the health of our environment or imbalances in our ecosystem. What is your creative process like?

Originally from Washington State, McGough has lived in the Twin Cities for over two decades. She began to paint in high school. She studied at the Brighton Polytechnic in England during the 1980s before earning her BFA in painting from the Kansas City Art Institute in 1990. She shows with the Veronique Wantz Gallery and the Rosalux Gallery, both in Minneapolis. When asked by Veronique Wantz who is, or has been, the biggest influence on her art, she replied, I would have to choose my father for the creative environment he designed for our family. He was an architect who created a one-ofa-kind Pacific Northwest ‘mid-century modern’ house that was built on the perfect site for a kid like me. It was surrounded by two-plus acres of volcanic rock outcroppings, natural areas, woods, and unique gardens. I spent my days outside from dawn to dusk collecting bugs and building things with rocks. Inside the house, my parents had a great art collection, and they surrounded us with so much culture—a book and record collection to die for, and both of my parents loved collecting things from the outdoors like rocks, and dried plants. To this day, I feel 35 that so much of my visual language was formed there.


to capture memorable, striking, or simply beautiful qualities can present themselves at any time. My emotions and thoughts are in response to the qualities I am looking at. When I love what I am seeing, I select it for display. I believe it’s even more essential to seek out the unusual, as it is in making sense of the display that the qualities make themselves known as “art.” As landscape photographer Chuck Kimmerle says, “there is no eye in cliche.”

Lot #42

Paul Gronhovd Grand Forks, North Dakota Caprock, 2016 Archival inkjet print 10.5 x 16.5 inches, 19 x 25 inches framed Range: $300 – 500

I have great respect for the photography of old. It was already perfect. I don’t think of black and white photography as “lacking.” Instead, I appreciate its abstractness and malleability. Artists that stand out for me include Edward Weston for what it means to live an artistic life, Henri Matisse for how to be bold and live with courage, and Jacques Henri Lartigue for how to have a personal approach. Of primary influence is former North Dakota news photographer Chuck Kimmerle, a practitioner who truly exemplifies the art of photography.

Paul Gronhovd was born and raised in Grand Forks,

North Dakota. He writes, I first gained exposure to photography from my father, an avid photography enthusiast and history buff. My relationship to art began in my late twenties when, seeking a better path through life, I returned to college. I received a BFA in printmaking from Moorhead State University. For the next thirty years, I worked for the University of North Dakota (UND) Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as a graphic artist and photographer. While at the EERC, I returned to school part-time and received an MFA in printmaking from UND. After retiring in 2012, I pursued a more personal style of expression: primarily black and white landscape photography. After a 2013 trip to Death Valley National Park, I displayed prints at Archives Coffee House on the campus of UND. This was a great experience. It was so rewarding to communicate ideas and feeling to viewers. In retirement, I operate a small farm and make bicycle journeys whenever I can. The small 100-acre farm that I own with my brother was an inheritance from our folks. The farm is near Lankin in a wooded area near the North branch of the Forest River. It is a pretty spot and is near where our mother grew up. I raise soybeans and wheat mostly and a little bit of hay. 36

These outdoor activities influence my photography and worldview. While I’m not an artist full-time, opportunities

Rena Effendi: Chernobyl: Still Life in the Zone is a series by Rena Effendi, a Baku, Azerbaijani photographer who grew up in the USSR. She documents everyday lives of the very few people still living in Chernobyl, Ukraine. April 26, 1986, the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant’s Reactor #4 blew up after a routine test. The resulting fire went on for ten days, spewing 400 times as much radiation as the bomb dropped on Hiroshima. The surrounding area was declared uninhabitable by the USSR’s government and 116,000 local residents were resettled. In the following months over 1,000 locals decided to return to Chernobyl, regardless of the risk and official prohibition. The women lived through Stalin’s Holodomor—the genocide-by-famine of the 1930s that wiped out millions of Ukrainians—and then the Nazis in the 1940s. When the Chernobyl accident happened a few decades into Soviet rule, many were simply unwilling to flee an enemy that was invisible. Almost thirty years after the Chernobyl disaster, access to the Zone of Alienation is still restricted, with police checkpoints and barbed wire. In spite of this, about 200 people still live in the ghost villages and settlements inside the Zone. Now, mostly elderly women in their seventies and eighties and living alone, they cultivate the toxic wastelands of Chernobyl, growing vegetables, maintaining


Birch tree growing on the second floor of a gym in the abandoned city of Pripyat in Chernobyl, Ukraine. As a result of the nuclear accident and the subsequent fallout the entire population of Pripyat had been evacuated and never returned home.

Veggies. Galina Konyushok butchered a chicken to cook a broth. The food chain has been contaminated with radiation, especially animals that consume local food, such as grain and vegetation from the zone. Zirka village, Chernobyl, Ukraine.

Lot #43

Rena Effendi Istanbul, Turkey Chernobyl: Still Life in the Zone Tree in Room, December 2010

Lot #44

Rena Effendi’s photographs are sponsored by Altru

31.5 x 31.5 inches framed Range: $1,500 – 3,500

small orchards, breeding animals, and collecting mushrooms and berries in the radioactive forest. Their everyday lives seem ‘normal’, if it weren’t for the fact that the soil, air, and water in the Zone are among the most heavily contaminated on earth. Differently from at least a dozen of photographers documenting Chernobyl, Rena Effendi decided to seek out ‘life in the zone’ rather than produce an eerie memento mori. She documented the harsh and lonely lives of Chernobyl babushkas, creating empowering portraits and painterly still lifes of simple, household objects. It’s one of those projects, where the visuals, narrative, and uncommon approach to the subject mean the images remain in your memory for longer—or at least should. Effendi was finalist for the Prix Pictet Prize, which aims to harness the power of photography—all genres of

Rena Effendi Istanbul, Turkey Chernobyl: Still Life in the Zone Veggies, December 2010 31.5 x 31.5 inches framed Range: $1,500 – 3,500

photography—to draw global attention to issues of sustainability, especially those concerning the environment. Prix Pictet has become the world’s leading award for photography and sustainability. Rena Effendi was one of twelve finalists in the 2011 competition and her photos were included in the worldwide touring exhibition with a global audience of 400 million. Following the tour, Rena Effendi had her work shipped to the United States to be given to the North Dakota Museum of Art. There were two duplicates among the seven and she suggested including them in the Museum’s Art Auction. Fifty percent of the sale price goes to the artist. Rena Effendi has been commissioned twice by NDMOA to come to North Dakota’s Spirit Lake to photograph life as it currently unfolds on the Reservation. 37


Lot #45

Chris Walla Moorhead, Minnesota Passing, 2014 Wood, Plexiglas, ball chain, chandelier crystals 72 x 24 inches wide and 10 inches deep $900 – 1,300

Chris Walla spent much of his young life on the West Coast. He was born in Los Angeles and later moved with his family to the Northwest. The compulsion to make objects and images was present from a very young age. Walla graduated from Western Washington University with his BFA in sculpture in 1997. After graduation, he maintained a studio and lived in Bellingham, Washington until 2000, when he moved to Madison to attend the University of Wisconsin. After completing his MFA in sculpture in 2003, he accepted a position at Minnesota State University Moorhead where he currently works as Professor of Sculpture. In 2006, he was selected as a McKnight Fellow and has had numerous exhibitions including an installation titled Wait & See at the Fargo Plains Art Museum. Past exhibitions include Don’t Piss On Me and Tell Me Its Raining at Apex Art, New York; and a solo installation at Fraction Workspace in Chicago. He participated in exhibitions such as InWords at the University Gallery in Newark, Delaware, and in a threeperson exhibition, Discourse and Decadence at Studio Aiello in Denver, Colorado.

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Mélanie Rocan’s painting is sponsored by All Seasons

Lot #46

Mélanie Rocan Arnes, Manitoba Cat Walk, 2009 Oil on canvas 48 x 48 inches Range: $3,000 – 5,000

Mélanie Rocan: In Cat Walk discarded materials become fashion for women who walk toward the viewer. They are adorned with objects or fragments which reveal their inner and outer state. The painting explores external and personal sources and the dichotomy between symbols of the self and symbols of the environment. My recent paintings speak of the fragility of human beings and the reality of the subconscious state. I want to capture a distressed beauty, to suggests inner emotional conditions. Rocan is a Franco-Manitoban artist based in Armes, Manitoba, which is north of Winnipeg and the Icelandic community of Gimli. She has a BFA from the University of Manitoba (2003) and an MFA from the University of Concordia in Montreal (2008) during which time she participated in an exchange program at the Glasgow School of Art in Scotland. She is a three-time semifinalist for the RBC (Royal Bank of Canada) Painting Competition, including Cat Walk in 2010. For the RBC Canadian Painting Competition, 600 submissions come in every year and from that the jury selects just fifteen finalists, Cat Walk among them.

The visual world Mélanie Rocan creates with her paintings is a blended swirl of emotions and objects. Her arthistorical genealogy traverses many eras, from Surrealism to Expressionism, but perhaps she owes her greatest impulse to the Symbolist outgrowth of Romanticism. Enthralled by the inner material of the self, the Romantics preferred to view emotions as an implicitly valid approach to the world, and not secondary to analytic thought. Rocan’s imagery floats in the realm of the subconscious, with her dream-like, dream-dwelling subjects melding with environments both natural and cultural. The sense of nostalgia evoked by Rocan’s painted images—Ferris wheels, gingham tablecloths, tire swings, floral wallpaper—speaks to memory and timelessness. These images are more about fleeting recollections than about the objects that define one’s social status. Rocan has exhibited at the Power Plant in Toronto, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Montreal, the Contemporary Art Gallery in Vancouver, the Winnipeg Art Gallery, and the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art in Toronto. Rocan has also exhibited in venues in Glasgow, Scotland; France; and the United States, and many others. 39


Right, Lot #48

Milena Marinov Fargo, North Dakota Eve’s Offering, 2017 Oil on panel 9.5 x 7.5 inches, 19.5 x 17.5 framed Range: $300 – 500

Far right, Lot #49

Milena Marinov Fargo, North Dakota African Roots: Shimmering Savannah 1, 2017 Ink on paper 10.5 x 13 inches, 17.5 x 21.5 framed Range: $300 – 500

Lot #47

Gretchen Kottke Cooperstown, North Dakota The Gleaners, 2017 Oil on canvas 30 x 30 inches Range: $400 – 800

Gretchen Kottke: I have done many things in my life, but art has always been a part of it either as an artist or lover. There’s a part of me that has always admired the abstract and has always wanted to paint really big abstract pieces. Sadly, the abstract has eluded me. . . . There’s always a figure that speaks louder. The figures, even if abstracted, help me relate to my sensibilities. Even though I do most times, I am hesitant to title my work, as I do not want to interfere with the message a viewer may receive. For me this is important. I love the stories people tell of what is happening in a piece. . . when they don’t have a title. It forces them to look and to think. In The Gleaners, two simply dressed women search in the bitter cold for wood for warmth and their very survival. The little sticks are all that is left after poor stewardship that 40 has come to the place we call Earth.

Gretchen Kottke’s painting is sponsored by Minnesota Public Radio

Gretchen was born in Bemidji, Minnesota during World II, raised in Cooperstown, and graduated from high school in three years so she could fly away to study art. The flight took her to Jamestown College and the University of North Dakota, Blair College of Medical Assistants and The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. Upon her return to North Dakota, she opened the GK Gallery that hosted eighty-four exhibits and sponsored two public art pieces, The Prairie Garden and Prairie Compass. She has shown her work in various cities and galleries since the mid-sixties and has works of art in private collections.


Milena Marinov: Art is complicated. It is not only about drawing or painting, but putting the soul into the artworks. In a variety of art forms, the maker can fix it until it satisfies them. Rarely, with ink drawings, can you go back to fix your piece. Marinov called the form a very unforgiving medium. You cannot erase it and it takes a lot of time and patience. But I love the purity of it—like black and white photography—it is not chatty! Marinov selected ink as her medium for recent works because she used to study ink drawings when she was a student. For some reason, she had forgotten about this art form but one of her friends recently sent her an article about calligraphy—also using ink—and it reminded her. Marinov believes, You need to have something to tell and you need to find a way to express your visions and ideas through your art in a way that excites and engages others. At its best, it is a dialogue between artist and viewer. No special events brought me to art—it is just me. Everyone tries to find their place in life and this is mine. She uses iconography as a medium as well—iconography is visual images and symbols used in a work of art or the study or interpretation of these. She explained, Ink drawings and iconography are very old mediums, popular in classical times. Iconography literally started with Christianity and it has changed very little over time. It is a conservative and dogmatic art form. Ink drawings have much more freedom of expression—not dictated by

canons or strict rules of religious art. She is inspired by religious art, her Bulgarian heritage, and Elena Kanterva, who was her friend, neighbor, and colleague (Kanterva is a prominent iconographer and teacher of Iconography and Art History at the Academy of Fine Art in Plovdiv, Bulgaria, the artist’s home country.) Especially, Kanterva has an influence on Milena Marinov’s iconography. Before Marinov met Kanterva, she had focused on graphic art. Marinov said, Elena was a talented artist and she shared her experience and knowledge of icons with me. Marinov was an artist in residence at the National Institute of Cultural Heritage for a decade. She has restored original frescos and icons in synagogues, churches, mosques, public buildings, houses, and ancient tombs. Marinov remembers those times as the happiest of her career. She worked with teams of artists and archeologists. It was very exciting to be part of revealing beautiful frescos, sometimes multiple layers of them that had not been seen by anyone for hundreds of years. Each project was different, the process of rediscovering a hidden fresco or icon, often blackened by soot, and restoring and preserving it. The restoration and preservation of such beautiful art made us feel like warriors in a fight against destruction brought on by time and vandalism. For years, Marinov has worked on history that cannot be changed, like her ink drawings. Quoted in part from Hu Han, High Plains Reader, 4/26/2017.

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Lot #50

Butch Thunderhawk Bismarck, North Dakota Horse Effigy, 2017 Cedar branch, acrylic paint, brass tacks, horse hair, buckskin pouch and reins, tooled leather feather Range: $1,400 – 1,600

Butch Thunderhawk is a Hunkpapa Lakota artist originally from Cannonball, North Dakota on the Standing Rock Reservation. He graduated from Dickinson State University in North Dakota and attended the California College of Art and Crafts in Oakland. Thunderhawk also studied tribal arts, including pipe making, with elders at Standing Rock. Since the late 1970s, he has taught tribal arts at United Tribes Technical College in Bismarck.

Butch Thunderhawk’s Horse Effigy is sponsored by William Wosick

Thunderhawk was contacted by the Thomas Jefferson House Foundation, Charlottesville, Virginia, and asked to reproduce twenty traditional Native American art pieces. All works were to be replicas of those President Jefferson received from Lewis and Clark. Many of the pieces were made during a special 2001 summer session in which Butch and his students studied historic objects in Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology and at the North Dakota Heritage Center. They gathered wood, rocks, earth pigments and other materials, and made clubs, lances, and arrows. Butch also created shields, two pipes, and a quiver and bow case for the project. Butch and his students used mane and tail hair from Nokota horses to embellish the objects they created. Nokota horses formerly ran wild in the Little Missouri Badlands of North Dakota and are descended from early Indian and ranch stock. They have been designated North Dakota’s “honorary equine” or state horse. In 2005, Thunderhawk was Visiting Curator and Student Mentor at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology–Harvard University where he received a Harvard Fellowship. He co-curated and assisted in design work for the Lewis and Clark Exhibit at the Harvard Peabody Museum and he also co-curated and assisted in design work for Wiyohpiyata (Ledger Art Exhibit). The 42 Nelson Atkins Museum in Kansas City as well as the

Peabody Museum–Harvard University, commissioned him to create Horse Memorial Effigies for their permanent collections—not unlike Thunderhawk’s work in this Auction. The James Monroe House Museum in Charlottesville, Virginia commissioned him to create two major art pieces for their Native American Section. Closer to home, the artist received a Fine Arts Fellowship from Dickinson State University and worked with the development of the North Dakota Cowboy Hall of Fame.


Walter Piehl’s painting is sponsored by News Radio 1310 KNOX

Lot #51 Walter Piehl Minot, North Dakota Heart River: Sweetheart of the Rodeo 2017 Acrylic on canvas 48 x 36 inches Range: $5,000 – 6,500

Walter Piehl: I like rodeo and putting on paint, but not necessarily in that order.

flying backward, the gesture of a flinging hand, a boot following the body into a somersault as the rider is tossed.

