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tuesday january

12 2010

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Student Government appropriations open Money to help those who help the community  Caitlin Cauley Staff Writer 

Student Government began accepting applications for appropriations on Jan. 11 and will close Jan. 29 at midnight.  Jackie Smith, president pro tempore of the Student Senate, described appropriations as funding for student organizations that are working hard to benefit themselves and the University community.  Any club, from the dressage club to the ski & snowboard club, can request money from SG.  Appropriations funds can be used for any student organization activity, as long as it benefits the University community.  Smaller groups can use the funding for recruitment efforts.  Larger groups can plan large events with their allotment, which goes toward creating a lively campus environment and ultimately impacting the community beyond monetary value.  SG is more than willing to distribute this money, Smith said, but runs into the

increasingly frustrating problem of not tion does not actively seek out a Student enough organizations requesting funds Senate sponsor.  This senator is not just the sponsor or not following the correct procedures to through the process, Smith said, but is also receive funds.  Kelli Rogers, Student Senate president and a direct guide.  If an organization does not seek out a last year’s appropriations chair, said it’s rare for a university to allot this much money for sponsor, SG will assign one.  With this sort of assignment, it’s much less likely that a student organization distribution.  “We actually had money left over last student organization will have an adequate voice in the approsemester because priations process.  we didn’t have very Most importantly, many groups apply,” SG seeks active stuRogers said.  dent organizations A common probwhich are willing lem in organizations to raise money to receiving funds is match what SG will lack of communicaStudent Senate President Kelli Rogers on give them.    tion.  late applicants for appropriations funds. “It’s a way to give When an organizaback to the stution switches hands in leadership, new leaders might not have dents,” Smith said.  “The process is competitive and strict, but this committee is full knowledge of how to request funds.  Smith emphasized that while SG has passionate.”  Rogers said the key to applying for apdistributed information through multiple venues, including WKNC and Greek Life, propriations is to begin the process early.  “We always have a hundred groups that the leaders of student organizations must file in the last four hours,” Rogers said.  do their own part to seek out help.  According to Smith, one of the most com- “What that does is hurt the group because mon mistakes is when a student organiza- their information is inaccurate and we’re

“We always have a hundred groups that file in the last four hours.”

Freshman, senior win free textbooks Bookstore offers chance for free books to those who register early 

How Much Did They SAVE?

Ty Johnson

As part of a sweepstakes, NCSU Bookstore shoppers who preordered online were automatically entered into a contest to get their books for free. William O’Donnell, a freshman in the College of Management, and Lauren Hahn, a senior in zoology, won the contest and received their books free of charge.. Below is the list of books the two didn’t have to pay for.

Editor-in-Chief 


Students are seldom more fiscally responsible when it comes to purchases than during the beginning of the semester when it’s time to buy textbooks.  Bargain-hunters cross town looking for the best deals and check Amazon, Facebook and other sites, making sure they can save every penny.  But for William O’Donnell, a freshman in the College of Management, the decision was easy.  “I ju st l i ke conven ience,” O’Donnell said of his mantra while shopping for textbooks. Because of his preference for simplicity, he booked online through the NCSU Bookstore in December since it assured his books would be waiting on him for pickup when he returned to begin spring classes.  At that time he didn’t realize he would be getting all of his books for free as part of a sweepstakes the Bookstore was putting on.  “I had no idea,” he said. “It just said I had to do it by this date and I got a call the next day.”  O’Donnell’s quest for convenience left him more than $460 richer, while fewllow sweepstakes winner Lauren Hahn, a senior in zoology, said she saved more than $500 by winning the contest. Hahn said she always tries to sign up for books early. “It’s easier than having to fight the crowds,” she said. “There were a couple of semesters when I tried to get a better deal, but it didn’t seem to be worth it so I just get it from the school. When I got it for free it was a great surprise.” And the timing was near perfect for the two winners, as well, as the two were notified just after exams concluded. “I ended up using some of it to buy more Christmas presents,” O’Donnell said. “I found out right after my last exam, so it was good to be able to use extra money for that.”  Instead of blowing the money on himself, O’Donnell bought his parents a new TV, a move he hopes solidifies his place as the favorite child, since he has two brothers.  O’Donnell said his biggest savings

