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TECHNICIAN          

Although it is rumored the 1911 Building is haunted, there is no proof of the building being haunted. Sagar Sane Staff Writer

Over the years, there are ghost stories that have circulated throughout the campus about the 1911 building and a supposed ghost. The 1911 Building is unique in the regard that it was originally built as a dorm that housed many students and was later converted to a building that has offices of many academic departments, including interdisciplinary studies, social work, and sociology and anthropology.

Michael Coombes, assistant director of the new student orientation said that there have been unconfirmed myths about the building in past. “The myth is that the building is said to be haunted by a student who died as a result of a prank gone wrong.  The student, while sleeping, was bound and gagged and tied to the railroad tracks by a secret society that existed on campus,” Coombes said.  These societies were student organizations that were banned by the administration at the time, according to Coombes. “The society knew the train schedule and tied the student to the side of the tracks the train would only pass by, so he would not be injured.  Legend has it that the student was so frightened that he died of a panic induced heart attack,” Coombes said. According to Coombes, there is

october

18 2010

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

1911 Building has no proof of being haunted

monday

QUESTIONS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS TASK FORCE The chancellor has begun work on the University’s Strategic Plan. The plan is divided up between nine task forces, one of which is Undergraduate Student Success. The Technician will be asking students their opinion about undergraduate student success each day leading up to the Strategic Town Hall Meeting on Oct. 27.

ARE UNDERGRADUATES SUCCESSFUL? HOW DOES THE UNIVERSITY BEST PREPARE UNDERGRADUATES FOR LIFE AND WORK?

no ev idence of a haunting in the 1911 Building. Coombes said, “This is just a myth, there is no evidence of a haunting or any strange occurrences.”

HAUNTED continued page 6

To submit your responses to the Technician, email: letters@ technicianonline.com. JORDAN MOORE/TECHNICIAN

The 1911 building, named in honor of the class of 1911, opened in 1909 as the largest dormitory in the south.

To submit your input to the Undergraduate Success Task Force, visit: http://info.ncsu.edu/strategicplanning/task-forces/ undergraduate-student-success/. To voice your opinion in front of the University, attend the Chancellor’s Forum on Oct. 26, at 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., in Stewart Theater.

CELEBRATE WHAT’S GREAT

JORDAN MOORE/TECHNICIAN

Ravi Akkinepalli, a first year buisiness administration student persuing his master, discusses supply chain management with Kimberly Pautz, a Lowes Inc. employee, at the College of Managment Career Fair Friday. Akkinapalli, who was not looking for a particular job or internship, was excited about his field of interest. “Supply chain management applies to all industries, and is multidimensional” said Akkinapalli.

College of Management holds career fair

Flyin’ high. PHOTO BY AYANNA SEALS

The College of Management held there semi-annual career fair on Friday with 82 companies being represented.

L

auren Gerringer, a freshman in First Year College enjoys a ride at the NC State Fair Sunday morning. “It was so fun…It was kinda scary” was Lauren’s reaction when getting off the “booster” ride. The ride is made of two extending arms balanced on a column with spinning seats at the ends. The column acts as a swing bearing while those riding swing in a circular motion while spinning in there seats.

Shivalik Daga Staff Writer

insidetechnician Red zone woes costly in Greenville See page 8.

Annual Open House considered a success See page 5.

viewpoint features classifieds sports

REFUSE TO ACCEPT THE STATUS QUO

4 5 7 8

The College of Management’s semi-annual career fair received well-rounded applause from students and recruiters. The career fair was held at the McKimmon Center on Oct. 15. Seventy-four companies had initially registered for the fair, and with 6 new companies being added at the last moment, the fair saw a total of 82 organizations during the day-long event. The one thing that stood out was the smooth handling of the event by the College of Management. Recruiters were unanimous in their praise for the well-organized event, according to Greg Claussen, accounting manager at Caterpillar Inc. “The coordination at this event has been much better here than other campuses we’ve been to. Right from when I got out of my car, there were 4 people to greet me,” Claussen said. “We’ve been to Pennsylvania State and Michigan too, but this has been much better.

our second time here; we hired a few I’m really impressed with this.” Accoridng to Terry Bolte, senior ac- interns the last time,” Jesse Driscolle, count manager with UPS supply chain regional assistant vice president at management, the students were of Horace Mann Insurance, said. Nancy Hatfield, special agent with high quality. “We’ve got some high quality ap- criminal investigation with the IRS plicants, and are looking at hiring said she met a lot of qualified candidates during the fair. fulltime for sales,” Bolte said. “No experience is required, we hire Bolte said that she was happy with right out of college,” Hatfield said. how the event was handled. Students, such as Christopher “The lunch was great,” said Bolte. The career fair had a generous mix Prosser, a junior in business adminof companies from all disciplines of istration, said they found the career fair to be a useful management, inopportunity to meet clud i ng f i na nce, recruiters. reta i l, sa les a nd “We had a lot of insurance. Federal great companies toagencies like the day, and they were EPA, IRS, Army and really friendly and Nav y ROTC, and helpf u l,” Prosser Marine Corps were said. “They are not also present at the Special Agent Nancy Hatfield just talking to us, but fair. they actually want to Olivia Davis, human relations specialist with the EPA help us.” Bryan Crolla, a junior in business said they were interested in students administration, said he found the caat all levels. “We’re hiring both undergraduates reer fair to be a successful and useful and students in graduate school. It’s event. “We always have good employers, been great so far. The students are very and today also it was a good mix,” enthusiastic,” Davis said. Most companies were offering both Crolla said. Janet Rakes, undergraduate career internships as well as fulltime recruitments, giving the students a lot of op- coach with the College of Managetions to choose from. We’re looking for trainees to hire for CAREER continued page 6 both fulltime and internships. This is

“No experience is required, we hire right out of college.”


Page 2

PAGE 2 • MONDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2010

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

TECHNICIAN

THROUGH CAITLIN’S LENS

CAMPUS CALENDAR

In Wednesday’s “Steam, Good Old Games, and the Art of the DLC,” Kyle Bolton is the president emeritus of the Gaming Club.

October 2010 Su

In Wednesday’s page 2 feature photo, Nathan Sloan is an employee of Aarrow Advertising, not an alumnus. The firm has a contract with the Bookstore to spin.

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Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Amanda Wilkins at editor@ technicianonline.com

BIOLOGY CLUB MEETING 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Room 102, David Clark Labs U.S. CENSUS DIRECTOR TO GIVE STATUS REPORT 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. 323 Mann Hall

WEATHER WISE Today:

POETRY, POLITICS, AND MUTUAL UNDERSTANDING 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. 450 Riddick Hall

79/52

CALDWELL FELLOWS INTEREST SESSION 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Senate Chambers, Witherspoon Student Center

Mostly sunny and partly cloudy.