Piehl, now in his seventies, went on to draw and paint horses, year after year, never wearying of his subject, never despairing in his quest to create contemporary Western art. In the beginning he worked alone, one of the very first to turn his back on the established ways of painting and bronze casting, rendered into cliché by followers of Frederic Remington and Charles Russell. By 1978, Piehl and his horses were well on their way. By drawing, overdrawing, and re-drawing, Piehl could leave the traces of movement on the paper or canvas. He worked and reworked the surface, always leaving enough description for the viewer to follow the motion of a falling hat, a rider

As he matured, his skill as a painter matured as well. Just as he was interested in observing the subtlety of a creek bottom, he wanted his surfaces to dance with subtle variations. Drips, feathered edges, scumbled paint, the judicious use of glazes, all contribute to his rich surfaces. Today Piehl is North Dakota’s most celebrated painter and is widely recognized as an artist who pioneered the contemporary cowboy art movement.

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Lot #52

John Lembi Bemidji, Minnesota Home, 2014 Oil on canvas 24 x 24 inches framed Range: $800 – 1,000

John Lembi: The theme of this series, “Child’s Play,” is a subtle handling of memento mori. Memento mori is a Latin phrase translated as, “Remember your mortality.” It refers to a genre of artworks that vary widely, but share the same purpose—to remind us of our mortal limits. In the series, I am conveying this concept through children’s block images. The block depictions all have the signifier of youth that the image carries, yet show the passage of time through the manipulation of their surface treatment. The ephemeral concept of memory may also come into play for some viewers. The sixteen watercolors in this body of work are presented in a series called “Foursquare,” with the goal of creating a unified, cohesive body of work. The images are somewhat flat in appearance. There is not an attempt to express great dimensionality. The letterforms are sometimes rotated or missing all together in these deconstructed word pictures. The viewer may also perceive the paintings as recognizable symbols with the added implications of language. My intention was to use the block images as explorations in color and composition and to employ the memento mori idea as a unifying concept.

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The oil paintings each contain an image and a word signifier. I’m exploring the connections of words and pictures. Quoting from an article by W. J. T. Mitchell, We might call this division the relations between the seeable and the sayable, display and discourse, showing and telling. It also relates to our youth when vocabulary was

forming and through these simple toy devices a foundation was laid for communication. In 1950, Lembi was born in San Francisco where he attended art school and began working with wood, ceramics, and painting. His father was a mechanic, so he was exposed to engine repair from the time he was young. Always curious about how things worked, he was engrossed by high school shop classes and learned on the job serving as a technician for a utility company. Training in the trades, followed by education in graphic design and fine art, schooled his development as an artist. Lembi has a wide range of creative interests, which include several media from watercolor, pastels and oils, to clay, metal and woodworking. These diverse explorations have resulted in the design and fabrication of Arts and Crafts-inspired furnishings, including copper and stained glass light fixtures as well as furniture. He also makes oneof-a-kind sculpture studio furniture pieces. Since moving to Minnesota, his work has been exhibited at Watermark Art Center in Bemidji and Nemeth Art Center in Park Rapids.


Lot #53, #54, #55

Carlos Rene Pacheco Fargo, North Dakota Flatland Series, 2016 Archival photo on rag paper 12 x 12 inches Range: $150 – 225 each

Carlos Rene Pacheco: Inspired by the seemingly unbroken flatness of rural Minnesota and North Dakota along a horizontal plane, Flatland is a series of photographs that explore the textures and space of the Midwest from an aerial point of view. From as high as 30,000 feet, these photographs look at the microscopic and macroscopic structures of the terrain below. From this aerial perspective the landscape is evocative of the extraterrestrial topography of a distant planet. As if visible through the circular portals of some space-faring craft, the view is not dissimilar to those captured by the satellites and probes used by NASA.

Flatland #5

Carlos Rene Pacheco is a photographer and artist originally from Tucson, Arizona. As a young astronomy student, Pacheco became disenchanted with applied physics and mathematics and exchanged his view through a telescope for a view through a camera lens. This was a transformational experience. Pacheco soon reconciled his passion for scientific exploration with his investigation of the photograph. In doing so, Pacheco unexpectedly found his voice in two seemingly disconnected areas of study. Pacheco views the photograph as an artifact, not only in the historical and anthropological sense, but also in the technological sense. Photographs are information. Photographic images can be truthful relics but they can also be data. They can be a stream of ones and zeros that are cataloged, shaped, or corrupted. Through this filter Pacheco explores issues of time, technology, and the photographic archive in his work.

Flatland #6

In 2011, Carlos Rene Pacheco received his BFA from the University of Arizona in Tucson, and, in 2014, his MFA in Photography plus Integrated Media from Ohio University in Athens. Pacheco currently resides in the FargoMoorhead area where he teaches Photography at Minnesota State University Moorhead. In addition to teaching, Pacheco remains an active artist and exhibits his work nationally on a regular basis.

Flatland #7

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John Miyazawa’s sculpture is sponsored by Plains Chiropractic & Acupuncture P.C.

Lot #56

John Miyazawa Grand Forks, North Dakota Waiting (in progress), 2017 Fired clay 36 x 12 x 13 inches Range: $800 – 1,300

All proceeds from the sale of John Miyazawa’s sculpture is a gift by the artist to the Museum

John Miyazawa currently is Artist in Residence at the University of North Dakota Department of Art and Design. He graduated from Kent State University in Ohio with an MFA in crafts and ceramics in 2014. In the intervening years as academic appointments have become scarce, John has taken short artist residencies at Brinsley Tyrrell, Ravenna, Ohio; Boys and Girls Clubs of Lorain County, Lorain, Ohio; Art House, Cleveland, Ohio; and the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He has taught at Baldwin Wallace University, Berea, Ohio; Firelands Association for the Visual Arts, Oberlin, Ohio; and been a Visiting Artist at such places as Lakeland Community College, Kirtland, Ohio; Kent State University, Kent, Ohio; and Okoe, Kochi Prefecture in Japan. Miyazawa is of Japanese heritage and speaks his native language as well as English. To this day, ceramics remain 46 a vital and exciting form of Japanese art. In contrast to

most countries where potters have a difficult time earning a living, Japan has tens of thousands of successful potters. Historical and regional traditions of ceramic production continue to flourish, and tea bowls and other pieces for cha no yu (Japanese tea ceremony) continue to be made and used. Innovative ceramic sculpture with western influence and ultra modern style also flourishes. Japan continues to maintain a high degree of ceramic artistry, which is at the same time both traditional and modernistic. Miyazawa first went to study ceramics in Japan in 2005 when he apprenticed to Teppei Ono, Kochi Prefecture. In 2006, he was the main translator at the Mashiko International Ceramic Festival. And during 2007–2008, he became the Resident Artist, Okoen, Kochi, Japan. The work in the Auction combines these wide-ranging influences along with his newest discovery: North Dakota clay.


Lot #57

Lin Hao Fujian, China Still Life with Boot, 2017 Pastel on paper 19 x 24.5 inches Range: $1,000 – 2,000

lin Hao: Artists Zhimin Guan and Lin Hao were practically destined to work together. Lin came across Guan’s artwork while searching for a location to use his visiting artist grant from Fujian Normal University in China. After viewing Guan’s dynamic metal paintings on Minnesota State University Moorhead’s website, he knew he wanted to work with him—enough to uproot his family and move to Moorhead to study with Guan for a year. Lin asked Guan via email to be his mentor, and that’s when their paths officially crossed. After they met, Lin and Guan learned of their strikingly parallel career paths. Not only are the two of them internationally recognized artists from China, they also teach art at the university level. Guan has been an art professor at MSUM since 1998; Lin is an associate professor of the Academy of Fine Arts at Fuijan Normal University in Fuijan, China. In addition to being a master teacher of oil painting, Lin is also a self-taught pastel artist — two prominent forms of media in Guan’s artwork. They even worked with the same pastel master in China, although at different times. In March 2016, Lin became a visiting professor in Guan’s painting and drawing classes at MSUM. Even though Lin spoke little English and relied on his phone (or Guan) for

translations, he worked extremely hard. Guan and his students were thrilled to have him. It was good to see other artists working with the same medium from the same background, Guan said. Chinese artists are very serious about their work, and I think it’s inspirational to see another artist come work with me on a daily basis. Born in the Fujian Province in China, Lin graduated from the Department of Fine Arts of Fujian Normal University in 1994. In 1999, he attended high level workshops on the painting materials and techniques of France by Abraham Pincas at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing. From 2003 to 2004, he studied at Moscow National Normal University, sponsored by the Chinese ministry of education. Lin is a member of the Chinese Artists Association, associate professor of the Academy of Fine Arts of Fujian Normal University, and a master teacher of oil painting. His works have been selected for numerous national, regional, and international awards and exhibitions.

Quoted in part from Chelsey Engelhard Ewen, The Arts Partnership, November 14, 201.

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North Dakota Museum of Art

Into the Weeds August 13 — January 10, 2018

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Francisco Alvarado-Juárez, Yerba Linda / Pretty Weed, Gallery installation 50 x 33 x 18 feet, 2017. Painted and cut paper bags, acrylic paintings on canvas, three video projections, sound, dirt, and organic material. Image copyright Francisco Alvarado-Juárez


Joan Linder, Hooker 102nd Street Book (Love Canal), 2013 and on.Ink on 6 Moleskin accordion notebooks, each 5.5 x 105 inches Kim Beck, A Great Piece of Turf, 2014. Graphite on paper 78.25 x 109 inches

Weeds are plants that grow in places other than where humans determine they should be. Weeds are the bane of existence across North Dakota, now an intensively planted, agricultural paradise. An adjacent industry has arisen just to kill weeds. Legal wars ensue between environmentalists and agribusinesses. Weeds, these undesirable or troublesome plants, adapt and continue to flourish. They quickly occupy empty spaces, abandoned spaces, condemned spaces. Vacant lots fill with weeds. Artists, however, relish weeds. They represent exuberance, vigor, abundance, a cornucopia bursting with life. Weeds project the power to take over the world. Even farmers, growers, and gardeners will chuckle at their nemesis, those unwanted and abhorred WEEDS.

Patterson Clark, Index1312ptd, 2017, Alien weed pigments and handmade paper

Artists include: Francisco Alvarado, Kim Beck, Paterson Clark, Matt Collishaw, Joan Linder, Vivienne Morgan page 14, Judy Onofrio, Eggert Pétursson, and Margaret WallRomana page 5

Bring your family and friends. The Museum doesn’t charge admission. Open weekends 1 – 5 pm parking readily available Open weekdays 9 am – 5 pm

Judy Onofrio, Twenty-two sculptures of “Botanicals,” 2011 – 2017. Cow bone, pig bone, small collected animal bones, horn matte gel, colorant, and bronze acrylic paint, various sizes

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The North Dakota Museum of Art is grateful to our sponsors who have given generously to guarantee that the arts flourish

North Dakota Museum of Art Board of Trustees

North Dakota Museum of Art Foundation Board of Directors

Julie Blehm

Julie Blehm

Ann Brown, Secretary

Nancy Friese

Ashley DiPuma

Bryan Hoime

Kristin Eggerling

Laurel Reuter

Susan Farkas Annie Gorder, Treasurer Darrell Larson Sally Miskavige Carson Muth Natalie Muth Jim Poolman Nicole Poolman Lynne Raymond

The 2017 Autumn Art Auction is underwritten by

Lois Wilde and

Laurel Reuter, Director Tammy Sogard Linda Swanston Kesha Tanabe Kelly Thompson, Vice President Lois Wilde Joshua Wynne, Chairman David Hasbargen, Emeritus Kim Holmes, Emeritus Douglas McPhail, Emeritus Gerald Skogley, Emeritus Anthony Thein, Emeritus Wayne Zimmerman, Emeritus

North Dakota Museum of Art Staff Matt Anderson Sarah Bowser Sungyee Joh Greg Jones Laurel Reuter Heather Schneider Gregory Vettel Matthew Wallace Brad Werner Part-time Staff Madeleine Ardelean Wyatt Atchley Payton Cole Sheila Dalgliesh Olivia Gaikowski Errin Jordan Kelly Kennedy Kathy Kendle Wayne Kendle Zephaniah Pearlstein Marie Sandman Curtis Longtime Sleeping

Front cover: Eleanor McGough, Billowing, 2013, acrylic on panel, 30 x 40 inches Back cover: Arduino Palanca Caponigro, Red Dress Jump, 2017, pigmented ink on archival rag paper, open edition, 12 x 12 inches

and over fifty volunteers


Autumn Art Auction Volume 19, 2017

North Dakota Museum of Art


The North Dakota Museum of Art is grateful to our sponsors who have given generously to guarantee that the arts flourish

North Dakota Museum of Art Board of Trustees

North Dakota Museum of Art Foundation Board of Directors

Julie Blehm

Julie Blehm

Ann Brown, Secretary

Nancy Friese

Ashley DiPuma

Bryan Hoime

Kristin Eggerling

Laurel Reuter

Susan Farkas Annie Gorder, Treasurer Darrell Larson Sally Miskavige Carson Muth Natalie Muth Jim Poolman Nicole Poolman Lynne Raymond

The 2017 Autumn Art Auction is underwritten by

Lois Wilde and

Laurel Reuter, Director Tammy Sogard Linda Swanston Kesha Tanabe Kelly Thompson, Vice President Lois Wilde Joshua Wynne, Chairman David Hasbargen, Emeritus Kim Holmes, Emeritus Douglas McPhail, Emeritus Gerald Skogley, Emeritus Anthony Thein, Emeritus Wayne Zimmerman, Emeritus

North Dakota Museum of Art Staff Matt Anderson Sarah Bowser Sungyee Joh Greg Jones Laurel Reuter Heather Schneider Gregory Vettel Matthew Wallace Brad Werner Part-time Staff Madeleine Ardelean Wyatt Atchley Payton Cole Sheila Dalgliesh Olivia Gaikowski Errin Jordan Kelly Kennedy Kathy Kendle Wayne Kendle Zephaniah Pearlstein Marie Sandman Curtis Longtime Sleeping

Front cover: Eleanor McGough, Billowing, 2013, acrylic on panel, 30 x 40 inches Back cover: Arduino Palanca Caponigro, Red Dress Jump, 2017, pigmented ink on archival rag paper, open edition, 12 x 12 inches

and over fifty volunteers


North Dakota Museum of Art

AUTUMN Art Auction Saturday, October 28, 2017 Wine and hors d‘oeuvres at 6:30 pm Auction begins at 8 pm

Auction Preview Thursday, October 26, until the auction in the Museum. Hours: 9 to 5 pm weekdays and 1 to 5 pm weekends. All works to be auctioned will be on display.

Autumn Art Auction is

sponsored by the following businesses, not-for-profits, and individuals:

Patrons — $1,000 All Seasons 62 Altru Advanced Orthopedics 65 C&M Ford 74 HB Sound and Light 52 Hugo’s Family Marketplace 71 Minnesota Public Radio 61 News Radio 1310 KNOX 69 Plains Chiropractic & Acupuncture P.C. 48 Rhombus Guys 72 William F. Wosick, MD 49

Auction Walk-about Laurel Reuter, Auction Curator, will lead an informal discussion about works in the Auction Thursday, October 26, 7 pm, in the galleries.

Supporters — $500 Acme Tools 54 AE2S 66 Avant Hair and Skin Care Studio 64 Badger-Tanabe Dental Group 56 Blue Moose Bar & Grill 59 Bremer Bank 50 Crary Real Estate 77 Edgewood Healthcare 56 Empire Arts Center 53 First State Bank 68 Grand Forks Country Club 66 Ground Round 51 Helix Wine & Bites 73 Icon Architectural Group 67 Julie Blehm 58 Little Bangkok 57 Auction Supporters continued on next page

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Supporters — $500 Julie Blehm 58 Museum Cafe 80 North Dakota Eye Clinic 55 Prairie Public 59 Reichert Armstrong Law Office 63 River City Jewelers, Inc. 50 Sky’s Cloud 9 68 Trojan Promotions 70 Truyu 76

Buy local. Read the sponsor pages to learn about those who invest in the Museum. Almost all are locally owned and operated.

Walls Medicine Center 75 Waterfront Kitchen and Bath 60

Contributors — $250 Alerus 77 Capital Resource Management 70 Dakota Commercial 55 Dimensions Photography 75 Family Day at the Museum 80

Advertisers — $125 ArtWise 64 Brady, Martz & Associates, P.C. 64

Family Institute, PC 75

Coldwell Bankers Forks Real Estate, Sarita Bansal 76

GFK Flight Support 77

Cornerstone Mortgage 54

Grand Forks Park District 73 Greenberg Realty, Inc 63 Inna Sumra 73 Meggen Sande, Greenberg Realty 57

Demers Dental, Chelsea R. Eickson, D.D.S. 64 Economy Plumbing 76 Elite Carpet Cleaning 60 Grand Forks Republican Women 54

Myra Presents: Sunday Concerts in the Galleries 80

Hillary Kempenich 58

Opp Construction 67

HUB International 76

Oxford Realty 53 Salon Seva 51 Salvation Army 55 Scan Design 70 Simonson Station Stores 54 Swanson & Warcup, Ltd. 60

Invisimax 53 Kevin Hruska, Grand Forks Subaru 67 Kelly Thompson, Oxford Realty 60 Kuhlen Cryotherapy Center, LLC 76 Marco’s Pizza 63 Shaft Law 53

The Lighting Gallery 51

Step Out & Stay Out 58

UND Theatre 57

Susan Nord Designs 63

Xcel Energy 58

Urban Stampede 67 Vilandre Heating & Air Conditioning, Inc. 64

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Mike Jacobs, Auctioneer

Auction Committee

Mike Jacobs calls himself “the garlic king.” He planted his

Special appreciation

first garlic crop in 2013, in anticipation of retirement to a life as

to our committee for

a gentleman gardener. Today, vegetables from his garden,

raising over $25,000,

including garlic, appear frequently in dishes served in the North

breaking last years

Dakota Museum of Art Café.

advertising sales.