William’s Books Book

Price

Essentials of the Living World

$107.50

Topics in Finite Mathematics

$39.95

Understanding Business

$111.15

Biology 106 Lab Manual

$40.00

Plaza Package

$162.50

Total:

$461.10 Source: William O’Donnell

Lauren’s Books Book

Price

Seely’s Principles of Anatomy

$292.95

Biological Psychology

$120.50

Sophocles li: Four Tragedies

$9.00

Aeneid

$12.00

Oresteia

$9.00

Inferno

$5.25

Euripides lii

$10.50

Iliad

$12.75

Grand Total (plus tax):

$508.53

Source: Lauren Hahn

Luis Zapata/Technician

William O’Donnell poses with some of the textbooks he received for free as winner of a sweepstakes.

came from the Plazas package he needed for a Spanish class. The book, audio CDs and online registration would have cost him $162.50 if he hadn’t won the contest.  “The Spanish book was new,” O’Donnell said. “It was a big change to the third edition, so that one was the most expensive.”

Hahn said her parents had always helped her out financially with books and tuition and that they were paying for her wedding later this year as well, so keeping them from having to dig deep into their pockets for her final semester was a help. But Hahn’s savings could be even more beneficial than scoring brownie points with her parents. “I’m getting married this summer, so any money I can save is definitely going into the wedding budget,” she said, adding she may use the money to hire a photographer for the event.

Save 25% on cost of your textbooks by buying used books at:

NC State Bookstores "The Official Store for NC State Textbooks."

When can I apply? Student Government began accepting appropriations requests Monday. The deadline for applications is Jan. 29 at midnight. For more information about appropriations, visit students.ncsu.edu or contact Appropriations Chair Jackie Smith. Source: students.ncsu.edu

not able to give them as much money as we could.”  This semester the SG Web site has a listing of senators who are certified to sponsor in the appropriations process.  With this information, groups can know early on who is most reliable and helpful as an appropriations sponsor.  Smith remains optimistic about appropriations requests.  “We had a very successful turnout for the appropriations process last semester and my main concern is to strive for an even better one.”

Contest may become staple in Campout Despite lack of participation in Campout’s “Ugliest Carolina Fan” contest, organizers remain optimistic for the future 

enthused.  “There weren’t a lot of people. We wanted there to be more, but then on the other hand, it’s Campout,” Center said. “Only the hardest N.C. State fans will Campout, and it’s kind of hard Justin Carrington to be like ‘Wear Carolina blue to our Campus & Capital Editor  Campout.’ ”  Arialle Crabtree, the senator in For years, Campout has been a staple in University tradition. The concept charge of the overall planning of behind the annual tradition remains Campout, said the lack of participathe same each year, as students camp tion in the contest had to do mostly out and brave the cold weather for the with communication.  “It was a great opportunity to raise chance to win tickets to the Carolina basketball game. This year’s Campout, money for a great cause, but I think however, was slightly different from that the participation was a little bit those of the past, as organizers encour- lower than we expected. Part of that aged students to turn out in pale blue is that we had problems in securing as part of the event’s first-ever “Ugliest e-mails between Student Government and the campers.”  Carolina Fan” contest.  The contest winner said he had simiSarah Center, the senator in charge lar thoughts.  of coordinating the “Persona l ly, I competition, got the t h i n k [e -m a i l] idea from something should be an effecshe witnessed at a frative way to comternity gathering.  municate, but the “A fraternity did an fact that I was the ugliest woman comonly one competpetition where they ing sort of suggests all dressed up in drag and makeup, so we Sen. Sarah Center on why it was t hat it wasn’t,” Pope said.  thought we would do difficult to solicit participation Citing commusomething like that to in the “Ugliest Carolina Fan nication as a large raise money,” Center Contest” at Campout factor in the lacksaid.  Before Campout students were chal- luster participation numbers, Crabtree lenged to come decked out in their best said Student Government may look Carolina wear and bring a box or jar to create a listserv at the beginning to collect donations, and that’s exactly of registration process to reach out to what Chris Pope, a junior in physics, more students in the future.  Whether or not the competition will did.  “When I first saw [the e-mail], I im- stick around for future years, however, mediately had a really good idea for a remains up in the air.  “We haven’t rea lly discussed costume,” Pope said. “Former Florida State point guard Sam Cassell once de- it,” Center said, though she said she scribed the fans in Chapel Hill as the would like to see it stick around.  “It’s a good idea to try again next wine and cheese crowd, so that was my year. We’ve done it once, and we know immediate idea.”  While Pope was fairly optimistic more about what we need to do to about his participation in the tournament, some students were not so FAN continued page 3