Enjoying the silver lining on the silver screen

Tomorrow:

MOTIVATIONAL TEACHING STRATEGIES Online

PHOTO BY CAITLIN CONWAY

81 54

B

reana McIver, a freshman in animal science, takes a free bag of popcorn from Roderick Ervin, a senior in electrical engineering, at the Despicable Me movie in Campus Cinema Sunday. “I’ve never seen [Despicable Me] but I’m pretty excited to. I love the prices of Campus Cimena, and the free popcorn today? That’s pretty good,” said McIver. Campus Cinema will be showing four movies this week, including the hit movie Salt and a free documentary on the Invisible Children of Africa.

Partly cloudy and mostly sunny.

Wednesday

SMART-SHOP SERIES WORKSHOP: EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Talley Student Center BUSINESS EMAILS THAT WORK Noon to 1:30 p.m. Talley Student Center-Walnut Room

71 47

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19

Chance of showers in morning and then partly sunny.

GLBT PROJECT SAFE 9 a.m. to noon GLBT Center

BRIAN SCHULTZ | CHEW FIRST

NEOMONDE BREAD AND DIP DISPLAY 10:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Clark & Fountain Dining Halls

SOURCE: NOAA.GOV

THE PROTECTED CLASS OF RACE AND COLOR 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Green Room, Talley Student Center

GET INVOLVED IN TECHNICIAN

APPRECIATION OF CHINESE Calligraphy and Painting 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. TBA

Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copy edit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday to Thursday 9 a.m. to midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or e-mail Editor-inChief Amanda Wilkins at editor@ technicianonline.com

‘NATURAL DISASTERS AND GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE’ 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 232a Withers Auditorium NCSU PIPES & DRUMS 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Stewart Theatre Ongoing Events N.C. STATE FAIR

IN THE KNOW

ncsu.edu/wolfline. Wolfline questions? Please contact Kim Paylor, transit manager, kim_paylor@ncsu.edu.

Wolfline Update: State Fair Route Changes

FIVE

DOLLARS

NCSU students pay only $5 for ARTS NC STATE performances

SOURCE: TRANSPORTATION OFFICE

From Oct. 14 to Oct. 24:

this week NCSU Pipes & Drums Tues, Oct 19 at 7pm Stewart Theatre

An evening of Scottish music and dance. Spirited bagpipe marches, Highland and Scottish Country Dancers, plus jigs, airs and reels from the Scottish Session Musicians.

Mayberry Modernism

There will be no Wolfline service to Centennial Biomedical Campus (CVM). The closest Wolfline bus stop is a temporary stop located on Westchase near Blue Ridge Road. Also, Carter Finley Park & Ride Lot is temporarily relocated to the northwest corner of the current P&R Lot - Westchase Boulevard at the bottom of steps. Directional signs are in place. Hillsborough Street stops west of Faircloth will not be served. For more Wolf line information, please visit: www.

Leadership in Action Applications due Nov. 5 Leadership In Action program, a four-year leadership experience sponsored by CSLEPS, is currently looking for applications for its class of 2014. The program includes three phases of leadership development for N.C. State students. Fifty students are invited to participate in the program each year. Participants will apply fall of their

freshman year and begin the program in the spring. Students must earn and maintain a minimum 2.5 GPA to participate throughout this four-year program. Students selected for Class #4 will be responsible for a $40 administrative fee to cover the costs of the freshman program. A limited number of need based scholarships are available. The fee and the program enrollment form will be due by the last day of classes, December 3, 2010. For more information about the application process, visit: http://ncsu.edu/csleps/leadership/lia_index09.htm. SOURCE: TIERZA WATTS

Thur, Oct 21 at 6pm Gregg Museum of Art & Design

Architectural historian George Smart, founder of Triangle Modernist Houses, speaks on the Triangle's rich architectural legacy of Modernist homes. FREE

Faith Healing Fri, Oct 22 at 8pm Stewart Theatre

Based on Tennessee Williams' play The Glass Menagerie, Faith Healing is a blend of dance and theatre, lip-synched film scenes and delicate duets. Mature themes. Pre-show discussion with choreographer Jane Comfort, 7pm.

Grains of Time Sat, Oct 23 at 8pm Stewart Theatre

NC State's favorite male a cappella vocal group is back with their fall concert.

Ticket Central 919-515-1100 2nd floor, Talley Student Center ncsu.edu/arts

THIS DAY IN HISTORY

2712 Hillsborough St.

919­836­1555

In 1946, State College secured a “victory train” to take 6,000 students to go to the football game against Wake Forest (in Winston-Salem). The train tickets were $0.65 and tickets to the game were $1.00.

order online @  gumbyspizza.com

M O N D AY M O N D AY

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See exclusive audio/photo slideshows. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline. com. Check it out!

DELTA FALL WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS REGISTRATION ONLINE IN SEARCH OF A STATE TREASURE THE CRAFTS CENTER PINHOLE CAMERA CHALLENGE EXHIBITION THE CRAFTS CENTER UNION ACTIVITIES BOARD VACANCIES TALLEY STUDENT CENTER SOUTHERN ROOTS OF MIDCENTURY MODERN Noon to 8 p.m. Gregg Museum of Art and Design

POLICE BLOTTER Oct 15 1:13 A.M. | TRAFFIC ACCIDENT Jackson Street Report of vehicle striking light pole and transformer. Driver left the scene after accident. Vehicle was impounded and accident report completed. Investigation ongoing. 12:09 A.M. | CHECK PERSON Hillsborough Street Officer observed three students acting in suspicious manner. Contact was made and it was determined no law or policy violation had occurred. No action taken. 12:32 A.M. | SUSPICIOUS PERSON Hillsborough Street Non-student was stopped for riding bicycle with no headlight. All file checks were negative. Verbal warning given.


News

TECHNICIAN

MONDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2010• PAGE 3

VS.