Jacobs was associated with the Grand Forks Herald for 36 years, first as a reporter and later as editor and publisher. The Herald won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service in 1998, when he was

ANUBHA BANSAL

editor. The award was for the uninterrupted publication of the Herald despite the 1997 flood and fire. The same year, he was named editor of the year by the National Press Association and won the editorial writing award from the American Society of Newspaper Editors. His association with NDMOA began more than half a century ago, when the gallery was located in the Student Union building. He recalls the controversy surrounding an early exhibit that

THERESA GARBE

ANNIE GORDER

MIKE LITTLE

SARA NARVESON

MEGGEN SANDE

TYLAH WILDEY

included a male nude. Even more vividly he remembers the visit of painter Donald Roller Wilson, who declared in a gallery talk that he created phantasmagorical images including pickles and chimpanzees “for the greater glory of God.” Jacobs and his partner, Suezette Bieri, have filled their home with art purchased at NDMOA events. In 2009, they chaired the annual dinner. When he retired from the Herald in 2014, a community reception was held in the Museum. Mike and Suezette live on fifty acres west of Gilby, North Dakota, with their collections. They share the house with cats and the property with snakes, ground squirrels, salamanders, frogs, and more than 100 species of birds. The mosquitos they export to Grand Forks on the northwest wind. In addition to art, Jacobs maintains a long time interest in birds and politics. Despite his retirement, he continues to write about both in columns printed in the Herald—plus garlic.

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Rules of the Auction

Each registered guest will receive a bidding card as part of

Welcome to North Dakota’s Premier Autumn Art Auction. The

the price of admission. Upon receiving the bidding card

Museum originally started the auction hoping to build a regional

each guest will be asked to sign a statement vowing to abide

support system for artists who live in our region. Galleries were

by the Rules of the Auction listed in this catalog.

few and far between; there wasn‘t an established regional

Absentee bidders will either leave their bids on an Absentee Bid Form with Museum personnel in person or by phone, or arrange to bid by phone the night of the Auction. Absentee bidders, by filling out the form, agree to abide by the Rules of the Auction.

From the Museum Director

market. Thankfully, this has changed in North Dakota, especially in Grand Forks and its surrounding communities. Auctions and sales have become commonplace. Original art is the norm in locally owned restaurants. Young people are filling their homes with art from our own artists. The event has grown into the Premier Art Auction in North Dakota, to be replicated by many.

Each bidder will use his or her own bidding number during the Auction.

This Auction set the regional precedent for paying artists before

All sales are final.

paying ourselves. We never ask artists to donate art—although

In September 2002, the Office of the North Dakota State Tax Commissioner determined that the gross receipts from the sales made at the Auction are subject to sales tax of 6.75%. This does not apply to out-of-state buyers who have works shipped to them.

In the event of a dispute between bidders, the auctioneer

some do. For the first seventeen years of this auction, we allowed artists to set a minimum price, which they were guaranteed to receive. Work that didn’t reach the artist’s minimum was brought in and returned. Any amount over the reserve was split 50/50 between the artist and the Museum. Finally, we feel confident that the prices for art have stabilized. The artists and the Museum will split the sales 50/50 in the 2017 Art Auction.

shall either determine the successful bidder or re-auction

the item in dispute.

Others in the region have adopted our policy of paying artists.

Purchasers may pay for items at any point following the

Instead of always being asked to donate, artists can expect actual

sale of a work but must pay for all artwork before the

income from auctions sponsored by art entities. And, bless you

conclusion of the evening unless other arrangements are

buyers for not forgetting that this is also a benefit for the Museum.

in place. Absentee bidders will be charged on the evening of

We notice and value your generosity.

the Auction or an invoice will be sent the next business day. •

Proceeds from the sale of works of art will be split between the Artist and the Museum 50/50. At times, the House will bid if representing absentee buyers. The range indicates artist’s established price for similar works.

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Remember, when you buy through the Auction, the price includes frames, which are often custom made by the artists or built by the Museum staff with archival materials. This adds significant value to most artworks, often as much as $400 in the Grand Forks market but considerably more elsewhere. Please


The Artists

The Museum

note that sales tax is charged on all art that stays in North Dakota.

Listed by lot number

#31. Adam Kemp

We could not publish this catalog without the underwriting of

#1. Emily Lunde

#32. Zhimin Guan

our sponsors. Please take your business to these companies and

#2. Jon Offutt

#33. Kelli Nelson

individuals, thank them for their significant contributions, and

#3. Lisa York

#34. Kelli Nelson

#4. Mollie Douthit

#35. Kelli Sinner

#5. Mollie Douthit

#36. Kelli Sinner

#6. Ned Krouse

#37. Albert Belleveau

#7. Lynne Allen

#38. Alexander Hettich

#8. Pirjo Berg

#39. Alexander Hettich

#9. Pirjo Berg

#40. Jessica Matson-Fluto

#10. Pirjo Berg

#41. Eleanor McGough

#11. Megan Duda

August 2017, we opened a splendid exhibition Into The Weeds

#42. Paul Gronhovd

#12. Brock Davis

#43. Rena Effendi

that was curated and mounted by the Museum staff. Nine artists

#13. Bill Harbort

#44. Rena Effendi

celebrated the tenacity and exuberance of common weeds.

#14. Vivienne Morgan

#45. Chris Walla

Margaret Wall-Romana made a new series of paintings including

#15. Dan Jones

#46. Mélanie Rocan

the bath of gold above. When asked, “Why should I bring my

#16. Jack Dale

#47. Gretchen Kottke

kids to see this exhibition?” Our Education Director Matt

#17. Marley Kaul

#48. Milena Marinov

Anderson replied, Into the Weeds is a splendid show for anyone

#18. Lewis Ableidinger

#49. Milena Marinov

#19. DeborahMae Broad

#50. Butch Thunderhawk

#20. Arduina Palanca Caponigro

#51. Walter Piehl

#21. Arduina Palanca Caponigro

#53. Carlos Rene Pacheco

#22. Arduina Palanca Caponigro

#55. Carlos Rene Pacheco

note how most are locally owned and operated. Sometimes they say, “I don’t care if I get an ad, I just want to give to you guys.” Supporting cultural life is not in the interest of most chains but rather has become the business of the butcher, the baker, and the keeper of bees: that is, those who live among us. Thank you. The Museum’s programming continues to enrich and expand. In

because it expands our concepts of what art can be. Botanical bouquets that came from a farmer’s bone pile. Immense, detailed drawings next to a room lifted from a Honduran jungle— immersive, colorful, accessible, a wonderment. It engages most of our senses—but don’t lick the floor to make it all. The show has been extended through the New Year so more families and school groups can visit. —Laurel Reuter, Director

#52. John Lembi #54. Carlos Rene Pacheco

#23. Dyan Rey

#56. John Miyazawa

#24. Catie Miller

#57. Lin Hao

#25. Eve Sumsky #26. Marlon Davidson & Don Knudson #27. Amenda Hiedt

Above: Margaret Wall-Romana, Sprout & Wing, 2017. Oil on birch panel with cutwork and metal leaf. 23 x 67 inches. Included in Into the Weeds exhibition.

#28. Guillermo Guardia (Memo) #29. Tim Schouten #30. Christopher Benson

5


All proceeds from the Emily Lunde sale go to the North Dakota Museum of Art for enhancement of its collection.

Lot #1

Emily Lunde (1914 – 2003) One Room Schoolhouse, c. 1980 Acrylic on canvas 23.25 x 29.25 inches Range: $500 – 800

Emily Lunde’s father died when she was five years old, and she and her two sisters were raised by her immigrant grandparents on a farm near Oslo, Minnesota. Memories of those days are the inspiration for much of her painting. Emily left home at the age of eighteen and went to work as a maid in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Although always interested in art, Emily first married and it wasn’t until 1974 that she raised four children was finally able to begin to paint seriously. Emily Lunde is one of North Dakota’s eminent folk artists and unofficial cultural historians. She has recorded the life of the Scandinavian immigrants who started coming in the late eighteen-hundreds and settled the prairies and small towns of the Red River Valley She categorized her work as a satire of human nature as I alternately toast and roast those I love. Lunde said, There was a time when I would paint on anything I could get hold of. Any piece of board or paper. It was fun to see what things looked like. Then I‘d take a painting somewhere and I’d be too bashful to go back and pick it up. My first art exhibit was at the University; I never did find out what happened to the painting. One of my first endeavors was to paint the farm home. I 6 gave it to my mother and she hid it in the attic. So I guess

it wasn‘t too good, at least she didn‘t think so. My husband didn‘t like my work in the beginning either. We got back from Fargo one time and he said, ‘Nobody is going to buy that stuff.’ So I stuck them in the attic. I thought I was never going to paint again. But then I got some calls for the paintings and from then on he would help me frame them. One time I painted a threshing machine and after I got my horses all harnessed and everything my husband looked at it, and he said, ‘the horses are going the wrong way. ‘ He could have told me that before. I paint things I’d seen at grandma’s or in my own home, things I have attended—weddings, carnivals, threshing gangs, things like that. It’s sort of a satire of the old days, some of it’s affectionate but some of it’s also a put-down. So there’s some kind of bite in The Gossips and there’s a little bit of hypocrisy in the one where the preacher comes unexpected. The people weren’t supposed to do any of the things they do in the painting, but they did them when nobody was looking. I don’t know if that is the thin line between comedy and tragedy. When I sit down and paint I laugh at my characters. They were like company. It was quiet here at home, my husband didn‘t talk much and we didn‘t go anywhere, so I painted. I don’t know what I would have done if I hadn’t painted. That and the library. Paintings is getting to be work now. But then there are times when there is something I’d like to do. I’d like to do something entirely different once. But when I do that it isn‘t what people want because they have an idea in their mind about what I do. So then you go back and make it. I don’t care if I never make a country store again. I have hundreds of them out, all to different persons. But they‘re so tedious. I wouldn’t sell one for under $100 now.

Emily Lunde, “Amazing Emily: Reminiscences of a Folk Painter,” Border Crossings, September 1985.


Jon Offutt is North Dakota’s leading glass blower, working out of his Fargo House of Mulciber Glass Studio. Named after the Roman god of fire, Mulciber, Offutt can be found most winter months in the studio with the 2,000degree furnace blasting away as the artist transforms molten glass into one vase form after another, interspersed with occasional sculptures. He closes down during the heat of summer to travel to art fairs and to demonstrate glass blowing from his Mobile Glassblowing Studio. Jon is currently known for his Dakota Horizons Series which celebrates the landscape of the region’s prairie horizons. Whereas works from that series can be found in the Museum’s Shop, the enormous bowl in the auction celebrates the glory of glass blowing. The bowl first appears to be clear glass. However, as light gleams through the glass, glints of violet swirl around, a reminder of Offutt’s physical act of blowing glass through, a long pipe, usually made from clay. The molten glass is collected at one end and from the other Offutt blows air through while spinning the mouth-pipe. In this free blowing method, the molten glass twirls outward into vase forms, seemingly under Offutt’s complete control. Jon Offutt was an instructor and studio coordinator with the glass program at Minnesota State University Moorhead, where he earned his BA in studio art with a concentration on glass and ceramics (1991). He also took a residency at Smoky Hills Artisan Community in Osage, Minnesota; was a studio assistantship at the Penland School of Crafts, North Carolina; and acquiried an MFA from Southern Illinois University Carbondale (1996).

Lot #2

Jon Offutt Fargo, North Dakota Handblown Glass Bowl, 2017 Size: 6.6 inches high by 18.25 inch diameter Range: $300 – 400

Lot #3

Lisa York Frederick, Maryland Ceramic and wood Bowl Set, 2014 6 x 24 x 7 (depth) inches Range: $400 – 600

Lisa York: Working primarily with forms finished in the soda kiln, Lisa York creates ceramics that are mounted on wood structures also made by York. She says, I use bold line and circle motifs to capture the viewer’s eye. I believe my work has a sense of natural and raw beauty. There is a weight to the ceramics as they are meant for everyday use without the fear of breaking them. The tactile surfaces enable the hand to discover smooth, or mottled, or rough surfaces. The range of texture varies depending on the amount of soda deposited on the pot during the firing. Areas with heavy soda have an aged weathered look, which relates to the details I so often notice on rocks and plants, rust, and decay. The palette is earthy, with some colors relating to nature. The pottery is a living record of my experiences and values distilled into a moment. Currently, York is an instructor and ceramic technician at Hood College. She studied art at University of North Dakota; Hood College; Houghton College, Houghton, New York; and apprenticed at Tye River Pottery, Amherst, Virginia. She was an artist-in-residence at Sanbao Ceramic Art Institute in Jingdezhen, China; the International Ceramics Studio in Kecskemet, Hungary; and the Residency for Ceramics, Berlin, Germany. In Tanzania, she started a ceramics program at Neema Crafts, an organization that trains people with disabilities to become skilled artisans. Likewise, she worked with a similar program in Chichi, Guatemala for a short-term project. Her functional ceramics have been exhibited nationally and internationally, and are represented in collections in the Fargo Plain Arts Museum and numerous universities. 7


Lot #4

Mollie Douthit Grand Forks, North Dakota Joey, 2016 Charcoal on paper 9.8 x 7.8 inches Range: $200 – 250

Above right, Lot #5

Mollie Douthit Grand Forks, North Dakota BV Cow, 2016 Pencil on paper 9.8 x 7.8 inches Range: $200 – 250

Mollie Douthit lived primarily in Burren, a tiny village in Ireland, from 2013 to summer 2017. Born and raised in Grand Forks, Douthit had already spent years studying to be a painter. This included taking her MFA from Burren College of Art, Ballyvaughan, Ireland (2014); a Post BAC Certificate from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (2011); and a BFA from the University of North Dakota (2009). While living alone in a small apartment in Burren, Mollie Douthit would set out from her home and walk a mileand-a-half to spend Sundays with a rabbit. I would sit in the shade with a white rabbit named Joey, said Douthit. Sometimes I would have to wait a few hours before Joey would be calm enough to sit for a few moments. The pressure of not knowing when she would 8 move allowed me to draw her and put paint on canvas in

a very direct, honest manner. When she was ready, I was ready. Then I painted and she rested. Paintings of Joey, the rabbit, and her pal Ginger, a guinea pig, were among the many pieces featured in the Art Makers Series exhibition at NDMOA in the summer of 2017. Launched in 2015 and underwritten by Grafton native, Dr. William Wosick, Fargo, the Series introduces regional artists who seem to be on the edge of a breakthrough in their work, according to Museum Director Laurel Reuter. Douthit imbues single objects with significance by situating them in isolation, to a remarkably evocative effect. It may be her connection with the subject, coupled with her exacting technique, that draws one in and evokes a sense of familiarity. She chooses to paint common items or scenes that have caught her attention and sparked a desire to document them in still life. Among the numerous awards and honors she has received, Douthit is most pleased with the 2013 Hennessy Craig Award from the Royal Hibernian Academy in Ireland. The $10,000 award kept me financially afloat so I could pursue painting, she said. In 2014, Douthit’s work was advanced to Stage II of the John Moores Painting Prize, and was included in Saatchi Art’s New Sensation Prize.


Lot #6

Ned Krouse Haslett, Michigan Ride the Badlands, 2017 Wheel thrown, slip decorated, raku fired 8 x 6 x 6 inches Range: $350 – 450 Detail below

Ned Krouse was born in Ft. Wayne, Indiana in 1946, and taught fifth grade until 1975. While teaching elementary, Krouse began taking night classes in ceramics. I reached a point where I decided I wasn’t going to teach spelling and handwriting for the rest of my life, Krouse said. His education in clay started at the Ft. Wayne School of Art. He also spent three years in Fine Arts at Indiana University, Bloomington. In the summer of 1978, he was a Monitor at Penland School of Craft. He received his MFA from Tyler School of Art in 1981. In 2014, he exhibited his work at Minot’s Taube Art Museum. His teaching career spanned over forty years and included public schools, colleges and universities, and art and craft centers around the country. He maintains a studio in Haslett, Michigan where he offers raku workshops to local potters. At age seventy, he retired from teaching to devote his time to pottery, golf, gardening and cooking, “all of which influence my artwork.” According to the artist, In 1990, I taught in the Art Department at Minot State University. When Krouse first started at Minot, he said he heard Walter Piehl walk down the hallway, stop at his office and toss a pair of cowboy boots in, telling him to wear them.