“It’s kind of hard to be like ‘Wear Carolina blue to our Campout.’ ”

insidetechnician Charity stripe plagues Pack See page 8.

viewpoint science & tech classifieds sports

SPECIAL BACK TO SCHOOL HOURS: Tuesday - January 12 - 8am to 8pm Wednesday - January 13 - 8am to 8pm Thursday - January 14 - 8am to 8pm Friday - January 15 - 8am to 6pm

4 5 7 8


Page 2

page 2 • tuesday, january 12, 2010

Corrections & Clarifications

Technician Campus CalendaR

Through andy’s lens

January 2010

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-inChief Ty Johnson at editor@ technicianonline.com.

Weather Wise

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Today:

Today AVC for Alumni Relations Search Committee Meeting Park Alumni Center Room 327, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday 2010 Dr. MLK Jr. Campus Commemoration Stewart Theatre, All Day

42/23 Expect winds from the northwest at 10 mph.

Excel 2007 Level 1 McKimmon Center, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Tomorrow:

University Budget Advisory Committee Chancellor’s Conference Room/ Holladay Hall, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m.

Having a catch

50 21 Look for sunny skies, wind from the west between 5-10 mph and 0 percent chance of rain.

Thursday:

Z

Photo by Andy Musselman ack Souther, a sophomore in biological engineering, leaps in the air to catch a disc thrown by his suitemate, Jake Cowart, a sophomore in chemical engineering, in front of Lee Hall. Souther said since everybody is back it’s something fun the two can do to get out of the room.

In the know Professor

Campus to honor MLK

53 30 Expect few clouds with a 0 percent chance of precipitation. source: www.weather.com

on the Web See exclusive audio/photo slideshows. Answer the online poll. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline.com. Check it out!

Get involved in technician Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copy edit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday to Thursday 9 a.m. to midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or e-mail Editor-inChief Ty Johnson at editor@ technicianonline.com.

The University will honor Martin Luther King Jr. Wednesday in Stewart Theatre at noon with an event featuring Lani Guinier, the first African American woman to be appointed to a tenured professorship at Harvard Law School. Guinier authored “Lift Every Voice,” “The Tyranny of the Majority,” “Who’s Qualified?” and “The Miner’s Canary.” “L i f t Eve r y Voic e ,” “Who’s Qualified?” and “The Miner’s Canary” will be available in the Catalyst Bookstore prior to the event and following her speech there will be a book signing. Sponsored by the NCSU African American Cultural Center, the 2010 MLK Jr. Commemorative programs are co-sponsored by the Union Activities Board Black Students Union and the Eta Omicron Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated. Contact Toni Harris Thorpe at 919-5151451 for more information. Source: ncsu.edu

to discuss language, society

Walt Wolfram, a professor in the English department, will speak Jan. 21 at noon in Withers Hall room 331 on the role of language variation in society. The event is called “Integrating Social Science and Humanities in the Research Paradigm.” The deadline to RSVP is Jan. 14 and lunch will be provided for the first 12 registrants. The event is part of the “Meet the Researchers” series hosted by the CHASS Office of Research. Contact Joyce Jones for more information.