TUCKER

OWEN

THE COMPETITION FOR NAMING RIGHTS TO THE BEACH AT THE FIRST YEAR COLLEGE VILLAGE GIVES STUDENTS FROM OWEN AND TUCKER RESIDENCE HALLS A CHANCE TO INTERACT WITH EACH OTHER. STORY BY ELISE HEGLAR | PHOTO BY JORDAN MOORE Residents of Owen and Tucker Residence Halls, the halls where participants year. It typically happens on a Saturday afternoon. This year, the event took of the First Year College program reside, got to bond over competition this place on Oct. 2. Students had a full day of competition before the winner was announced. month, with the annual Battle for the Beach. “People call it Tucker Beach out of habit. The competition is a good idea The competition is an opportunity for the residents of Tucker and Owen to meet new people and engage in some friendly competition. According to because it allows the residents to get together and get to know each other,” Tucker Residence Hall residence director Kristen Marley, there were numerous Kennedy said. Owen Hall was the winner of the competition this year. competitions during Battle of the Beach. This means that, technically, Owen gets to call the beach “There was a volleyball tournament, cornhole tournaarea theirs for the duration of the 2010/2011 academic ment, quiz bowl, pudding race and tug-of-war competischool year. tion,” Marley said. “Owen Hall won the Battle and therefore the Beach is “The people in the dorms care about the competition “Owen Beach” for the 2010-2011 academic year,” Marley because it allows everyone to come together and be united,” said. Lauren Kennedy, a freshman in First Year College, who Some students are hoping that this year, more people will lives in Owen Hall, said. recognize the name change in Owen Hall’s favor. The competition had various events, including a volley“It’s really not fair to Owen Hall residents if people ignore ball tournament. Students who live in Tucker and Owen that they were the winner,” Michelle Ebersole, a sophoare eligible to compete, but all students on campus are Kristen Marley, resident director more in general engineering who lived in Tucker Hall last welcome to watch the events. Students in Tucker and Owen semester, said. take the competition seriously. More than the name of the beach, the competition is about bringing First “I feel like a lot of people were interested in the competition because it is one Year College students together. Similar to other social events that all residence of N.C. State’s traditions and was a really fun event,” Kennedy said. Despite the fierce competition, many students at the University do not seem halls hold throughout the year, the competition is an opportunity for residents to be aware of the competition. Although Owen was the winner this year, some to meet new people and make friends. “I participated and it was really fun. I got to meet other people in Owen and students still say Tucker Beach out of habit. “All of my friends live in Tucker, so I just always thought it was only Tucker made new friends,” Kennedy said. According to Marley, students enjoyed the day. Beach,” Austin Teague, a freshman in biomedical engineering who lives in “Lots of residents attended the program and it was a very fun day for everyMetcalf Residence Hall, said. Despite this misconception, students take part in the competition every one,” Marley said.

“Owen Hall won the Battle and therefore the Beach is “Owen Beach” for the 20102011 academic year,.”

BUILT IN: 1947

BUILT IN: 1947 Square footage: 67,679

Square footage: 67,299

Floors: 4

Floors: 4

Occupancy: 376 people

Occupancy: 358 people

Room layout: Hall

Room layout: Hall SOURCE: NCSU HOUSING

SOURCE: NCSU HOUSING


Viewpoint

PAGE 4 • MONDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2010

TECHNICIAN

{OUR VIEW}

THE FACTS:

The Office of Undergraduate Admissions held the 2010 Open House on Saturday. An anticipated 7,000 prospective students, parents and families attended campus tours, showrooms, the club fair and college information sessions.

OUR OPINION:

Open house was unorganized and had families sprinting everywhere and standing in long lines. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions should be more organized next year and take into account the number of people who are coming, so they can organize the sessions to serve the various interests of visitors.

Organize Open House please T he University’s open house introduced the campus and college life on Saturday to an anticipated 7,000 students, parents and family members. Although the event may have seemed like a success, many were let down by how the event was organized. These students and their families’ first encounter with University should not have been chaotic and unorganized. Visitors were met by an atmosphere of overcrowding when they went to visit the showrooms. A room in Owen and Lee were open for students and their families to view to get a feel for campus life, however many of them were met with extremely long lines just to see one room. At one point, the line to see the room in Owen was past the Tri-towers. This is not an effective way to market living on campus. Mul-

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

tiple rooms should have been opened to effectively show visitors there are options and space. Visitors were cheated on campus tours as well. Ambassadors were told to limit their tours to 30 minutes, but it is impossible to show the campus in that small amount of time. Many tour guides only went as far as the Court of North Carolina or the Brickyard and then returned to Talley. Although these tours showed the larger parts of campus, it was useless to visitors. There were prospective students from all colleges, so it wouldn’t have been unreasonable to develop tours that covered only the key buildings for each college. Prospective students would

have been able to get a feel for their future homes and walk by other buildings to gain an appreciation for the campus’ architecture. The club and organization fair held in Talley Ballroom is the highlight of the prospective student’s visist. They can see what opportunities are available to them outside of the classroom. The fair was crowded, as was expected, but could have been more organized. If Undergraduate Admissions organized Talley by spacing out popular clubs and organizations, long lines would have been less tangled and prospective students could have navigated more easily. Information sessions explained the details for the

various colleges during open house, however only prospective students and their parents were allowed to attend some of them due to overcrowding. Grandparents and siblings had to wait out on the experience. This is robbing the prospective students of an opportunity to inform other parts of their family and get them involved with the possibilities of coming to N.C. State. N.C. State should embody success and exhumes an atmosphere of organization. Overall, this event could not have made a good impression on families. They were met with long lines and sprinting from place to place. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions should learn from this year and be more organized in during next year’s open house.

Don’t forget about the military

R

ecently, both elections and the military have been in the news and on the minds of a lot of people. Elections are coming and they are coming fast early voting is being put in motion, and Nov. 2 will be here before we k now it. The military has been in the Chad news recently Rhoades because of the Senior Staff recent injuncColumnist tion placed on the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy. It is clear that we have a long list of problems in the U.S. today. We are in a recession, many people feel like we cannot trust our government to fulfill our needs, there are still people without jobs, and the American people are hurting. That being said, it is very important that we also remember our military. When problems are affect ing us directly, it is very easy for us to only focus on those problems. If you are not in the military or you are not directly involved with someone in the military, it would be easy for you to forget that they are essential to our success as a nation. We have been involved in two wars since 2001. Some people did not support these wars, and are disgruntled with how long it has taken and how much it has cost this nation both monetarily and with the lives of great Americans. However, we are still at war, and we need to make sure the original objectives are still being pursued. Security is a right we should all have. It is the most important right because living in fear is not truly living. Our military protects us from foreign dangers and from some of the most ruthless organizations on Earth, whether it is Al Qaeda, Hamas, Hezbollah, Somali Pirates, or potential threats from places like North Korea. Most people do not realize how much power these people have, and

how dangerous they can potentially be. The strength and size of our military serves as a large deterrent from potential threats to the United States. I truly believe that our world would be much different if our military was not as great as it is. It is important that we remember what they do, and not take anything away from them, even if you do not agree with their policies. Some people feel that the injunction on DADT is progressive and important for the future success of the military, while others believe that it will actually hurt the military. Unfortunately, the publicity surround DADT has put the military in a bad light. I hope that since their currently is an injunction in place on DADT, we as a nation can move forward, and truly find the most appropriate policy for t he men and women serving in the armed forces. Out of all the political ads I have seen, I have not seen any concerning our military and how our potential candidates feel about the United States’ foreign policy. We need to make sure to elect officials and representatives that realize the importance of our military. We need to value them, protect them and make sure their needs are met. We also need to give them the moral support they deserve. When you consider your candidate, make sure you pick the one that suits your needs best, but don’t forget that among all the issues on the ballot, the military is among the most important.