I’ve returned many times as a visiting artist to teach workshops and exhibit my work, and have a long friendship with Walt and his family. One of my favorite things to do is ride horse with Walter and his son Shadd. A photo I took when we were riding in the Badlands near

Medora was the inspiration for the title of my piece, Ride the Badlands. My work is slip decorated and raku fired. While the piece is leather hard, I brush on layers of colored slip and carve and etch through the layers to reveal the colors underneath. Today raku pieces are fast-fired to 1900 degrees, removed while red hot, and placed in a barrel of combustible material such as straw, sawdust, or newspaper. The rapid cool down crazes the glaze, enhanced by the smoke from the combustible. The multiple colors of slip allow me to alternate colors in the 9 layering and produce many different combinations.


Lynne Allen’s Wind Woman is sponsored by HB Sound and Light

Lot #7

Lynne Allen Brookline, Massachusetts Wind Woman (Ita ta win), 2006 Digital print, woodcut (printed intaglio style) 22 x 22 inches

Lynne Allen: Empathy is the power to imagine a world outside your own experience. The matriarchs in my family have all been members of the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in South Dakota. I can trace my Native heritage back five generations to Wastewin (Good Women) in the early 1800s. As a visual artist, I incorporate the passions that drive me personally into a bigger reality—the world is full of threats and rewritten histories. The history of my art -making has referenced the homeless, prisoners, police, hyenas, unsavory characters that pose a threat or danger, lead fishing sinkers that look like bullets, fish hooks, facts and myths about how the west was won, porcupine quills, and squashed and rusted beer caps. All of these are linked, either through metaphor or an insane compulsion to collect. My goal is to create a space where the viewer has a chance to imagine a world other than their own. Ita ta win (Wind Woman) is a portrait of Allen’s greatgreat- grandmother, born in Indian Territory in 1830. Her 10 daughter Josephine, Allen’s great-grandmother, became

Range: $800 – 1,200

the tribal historian of her Lakota people. Allen was instrumental in the publication of Josephine’s manuscript, written in the 1920s–1940s, published in 2013, edited by Emily Levine. Witness: A Hunkpapa Historian‘s StrongHeart Song of the Lakotas won the 2013 Nebraska Book Award. Allen has made many images to honor the matriarchs in her family, depicting their struggle, their undying spirit and grace in a turbulent time in our history. The red circles on this print could represent bullet holes, or small pox, both which ran rampant in the early years of our nation. Born in Trenton, New Jersey, Allen has an MFA from the University of New Mexico, a Master of Arts for Teachers from the University of Washington, and a BS in Art Education, Kutztown University, Pennsylvania. She currently resides near Boston.


Lot #8

Lot #9

Lot #10

Pirjo Berg

Pirjo Berg

Pirjo Berg

Grand Forks, North Dakota

Grand Forks, North Dakota

Grand Forks, North Dakota

Left Behind, 2017

Passes #1, 2017

Spring Memory, 2017

Oil on paper on board

Oil on paper on board

Oil on paper on board

6 x 6 inches framed

6 x 6 inches framed

6 x 6 inches framed

Range: $200 – 300

Range: $200 – 300

Range: $200 – 300

Pirjo Berg is interested in studying the experience of space, place, and landscape. The childhood visual world defines what one considers to be familiar. As an immigrant Berg feels in between her new and old countrys. The stripes in her paintings are inspired by Finnish traditional rag rugs and wall hangings, which filled the floors and walls at her childhood home. Even today those striped designs remind her of childhood. There is the longing for the old places and times which don’t exist anymore. The stripes have skewed away from an orderly grid. Pirjo’s paintings are based on color, texture, and shape. The stripes, repetition, and texture are found not only in the familiar textiles, but also in geological formations. Her recent paintings have layers (or beds) of landscapes, which are squeezed by time and “flattened.” One can recognize the landscape in them, but they are in motion all the time, as if you were watching a movie where you can slide back and forward in time and space. Pirjo was born in Helsinki, Finland. She received her MA in Regional Planning at the University of Tampere, Finland, before moving to the United States in 1991. In 1996, she moved back to Finland to attend the School of Art and Media in Tampere. There she concentrated in painting but also enjoyed making installations in collaboration with other students. The years at the Art School meant considerable traveling, not only between Tampere and

Seattle, but also painting trips to Norway, Estonia, Italy, and Nepal. She moved back to Seattle in 2000 and established a studio in Ballard at Building C. In 2005, she graduated from the Artists Trust EDGE-Program. She moved to Grand Forks, North Dakota in 2008 and established a studio here. Over the years she has travelled with her geologist husband all over the world (Nepal, Greenland, Arctic Spitsbergen in northern Norway, Baja California, Alaska, Southwest Canyon Lands in Utah, Sierra Nevada, and so on) as his field assistant. The landscape, especially the sedimentary rocks, and layers (or beds as geologists call them), are elements which have became familiar to her. She has participated in many group and solo exhibitions. Her career highlights include the six-person exhibition Paint Local at the North Dakota Museum of Art; Art on the Plains XI at the Fargo Plains Art Museum; the solo shows at Grand Fork’s Third Street Gallery; a solo show in Gallery 63Eleven in Seattle, (reviewed on NPR’s Washington affiliate by art critic Gary Fagin); a solo show and a threeperson exhibit at the Nordic Heritage Museum in Seattle; and a solo show at Gallery Jangva, Helsinki, Finland. She has been awarded artist residencies at Vermont Studio Center; NDMOA’s McCanna House; Washington’s Willapa Bay Air; and in Berlin; Marbella, Spain; and Serlachius, 11 Finland.


Lot #11

Megan Duda Fargo, North Dakota Hatbox Studies, 2016 Silver gelatin photograph 6.5 x 24 inches, 11.25 x 29 inches framed Range: $200 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 300

Below, Lot #12

Brock Davis Fargo, North Dakota Firepit, 2017 Steel 33 x 28 x 28 inches Range: $400 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 650

Megan Duda was born in Massachusetts and raised in South Carolina. Today she is a fine art photographer living in Fargo. She took a degree in architecture from Virginia Tech (a terminal, professional degree, including a fifth year thesis project). The thought of working in an office was unappealing, so she opted instead to travel the country driving twenty-foot trailers and selling pizza at music festivals and Nascar races, while making photographs of architecture in her spare time. In 2007, she and her architect husband settled in Fargo and Duda returned to school for her MFA from the University of North Dakota. Between 2009 and 2016, Duda taught a range of photography courses at North Dakota State University and Minnesota State University Moorhead. She mainly works in abstract black and white pinhole photography, designing each camera to suit the subject matter. She is most inspired by explorations of vantage point and perspective, as well as the many ways in which the camera perceives light. Hatbox Studies is part of a series of images exploring space with a homemade, 360-degree pinhole camera. The photographic impression is a true representation of an abandoned apple grove, yet the final image is drastically different from experienced reality, presenting an existence 12 that only the camera can perceive, as if it were a dream.

Brock Davis designed and made this custom fire pit for the Autumn Art Auction. He started welding in high school and never looked back. He welded professionally on oilfield trucks, trailers, and tankers for thirteen years until in 2016 when he decided to follow his dream and start Davis Designs. Brock enjoys


Lot #13

Bill Harbort Minot, North Dakota Bingo, 2017 Mixed media collage on panel 32 x 48 inches Range: $650 – 800

Bill Harbort, or William Charles Harbort, also known as Billy Chuck, is represented in the Auction with Bingo, a saturated and vibrant painting that explores luck and synchronicity. Science currently explains attraction between human beings with biology and pheromones. This visual exploration spotlights a nostalgic moment with bright colors, the rhythmic use of circles, a spontaneous use of paint and a couple close to kissing. The art celebrates the coincidental occurrence of events that defy logic and odds. Bill Harbort is a professor in the art department at Minot State University where he teaches foundation art classes, graphic design and illustration courses. He is a co-founder and co-organizer of NOTSTOCK, MSU‘s signature live arts event that spotlights the arts at MSU and in the community. Prior to teaching, he worked as a package designer for a major cosmetics company, an art director for a children’s educational software company, and built a reputation as

Brock Davis continued welding both abstract and figurative sculptures. He also creates furniture, wall art, and anything to do with steel. Recently, Davis Designs acquired a CNC Plasma Table that will allow Brock to do anything from mass-producing parts to custom sign work, and everything in between. He currently lives in Fargo with his wife and two daughters.

an award winning automotive artist. Today, Bill Harbort is best known for his pop art, mixed-media collages that celebrate calendar girls, clip art, advertisements, and ephemera from pop culture. These are just a few of the ingredients often found in popular culture landfill, according to the artist. I am fascinated with each individual ingredient and the infinite messages that can be expressed by combining and juxtaposing them. It is through this process that I discover meaning and express thought. Allusion, suggestion and investigation become an important part of the viewing experience. He continues, Love, true-love, lust, temptation, luck, loss, and life and death are recurring subject in my work. Harbort also brings good humor, wit, flexibility, an egalitarian spirit, energy, and joy to his teaching, collaborations, and art making. And the art he makes is of and for the people. Harbort was one of six artists commissioned by the North Dakota Museum of Art to work with the people of North Dakota’s Spirit Lake Reservation to create a body of artwork about contemporary life on the Reservation. An exhibition of the first round of art was shown at the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Project Space in New York’s prestigious Chelsea Art District in June 2013, followed by a tour to Fort Totten on Spirit Lake, and finally to NDMOA. Twice Harbort has returned to Spirit Lake to create additional works which are permanently installed in Spirit Lake’s Cankdeska Cikana Community College at Fort Totten. His subjects include North Dakota’s seasons, basketball, and the buffalo as a mystical presence. 13


Lot #14

Vivienne Morgan Bemidji, Minnesota Bladder Campion, 2017 Tea toned cyanotype photogram 30 x 22 inches Range: $ 400 – 500 Installation below

English wildflower even though it originated in North Africa and Asia. It was one of my favorite flowers as a child, called Tom Thumb by my mother, because it’s so small, and I picked posies of them, they were magical. Once used as livestock forage and for erosion control, Birdsfoot Trefoil is now considered an invasive plant, to be eradicated. It grows in our ditch and the county tries to spray it every year, so I say a few choice words.

Vivienne Morgan: Silene vulgaris. Bladder Campion, or Maidenstears European origin, common in England, Finland, considered a weed in America. Medicinal use of Bladder Campion: The plant is said to be an emollient and is used in baths or as a fumigant. The juice of the plant is used in the treatment of ophthalmia. Edible parts of Bladder Campion: Young shoots and leaves, raw or cooked. The young leaves are sweet and very agreeable in salads. The cooked young shoots, harvested when about 5 cm long, have a flavor similar to green peas but with a slight bitterness. Picking and blanching the young shoots as they poke through the ground can reduce this bitterness. When pureed it is said to rival the best spinach purees. The leaves should be used before the plant starts to flower. Contains saponins. (Plants for a Future database) In August 2017, the exhibition Into the Weeds opened at the North Dakota Museum of Art. Organized by NDMOA, nine artists created diverse work. Morgan was among them and the work Bladder Campion grew out of her weed installation (right). I‘ve been thinking about how when you immigrate you take with you the things that you know, the food, medicines, and animal feed that you are used to. Birdsfoot Trefoil with its bright little orchid-like flower, for 14 example, is so common in England that it’s considered an

Before Coca-Cola really hit the U.K. market, I used to drink pop made from dandelion and burdock. It was sweet and fizzy and considered medicinal, so okay for children. Burdock roots are long, edible, tasty even. Burdock would have been brought from England for its medicinal properities, and edibility. The burs, or cockleburs, that come from the plant and attach to sheep and ruin the wool, and the plants are spread by wild animals and are hard to contain.


All proceeds from the sale of Still Life with White go to the Museum of Art, a gift of appreciation from Dan Jones Dan Jones is best known as a painter of the landscape of western Minnesota and southeastern North Dakota. This Red River Basin provides Jones with endless subjects,. but every now and then he creates a work of another kind in his studio. This lovely vase of flowers bathed in the palest of blues is such an example. In 2013, the North Dakota Museum of Art published the book Dan Jones: Charcoal written, and the accompanying exhibition curated, by NDMOA Director Laurel Reuter. The following are excerpts by Jones: Realism: I went to parochial schools. No art education either there or in public schools. But my mother loved art and always had reproductions. Poster of Miro painting in my bedroom. Posters of Picasso but also Rembrandt. Michelangelo’s David reproduction was on the library table. All the religious stuff illustrated by old masters. Story about Lazarus . . . . My earliest exposure was to old masters. Norman Rockwell always fascinated me with his drawing ability to illustrate something almost photographically. Kind of like golf. It’s a game you can never win; all you can do is play. Draw and draw and draw. Jacque David said that in order to learn to draw you have to do 10,000 drawings but they are never good enough. I haven’t completely shaken off the yoke of realism but I am less concerned than I used to be. Milton Avery helped me out of that. A big black shape on a canvas can read as a big plowed field. Sometimes I still wonder if I am a painter. I didn’t start until late, maybe in the early 1980s when I quit construction and enrolled in architecture at NDSU. I didn’t care for it; I was always a little ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) but I had to take a drawing class so ADD was almost instantaneous with starting class. My drawing instructor was Catherine Mulligan and I couldn’t understand anything she said. Picture planes, chiaroscuro, oblique angles. I knew nothing about art. She taught me how to see things differently, things I never would have noticed. Wayne Tollefson‘s enthusiasm about art was catching,

Lot #15

Dan Jones Fargo, North Dakota Still Life with White, 2017 Oil on linen Image 14 x 11 inches framed Range: $650 – $1,000

infectious. He would get so excited talking about art. Jerry Vanderlin was head of the department. He had all the technical information. I wanted to learn how to paint. The obstacles accumulated. Jones didn’t quite see eye to eye with faculty at the University of Minnesota (“a bunch of abstract expressionists from New York”). He worked as a janitor at Fargo South High School, the school he attended, for a time while trying to make ends meet and had a former teacher tell him that he knew Jones would never amount to anything. In order to complete a degree at MSUM, he had to take a class that he had once taught as an adjunct instructor. And after a severe aneurysm five years ago, Jones wasn’t sure if he’d ever paint again. (Kris Kerzman, ARTSpulse, 4/7/2014)

Dan came back and his work is stronger than ever, the paint application looser, the themes more varied. Bravo! 15


Lot #16

Jack Dale St. Paul, Minnesota The Sun in Winter, 2015 Oil on canvas 36 x 48 inches Range: $500 – 800

Jack Dale went to college at the University of Minnesota on a hockey scholarship, played on the 1968 United States Olympic Hockey Team, and three years as a professional before an injury ended his career. The good fortune is that he turned to his art and has been painting ever since. I am an abstract expressionist painter who primarily works with oil on a variety of surfaces—the painting in the Auction may be among the most figurative I have ever made. My process is spontaneous, intuitive, and reactive. My work is the result of this process coupled with a lifetime of experience. Painting, for me, is all about texture, color, composition, line, movement, positive/negative space, etc. All the elements that go into making a painting that “works,” whatever your style might be. It’s not about landmarks, narrative, or recognizable imagery. It’s about creating something that viewers can relate to on an emotional level through their visual experiences. I want the viewers to remember my paintings for the feelings that they evoke rather than for what they might represent. The chaos that I experience while painting is like being in the painting. Being surrounded by paint, brush strokes, 16 scrapings, and layers in an environment that is ever

changing. I have learned to exist calmly within this chaos, which allows me to interact with the painting as it pulls and pushes me along the path to completion. I have always thought that there is a connection with my past life as a hockey player and my present life as an artist. The connection became more real when I embraced the idea of “calmness within chaos.” As a hockey player, one wanted to get to this psychological state as soon as possible during a game. The sooner you reached this state, you stopped worrying about what you wanted to do on the ice, what opposing players had on their agenda. You forgot about the crowd, the possibility of making mistakes, and the significance of the game. You, in effect, removed yourself from these distractions. You were then able to play in a completely spontaneous and reactive way. All your talents were then manifested. Painting is similar for me. Once I envelop myself psychologically in a painting, my abilities all seem to come out naturally.