Institute for Nonprofits to hold info session

tend, send an RSVP to the Institute for Nonprofits. Source: CHASS Dean’s Office

The University’s Institute for Nonprofits will hold an informational meeting about graduate student research awards Jan. 22 from noon until 1:30 p.m. at 219 Oberlin Rd. The awards provide up to $1,500 to doctoral students conducting research related to nonprofit or non-governmental organizations. Parking is free and pizza will be provided. To at-

No classes in observance of holiday The University will be closed Jan. 18 in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Classes will resume Jan. 19.

WHIP IT Witherspoon Cinema. 7 to 8:50 p.m. THIS IS IT Witherspoon Cinema, 9:30 to 11:20 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 14, 2010 THIS IS IT Witherspoon Cinema, 7 to 8:50 p.m. WHIP IT Witherspoon Cinema, 9:30 to 11:20 p.m. Friday, Jan. 15, 2010 Last day to add without instructor permission First Year College Visitation Program First Year College, 1:30 to 3 p.m. Introduction to Teaching Clark Hall, 3 to 5 p.m.

Source: ncsu.edu

Source: CHASS Dean’s Office

Philosophy and Religious Studies hosts lecture Rüdiger Bittner from the University of Bielefeld and the National Humanities Center will deliver a lecture titled “Some Naturalisms in Ethics” Jan. 21 at 4:30 p.m. in Withers 344. The event is hosted by the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies and all are invited to attend. Source: CHASS Dean’s Office

Protect the Pack Get the H1N1 flu vaccine It’s quick, safe and FREE! No appointment necessary. Shot and nasal spray available. FREE CLINICS FOR STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF DATE Wed., Jan 13

Thurs., Jan 14

TIME Noon-4 p.m.

9 a.m – 3 p.m.

LOCATION Student Health Center Talley Student Center Ballroom

Learn more at ncsu.edu/student_health

Charge Free if covered by BCBSNC with member card or student ID.

Seniors, schedule your appointment today and become eligibile for a free yearbook! Jan 20-22, 2010 Witherspoon 3rd Floor Lounge Portraits are free. www.ouryear.com | 1-800-OUR-YEAR School Code 279

Select H1N1

ncsu.edu/agromeck

seniorportraits.indd 1

1/11/10 2:01 PM


News

Technician

tuesday, january 12, 2010 • Page 3

fan

continued from page 1

NC State University

wednesday,

JANUARY

13

2010 12 NOON stewart theatre talley student center

Dr. MLK Jr. campus commemoration about guinier Lani Guinier came to public attention when she was nominated by President Bill Clinton in 1993 to head the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, only to have her name withdrawn without a confirmation hearing. In response, Guinier published a powerful personal and political memoir, Lift Every Voice: Turning a Civil Rights Setback into a New Vision of Social Justice.

guest SPEAKER

Attorney Lani Guinier presents “Lift Every Voice” Civil Rights Attorney & First Tenured Black Woman Professor at Harvard Law School

5:30 pm

commemoration MARcH

ncsu belltower to the african american cultural center

Eta Omicron Chapter

6:30 pm the african american cultural center washington sankofa room

more information For more information on the 2010 Dr. MLK Jr. Campus Commemoration, visit the African American Cultural Center website: www.ncsu.edu/aacc.

of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated & the African American Cultural Center

evening REcEPtiON

Mrs. Donna Battle presents “Practicing Healthy Lifestyles in the African American Community”

make it more successful,” Center said.  Crabtree echoed Center’s sentiments.  “I liked the competition and I think the students that participated had a lot of fun with it,” Crabtree said. “Next year, besides publicizing it more, I think we might really try to make it more of an event.” “This is definitely something we would like to try again,” she said. “It’ll be one of those things where we’ll try it again and see how it goes, so we can sit back and evaluate the results.   “The first time’s always going to be a little bit rocky and we’re going to have those quirks that you need to work out,” Crabtree said. “Once we get all that straightened out and have a good basis for what we can evaluate, we’ll see if this is something that we want to continue and make an event that we a lways have at Campout.” 