“When problems are affecting us directly, it is very easy for us to only focus on those problems.”

Christian O’Neal, sophomore in mechanical engineering

{

CAMPUS FORUM

}

HOW TO SUBMIT Letters must be submitted before 5 p.m. the day before publication and must be limited to 250 words. Contributors are limited to one letter per week. Please submit all letters electronically to viewpoint@

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EDITOR’S NOTE Letters to the editor are the individual opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Technician staff or N.C. State University. All writers must include their full names and, if applicable, their affiliations, including years and majors for students and professional titles for University employees. For verification purposes, the writers must also include their phone numbers, which will not be published. NOTE: Charlton Brown’s “Why I can’t call myself a ‘State fan’” letter to the editor is posted online due to spacial issues.

Apology for ECU’s actions at Saturday’s game

Response to “Unit cohesion” column

Dear N.C. State family,

Editor’s note: Word limit waived

I am an East Carolina University alumnus and returning student. I attended the epic game on Saturday, Oct. 16 with many of you. While I was proud of my team for beating such a respectable school, I am appalled at my fellow students. I know that nothing I say can make up for the embarrassment and humiliation some of you had to endure in the stands, but I would like to apologize on behalf of my classmates.There is no excuse for a minimum of three fights breaking out in a four-hour period at a university function. There is no excuse for people throwing trash at visitors. There is no excuse for performing lewd acts on possessions that represented you. Ene drunken idiot tried to give N.C. State syphilis by sticking an N.C. State flag down his pants, rubbing vigorously, and then pulling it out for all to see, smell, etc. I hope most of my East Carolina family will agree with me when I say thank you for visiting our fine campus, thank you for allowing us to be your hosts, and next time we meet again I hope we can act a little more respectable and welcome you with more positive attitudes and actions.

After reading “Unit cohesion depends on keeping DADT,” I have to admit I was a little disconcerted. While I completely understand Mr. Jeffreys’ point of view as a retired military veteran and admire all that he has personally done for the country I love, there are two points that I would like to revisit. First, the statement was made that, “a commanding officer will never place a flamboyantly gay person in charge of leading troops into combat if his mannerisms and way of speech reflect his sexual orientation.” While I cannot begin to argue the validity of that statement, it is necessary to note that every person in the GBLTIQ community is different. Just come to a GLBTCA meeting on State’s campus and see! There are many people who identify as GBLTIQ that are not flamboyant. In fact, there are people in the armed services now that are part of the GBLTIQ community. Because they are unable to announce their sexual orientation, their voice and presence as non-stereotypical gay men and women is silenced. Secondly, and I believe more importantly, DADT does not only affect those on the front lines. The Armed Forces is comprised of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and the Coast Guard ‚ and DADT is applicable to them all. This means that military lawyers, doctors, midshipmen and pilots are all unable to reveal their sexuality. It also keeps those who

Caroline Knauss ECU alumnus

Editor-in-Chief Amanda Wilkins

News Editor Nathan Hardin

Sports Editor Tyler Everett

Photo Editor Sarah Tudor

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are open about their sexuality from filling those roles. As the son of an active duty military officer, I was raised to appreciate the sacrifice made by our Armed Forces. I quickly realized that, because of DADT, I would not be able to follow in my father’s footsteps and, concurrently, be true to myself. To join the military in any capacity would mean suppressing and hiding a large part of who I am. So when I finally did decide to come out, I was also forced to dismiss my dreams of serving my country. The DADT policy restricts the rights of a minority with rationale based on flawed logic and fear. Just because someone is gay does not mean they do not have the ability or the right to live and die for their country. To say the opposite goes against all that our country was founded upon. This attitude of self-suppression and government-supported discrimination should not be condoned or encouraged in our society. Matt Gromlich senior, plant biology

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2008 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features

TECHNICIAN

MONDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2010 • PAGE 5

Fast brings awareness to world hunger The 30 Hour Famine, hosted by CSLEPS, had students fast to bring awareness to campus.

food on campus, students made the effort to raise consciousness and activism. According to the World Food Program, an offshoot of the United Nations, a billion people experience malnutrition today—that is nearly 15 Mark Herring percent of the world’s population. More Staff Writer than 1,200 people die due to malnourHunger strikes have been popular ishment annually, which equates to one methods of passive resistance to bring person every six seconds. The U.S. is no exception. Within attention to salient and controversial issues. Gandhi, Bobby Sands of the Irish this land of opportunity, the number Republican Army and Cesar Chavez are of Americans on food stamps exceeds examples of activists who used hunger 40 million, according to the Federal as a way to publicize their suffering and Department of Agriculture. Numbers to express their dedication to political aside, the 30 Hour Famine worked to movements. Sands even died from his do more than just raise awareness of the hunger issue. strike. “First and foremost, I want to mention At a local level, students are using hunger as a means to bring awareness that the problem with hunger is not a to the issue of world hunger. The Cen- lack of food, but rather the obstruction ter for Student Leadership, Ethics and of various policies,” Mike Giancola, the director of Public Service CSLEPS, said. organized Adkins said the 30 Hour there is essenFa m i ne, a n tially enough event to raise food to feed awareness e ve r yone i n about hunger the world four related issues. pounds of food F r o m 10 a day. a.m. Friday “Unless you to 4 p.m. Sata re M ic h a e l urday, over 50 Ph e l p s , y ou students and don’t eat half of fac u lt y ab Mike Giancola, director of CSLEPS that,” Adkins stained from said. “I can’t eating to publicize their main point—despite the speak for everyone here with the event, multitude resources at man’s disposal, but I draw the line when in our country hunger remains a pertinent yet forgot- there are people dying every day because of hunger.” ten issue. The event organizers took to the Chris Adkins, a junior in mechanical engineering and director of the Hun- Brickyard to publicize a petition to try ger and Homelessness Issues Commit- to raise awareness and to pressure politee with CSLEPS, said, “the thing is to ticians to change policy in the U.S. that get a bunch of students to commit to perpetuate and reinforce hunger. “I am participating and contributing the idea that we’re going to fast for 30 hours because we are upset that this is- to the organization of event and I noticed that the petition affects millions sue exists.” Adkins, along with fellow students of people on food stamps,” said Hema from the Hunger and Homelessness Patel, a sophomore in political science Committee, a branch of the student-run and a member of the Service LeaderService Leadership Team, were busy or- ship Team. Congress is currently debating whethganizing the event since the beginning er to cut food stamps by about 20 cents of the school year. “[We spent] essentially all of our time apiece, from the current value of 78 trying to get the event’s groundwork laid cents, Patel said. “On average, this would be a $50 down,” Adkins said. Despite the abundant availability of decrease for families on food stamps,”