Lot #17

Marley Kaul Bemidji, Minnesota Out of the Sun, 2016 Egg tempera on panel 15.5 x 27.5 inches framed Range: $2,700 – $3,200

All proceeds from the sale of Out of the Sun go to the Museum of Art, a gift of appreciation from Marley Kaul Marley Kaul: The Auction painting Out of the Sun is based on an actual event that occurred in early morning as I sat in my reading chair at home. A hawk, flying “out of the sun,” attempted to capture hummingbirds and small songbirds. It flew by me with great speed, and I could not record it easily, so I waited each morning for it to revisit. It flew the same route three mornings in a row, each time providing me with information to draw from. Once the drawing was complete, the painting was a challenge to do. The light, textures, and patterns all became vital elements to work with. Predator/prey is a theme that I have studied over the years. I create narratives in my paintings and delight in sharing them. Over the years the North Dakota Museum of Art has included and exhibited my work and I am so grateful for that opportunity. My work can now be found all over the state of North Dakota. To have others enjoy my work is most satisfying and I thank all of you for the privilege. Most of my recent paintings uses the processes of an ancient media called egg tempera, which reached its height in the 14th and 15th centuries. I am a 21st century artist who respects the tradition but I have pushed my own understanding by utilizing more opaque renderings than earlier art. I love the application of color to emphasize my expressions and the brushwork becomes a meditative process for me. My 2015 book Letters to Isabella contains seventy-seven of my tempera paintings and the letters that accompany them. I am currently working on a second book of works on paper. Quoted from Helen Dumont, Midwest Book

Review by Helen Dumont, Midwest Book Showcasing the paintings of Marley Kaul, Letters to Isabella is a fine art book that features seventy-seven vivid color plates on the highest quality archival paper. Each of the tempera paintings is accompanied by a letter written to his granddaughter. The book offers stunning full color reproductions of his paintings and is an intimate look at his artistic process and the unique personal and professional influences reflected in his work. In 2003, Marley learned he would become a grandfather. He thought about his granddaughter to be and wondered if he would still be around years from now to tell her about himself in person, or if she would have to speculate about his life and art after he was gone. He decided that in case he was unable to be there when she grew up, he would compose a letter to her so she could read it later and know a little more about him. As time went on, Marley got to know his granddaughter quite well, but he continued writing her the letters, filling them with his advice, insights and descriptions of his painting techniques. A unique and absolutely fascinating art book, Letters to Isabella presents and showcases a truly impressive body of work and commentary. Very highly recommended for personal, community, and academic library Contemporary Art collections, it should be noted that Letters To Isabella would also aptly serve as an example or template for other artists to similarly present their own life, work and insights to a grateful and appreciative readership. The book was the Total Book Design winner and a finalist in the Memoir category of the 2016 Midwest Book Awards. Book available in NDMOA’s Museum Shop. 17


Lot #18

Lewis Ableidinger Harvey, North Dakota Ice Fishing near Eckelson, North Dakota 2016 Archival inkjet photograph 24 x 30 inches framed Range: $300 – 500

Lewis Ableidinger is from the small town of Kensal (pop. 163), located in the east-central part of North Dakota. Early on he developed an appreciation for the subtleties of a region most people dismiss as “boring.” In 1998, he picked up a camera for the purpose of photographing old elevators. This led to day trips to find ghost towns with old elevators and eventually he started pointing his camera at other subjects. Soon it became a nearly obsessive passion to visit every corner and every town in the state, just to see what’s there. This grew into his current documentary-like focus, “Driving Through Flyover Country,” an area of land that is viewed as boring and just flown over to get to the coasts where more interesting things happen. This project looks at what is in Flyover Country and how it’s not a boring place where nothing exciting happens. There are plenty of facinating things to photograph if you take the time to slow down and look at what’s around you. I prefer to drive to my destinations so that I may make pictures along the way. The title evolved out of that. The project is far from complete but I‘m starting to develop some ideas I like. In my work I am trying to make a statement about a place using what already exists in the landscape but my work is not purely documentary. What I choose to include or exclude from a photograph can change what I‘m saying about a particular place, so though my work is generally ‘straight‘ photography I‘m still including my own personal 18 views in the work. Where I grew up in North Dakota there

were a lot of things rapidly disappearing from the small towns around me and I wanted to make a record of what was there before it was gone. In college I was fortunate enough to take some classes with Wayne Gudmundson, a Fargo photographer who primarily worked in the same plains landscapes I was working in. In addition to his own work he introduced me to Robert Adams and Frank Gohlke and I began to think perhaps my pictures could be more than just a dry history lesson but actually say something. Wayne shifted my course in photography more toward the art side, and since then I have continually worked to educate myself to what other photographers are doing and saying. Lewis Ableidinger graduated from Minnesota State University Moorhead in 2007 with a BS in Graphic Communications and a BAMus in Jazz Performance. Though photography was never his primary focus of study, he continued shooting and was able to take a few classes that helped broaden his photographic horizons. Since 2008, Lewis Ableidinger has had a “day” job as a locomotive engineer that echoes his second photographic focus on the railroad. Since graduation, he has worked as a conductor and later an engineer for Wisconsin and Southern Railroad and Canadian Pacific Railway in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota. Quoted in part from an interview with PhotoArtMag, a contemporary art and photography blog that showcase the work and projects of very talented professional and amateur artists and photographers.


Lot #19

DeborahMae Broad Hawley, Minnesota Without You, 2016 Wood engraving Edition 7 of 15 24 x 18 inches 31.5 x 25.5 inches framed Range: $600 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 900

DeborahMae Broad is one of the top practitioners of wood engraving in the United States, according to Museum Director Laurel Reuter. She makes large-scale wood engravings with screenprinted colors, copper plate etchings, and stone lithographs. This master printmaker retired from teaching from Moorhead State in 2003 to work as a full-time artist. She works in a renovated granary and chicken coop (Prairie Press) on her farmstead in Hawley, Minnesota. She earned her BFA from Virginiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hollins College in Roanoke County, and her MFA in printmaking from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. For Broad, animals serve as stand-ins for human beings and their foibles. This is a device as old as Aesop. The animals are pictured in clear relief against neutral backgrounds. She says, We are meant to examine and interpret their attributes as universal characteristics. She continues, My work started with a love for animals, which has been a constant influence throughout my life. I am grateful to now live among the animals I draw and have the luxury of time to observe them. Some subjects have continued to interest me over the years. Many times my animals do simple things in daily life, which gives me ideas. Every animal is an important individual to me. I believe that they have emotions and abilities beyond our imagination. I like the idea that the animals who live here

on my farmstead with me give me a way to do my work full time and I am able to give them a good home because of my work. Horses: Broadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father Richard Broad was a strong influence throughout her life. He insisted that she take art lessons as a child instead of riding lessons until her art instructor told him to let her learn to ride and spend time around horses since they were all she seemed to draw. At twelve-years of age her father gave her a horse, Joanie, who went to college with DeborahMae. DeborahMae has worked with horses throughout her life. She trained two-year-old thoroughbreds for Rosalie Plantation in Alexandria, Louisiana; worked as an exercise girl at Evangeline Downs in Louisiana and Delaware Park, Delaware; exercised polo ponies in Virginia; reining horses in Pennsylvania; and galloped race horses in Fargo. As a child, her father gave her The Visible Horse toy to satisfy her curiosity about how animals were put together so she would stop bringing home dead animals she found and taking them apart. This taught her to draw animals from the inside out, but it also upset her mother terribly. 19 The Visible Horse was a great gift.


Lot #20

Lot #21

Arduina Palanca Caponigro

Arduina Palanca Caponigro

Cushing, Maine

Cushing, Maine

Tree and Flock, Open edition

Red Dress Jump, Open edition

Pigmented ink on coated archival rag paper

Pigmented ink on coated archival rag paper

12 x 12 inches, 22 x 22 framed

12 x 12 inches, 22 x 22 framed

Range: $1,000 – 1,500

Range: $1,000 – 1,500

Arduina Palanca Caponigro is a first generation American raised by Italians who immigrated to North Dakota. Her appreciation for the arts grew out of a childhood that was spent equally between Europe and the United States. Her father, with a PhD in Latin, was a Professor of Languages at the University of North Dakota from 1960 to 1988. He took study groups to Europe for all twenty-eight years. He emphasized not only the importance of languages, but also of philosophy, mythology, and art. As Arduina’s understanding of the creative process developed, she began to recognize art as a way of life for much needed social connection and personal expression. Arduina helps other artists see their computers and software as simple artistic tools. She shares her craft internationally through private consultation, personal mentoring, and by leading workshops for diverse organizations including The Maine Media Workshops, The Santa Fe Workshops, and Rockport College. She has worked extensively in all areas of fine art photography, graphic design, pre-press, and print, and is most recently 20 excited by fine art bookmaking. Her images evoke a

dreamlike timelessness with no trace of the high-end technology used to create it. Grateful to be living in a family of artists and surrounded by an inspirational creative community, she works alongside her husband John Paul Caponigro, and is currently the CFO for Caponigro Arts in Cushing, Maine. Artist’s Philosophy: Like yoga and meditation, making images is a practice of self-discovery, connection, and acceptance. Photography helps me shine a light on the world around me—and to connect with the world within me.My work begins with an effort to quiet the mind, making it possible to feel and capture the moments of beauty and wonder that break through every day. Our lives are saturated with so many important moments of growth, intimacy, joy, beauty, humility, and courage. They offer insight, and I feel are deserving of more time for contemplation and exploration. By following the feelings, images, and ideas that resonate most deeply, my images have become a visual journal. The interplay of rich colors and velvety shadows are intended to create a timeless quality, and express the magic of our humanity.


Dyan Rey: In this Chinese Vase Series I am referencing the bronze vessels I saw during a visit to China in 2009 with my husband Eliot Glassheim. We joined a group led by the UND China Studies Program. The images were included in Foreign Exchange: American Encounters with China, a book of poetry written by Eliot and published by the North Dakota Museum of Art. The images reflect the shapes of Chinese bronze containers that often reoccur in ceramics. The collages are cut from abstract ink paintings that I had made years earlier. At the time I was influenced by the calligraphic brushwork of Abstract Expressionism, a style that itself was originally influenced by Chinese calligraphy. Just as Eliot took the form of the Tang Dynasty poems and put his Western content into it, I put the painting style of Western Abstract Expressionism into the forms of Asian vessels.

Lot #22

Originally from Grand Forks, Dyan Rey has lived in many other places in the States. She received a BFA from the University of Oregon and an MFA from the University of North Dakota.

Arduina Palanca Caponigro Cushing, Maine Tree and Boat, Open edition Pigmented ink on coated archival rag paper 12 x 12 inches, 22 x 22 framed Range: $1,000 – 1,500

All proceeds from the sale of Arduina Palanca Caponigro’s three photographs go to the North Dakota Museum of Art, a gift from the artist who worked at the Museum as a UND student.

This series of over forty works has been exhibited at the North Dakota Museum of Art, the Northern Art Gallery at Mayville State University, and has toured at other venues through the North Dakota Art Gallery Association. Rey currently teaches at Northland Community and Technical College, East Grand Forks.

Right, Lot #23

Dyan Rey Grand Forks, North Dakota Chinese Vase, 2017 Collage on paper 29.5 x 21.5 inches framed Range: $700 – 800

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Eve Sumsky began as a young girl to learn needlework techniques and to sew. Since 1995, however, she has been making baskets and by 1999 she was selling her baskets.

Lot #24

Catie Miller West Fargo, North Dakota Temptation, 2016 Clay and paint 9.5 x 14 x 5 inches

Sumsky attended the Sievers Fiber Arts School in Wisconsin, and took in-depth workshops whenever she could, including at the National Basketry Organization’s Bi-Annual Conference. She is also a member of the Headwaters Basketmakers Guild. She enjoys exploring different techniques of weaving and uses a variety of materials in her work. The more she weaves and masters the traditional styles and techniques, the easier it becomes for her creativity to take over and make “new” or contemporary baskets using the old ways. When not involved in basket weaving, she taught music to kindergarten through fifth grade students until her retirement in 2013. She continues to play the French horn in the Bemidji Symphony Orchestra.

Range: $200 – 400

Catie Miller’s Cone Series is the product of her celebration of wonderful times, of joy, of filling the table with gorgeous flowers. The cones are left with their unglazed, aged, and weathered surface to contrast with the flowers they might contain and the gay images that dance across the base. As she explains, In connecting surface and form, I balance densely filled graphic areas with simple raw clay surfaces. Similar to a monoprint process, I draw on newsprint with underglaze and paint the designs with colored slips. The slip-covered newsprint is then pressed and transferred to the clay surface. This method results in diverse representation of my drawings, creating a timely, aged, and weathered appearance on the red clay foundation. After the first firing, the drawings are set so the pieces can be sanded and glaze fired to be functional and food safe. After graduating from Minnesota State University Moorhead with a BFA in ceramics and a BS in art education, Miller was chosen for a two-year artist residency at Red Star Studios in Kansas City, Missouri, where she refined her ceramic practice. Her artwork has been exhibited nationally and internationally, and included in publications such as Ceramics Monthly. Since her return to North Dakota, she continues to embrace many opportunities to work within the art community. She currently works as a studio potter from her West Fargo 22 home studio.

Lot #25

Eve Sumsky Tenstrike, Minnesota Nantucket Style (medium canister), c. 2016 Rattan reed, walnut wood 6.75 inches high x 6.5 inches in diameter Range: $200 – 400


Lot #26

Marlon Davidson & Don Knudson Bemidji, Minnesota Polycitrome Pipes, 2017 Acrylic and uretatin on wood 42 x 56 x 2.5 inches Range: $800 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 900

Marlon Davidson & Don Knudson are collaborative artists who have lived in the Bemidji area for three decades. They have individual art careers but have been producing collaborative work for about thirty years. Their art is in private and public venues and they are represented in collections across the United States and Europe. Their collaborative wall work, Great Wave, hangs in the commons area of the University of Denmark. Both artists were educated at Bemidji State College (now Bemidji State University), and at the Minneapolis School of Art (Minneapolis College of Art and Design). Marlon has had a long history in the area of art education, as a teacher in the public schools of West St. Paul and later as a fixed-term instructor at Bemidji State University. Don worked for some years as a display artist for the Emporium Department Store in St. Paul. He is also a furniture maker and sculptor who makes assembled works for the wall as well as standing objects. The artists once owned and operated a bed and breakfast, Meadowgrove, in the Bemidji area but they now devote full time to art production. They are life partners who have lived together for fifty-seven years.

The artists feel that their primary inspiration derives from nature. They attempt to combine natural elements with contemporary design concepts. They both are perpetual students of art history. They read and listen, they travel and they look at art. Marlon says, We are a collection of influences from our mentors, from other artists, and from the wide world of fine arts. The artist must absorb and then select, finding a voice that speaks for him or her, hoping to achieve some universal truth in seeking perfection throughout a lifetime. According to the artists, We are especially grateful to the North Dakota Museum of Art, to the director, and to the community which offer us an opportunity to have our work seen. We have gained new friends, and have been thrilled by the warm reception our collaborations have received among area people.

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Lot #27

Amanda Heidt Fargo, North Dakota Still, 2010 Lithograph on Kitakata paper Edition 2 of 10 22 x 16 inches Range: $300 – 400

Amanda Heidt: I have so often dreamed of you,

According to Heidt, while taking a month-long crash

walked, spoken, slept with your phantom that perhaps I

course in lithography, this image marks the first of many

can be nothing any longer than a phantom among

created while experimenting in the fine art of lithography.

phantoms and a hundred times more shadow than the

The whole idea behind lithography is water repelling

shadow which walks and will walk joyously over the

grease. In this figure you will find the beginning of

sundial of your life.

exploration of various grease contents that can be etched

—Robert Desnos, I Have So Often Dreamed of You So powerful is memory that it connects us to the things we care about, even across time. Using form, color, and photography as a vehicle for expression in printmaking, I find harmony between naturally occurring shapes and replications of sacred spaces that are found in my own mythology, muses the artist.

into a lithographic limestone to create an edition. Amanda Heidt graduated from Minnesota State University Moorhead in 2013 with a BFA emphasis in printmaking. A native of Bismarck, she resides in Fargo. In the past seven years, Heidt has taken on various internships in printmaking, including at Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop in New York City. Currently she is the manager of Hannaher’s Inc. Print Studio inside Fargo’s Plains Art

It is a fact that myths work upon us, whether consciously

Museum. While managing the Print Studio, Heidt also

or unconsciously, as energy–releasing, life–motivating, and

holds a residency at North Dakota State University

life directing agents. —Joseph Campbell

through PEARS: Printmaking Education and Research Studio working through a book project under master

24

printer Kent Kapplinger.