Technician was there. You can be too.

parking Please visit the NC State Transportation website for event parking information: www.ncsu.edu/transportation. accessibility If you are a person with a disability and desire any assistive devices, services or other accommodations to participate in this activity, please contact Ms. Toni Thorpe in the African American Cultural Center at (919) 515 — 1451 during the business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

co-sponsored by the union activities board black students board

The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information.


Viewpoint

page 4 • tuesday, january 12, 2010

Technician

{Our view}

The Facts:

Reynolds Coliseum was again the site of the University’s annual Campout for men’s basketball tickets against UNC-Chapel Hill, Friday. The event, which was removed from its traditional home last year, was witness to bitter temperatures but few complaints from students.

A welcome return to Reynolds C

Our Opinion:

Student Government was thoughtful to move Campout back to Reynolds. The date could have used better consideration, but the event went off without any major hitches.

ampout is one of N.C. State’s oldest traditions. Many alumni fondly recall the tradition as one of the University’s finest and will quickly recall their own experiences braving the cold in front of Reynolds Coliseum. In that spirit, students gathered Friday evening to celebrate the Wolfpack. In a refreshing reversal of last year, the event returned to its customary home on the Jeter Bay parking lot and the north side of Reynolds. The area may not be as spacious as Miller Fields, but certainly is more than capable of engendering the spirit of unity and brotherhood which define the annual event. Some students complained

ing defeat on a miracle bid by Florida, but the game against the Tar Heels transcends the ups and downs of each season. Students came out in force available weekend between now and the game would have and the event seemed to work been impossible from an ad- smoothly. There have been several grumblings of lost group ministrative standpoint. Nonetheless, Student Gov- registrations, but the accounts ernment could have made a were supposedly resolved with better effort to poll students ease and didn’t detract from on the issue of a date change or the quality or camaraderie of considered holding the event the Campout. It’s one of the University’s in the waning days of the fall oldest traditions and a source semester. Despite the cold and the for pride and school spirit, even date, many students attended when our teams struggle. The the event in search of elusive fall football match-up against tickets to the Jan. 26 match- Carolina should lay some creup against UNC-Chapel Hill. dence to that article. The men’s basketball team has struggled in early conference play, including its heart-break-

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board excluding the news department and is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief.

about the hindrance of being unable to throw a football — due to the special limitations — or inadequate entertainment. Truth be told, the location reversion was in holding with tradition and most students reacted positively, despite the cold weather. The date for the event wasn’t great and Student Government seemed intractable on a change. But harsh criticism needs to be withheld due to their lack of options; Martin Luther King Jr. weekend wasn’t possible due to budgetary restrictions and the only other

Where is my jetpack?

I

t’s 2010, and I don’t have my jetpack or a voice-activated computer running everything in my house. And Doc Brown didn’t invent me a DeL ore a n time machine. W h a t ’s t h e deal, science? Then again, I’m not surprised. As a societ y, huma ns have Paul done little to McCauley foster the sort Senior Staff of atmosphere Columnist conducive to supplying the technology needed to pimp my jetpack with thrust-vectoring and handsfree controls. The problem lies in politics and culture. Consider the debate over the Talley Student Center renovation indebtedness fee from last semester. The argument in favor of the fee generally indicated that students, who are only here for four to six years, can’t rea lly see the forest from the trees and don’t understand the significance of having a building for student life. I, on the other hand, argued that a far better way to improve the University would be to ask for more money so as to prevent cutting classes and increasing class size to deal with budget cuts or improving vital services that ensure students can go to class and learn every day of the week (transportation, health services, etc.) Predictably, instead of any sort of carefully negotiated compromise or brilliant plan to balance academic concerns and improvements with student life facilities, the indebtedness fee became something of a Hobson’s choice: we can vote for any of the fees in the increase package, as long as the indebtedness fee is the one we have to pass. On a broader scale, consider the quagmire in Washington concerning reform to the health care system or the financial sector. This may seem irrelevant, but given the fact that anyone graduating with me in May will need to buy health insurance unless certain aspects of the current bill pass and may need to pay off outstanding loans or take loans out to continue for further studies, this matters.