“I don’t want to undermine the importance of food drives, but this issue won’t be solved without putting pressure on politicians.”

Patel said. Participants managed to keep their minds off of their personal hunger and the heaviness of the issue through activities CSLEPS offered. Friday night the Service Leadership Team organized various activities, including a photo scavenger hunt, entertainment by the Fusion dance team and local stand-up comics. “Although the turnout to these events was lower than we expected, I think that we can evaluate this to make it more interactive next year,” Adkins said. Nevertheless, the hunger did take a small toll on the students participating in the event. Alexis Gomez, a sophomore in animal science, said food was on her mind. “I’m doing this with a friend and we’ve been sitting around a lot think about our stomachs,” Gomez said. “I’ve just been feeling a little sleepy.” The fasters did have a light at the end of the tunnel. Saturday at 4 p.m., participants broke the fast after packing 400 meals for the Shepherd’s Table Soup Kitchen. However, this fast was no festive celebration like Eid at the end of Ramadan. The fasters all shared a soup kitchen meal, eating one peanut butter and jelly sandwich and a fruit cup to mark the end of the 30 Hour Famine. The meal signified that even after a long period without food, this may be the most a starving person may manage to eat. “I knew that I would be hungry,” Emily Robertson, a sophomore in biochemistry, said. “The nice thing is that I know I will have food at the end, but people in hunger don’t have that certainty of food in their future.” After breaking the fast, Giancola and Bob Patterson, a specialist in crop science, discussed the issue of hunger. Patterson recounted personal experiences while studying crops and hunger abroad and both men stressed the importance of a change in policy. “We all grow up knowing what hunger is,” Giancola said. “In an ideal world, I would love to see my kids not understand what hunger is, because this problem should not exist. Unfortunately, they do. The fact that we allow a tremendous amount of people to pass through this is shameful.” Nevertheless, Giancola’s idealism is tied to reality.

“I don’t want to undermine the importance of food drives, but this issue won’t be solved without putting pressure on politicians—domestic and international,” Giancola said. The 30 Hour Famine is not the last opportunity for students to get involved in hunger awareness programs. CSLEPS and Student Government will host activities and programs in the Brickyard November 14-20 to compliment Global Hunger Week. The Service Leadership Team also plans to visit the Fighting World Hunger Conference in February to encourage 120 other universities to host a similar event to that of the 30 Hour Famine. Additionally, students can apply for the Bill Clinton Hunger Leadership Award, which CSLEPS started two years ago. Applicants submit a short Youtube video that exposes and demonstrates the gravity of global hunger. The competition has expanded from the N.C. State campus, and students from across the United States and Canada can enter before the November 16 deadline.

BY THE NUMBERS the number 30 of hours participants fasted to raise awareness about world hunger

1 billion

the number of people today that experience malnutrition

1200+

the number of people who die from malnutrition annually

40+ million

the number of people in the United States who use food stamps

78 cents 400

the current value of food stamps the number of meals packed for the Shepherd’s Table Soup Kitchen

SOURCE: FDA, HEMA PATEL, WORLD FOOD PROGRAM

Fairgoers stock Food Bank shelves Students help solve the state’s hunger problem by participating in Food Lion Hunger Relief Day at the State Fair. Nasir Khatri Staff Writer

This Thursday, the North Carolina State Fair will be hosting their 15th annual canned food day, during which fairgoers can bring four cans of Food Lion brand food to the North Carolina State Fair at any time of the day in exchange for one free admission ticket. Hunger Relief Day, which has been sponsored by the North Carolina-based grocery store giant Food Lion for the past seven years, is one of the largest one-day canned food drives in the state. Held each year to benefit the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina, many students flock to the fair on this day to get free admission, as opposed to purchasing a $6 admission ticket. Although only four cans are required for free admittance into the fair, several AYANNA SEALS/TECHNICIAN fairgoers are seen bringing in several Emily Eby, a senior in industrial design and textiles, shares free samples of Carolina Kettle Corn during the North Carolina more cans than are necessary in an at- State Fair the morning of October 16, 2010. Carolina Kettle Corn is seen at many different festivals in North Carolina. “We do tempt to help the needy. The relief day’s different events like Lazy Daze in Cary,” Eby said. success can also be seen by how much food has been collected over the years. Saad Khan, a senior in computer sci- pounds of food, according to the N.C. cies in a 34-county area surrounding an opportunity to make a difference in ence, has brought several cans to the fair State Fair’s official website. It also states Raleigh, as well as with Second Harvest our state as well, and that’s why I go to that the event has collected more than 2 Food Banks in other regions of North the fair on Can Day every year,” Gill in the past. “I really like this food drive because million pounds of food over the course Carolina, such as Fayetteville, Winston said. “Can Day also allows those who would not be able to go to the fair othof the 15 years the Salem, and Elizabeth City. it allows thousands The goal of the event is to help feed as erwise, due to financial reasons, to be program has been of people to be promany hungry residents of North Caro- able to go.” going on. actively involved in Faiza Mustafa, a sophomore in bioT h e w e b s i t e lina, especially in those areas where the solving the hunger also has a link to needy don’t have too many resources logical sciences, is also planning on atproblem in North the Fair’s official provided to them by the local govern- tending the fair with her on the same Carolina. I see the day and agrees with her comment. blog—known as ment. Food Lion Hunger “From what I’ve seen in the past, Can Citing the good deal and the want Deep Fried @ The Relief Day as more NC State Fair blog to help the hungry in North Carolina, Day is when the fair is the most packed, than just a free pass —which allows a many N.C. State students plan to go to and that just goes to show how successinto the fair, but special behind-th- the fair on what they have termed “Can ful the event is,” Mustafa said. “It’s also rather, an opporSaad Khan, senior in comp. science really cheap, to be honest… especially if scenes tour of the Day” this year. tunity to help othJyoti Gill, a sophomore in biological you’re going to the fair multiple times, Food Bank of Ceners. For this reason, sciences, said she plans on bringing cans how I am. It’s not like there’s a season I usually bring 10 or 12 cans with me to tral and Eastern North Carolina. pass for the fair.” The food bank will distribute the cans to the fair this Thursday. the fair to donate,” Khan said. “Not only is this a good deal, but it’s In 2009, fairgoers donated 222,956 to needy people and hunger relief agen-

“I really like this food drive because it allows thousands of people to be proactively involved .”