Lot #28

Guillermo Guardia (Memo): Princess Ocllo is the Quechua name for the first female that the Inca’s god Wiracocha created. Legend says Wiracocha created the first two human beings, female and male: Mama Ocllo and Manco Capac. They emerged from the Titicaca Lake with the mission to found the Inca Empire’s capital city of Cuzco. Princess Ocllo continues the series of Baby Devils, which I originally started as a reaction to the war in Iraq. They began as a duality idea: good and evil. Babies are pure, no sins yet, but mine have those little horns on their heads that make them devilish. The early baby devils were painted wearing military camouflage. The series evolved and became more intricate, especially with the use of surface designs. Now they are covered with Mochica designs. Mochica is a Peruvian Pre-Columbian culture that flourished in Northern Peru from about 100-900 AD. Princess Ocllo is also holding two samurai swords. In the early twentieth century a large number of Japanese citizens migrated to Peru. So today Peru is home to one of the biggest Japanese descent communities outside Japan. One of those Japanese immigrants was my maternal

Guillermo Guardia St. Paul, Minnesota Princess Ocllo, 2016 Painted stoneware 24 x 14 x 12 inches Range: $2,500 – 3,500

grandfather. He came to Peru when he was about five years old. Princess Ocllo exposes my two cultural heritages; the Peruvian side with the Mochica designs and the Japanese side with the two samurai swords. Guillermo Guardia is originally from Lima, Peru. Guardia obtained an MFA in Ceramics and an MS in Industrial Technology from the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks. He worked at the North Dakota Museum of Art as artist in residence until 2015, when he resigned to become a full time studio artist. His sculptures deal with personal, social, and political ideas and have been in exhibits around the country. Currently Guardia lives and works in Saint Paul, 25 Minnesota.


All proceeds from the sale of Jackson and Queen go to the Museum of Art, a gift of appreciation from Tim Schouten

Lot #29

Tim Schouten Winnipeg, Manitoba Jackson and Queen, 2016 Oil, pigment, beeswax, microcrystalline wax, dammar resin on birch panel 48 x 36 inches Range: $800 – 1,200

Tim Schouten‘s painting is from a series titled Horse Songs, created for the exhibition Songs for Spirit Lake II at the North Dakota Museum of Art, the culmination of a three-year collaborative project with six international artists sponsored by the Museum and Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Fort Totten. Jackson Dion lives in Fort Totten on Spirit Lake Dakota Nation, 100 miles west of Grand Forks in North Dakota. Queen was Jackson‘s late grandfather Hubert Thomas‘ horse. Schouten met Jackson on a Memorial Horse Ride at Spirit Lake in 2013 that had been organized by Darla Thiele, Director of the Sunka Wakan Ah Ku Program. It was a diversionary project within the Spirit Lake Juvenile Court system designed to reduce juvenile delinquency and the likelihood of repeat offenders through caring for horses. The painting is based on a photograph Schouten took on that ride. In Tim Schouten‘s North Dakota landscapes, the ground is anything but solid. Made with gestural swipes of encaustic (a mixture of molten beeswax, resins, oils, and pigments), Schouten’s paintings are emphatically “physical,” even as 26 the scenes he depicts seem ready to dissolve in front of us.

Their surfaces churn with layered encrustations of highly textured, richly hued wax, giving equal weight and substance to land and sky. Meanwhile, ghostly telephone poles and rough outlines of buildings hover like mirages in the narrow space between. Though the views themselves are calm, the Winnipeg artist’s frenzied handling suggests an underlying turbulence, something the clean boundaries of the picture plane and the stark prairie horizon can‘t quite contain. Despite their pastoral beauty and seductive surfaces, many of the paintings seem on the brink of rupture, as if threatening to cast up buried trauma. Given the land in question, it seems possible. Schouten invites us to admire the landscape of Spirit Lake, but he asks us to consider from what vantage point we do so — and at what cost. Schouten is a Canadian artist, curator, writer, and educator based in Winnipeg, Manitoba. From 1978–1980, he studied at Art‘s Sake Inc. in Toronto. He has exhibited his work across Canada and in the United States, and his paintings reside in private and public art collections including the those of the Winnipeg Art Gallery, North Dakota Museum of Art, and Cankdeska Cikana Community College in Fort Totten on the Spirit Lake Dakota Nation.


Lot #30

Christopher Benson Santa Fe, New Mexico Broadside: Standing Rock, Coming of the Black Snake, 2017 Archival color ink print made on an Epson printer reproducing the image of Christopher Benson’s painting. Letterpress text of a Sitting Bull quote designed and printed by Peter Kock Printers of Berkeley, California. Edition 75 28 x 18.75 inches Range: $400 – 600

Christopher Benson & Peter Koch created this broadside to be sold to benefit the legal defense fund of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in their protest of the Dakota Access Pipeline project. Christopher Benson’s large painting, Standing Rock, Coming of the Black Snake (54.125 x 64.25 inches) is reproduced on the broadside. The artist, seeking no personal gain from the painting, has given it to the North Dakota Museum of Art. Christopher Benson: I was born in Rhode Island and grew up in Newport till I went to school in Vermont as a teenager to study painting and later to RISD where I did the same. I moved to the west (to Santa Fe) in 1988 at age twenty-eight. I also lived and exhibited for many years in the San Francisco Bay Area, in Berkeley. I’ve been painting for over forty years and have work in private collections all over the US, including at several museums and universities. My limited edition Fisher Press books are also in many top special collections libraries. I studied photographic book printing with my late uncle, the photographer Richard Benson, and book design with Eleanor Caponigro [a book designer who is currently collaborating with Museum Director Laurel Reuter on a book about photographer Lynne Geesaman]. Like Mr. Koch, I too am having a mid-career retrospective this year of my oil paintings which will take place in October 2017 at the Newport Art Museum in my home town of Newport, Rhode Island. According to Christopher Benson, his collaborator Peter Kock is a bit of an institution in the Bay Area. He originally came from Montana and does many western state themed book and print projects, often with a bit of a raw political edge. He and his wife, the paper conservator Susan Filter, are two of the founding board members of the CODEX Foundation, which hosts a big biennial rare book fair in

Richmond, California. Just this summer, Stanford hosted a forty-year retrospective of Peter’s print work. The text is Sitting Bull’s 1877 famous speech given at the purely Indian Powder River Council. Behold, my brothers, the spring has come; the earth has received the embraces of the sun and we shall soon see the results of that love! Every seed has awakened and so has all animal life. It is through this mysterious power that we too have our being and we therefore yield to our neighbors, even our animal neighbors, the same right as ourselves, to inhabit this land. Yet hear me, my people, we have now to deal with another race—small and feeble when our fathers first met them, but now great and overbearing. Strangely enough they have a mind to till the soil and the love of possessions is a disease with them. . . They claim this mother of ours, the earth, for their own, and fence their neighbors away; they deface her with their buildings and their refuse. They threaten to take [the land] away from us. My brothers, shall we submit, or shall we say to them: “First kill me before you take possession of my 27 Fatherland.”


Adam Kemp’s painting is sponsored by Rhombus Guys

Lot #31

Adam Kemp Grand Forks, North Dakota Lincoln Park, 2017 Acrylic on canvas 72 x 52 inches Range: $2,000 – 2,400

Adam Kemp’s paintings are highly biographical. He paints the landscape because he is out-of-doors much of the time and often in Lincoln Park. He also paints buildings and bridges in Grand Forks because that is where he lives. Some years he paints swimmers because he and Hanna swim all summer long. Hanna is the little girl he latched onto when she was tiny and in need of him. He says, I find myself reaching out as well as reaching in. You don’t want to be a total clown but I can still enjoy wearing clown’s shoes. I primarily paint straight from the tube rather than mixing paint. Or I will mix on the canvas. It is a fair criticism to say I could be a more accomplished painter if I went back to mixing paint on the pallet. I like the elasticity and urgency of painting direct from the tube with acrylic paint. If I make a mistake, I can paint over it in fifteen minutes. I 28 like painting fast and painting messy.

According to Museum Director Laurel Reuter, When kids enroll in Adam’s workshops they are covered in paint the first day, just as Adam is when he paints. Adam exudes joy and heightened energy both when and in his paintings. Simply put, he is a natural painter with rigorous European schooling under his belt. He is also Grand Fork’s unofficial painter-in-residence: teaching workshops and passersby, working with special needs kids, talking about their art with younger artists, giving paintings away, fighting with the powers that be whenever he finds too many rules and regulations for his version of a proper life, selling a painting whenever he can, and turning friends and strangers into collectors. Our region is blessed to have such a force living among us. Kemp was born in Ugley, Essex, England. In 1986, he received a BFA from Newcastle-upon-Tyne where his studies were based in the intense study of technique and


Adam Kemp continued art history. He came to Grand Forks to cast the sculpture located on the southwest corner of University Park, having studied bronze casting in Italy. He stayed to earn his MFA from the University of North Dakota in 1989. Adam continues to actively work within the regional arts community, generously showing his work on the streets and in local galleries. His workshops with teens and children are in great demand throughout the region, including the weeklong sessions through the Museum’s Summer Art Camps. He is particularly praised for his work with troubled and disabled youngsters. He often says, I still look at the landscape around here as a pleasantly surprised outsider.

Lot #32

Zhimin Guan Fargo, North Dakota Waterlilies, 2013

Zhimin Guan strives in his paintings to have an equal balance of traditional and experimental, as well as figurative and abstract in his art. In the past twenty-years, he has created six series of paintings which include: Fossil Series (1995-2000), Landscape Series (1999-2002), American Dreamers Series (2002-2006), Abstract Series (2006-2007), Landscape on Metal Painting Series (20072012), and the Summit Series (2012-2014). The Summit Series is a body of abstract paintings portraying mountains and water, subjects that visualize the opposite roles of Yin and Yang, solid and void, energy and charm. Guan made these paintings with large gestural marks, creating harmonious landscapes through form, color, and shape. His process also allows for chance happenings as his runny painting materials and gesture marks transform each other into a spiritually and physically integrated autonomy. He continues to explore his new subject matters, inspirations, and expressive painting methods in his abstract and realistic work. Waterlilies continues in the abstract Summit Series. Born in Anhui, China, Guan received a BFA in painting in China 1984. He earned his MFA in painting and drawing from Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kansas, in 1998. Since graduating, he has been a professor of art at Minnesota State University Moorhead. Over the past eighteen years, Guan has presented twenty solo exhibitions and appeared in more than 200 selective

Watercolor on paper 42 x 62 inches Range: $1,200 – 1,500

professional exhibitions. He received twenty-five art awards throughout the United States and abroad. In 2010, Guan received a McKnight Fellowship from the Lake Region Art Council, Fergus Falls, Minnesota, with funding from the McKnight Foundation in Minneapolis. Guan participated the 2012 Contemporary Chinese Art Invitational residency and exhibition at the Blue Roof Gallery in Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China. He also was awarded The Art Partnership’s Individual Artist Grant in Fargo in 2015. Guan has exhibited his art throughout the United States and China in museums and galleries including the China National Art Gallery in Beijing; China Academy of Fine Arts Museum in Hangzhou; Singapore Asian Artist Gallery; The Salmagundi Club and the Asian Cultural Center in New York City; CCC/USA, Philadelphia; The Minneapolis Institute of Arts; Museum Services, Minneapolis; the Minneapolis Foundation; The Fraser Gallery in Washington DC; Murphy Hill Gallery in Chicago; and the Museum of the Southwest in Texas, among others. 29


Lot #33

Kelli Nelson Minneapolis, Minnesota

Virga, 2017 Oil on canvas 28 x 22 inches Range: $1,200 – 1,400

Kelli Nelson is a Minneapolis-based painter and educator. Her work rests precariously between reality and imagination, evoking familiar, yet enigmatic images of plant life, horizons, and figurative forms. The paintings are made from memory and invention, resulting in a spectrum of abstraction and fragmented realism. Over the last two summers, Nelson has spent time as artistin-residence at NDMOA’s McCanna House. The two works in the Auction are among those she created during her last stay. The paintings were influenced by the transformative beauty of the rural North Dakota landscape, biking with her twelve-year-old son through the wooded valley of Turtle River State Park, time spent in solitude on the McCanna grounds, and endlessly engulfed in the vast library of Marjorie McCanna. 30 She considers these paintings meditations on the grace and

beauty of form. Yet, there exist elements which cause disruption, alluding to the uncertainty and uncontrollable power present in nature. Salient themes of serenity and turbulence are evoked in the painting Virga, which refers to a shaft of rain that evaporates before it reaches the ground. Thin veils of paint create atmospheric qualities where light is permitted to bounce through the layers. The subtle transitions of color suggest slowness and rest, while other dense paint strokes float on the surface creating tension and a jarring effect. Found in her favorite book at the McCanna house, Shepardess was a response to the Rococo painting Lady Mary Leslie created by Joshua Reynolds in 1764. Drawn to the idyllic pastoral scene, she felt an existential kinship to the portrait of the lone woman in the peaceful countryside. The pale pinks, soft peaches, and subtle grey shadows on the figure mirror the tranquil sky, while the crimson-tinged dark hair mimics the background trees, provoking feelings of harmony and unity between humans and nature. Nelson, a Grand Forks native, earned her BFA in Visual Art with a minor in Art History from the University of North Dakota. She received her MFA in Visual Studies with a concentration in Painting and Drawing from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. Nelson’s work is in the University of North Dakota’s Permanent Collection, numerous private collections, and has been exhibited at the State Capitol Building in Bismarck. Currently, she teaches drawing at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design and painting at the College of Saint Benedict.


Left, Lot #34

Kelli Nelson Minneapolis, Minnesota Shepardess (after Joshua Reynolds, Lady Mary Leslie, 1764), 2017 Oil on linen 16 x 12 inches Range: $700 – 800

Kelli Nelson’s paintings are sponsored by Hugo’s

Lot #35

Kelli Sinner Moorhead, Minnesota Cloud Vase, 2013 Stoneware 9 x 8 x 4 inches Range: $150 – 250

Kelli Sinner’s vases included in the Auction are part of a series called Clouds and Consequences, inspired by a year spent traveling. The artist believes that choosing to be an artist is a political act. Every piece that I make is a manifestation of the experience of growing up a woman in a world where I have to work twice as hard as my male peers. This experience has instilled in me a desire to promote justice and equality for everyone, regardless of race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, etc. I am an educated, white woman, and that has afforded me privilege. With that privilege comes a duty to use my voice. I believe in equality, education, and civility. I believe we need to make choices based on how our actions impact a global community. I believe we need to take care of our planet, because there are too many warning signs to ignore. I believe there is power in thoughtfulness, labor and skill. I

Lot #36

Kelli Sinner Moorhead, Minnesota Cloud Vase with Purple Handles, 2013 Stoneware 11 x 9 x 6 inches Range: $150 – 250

make artwork that has a strong historical connection because I believe we need to learn from the past in order to create a quality of life for everyone that is guided by integrity and respect. The pieces are made of stoneware clay, thrown on the potter’s wheel. The glazes are hand painted and fired to Cone 6. Originally from Utah, Kelli obtained her MFA in Ceramics from Penn State University and her BFA in Ceramics from Utah State University. Before moving to Minnesota, Kelli worked in New York City where she taught ceramics at Marymount College Manhattan, the 92nd Street Y, and the Educational Alliance. Kelli has completed artist residencies at the Zentrum fur Keramik in Berlin, Germany, and at Penland School of Craft in Penland, North Carolina. Sinner is a Professor of Art at Minnesota State University Moorhead where she teaches ceramics, papermaking, and foundation design. In 2015, she received MSUM’s Excellence in Teaching Award. 31


to depict humorous life forms, unique functional furniture, art structures, and decorating accoutrements. During frequent kayaking trips on Lake Superior I collect the windand-wave softened stones and turn them into sculpture at my Puposky studio. I thrust the stones into cages of steel, formed and tightened under enormous pressure. Then I weld them into sculpture. The finished piece is sand blasted to even the surfaces and sealed with two coats of lacquer to accentuate the stone’s beauty and protect the steel from rust. Lot #37

Albert Belleveau Puposky, Minnesota Red Rock Turtle, 2017 Stone and steel 5 x 10 x 14 inches Range: $200 – 400

Albert Belleveau: We make art to see more clearly. Born in Minneapolis in 1959, I moved to my grandparents’ farm in 1970 and continue to roam the hills and valleys of Maple Ridge Township. I live in a log house surrounded by the fullness of nature that inspires many of my works. I have primarily created with metals in my mature years, but before I had the technology to weld I would collect sticks and stones and steel and glue them together to create my little sculptures—I did this primarily between the ages of seven to sixteen. After joining the work force as a welder at seventeen, I often spent my coffee and lunch breaks at my various places of employment welding sculptures, having always been haunted by the shapes and possibilities of cast off materials.

I have been using this process for ten years, but only recently have come to understand its significance. The stone—as recognized by the indigenous peoples—is Grandfather or Spirit and the steel is temporary flesh. Thus through this parallel of steel wrapped stone and flesh wrapped spirit, I am coming to better understand myself and others and how we are related.