I am perfectly willing to discuss legitimate concerns with the proposals for public options or individual mandates against the need for fiscal prudence in the face of a rising national debt. I have no problems with discussing ways to control costs, whether they are tax incentives or social programs. But again, instead of hearing such a debate, the news from the Capitol mostly consisted of one senator or congressperson talking about the strength of the new legislation and another yelling about death panels, tea parties and socialized medicine. And we haven’t even started to hear the inevitable craziness around bank reform. I have no doubt the free market purists will start screaming about government regulation stifling innovation. Don’t get me wrong, I have no problems with capitalism and do not believe in excessive regulation. But I happen to know that no matter how much the invisible hand may push consumers towa rds a certain correc t ive behavior in the big economic picture, simple common sense and math cannot be avoided. One cannot simply say a loss of fewer jobs than predicted is a sense of recovery; a negative number of jobs is still equal to a net loss of jobs against a rising population. One can call packaging risky mortgage debt a brilliant financial instrument, with all the bells and whistles a bank can attach to it, but such a security still requires housing prices to go up at an unsustainable pace to make money, which is a terrible gamble for the people who handle our money to take. With the sort of inane “debates” about simple social issues that should be a matter of weighing the evidence, how can anyone reasonably expect to address problems related to building jetpacks or inventing flying cars? Whatever. I’m gonna go watch YouTube for a few hours. At least politics did not prevent a brilliant person from inventing streaming online video Web sites.

“I don’t have my jetpack or a voice-activated computer ... I’m not surprised.”

Send Paul your thoughts on the “advent” of technology to letters@technicianonline.com.

Editor-in-Chief Ty Johnson editor@technicianonline.com

Deputy News Editor Alanna Howard Nick Tran

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695 Editorial Advertising Fax Online

{

Was the Campout experience enjoyable? Why or why not? by marisa Akers

“Yes. It was fun hanging out, but it was cold.”

That’s a pretty hefty shot there Sam.

Elizabeth Scott junior, civil engineering

Christian O’Neal, freshman in mechanical engineering

Take a chance on the chancellor

T

ake my chancellor ... please! Ja mes “JLO” Oblinger ransacked the school’s morality. How? He h i red Mary “The Difficulty” Easley. I’ve got this to say for the new chancelJake Goldbas lor-elect Staff Columnist William “Randy” Woodson: “It was Purdue or don’t.” Or “Purdue or Die.” Or Something. Pundits are saying that the chancellor selection committee chose him because of the Purdue engineering and agriculture programs; let’s hope he can engineer a better school here. Meanwhile, no one knows anything about this guy. Apparently he’s a pro at vosting, but I don’t think that’s anything to boast about. He was provost before becoming chancellor here — which just means he’s gone from one vacuous position where no one knows what he does to yet another mysterious position. Figuratively, he’s a figurehead, so far as I can figure. But they’ve pulled a figure eight by swinging around and getting another sixfigure, five-finger discount to this webbed-fingered hobnobbing hobgoblin. My

Deputy Features Editors Justin Carrington Caitlin Cauley Rich Lapore Jessica Neville Laura Wilkinson features@technicianonline.com

news@technicianonline.com 515.2411 515.2029 515.5133 technicianonline.com

}

in your words

hemoglobin curdles. Meanwhile, the jury has come back on Woodward. And you thought we were out of the Woods for now. But people come from out of the woodwork to say that we would work harder with a better chancellor than “wayward Woodward.” Don’t think this columnist has forgotten the way the other “Wood” corrupted the fee process. He coerced the craven Student Government into going against a popular student vote. Everybody was angry at the way they “Ceresn”acted. At least provost is a position similar to chancellor. But still, these people make more money than Billy Mays did. Hey, I’ve got an amazing “cleaning” solution: next time, get rid of them sooner. Under JLO, scandal seemed to chase us like a giant cone monster on Hillsborough Street. The past two chancellors make the new Tally Student Center look like a bundle of joy. Things are low ... like Sidney Lowe. I hope everyone has had a great December break and is ready to get back to work. I wish the new chancellor the best of luck. I want everyone to do the best they can. I want all of the professors to leave nothing to fine print and students

Deputy Sports Editors Taylor Barbour Tyler Everett Jen Hankin Viewpoint Editor Russell Witham

“Figuratively, he’s a figurehead, so far as I can figure.”

sports@technicianonline.com

Send Jake your thoughts on the new chancellor to letters@technicianonline. com.