News

PAGE 6 • MONDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2010

TECHNICIAN

Annual Open House considered a success The Office of Undergraduate Admissions expected about 7,000 people to attend the annual event intended to help high school juniors and seniors decide if they want to attend N.C. State. Chelsey Francis Deputy News Editor

Yearly, the Office of Undergraduate Admissions holds the Open House the same week as the North Carolina State Fair. The Open House is intended for prospective high school juniors and seniors. At Open House, students can talk with University students in different programs and clubs, as well as admissions officials. As well, University Ambassadors holds campus tours throughout the day for students and University Housing has two model rooms, one in Owen Residence Hall and one in Lee Residence Hall. According to Joyce Mai, admissions assistant director, the event ran smoothly. “Today’s been a great day,” Mai said. “We saw the numbers we were expecting to see. It’s definitely been running smoothly so far.” Ricky Smith, a sophomore in biology and an intern at the Office of Administration, said he was required to attend Open House. “It’s part of our job to represent the student body, in addi-

tion to the University Ambassadors,” Smith said. “We are a little bit of extra help basically. We predicted over 7,000 people coming today, so obviously every set of hands would be really great.” Smith said the day went smoothly and he answered a lot of questions. “I’ve been answering questions most of the day. Mostly today I’ve been getting questions where everything is at and how to get up and down and what building am I in. We got a few questions about the student application,” Ricky Smith said. “Actually, a lot of students here have already applied. There are information sessions about applying for admissions but the first deadline was yesterday.” Some students, such as Andrea Smith, a senior in international studies and Spanish, attended Open House to help usher and direct people to various locations where sessions were being held. “We came out here to usher people in and answer everybody’s questions and help out,” Andrea Smith said. “I love talking to people and the prospective students. They usually have lots of questions. They have a ton of question about the different colleges. They find all of this stuff online but they like to talk to people. It’s been a ton of people nonstop.” Marina Brochado Offner, assistant director with admissions, said they are the people who organize the event.

“We are the one that head everything. We work with all of the other departments to get everything organized,” Offner said. “We had about 6,500 students register to come to Open House.” According to Mai, N.C. State’s Open House draws a large crowd. In regards to other Universities, some might have more than one open house,” Mai said. “They might have three or four.” Prospective N.C. State students and their parents were standing outside the doors, according to Cheryll bowman-Medhin, an administrative support associate with the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences dean’s office. “I came out to assist at Open House. I’ve been doing this for about three years now and basically give out information about the college and find out what interest prospective students have.” Bowman-Medhin said she thought there were more high school students than normal. “They estimated about 7,000. When I cam this morning there were people standing outside waiting to come in, so we’ve had quite a few. I haven’t been counting, but I can tell it’s been very busy,” Bowman-Medhin said.

LEE DANIELLO/TECHNICIAN

Representatives of First Year College, Taylor Clawson, a senior in psychology, Josh Moore, a senior in chemistry, Ann Garrett Hughes, a junior in biological sciences, and Caroline cooke, a junior in textiles, have a great time helping out at N.C. State open house on Sat. Between Talley Student Center, Carmichael gym and the multiple tours going on, there was plenty for prospective students to see during their visit. All four upperclassmen agreed, “It’s great for students to find out about the college they want to go into.”

Staff Writer Joanna Benagas contributed to this report.

LEE DANIELLO/TECHNICIAN

Barbara Adams, the student advisor for the Computer Science majors, gives out free CSC pens, while explaining the perks of being part of the Computer Science community here at N.C. State. Adams said she loves talking to prospective students and devoted a lot of energy to making the Computer Science booth a memorable one at Open House.

HAUNTED

LEE DANIELLO/TECHNICIAN

Rick Jackson, a junior in business administration, speaks about internship and job opportunities with two representatives from the Target corporate office, with a copy of his resume ready in hand. Jackson was grateful for the fact that the fair was located on campus, with access to many local and widespread companies. “It’s so convenient to have all these businesses in one place. You can pass out resumes and talk face-to-face with recruiters,” said Jackson.

CAREER

continued from page 1

ment, said she was pleased with the student turnout. “We were expecting around 700 students, and we’ve already had 600 students visiting us with around 2 hours still left for the day. I think we’ll probably surpass our original estimates,” Rakes said. The College of Management

advertised about the event beforehand, and students were encouraged to attend the career fair. “The College of Management did quite a bit of advertising, making sure people came at the event and that we had a good turnout,” Prosser said.

COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT QUICK FACTS: Fall 2009 enrollment: 2,584 students Bachelor’s Degree Options: Accounting, Business Administration, Economics Minors: Accounting, Business Administration, Economics Rankings: U.S News and Report 2010 – 83 Business Week 2009 – 85 SOURCE: NCSU COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT

By 2016, the Nonprofit sector will need over 80,000 new leaders per year. Are you ready to step up to the plate?

dent, who died in W.W.I as well as some other distinguished personalities. Ronald Wimberley, a procontinued from page 1 fessor in department of sociThomas Stafford, vice chan- ology and anthropology said, cellor of the student affairs “I have been in this building said the name of the building since 1971. There have been no haunted stories I have ever is no coincidence. heard.” “The According building was to Wimbernamed after ley, there are the class of a couple of 1911 which interesting effectively fac ts about banned the Ronald Wimberely, professor this building. practice of When I hazing new freshman. In those days, haz- became the department head ing was a popular practice in the early 1980s, the main amongst the students,” Staf- doors of the south and north entrances were never locked,” ford said. The class of 1911 included Wimberley said. “Due to this, O. M. Sigman, the class presi- sometimes the security guard

“There have been no haunted stories I have ever heard.”

of the building used to see men sleeping in the verandah of the building in the morning, who were not related to any departments this building housed.” “Today, on the outer concrete panes of the window panes, you can see letters carved in them. This might be in the days when the building was a dorm, before 1950s,” Wimberley said. This building was first constructed in 1909 as a dormitory. Until the early 1940s, the 1911 building was the largest dormitory in the South. During the month of October, the Technician decided to investigate several supposedly haunted places on campus. This is the first of the supposedly haunted places.