Alexander Hettich was born in Tajikistan, the southernmost republic in the former Soviet Union. He grew up in a valley surrounded by the Soviet Union’s tallest mountains. In 1993, a civil war forced him to flee to a small collective farm in Belarus where the climate and scenery were quite different from what he was used to. During long Belarusian winters—cold like those here in North Dakota—as he struggled to settle into a new place, he started taking painting lessons from a local artist. He fell in love with the process of creating art, from stretching a canvas to the final steps of framing a painting. His works are images of nature—the beauty he has learned to see in the many landscapes where he has lived.

In the last few years I have begun to re-explore the materials of my youth and compose them in more mature themes. What I’m really feeling with my stick and stone and steel sculptures is the merging of the human spirit with the organic materials of our creation. The human form, shaped of the stuff we often overlook, leads us to the excitement of “seeing the new in the familiar” and all art is simply “SEEING” better.

After several years of looking for a new homeland and unable to return to Tajikistan, Alexander settled in Grand Forks where he lives with his wife and three children. He works in information services at Altru Health System. His wife, Bella, is Director of the ESL Language Centers (English as a Second Language). Importantly, he continues to paint.

My Rock Iron Art is the synthesis of a life-long love affair that I have had with two of northern Minnesota’s most 32 plentiful resources. I use rocks and metal in sculptural form

The Grand Forks community is fortunate to have artists such as Hettich living here. Rather than academic formalism, his truthful honesty is dominated by warm emotions when painting the natural world.


Above, Lot #38

Alexander Hettich Grand Forks, North Dakota Long Horns, 2017 Oil on canvas 24 x 36 inches Range: $500 – 700

Alexander Hettich’s paintings are sponsored by C&M Ford

Right, Lot #39

Alexander Hettich Grand Forks, North Dakota Trees, Trees, 2017 Oil on canvas 36 x 24 inches Range: $500 – 700

All proceeds from the sale of Long Horns goes to the Museum of Art—as is Alexander Hettich’s generous habit.

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Lot #40

Jessica Matson-Fluto West Fargo, North Dakota Disperse, 2015 White charcoal on paper 18 x 29 inches framed Range: $400 – 500

Jessica Matson-Fluto: The term ‘passage’ reflects the process of moving through, under, over, or past something on the way from one place to another. Through this particular body of work, incorporating drawings and prints, artist Jessica Matson-Fluto expresses her recent passages—the continuance of self-discovery as a female artist and more recently as a mother. The artist has long explored themes related to the female form, whether working in detail or in abstraction. In this series, the females are both subject and voyeur. Their obscured faces, body language, and positioning within the picture frame leave us wondering just who is looking at whom. Masking these female forms in abstraction, and the lack of detail signifies a state of isolation from others as well as from one’s own physical persona. Repetition of, or a new physical relationship between, individual figures creates a sense of disconnection from one another, amplifying the sense of isolation. Matson-Fluto has presented the viewer with a series of works that are not easily categorized. The images are both haunted and haunting. 34 Born in Spokane, Washington in 1980, Jessica Matson-

Fluto studied painting at Minnesota State University Moorhead, earning her BA in 2006. In 2008, she received her MFA from the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts where she studied with Bruce Samuelson, Dan Miller, William Scott Noel, Sydney Goodman, and Vincent Desiderio, among others. The artist continues her artistic education by enrolling nationally in workshops and master classes. Active in the Fargo-Moorhead Metro arts community, Matson-Fluto teaches as an adjunct professor at her alma mater, Minnesota State University Moorhead. She has exhibited her paintings, drawings, and prints in group and solo exhibitions nationally. Her work can be found in public and private collections throughout the Midwest. She is currently employed as an adjunct professor at Minnesota State University Moorhead. She resides in West Fargo with her husband and twin sons.

Note: White charcoal on white paper results in the palest of drawings, but ones that are mysteriously beautiful. —Laurel Reuter


Lot #41

Eleanor McGough Minneapolis, Minnesota Billowing, 2013 Acrylic on panel 30 x 40 inches Range: $550 – 650

All proceeds from the sale of Eleanor McGough’s Billowing are a gift from the artist to the Museum of Art.

Eleanor McGough: My paintings and paper cut-out installations explore insect migrations, climate change, and vanishing habitats. Commingling information from biology, textile patterns, and maps, the paintings combine layers of atmospheric depth with flat pattern. The result is often a blending of landscape, microscopic slide, and aerial view. The paper cut-out installations explore the concept of multiples in endless variation, and the role of collections in natural history. Some of these paper installations include air movement from fans to facilitate a subtle fluttering motion, and are inspired by the astonishing fact that billions of insects are swept up and carried in air currents through the layers of our atmosphere. I am drawn to insects for their elegant engineering, metamorphosis, crucial role in pollination, and their alienlike otherness that both captivates and repels us. I am fascinated with the idea that insects are messengers whoconvey information about the health of our environment or imbalances in our ecosystem. What is your creative process like?

Originally from Washington State, McGough has lived in the Twin Cities for over two decades. She began to paint in high school. She studied at the Brighton Polytechnic in England during the 1980s before earning her BFA in painting from the Kansas City Art Institute in 1990. She shows with the Veronique Wantz Gallery and the Rosalux Gallery, both in Minneapolis. When asked by Veronique Wantz who is, or has been, the biggest influence on her art, she replied, I would have to choose my father for the creative environment he designed for our family. He was an architect who created a one-ofa-kind Pacific Northwest ‘mid-century modern’ house that was built on the perfect site for a kid like me. It was surrounded by two-plus acres of volcanic rock outcroppings, natural areas, woods, and unique gardens. I spent my days outside from dawn to dusk collecting bugs and building things with rocks. Inside the house, my parents had a great art collection, and they surrounded us with so much culture—a book and record collection to die for, and both of my parents loved collecting things from the outdoors like rocks, and dried plants. To this day, I feel 35 that so much of my visual language was formed there.


to capture memorable, striking, or simply beautiful qualities can present themselves at any time. My emotions and thoughts are in response to the qualities I am looking at. When I love what I am seeing, I select it for display. I believe it’s even more essential to seek out the unusual, as it is in making sense of the display that the qualities make themselves known as “art.” As landscape photographer Chuck Kimmerle says, “there is no eye in cliche.”

Lot #42

Paul Gronhovd Grand Forks, North Dakota Caprock, 2016 Archival inkjet print 10.5 x 16.5 inches, 19 x 25 inches framed Range: $300 – 500

I have great respect for the photography of old. It was already perfect. I don’t think of black and white photography as “lacking.” Instead, I appreciate its abstractness and malleability. Artists that stand out for me include Edward Weston for what it means to live an artistic life, Henri Matisse for how to be bold and live with courage, and Jacques Henri Lartigue for how to have a personal approach. Of primary influence is former North Dakota news photographer Chuck Kimmerle, a practitioner who truly exemplifies the art of photography.

Paul Gronhovd was born and raised in Grand Forks,

North Dakota. He writes, I first gained exposure to photography from my father, an avid photography enthusiast and history buff. My relationship to art began in my late twenties when, seeking a better path through life, I returned to college. I received a BFA in printmaking from Moorhead State University. For the next thirty years, I worked for the University of North Dakota (UND) Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as a graphic artist and photographer. While at the EERC, I returned to school part-time and received an MFA in printmaking from UND. After retiring in 2012, I pursued a more personal style of expression: primarily black and white landscape photography. After a 2013 trip to Death Valley National Park, I displayed prints at Archives Coffee House on the campus of UND. This was a great experience. It was so rewarding to communicate ideas and feeling to viewers. In retirement, I operate a small farm and make bicycle journeys whenever I can. The small 100-acre farm that I own with my brother was an inheritance from our folks. The farm is near Lankin in a wooded area near the North branch of the Forest River. It is a pretty spot and is near where our mother grew up. I raise soybeans and wheat mostly and a little bit of hay. 36

These outdoor activities influence my photography and worldview. While I’m not an artist full-time, opportunities

Rena Effendi: Chernobyl: Still Life in the Zone is a series by Rena Effendi, a Baku, Azerbaijani photographer who grew up in the USSR. She documents everyday lives of the very few people still living in Chernobyl, Ukraine. April 26, 1986, the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant’s Reactor #4 blew up after a routine test. The resulting fire went on for ten days, spewing 400 times as much radiation as the bomb dropped on Hiroshima. The surrounding area was declared uninhabitable by the USSR’s government and 116,000 local residents were resettled. In the following months over 1,000 locals decided to return to Chernobyl, regardless of the risk and official prohibition. The women lived through Stalin’s Holodomor—the genocide-by-famine of the 1930s that wiped out millions of Ukrainians—and then the Nazis in the 1940s. When the Chernobyl accident happened a few decades into Soviet rule, many were simply unwilling to flee an enemy that was invisible. Almost thirty years after the Chernobyl disaster, access to the Zone of Alienation is still restricted, with police checkpoints and barbed wire. In spite of this, about 200 people still live in the ghost villages and settlements inside the Zone. Now, mostly elderly women in their seventies and eighties and living alone, they cultivate the toxic wastelands of Chernobyl, growing vegetables, maintaining


Birch tree growing on the second floor of a gym in the abandoned city of Pripyat in Chernobyl, Ukraine. As a result of the nuclear accident and the subsequent fallout the entire population of Pripyat had been evacuated and never returned home.

Veggies. Galina Konyushok butchered a chicken to cook a broth. The food chain has been contaminated with radiation, especially animals that consume local food, such as grain and vegetation from the zone. Zirka village, Chernobyl, Ukraine.

Lot #43

Rena Effendi Istanbul, Turkey Chernobyl: Still Life in the Zone Tree in Room, December 2010

Lot #44

Rena Effendi’s photographs are sponsored by Altru

31.5 x 31.5 inches framed Range: $1,500 – 3,500

small orchards, breeding animals, and collecting mushrooms and berries in the radioactive forest. Their everyday lives seem ‘normal’, if it weren’t for the fact that the soil, air, and water in the Zone are among the most heavily contaminated on earth. Differently from at least a dozen of photographers documenting Chernobyl, Rena Effendi decided to seek out ‘life in the zone’ rather than produce an eerie memento mori. She documented the harsh and lonely lives of Chernobyl babushkas, creating empowering portraits and painterly still lifes of simple, household objects. It’s one of those projects, where the visuals, narrative, and uncommon approach to the subject mean the images remain in your memory for longer—or at least should. Effendi was finalist for the Prix Pictet Prize, which aims to harness the power of photography—all genres of

Rena Effendi Istanbul, Turkey Chernobyl: Still Life in the Zone Veggies, December 2010 31.5 x 31.5 inches framed Range: $1,500 – 3,500

photography—to draw global attention to issues of sustainability, especially those concerning the environment. Prix Pictet has become the world’s leading award for photography and sustainability. Rena Effendi was one of twelve finalists in the 2011 competition and her photos were included in the worldwide touring exhibition with a global audience of 400 million. Following the tour, Rena Effendi had her work shipped to the United States to be given to the North Dakota Museum of Art. There were two duplicates among the seven and she suggested including them in the Museum’s Art Auction. Fifty percent of the sale price goes to the artist. Rena Effendi has been commissioned twice by NDMOA to come to North Dakota’s Spirit Lake to photograph life as it currently unfolds on the Reservation. 37


Lot #45

Chris Walla Moorhead, Minnesota Passing, 2014 Wood, Plexiglas, ball chain, chandelier crystals 72 x 24 inches wide and 10 inches deep $900 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1,300

Chris Walla spent much of his young life on the West Coast. He was born in Los Angeles and later moved with his family to the Northwest. The compulsion to make objects and images was present from a very young age. Walla graduated from Western Washington University with his BFA in sculpture in 1997. After graduation, he maintained a studio and lived in Bellingham, Washington until 2000, when he moved to Madison to attend the University of Wisconsin. After completing his MFA in sculpture in 2003, he accepted a position at Minnesota State University Moorhead where he currently works as Professor of Sculpture. In 2006, he was selected as a McKnight Fellow and has had numerous exhibitions including an installation titled Wait & See at the Fargo Plains Art Museum. Past exhibitions include Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Piss On Me and Tell Me Its Raining at Apex Art, New York; and a solo installation at Fraction Workspace in Chicago. He participated in exhibitions such as InWords at the University Gallery in Newark, Delaware, and in a threeperson exhibition, Discourse and Decadence at Studio Aiello in Denver, Colorado.

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Mélanie Rocan’s painting is sponsored by All Seasons

Lot #46

Mélanie Rocan Arnes, Manitoba Cat Walk, 2009 Oil on canvas 48 x 48 inches Range: $3,000 – 5,000

Mélanie Rocan: In Cat Walk discarded materials become fashion for women who walk toward the viewer. They are adorned with objects or fragments which reveal their inner and outer state. The painting explores external and personal sources and the dichotomy between symbols of the self and symbols of the environment. My recent paintings speak of the fragility of human beings and the reality of the subconscious state. I want to capture a distressed beauty, to suggests inner emotional conditions. Rocan is a Franco-Manitoban artist based in Armes, Manitoba, which is north of Winnipeg and the Icelandic community of Gimli. She has a BFA from the University of Manitoba (2003) and an MFA from the University of Concordia in Montreal (2008) during which time she participated in an exchange program at the Glasgow School of Art in Scotland. She is a three-time semifinalist for the RBC (Royal Bank of Canada) Painting Competition, including Cat Walk in 2010. For the RBC Canadian Painting Competition, 600 submissions come in every year and from that the jury selects just fifteen finalists, Cat Walk among them.

The visual world Mélanie Rocan creates with her paintings is a blended swirl of emotions and objects. Her arthistorical genealogy traverses many eras, from Surrealism to Expressionism, but perhaps she owes her greatest impulse to the Symbolist outgrowth of Romanticism. Enthralled by the inner material of the self, the Romantics preferred to view emotions as an implicitly valid approach to the world, and not secondary to analytic thought. Rocan’s imagery floats in the realm of the subconscious, with her dream-like, dream-dwelling subjects melding with environments both natural and cultural. The sense of nostalgia evoked by Rocan’s painted images—Ferris wheels, gingham tablecloths, tire swings, floral wallpaper—speaks to memory and timelessness. These images are more about fleeting recollections than about the objects that define one’s social status. Rocan has exhibited at the Power Plant in Toronto, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Montreal, the Contemporary Art Gallery in Vancouver, the Winnipeg Art Gallery, and the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art in Toronto. Rocan has also exhibited in venues in Glasgow, Scotland; France; and the United States, and many others. 39


Right, Lot #48

Milena Marinov Fargo, North Dakota Eve’s Offering, 2017 Oil on panel 9.5 x 7.5 inches, 19.5 x 17.5 framed Range: $300 – 500

Far right, Lot #49

Milena Marinov Fargo, North Dakota African Roots: Shimmering Savannah 1, 2017 Ink on paper 10.5 x 13 inches, 17.5 x 21.5 framed Range: $300 – 500

Lot #47

Gretchen Kottke Cooperstown, North Dakota The Gleaners, 2017 Oil on canvas 30 x 30 inches Range: $400 – 800

Gretchen Kottke: I have done many things in my life, but art has always been a part of it either as an artist or lover. There’s a part of me that has always admired the abstract and has always wanted to paint really big abstract pieces. Sadly, the abstract has eluded me. . . . There’s always a figure that speaks louder. The figures, even if abstracted, help me relate to my sensibilities. Even though I do most times, I am hesitant to title my work, as I do not want to interfere with the message a viewer may receive. For me this is important. I love the stories people tell of what is happening in a piece. . . when they don’t have a title. It forces them to look and to think. In The Gleaners, two simply dressed women search in the bitter cold for wood for warmth and their very survival. The little sticks are all that is left after poor stewardship that 40 has come to the place we call Earth.

Gretchen Kottke’s painting is sponsored by Minnesota Public Radio

Gretchen was born in Bemidji, Minnesota during World II, raised in Cooperstown, and graduated from high school in three years so she could fly away to study art. The flight took her to Jamestown College and the University of North Dakota, Blair College of Medical Assistants and The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. Upon her return to North Dakota, she opened the GK Gallery that hosted eighty-four exhibits and sponsored two public art pieces, The Prairie Garden and Prairie Compass. She has shown her work in various cities and galleries since the mid-sixties and has works of art in private collections.