Photo Editor David Mabe

Advertising Manager Laura Frey

photo@technicianonline.com

advertising@sma.ncsu.edu

Design Editor Biko Tushinde design@technicianonline.com

viewpoint@technicianonline.com

Sports Editor Kate Shefte

to ask questions about what will be expected from them. I want everyone to get their books as soon as possible — I haven’t gotten mine yet, either. Get your work early before it gets you late. We may have taken a hit with two seconds in a game a week back, but there’s no overtime to lose in our school. We have to put our trust behind our currently enigmatic, upcoming chancellor. No doubt, he can make a difference. We should not f i nd ourselves surprised when we discover the reason the provost crossed the road to take a chance for our University as a chancellor — it was to make it better. Regardless of (ob)lingering skepticism, I fully support the new chancellor. I wish him the best in this new year. We may find we have a reason to put 2010 in the top successes of this University. Like it or not, we have a job to do here — the chancellor’s job is cloudy, but I wish him the best.

Design Director Lauren Blakely

“It was awesome because you got to rough the cold weather with a lot of other people as crazy as you.” Murphy Carroll sophomore, textile engineering

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Are you excited about the hiring of the new chancellor, William “Randy” Woodson? • Yes • No • I don’t care because it doesn’t affect me Visit www.technicianonline.com to cast your vote.

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2008 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features Science & Tech

Technician

tuesday, january 12, 2010 • Page 5

University participates in NASA Student Launch Initiative for the first time  Story By Jessica Neville  | photo illustration by luis zapata & lauren blakley

W

hen Isaac Owolabi first heard about an opportunity for university students to gain real experience building rockets through the NASA Student Launch Projects, his initial response was to question why his University wasn’t taking part. While he himself participated in a NASA workshop over the summer in Utah, he decided to bring the idea back to his classmates and see if he could find any response.  Four months later, Tacho Lycos (Greek for “speedy wolf ”) has been accepted into the NASA University Student Launch Initiative and is preparing to build their first small-scale test model.    In April the team will travel to Huntsville, Ala. with 350 other student rocket enthusiasts from middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities to launch a rocket they hope will hit the one-mile-high mark.  “I thought this was something other students would be interested in, being an engineering university with an aerospace program,” Owolabi, a senior in aerospace engineering, said. “I had an interest meeting to talk about the requirements, and the people who were really committed to the idea stuck around.”  The team is comprised of ten members: nine aerospace engineering majors and one mechanical engineer. Anna Winslow, a senior in aerospace engineering, is the only female representative on the team. All the members of Tacho Lycos are seniors.  Reed Goodwin-Johanssen, a senior in aerospace engineering, said he joined the rocket team because he has been interested in rocketry since high school.  “I’ve been building and flying rockets for a while, so when I heard Isaac talk about the contest of course I

MORE INFO: The team keeps a Web site with current information on how they are progressing with the design and building of the rocket. They hope to launch a small-scale model by the end of the month. Check out www. ncsurocketry.com for more info on Tacho Lycos!

wanted to be a part of it,” GoodwinJohanssen said.  Goodwin-Johanssen’s official title on the team is safety officer, or in his words the one who “makes sure everyone doesn’t blow themselves up.” He also draws from his past experiences with rockets to help purchase and acquire parts and get other team members involved with construction.  To be accepted into the Launch Initiative, the team members had to submit a proposal to the program’s selection committee outlining the team’s plan of work, initial designs for the rocket and safety precautions. After receiving approval, the team also had to request money from the N.C. Space Grant for supplies.  “We’ve already had to do a lot of preparation, and we are just now starting to build the small-scale model,” Owolabi said. “The support we have received from faculty advisers and the University has been helpful as we hit the ground running.”  The purpose of the NASA Student Launch Initiative is, according to a NASA press release, to “inspire students to parlay their interests in sci-

photo courtesy alan brown

The members of the University Rocketry Team, better known as Tacho Lycos. The name is Greek for “speedy wolf.”