Technician was there. You can be too.

Minor In NONPROFIT STUDIES Learn more at http://nonprofit.chass.ncsu.edu/minor

The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information.


Sports

TECHNICIAN CLUB SPORTS

Swimming and diving start with a bang Pack opens season with decisive victories over VMI and Campbell. Dan Smith Staff Writer

Saturday marked the beginning of the swimming and diving season for both the men’s and women’s teams. The men’s swimming and diving team began its season with a victory over the Virginia Military Institute, while the women’s team won against Campbell. The women’s team was bolstered by multiple event victories from senior Jennifer Kopenitz, freshman Lauren Poore and sophomore Marifrances Henley on its way to a 168-79 win. In total, the women notched 11 event victories on their way to an overwhelming victory over the ladies from Campbell. Kopenitz’s victories came in the 100-yard butterfly and the 200-yard freestyle. Poore took home the 50 freestyle and 200 backstroke. Henley claimed the top spot in the 100 breaststroke and 100 freestyle. Their teammates Kaitlin Mills, Jordan Paavola, Jessica Ward, and Kelsey Liu joined them in winning top honors. Not to be upstaged by the women’s team, the men’s team notched 12 victories of its own and won in a similarly lopsided match over VMI by the score of 165-81. Sophomore Ivan Kopas was the only

male to notch wins in multiple events, winning the 200-yard backstroke and the 100-yard backstroke. The Wolfpack men spread the victories around against VMI, as eight different men, in addition to Kopas, took home first place finishes. Andrew Tollefson, Brandon Kingston, Dan Forsythe, Barrett Miesfeld, Joe Martin, Gaites Brown, Maxim Litvinov and Kohl Hurdle all managed to win events. While swimming events composed most of the action Saturday, there was one diving competition. Wolfpack sophomore Hudson Rains scored a big victory in the competition, beating two VMI opponents to secure a win for the Wolfpack. State not only benefitted from outstanding individual performances, but also from excellent team play. Both teams were able to win the 200-yard medley relay events, which went a long way in helping the Pack prevail in its season-opener. All in all, the Wolfpack swimming and diving teams gave their season a rather auspicious start. The men’s team returned fifteen letter winners from last season, and the women brought back eighteen. Both teams have high expectations entering the season, and Saturday went a long way towards fulfilling those expectations. The Wolfpack will look to build on its first meet as it takes on Maryland and Davidson Friday and Saturday.

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SOCCER

continued from page 8

nie Krauser 42 seconds later. Senior defender Alyson Santilli picked up the assist by sending a cross to Krauser who fired a shot on the right side of the goal. “The ball came across from the right side and I was playing left forward,” Krauser said. “It crossed in and I capitalized and finished it.” Despite being down 1-0 at the start of the game, Springthorpe said he was pleased with how his team responded. “I think a positive thing is when we got down one goal, we found a way to equalize a minute or two later,” Springthorpe said. “It showed a lot of resolve

CROSS

continued from page 7

ward to the future of the team. “We ended up close to where we want to be but we have some things we have to improve on,” said coach Henes. Freshman Laura Hoer led the team finishing in fourth place, less than a second behind Stanford’s Kathy Kroeger. Hoer stayed with the leaders the entire race even when the frontrunners began to pull away. “Laura was amazing,” said coach Henes. “A true freshman in that situation, to come back up to the leaders at the end, she did a great job.” Junior Andie Cozzarelli also had an impressive performance, finishing in 37th place.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2010 • PAGE 7

in our team. That’s something we can certainly build on.” Five minutes into the second half, Short scored another goal for FSU on a one on one breakaway against Wolfpack goalkeeper Kim Kern. “In the second half, we didn’t get that goal back right away, so we couldn’t get the equalizer.” Kern said. The nail was hammered into the coffin by the 61st minute of the match when Seminole midfielder forward Janice Cayman notched another goal for FSU after making a play off of a free kick. The fourth goal for FSU only added insult to injury for State, as Cayman scored her second goal of the contest, pushing the score to 4-1. “The second half has unfortunately caught us this year,” Springthorpe said.

“That was huge step up for her,” Henes said. “She was a really big help for us.” Both teams will shift their focus to the ACC Championships in Boston, Mass., on Oct. 30. The teams will turn back the intensity and go into slightly lighter training cycles. “We really had a really big load the last few weeks so we’ll have to pull it back a bit,” Geiger said. “So we can get our legs back under us for conference.” The women’s team will also decrease the training load. “We plan to change up some things in this cycle, the mileage has been pretty high,” Henes said.

Classifieds

“We have played good in the first half, but second half we gave up on goals for whatever reason, and we’ll have to figure that out. “ Though a devastating loss came on an emotional day for the Pack, the seniors were able to reflect on their time here at State and what it meant to them. “It was really emotional, but it was happy and sad at the same time because we played for four years on this team and to see everyone get together in the locker room and have a little ceremony,” Santilli said. “The girls actually put together a scrapbook, and so each person created one page for each of us. It was really good to talk about the past memories. It was sad but it’s good to look back on the memories.”

FOOTBALL continued from page 7

its five trips yielded the exact same results State came away with against VT. On the year, the Pack has made 38 forays into scoring position and has come away with 19 touchdowns and 10 field goals. For an offense so effective at moving the ball between the 20’s and putting up points the difficulty in the red zone has been overlooked, especially after wins. But with losses in two of three games after a 4-0 start and the Pack’s toughest test of the year, an Oct. 28 battle against Florida State, up next, the coaching staff and offensive players will likely devote a good portion of their bye week to finding ways to finish drives.