Milena Marinov: Art is complicated. It is not only about drawing or painting, but putting the soul into the artworks. In a variety of art forms, the maker can fix it until it satisfies them. Rarely, with ink drawings, can you go back to fix your piece. Marinov called the form a very unforgiving medium. You cannot erase it and it takes a lot of time and patience. But I love the purity of it—like black and white photography—it is not chatty! Marinov selected ink as her medium for recent works because she used to study ink drawings when she was a student. For some reason, she had forgotten about this art form but one of her friends recently sent her an article about calligraphy—also using ink—and it reminded her. Marinov believes, You need to have something to tell and you need to find a way to express your visions and ideas through your art in a way that excites and engages others. At its best, it is a dialogue between artist and viewer. No special events brought me to art—it is just me. Everyone tries to find their place in life and this is mine. She uses iconography as a medium as well—iconography is visual images and symbols used in a work of art or the study or interpretation of these. She explained, Ink drawings and iconography are very old mediums, popular in classical times. Iconography literally started with Christianity and it has changed very little over time. It is a conservative and dogmatic art form. Ink drawings have much more freedom of expression—not dictated by

canons or strict rules of religious art. She is inspired by religious art, her Bulgarian heritage, and Elena Kanterva, who was her friend, neighbor, and colleague (Kanterva is a prominent iconographer and teacher of Iconography and Art History at the Academy of Fine Art in Plovdiv, Bulgaria, the artist’s home country.) Especially, Kanterva has an influence on Milena Marinov’s iconography. Before Marinov met Kanterva, she had focused on graphic art. Marinov said, Elena was a talented artist and she shared her experience and knowledge of icons with me. Marinov was an artist in residence at the National Institute of Cultural Heritage for a decade. She has restored original frescos and icons in synagogues, churches, mosques, public buildings, houses, and ancient tombs. Marinov remembers those times as the happiest of her career. She worked with teams of artists and archeologists. It was very exciting to be part of revealing beautiful frescos, sometimes multiple layers of them that had not been seen by anyone for hundreds of years. Each project was different, the process of rediscovering a hidden fresco or icon, often blackened by soot, and restoring and preserving it. The restoration and preservation of such beautiful art made us feel like warriors in a fight against destruction brought on by time and vandalism. For years, Marinov has worked on history that cannot be changed, like her ink drawings. Quoted in part from Hu Han, High Plains Reader, 4/26/2017.

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Lot #50

Butch Thunderhawk Bismarck, North Dakota Horse Effigy, 2017 Cedar branch, acrylic paint, brass tacks, horse hair, buckskin pouch and reins, tooled leather feather Range: $1,400 – 1,600

Butch Thunderhawk is a Hunkpapa Lakota artist originally from Cannonball, North Dakota on the Standing Rock Reservation. He graduated from Dickinson State University in North Dakota and attended the California College of Art and Crafts in Oakland. Thunderhawk also studied tribal arts, including pipe making, with elders at Standing Rock. Since the late 1970s, he has taught tribal arts at United Tribes Technical College in Bismarck. Thunderhawk was contacted by the Thomas Jefferson House Foundation, Charlottesville, Virginia, and asked to reproduce twenty traditional Native American art pieces. All works were to be replicas of those President Jefferson received from Lewis and Clark. Many of the pieces were made during a special 2001 summer session in which Butch and his students studied historic objects in Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology and at the North Dakota Heritage Center. They gathered wood, rocks, earth pigments and other materials, and made clubs, lances, and arrows. Butch also created shields, two pipes, and a quiver and bow case for the project. Butch and his students used mane and tail hair from Nokota horses to embellish the objects they created. Nokota horses formerly ran wild in the Little Missouri Badlands of North Dakota and are descended from early Indian and ranch stock. They have been designated North Dakota’s “honorary equine” or state horse. In 2005, Thunderhawk was Visiting Curator and Student Mentor at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology–Harvard University where he received a Harvard Fellowship. He co-curated and assisted in design work for the Lewis and Clark Exhibit at the Harvard Peabody Museum and he also co-curated and assisted in design work for Wiyohpiyata (Ledger Art Exhibit). The 42 Nelson Atkins Museum in Kansas City as well as the

Butch Thunderhawk’s Horse Effigy is sponsored by William Wosick

Peabody Museum–Harvard University, commissioned him to create Horse Memorial Effigies for their permanent collections—not unlike Thunderhawk’s work in this Auction. The James Monroe House Museum in Charlottesville, Virginia commissioned him to create two major art pieces for their Native American Section. Closer to home, the artist received a Fine Arts Fellowship from Dickinson State University and worked with the development of the North Dakota Cowboy Hall of Fame.


Walter Piehl’s painting is sponsored by News Radio 1310 KNOX

Lot #51 Walter Piehl Minot, North Dakota Heart River: Sweetheart of the Rodeo 2017 Acrylic on canvas 48 x 36 inches Range: $5,000 – 6,500

Walter Piehl: I like rodeo and putting on paint, but not necessarily in that order.

flying backward, the gesture of a flinging hand, a boot following the body into a somersault as the rider is tossed.

Piehl, now in his seventies, went on to draw and paint horses, year after year, never wearying of his subject, never despairing in his quest to create contemporary Western art. In the beginning he worked alone, one of the very first to turn his back on the established ways of painting and bronze casting, rendered into cliché by followers of Frederic Remington and Charles Russell. By 1978, Piehl and his horses were well on their way. By drawing, overdrawing, and re-drawing, Piehl could leave the traces of movement on the paper or canvas. He worked and reworked the surface, always leaving enough description for the viewer to follow the motion of a falling hat, a rider

As he matured, his skill as a painter matured as well. Just as he was interested in observing the subtlety of a creek bottom, he wanted his surfaces to dance with subtle variations. Drips, feathered edges, scumbled paint, the judicious use of glazes, all contribute to his rich surfaces. Today Piehl is North Dakota’s most celebrated painter and is widely recognized as an artist who pioneered the contemporary cowboy art movement.

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Lot #52

John Lembi Bemidji, Minnesota Home, 2014 Oil on canvas 24 x 24 inches framed Range: $800 – 1,000

John Lembi: The theme of this series, “Child’s Play,” is a subtle handling of memento mori. Memento mori is a Latin phrase translated as, “Remember your mortality.” It refers to a genre of artworks that vary widely, but share the same purpose—to remind us of our mortal limits. In the series, I am conveying this concept through children’s block images. The block depictions all have the signifier of youth that the image carries, yet show the passage of time through the manipulation of their surface treatment. The ephemeral concept of memory may also come into play for some viewers. The sixteen watercolors in this body of work are presented in a series called “Foursquare,” with the goal of creating a unified, cohesive body of work. The images are somewhat flat in appearance. There is not an attempt to express great dimensionality. The letterforms are sometimes rotated or missing all together in these deconstructed word pictures. The viewer may also perceive the paintings as recognizable symbols with the added implications of language. My intention was to use the block images as explorations in color and composition and to employ the memento mori idea as a unifying concept.

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The oil paintings each contain an image and a word signifier. I’m exploring the connections of words and pictures. Quoting from an article by W. J. T. Mitchell, We might call this division the relations between the seeable and the sayable, display and discourse, showing and telling. It also relates to our youth when vocabulary was

forming and through these simple toy devices a foundation was laid for communication. In 1950, Lembi was born in San Francisco where he attended art school and began working with wood, ceramics, and painting. His father was a mechanic, so he was exposed to engine repair from the time he was young. Always curious about how things worked, he was engrossed by high school shop classes and learned on the job serving as a technician for a utility company. Training in the trades, followed by education in graphic design and fine art, schooled his development as an artist. Lembi has a wide range of creative interests, which include several media from watercolor, pastels and oils, to clay, metal and woodworking. These diverse explorations have resulted in the design and fabrication of Arts and Crafts-inspired furnishings, including copper and stained glass light fixtures as well as furniture. He also makes oneof-a-kind sculpture studio furniture pieces. Since moving to Minnesota, his work has been exhibited at Watermark Art Center in Bemidji and Nemeth Art Center in Park Rapids.


Lot #53, #54, #55

Carlos Rene Pacheco Fargo, North Dakota Flatland Series, 2016 Archival photo on rag paper 12 x 12 inches Range: $150 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 225 each

Carlos Rene Pacheco: Inspired by the seemingly unbroken flatness of rural Minnesota and North Dakota along a horizontal plane, Flatland is a series of photographs that explore the textures and space of the Midwest from an aerial point of view. From as high as 30,000 feet, these photographs look at the microscopic and macroscopic structures of the terrain below. From this aerial perspective the landscape is evocative of the extraterrestrial topography of a distant planet. As if visible through the circular portals of some space-faring craft, the view is not dissimilar to those captured by the satellites and probes used by NASA.

Flatland #5

Carlos Rene Pacheco is a photographer and artist originally from Tucson, Arizona. As a young astronomy student, Pacheco became disenchanted with applied physics and mathematics and exchanged his view through a telescope for a view through a camera lens. This was a transformational experience. Pacheco soon reconciled his passion for scientific exploration with his investigation of the photograph. In doing so, Pacheco unexpectedly found his voice in two seemingly disconnected areas of study. Pacheco views the photograph as an artifact, not only in the historical and anthropological sense, but also in the technological sense. Photographs are information. Photographic images can be truthful relics but they can also be data. They can be a stream of ones and zeros that are cataloged, shaped, or corrupted. Through this filter Pacheco explores issues of time, technology, and the photographic archive in his work. In 2011, Carlos Rene Pacheco received his BFA from the University of Arizona in Tucson, and, in 2014, his MFA in Photography plus Integrated Media from Ohio University in Athens. Pacheco currently resides in the FargoMoorhead area where he teaches Photography at Minnesota State University Moorhead. In addition to teaching, Pacheco remains an active artist and exhibits his work nationally on a regular basis.

Flatland #6

Flatland #7

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John Miyazawa’s sculpture is sponsored by Plains Chiropractic & Acupuncture P.C.

Lot #56

John Miyazawa Grand Forks, North Dakota Waiting (in progress), 2017 Fired clay 36 x 12 x 13 inches Range: $800 – 1,300

All proceeds from the sale of John Miyazawa’s sculpture is a gift by the artist to the Museum

John Miyazawa currently is Artist in Residence at the University of North Dakota Department of Art and Design. He graduated from Kent State University in Ohio with an MFA in crafts and ceramics in 2014. In the intervening years as academic appointments have become scarce, John has taken short artist residencies at Brinsley Tyrrell, Ravenna, Ohio; Boys and Girls Clubs of Lorain County, Lorain, Ohio; Art House, Cleveland, Ohio; and the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He has taught at Baldwin Wallace University, Berea, Ohio; Firelands Association for the Visual Arts, Oberlin, Ohio; and been a Visiting Artist at such places as Lakeland Community College, Kirtland, Ohio; Kent State University, Kent, Ohio; and Okoe, Kochi Prefecture in Japan. Miyazawa is of Japanese heritage and speaks his native language as well as English. To this day, ceramics remain 46 a vital and exciting form of Japanese art. In contrast to

most countries where potters have a difficult time earning a living, Japan has tens of thousands of successful potters. Historical and regional traditions of ceramic production continue to flourish, and tea bowls and other pieces for cha no yu (Japanese tea ceremony) continue to be made and used. Innovative ceramic sculpture with western influence and ultra modern style also flourishes. Japan continues to maintain a high degree of ceramic artistry, which is at the same time both traditional and modernistic. Miyazawa first went to study ceramics in Japan in 2005 when he apprenticed to Teppei Ono, Kochi Prefecture. In 2006, he was the main translator at the Mashiko International Ceramic Festival. And during 2007–2008, he became the Resident Artist, Okoen, Kochi, Japan. The work in the Auction combines these wide-ranging influences along with his newest discovery: North Dakota clay.


Lot #57

Lin Hao Fujian, China Still Life with Boot, 2017 Pastel on paper 19 x 24.5 inches Range: $1,000 – 2,000

lin Hao: Artists Zhimin Guan and Lin Hao were practically destined to work together. Lin came across Guan’s artwork while searching for a location to use his visiting artist grant from Fujian Normal University in China. After viewing Guan’s dynamic metal paintings on Minnesota State University Moorhead’s website, he knew he wanted to work with him—enough to uproot his family and move to Moorhead to study with Guan for a year. Lin asked Guan via email to be his mentor, and that’s when their paths officially crossed. After they met, Lin and Guan learned of their strikingly parallel career paths. Not only are the two of them internationally recognized artists from China, they also teach art at the university level. Guan has been an art professor at MSUM since 1998; Lin is an associate professor of the Academy of Fine Arts at Fuijan Normal University in Fuijan, China. In addition to being a master teacher of oil painting, Lin is also a self-taught pastel artist — two prominent forms of media in Guan’s artwork. They even worked with the same pastel master in China, although at different times. In March 2016, Lin became a visiting professor in Guan’s painting and drawing classes at MSUM. Even though Lin spoke little English and relied on his phone (or Guan) for

translations, he worked extremely hard. Guan and his students were thrilled to have him. It was good to see other artists working with the same medium from the same background, Guan said. Chinese artists are very serious about their work, and I think it’s inspirational to see another artist come work with me on a daily basis. Born in the Fujian Province in China, Lin graduated from the Department of Fine Arts of Fujian Normal University in 1994. In 1999, he attended high level workshops on the painting materials and techniques of France by Abraham Pincas at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing. From 2003 to 2004, he studied at Moscow National Normal University, sponsored by the Chinese ministry of education. Lin is a member of the Chinese Artists Association, associate professor of the Academy of Fine Arts of Fujian Normal University, and a master teacher of oil painting. His works have been selected for numerous national, regional, and international awards and exhibitions.

Quoted in part from Chelsey Engelhard Ewen, The Arts Partnership, November 14, 201.

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North Dakota Museum of Art

Into the Weeds August 13 — January 10, 2018

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Francisco Alvarado-Juárez, Yerba Linda / Pretty Weed, Gallery installation 50 x 33 x 18 feet, 2017. Painted and cut paper bags, acrylic paintings on canvas, three video projections, sound, dirt, and organic material. Image copyright Francisco Alvarado-Juárez


Joan Linder, Hooker 102nd Street Book (Love Canal), 2013 and on.Ink on 6 Moleskin accordion notebooks, each 5.5 x 105 inches Kim Beck, A Great Piece of Turf, 2014. Graphite on paper 78.25 x 109 inches

Weeds are plants that grow in places other than where humans determine they should be. Weeds are the bane of existence across North Dakota, now an intensively planted, agricultural paradise. An adjacent industry has arisen just to kill weeds. Legal wars ensue between environmentalists and agribusinesses. Weeds, these undesirable or troublesome plants, adapt and continue to flourish. They quickly occupy empty spaces, abandoned spaces, condemned spaces. Vacant lots fill with weeds. Artists, however, relish weeds. They represent exuberance, vigor, abundance, a cornucopia bursting with life. Weeds project the power to take over the world. Even farmers, growers, and gardeners will chuckle at their nemesis, those unwanted and abhorred WEEDS.

Patterson Clark, Index1312ptd, 2017, Alien weed pigments and handmade paper

Artists include: Francisco Alvarado, Kim Beck, Paterson Clark, Matt Collishaw, Joan Linder, Vivienne Morgan page 14, Judy Onofrio, Eggert Pétursson, and Margaret WallRomana page 5

Bring your family and friends. The Museum doesn’t charge admission. Open weekends 1 – 5 pm parking readily available Open weekdays 9 am – 5 pm

Judy Onofrio, Twenty-two sculptures of “Botanicals,” 2011 – 2017. Cow bone, pig bone, small collected animal bones, horn matte gel, colorant, and bronze acrylic paint, various sizes

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The North Dakota Museum of Art is grateful to our sponsors who have given generously to guarantee that the arts flourish

North Dakota Museum of Art Board of Trustees

North Dakota Museum of Art Foundation Board of Directors

Julie Blehm

Julie Blehm

Ann Brown, Secretary

Nancy Friese

Ashley DiPuma

Bryan Hoime

Kristin Eggerling

Laurel Reuter

Susan Farkas Annie Gorder, Treasurer Darrell Larson Sally Miskavige Carson Muth Natalie Muth Jim Poolman Nicole Poolman Lynne Raymond

The 2017 Autumn Art Auction is underwritten by

Lois Wilde and

Laurel Reuter, Director Tammy Sogard Linda Swanston Kesha Tanabe Kelly Thompson, Vice President Lois Wilde Joshua Wynne, Chairman David Hasbargen, Emeritus Kim Holmes, Emeritus Douglas McPhail, Emeritus Gerald Skogley, Emeritus Anthony Thein, Emeritus Wayne Zimmerman, Emeritus

North Dakota Museum of Art Staff Matt Anderson Sarah Bowser Sungyee Joh Greg Jones Laurel Reuter Heather Schneider Gregory Vettel Matthew Wallace Brad Werner Part-time Staff Madeleine Ardelean Wyatt Atchley Payton Cole Sheila Dalgliesh Olivia Gaikowski Errin Jordan Kelly Kennedy Kathy Kendle Wayne Kendle Zephaniah Pearlstein Marie Sandman Curtis Longtime Sleeping

Front cover: Eleanor McGough, Billowing, 2013, acrylic on panel, 30 x 40 inches Back cover: Arduino Palanca Caponigro, Red Dress Jump, 2017, pigmented ink on archival rag paper, open edition, 12 x 12 inches

and over fifty volunteers


Autumn Art Auction Volume 19, 2017

North Dakota Museum of Art

Profile for North Dakota Museum of Art

AAA 2017 catalog web  

AAA 2017 catalog web  

Profile for ndmoa
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