Red zone offense: N. C. State

7 2 2

Trips to red zone touchdowns field goals

Red zone offense: ECU

7 4 2

Trips to red zone touchdowns field goals

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Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

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Sports

COUNTDOWN

• 33 days until the football team takes on North Carolina

INSIDE

• Page 7: A continuation of the East Carolina recap

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 8 • MONDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2010

FOOTBALL

Red zone woes costly in Greenville

Thomson, Pulgar impress at ITA Carolinas Regional

In otherwise evenly played overtime showdown, Pirate’s success in red zone proves key

like the interception that sealed the Pack’s fate in overtime came at inopportune moments, passes were dropped, and tackles were missed. But a look at the final statistics showed that the game was essentially a tossup. The Pack had Tyler Everett 26 first downs to 24 for ECU, Sports Editor was outgained by only 20 yards In a lot of ways, the Wolf- and committed the same numpack offense has been pro- ber of turnovers – four - as its lific through its first seven instate rival. State’s undoing was its difgames. Only four teams in ficulty the nation finishing have gained drives after more f irst getting to downs, and the ECU 20, only 12 squads have a nd t hese more piled difficulup more ties loomed yardage. even larger But as it has when comnow done pared with in three the Pirates’ said by consecutive own success games, the in the red unit bogged down in the zone. Both teams moved into loss to ECU after reaching scoring position seven times, the most important part of but ECU made the most of its the field, the red zone. opportunities, scoring four A number of things went touchdowns and two field wrong Saturday. Turnovers goals to account for all 33 of

The N.C. State men’s tennis team was well represented a the ITA Carolinas Regional over the weekend, as sophomore Dave Thomson and junior Jamie Pulgar made deep runs in the tournament. Thomson defeated Campbell’s Davy Sum, 6-3, 6-3, to move into the quarterfinals, followed by a victory over 36thranked Tripp Carleton of Wake Forest, 6-1, 6-3, to advance to the semifinals, which will be held today. In all, Thomson has notched five victories over the last three days of competition. Pulgar experienced similar success over the weekend, topping UNCGreensboro’s Orcun Seyrek, 6-2, 6-2, in the round of sixteen before losing to North Carolina’s Stefan Hardy, 7-5, 6-3. The men’s tennis team will play its last tournament of the fall season this weekend at the UNC-Wilmington Invitational.

“Da dolorepti dolor si offictatus re si untinti bearcii lorem ipsum.”

SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Volleyball comes up short against Georgia Tech The volleyball team fell to Georgia Tech 3-1 Sunday in Atlanta by the scores 14-25, 27-25, 20-25, and 16-25. The loss drops the Wolfpack’s record to 12-9 overall and 2-7 in the ACC. A bright spot in the loss was the play of freshman Elena Frac, who finished the match with 10 of the team’s 38 kills. Junior Luciana Shafer also helped the Pack out offensively, recording 10 kills of her own. Junior Kelly Wood and senior Taylor Pritchard led State on the defensive side, finishing the match with 10 and eight digs, respectively. Sophomore Megan Cyr, a transfer from Colorado, added to her team-leading assist total by notching 31, and added four kills and two service aces. The Wolfpack will be looking to get back on track as it squares off against Virginia Friday in Reynolds Coliseum.

CROSS COUNTRY

Jon Goodman Staff Writer

Both men’s and women’s cross country teams finished in the top ten at NCAA Pre-Nationals at Lavern Gibson Championship Cross Country Course in Terre Haute, Ind. The N.C. State men finished fifth in the 8k race with 177 points, powered by junior Ryan Hill’s close second place finish. State was one of four teams to have four runners finish in the top-40 out of the 241 runners in the field. Hill finished second with redshirt freshman Andrew Collie finishing 16th, while redshirt senior Sandy Roberts and sophomore Matt Sonnenfeldt finished 35th and 36th respectively. Men’s coach Rollie Geiger believes the team has some improving to do between now and the upcoming conference championships.

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the team’s points. On the other hand, State’s seven red zone possessions yielded two touchdowns and two field goals. The difficulty near the goal line against ECU wasn’t unprecedented. In the loss to Vir-

ginia Tech, State managed two touchdowns and two field goals on five red zone possessions. The Hokies only got inside the Wolfpack red zone three times that afternoon, but found the end zone on each occasion. The

Pack had little to no trouble at any point in its win over BC, except in the red zone, where

FOOTBALL continued page 7

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Cross country teams post top-10 finishes at Pre-Nationals

SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

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LUIS ZAPATA/TECHNICIAN

Redshirt freshman halfback Dean Haynes, is tackled by a horde of ECU players during the Saturday match-up in Greenville, N.C. Haynes had 33 yards of passing from 4 throws with 13 being the lostest and 36 yards from rushing. N.C. State lost to ECU in overtime, 33 - 27.

“We had some teams we should have beaten,” Geiger said. “We have to run better overall.” Although there are some things the team would like to improve, Geiger sees the team stepping up to the challenge of the tough ACC competition. “There are some really good teams in this conference,” Geiger said. “We have the pieces, we just aim forward and run better.” The Wolfpack women finished in eighth place in the 6k women’s race with 341 points, one point ahead of ninth place Toledo. Laura Hoer led the team finishing the race in fourth place, less than a second behind Stanford’s Kathy Kroeger. Women’s Coach Laurie Henes, while proud of the team that ran three true freshmen, is looking for-

CROSS continued page 7

ALEX SANCHEZ/TECHNICIAN

Senior forward Kara Baldy fights for control of the ball with Florida State midfielder Tori Huster Oct. 17, 2010. The team fell to 8th ranked Florida State 4-1 after conceding 3 goals in the second half.

Seminoles prove too much for Pack Women’s soccer comes up short against Florida State on Senior Day Jeniece Jamison Senior Staff Writer

Florida State handed the Wolfpack a disheartening 4-1 loss Sunday afternoon on Senior Day at Dail Soccer Field. With the loss, State now carries a 7-9 overall record with a

1-6 conference record and an outside chance of making the ACC tournament. The team’s final three matches will come against Duke, Virginia and Virginia Tech. “Certainly you want your seniors to go out with a win,” coach Steve Springthorpe said. “I don’t know that we played poorly. I’m not disappointed in how we played but I’m disappointed that we didn’t come out with the win. “

Throughout the match, the Seminoles were able to create more opportunities on offense, as they were able to attempt six shots on goal in comparison to three from State. The stalemate was finally broken at the 35thminute mark with a goal from FSU midfielder Casey Short. State was quick to respond with a goal from forward Jen-

SOCCER continued page 7

Randy Woodson

Kelly Hook Student Body President

Tommy Anderson

Mark Thomas

Julius Hodge

Debra Morgan

Tyler Everett

Tucker Frazier

Sean Klemm

Chancellor

Deputy sports editor

Deputy sports editor

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WKNC General Manager

Co-host of 620 The Buzz’s “The Insiders”

Former Wolfpack basketball star

WRAL TV anchor

Sports editor

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Taylor Barbour

N.C. State at ECU

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N.C. State

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No. 1 Ohio State at No. 18 Wisconsin

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Technician - October 17, 2010