ence, technology, engineering, and mathematics into rewarding careers in fields critical to NASA’s mission of exploration and scientific discovery.”  Students participating in the contest have to design their own rockets, including a working science payload, and launch them to an altitude of one mile. The payload is an on-board science experiment that contestants design to last the course of the rocket’s flight and gather data that can be studied when the rocket returns to Earth.  “Apart from the actual rocket launching, we will also have the chance to tour the NASA facility in Alabama, meet engineers and scientists working in the field, present our findings to other students and attend a banquet for all participants,”  Owolabi said. 

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“Despite it being our first year in the competition, I think we still have a good chance because we have a lot of enthusiasm and knowledge on our team,” Bowe said. “It’s a learning experience for all of us. We hope to make a good impression as first-time competitors.” The current team members of Tacho Lycos are all seniors, but the team hopes to find students interested in keeping the club going for next year’s competition.  “We want to start showing presentations to junior level classes and find students who want to keep the club going,” Bowe said. “Since I will still be here next year as a graduate student I can continue to help out. “ 

New Year, New You  How to meet your fitness resolutions in 2010 and beyond  Jessica Neville Science & Tech Editor 

Whether you want to run a marathon, lose a few pounds by Spring Break or just have a healthier body image, New Year’s resolutions can be a great way to jumpstart your fitness goals. So why do so many people have a hard time keeping their commitments longer than Feb. 1st?  Nutrition professor Sarah Ash said the key to staying on track with fitness is fundamentally about the approach students take toward weight loss.  “People put a lot of emphasis

FREE Stuff!

FREE ee! F App

Tacho Lycos is actively involved in outreach campaigns to local schools in the Raleigh area, according to Owolabi.  “Our goal is to reach 500 students by the end of the year,” Owolabi said. “We do a PowerPoint presentation and show kids the rockets we are working on. We are excited about the response we are having from younger students who are really interested in rocketry.”  Even though the team will be competing against other schools with established teams, they hope to still present a strong presence at the competition April 15 to 18. Aaron Bowe, a senior in aerospace engineering, serves the team by researching the recovery system to make sure the rocket will safely land on the ground.

FREE T’s

on weight because it is something we can see, and we are all image-conscious,” Ash said. “But fitness has to be about more than just losing weight . Students need to see the benefits from a health perspective.”  Exactly what benefits can students expect to see from a commitment to maintaining a healthy weight?  “There is a correlation between body weight and diabetes, cholesterol and heart disease, among other health problems,” Ash said. She said being physically fit also leads to a better mood and increased energy level.  Beth Harvey, a freshman in fashion merchandising, agrees

FITNESS continued page 6


Features Science & Tech

Technician

tuesday, january 12, 2010 • Page 5

University participates in NASA Student Launch Initiative for the first time  Story By Jessica Neville  | photo illustration by luis zapata & lauren blakely

W

hen Isaac Owolabi first heard about an opportunity for university students to gain real experience building rockets through the NASA Student Launch Projects, his initial response was to question why his University wasn’t taking part. While he himself participated in a NASA workshop over the summer in Utah, he decided to bring the idea back to his classmates and see if he could find any response.  Four months later, Tacho Lycos (Greek for “speedy wolf ”) has been accepted into the NASA University Student Launch Initiative and is preparing to build their first small-scale test model.    In April the team will travel to Huntsville, Ala. with 350 other student rocket enthusiasts from middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities to launch a rocket they hope will hit the one-mile-high mark.  “I thought this was something other students would be interested in, being an engineering university with an aerospace program,” Owolabi, a senior in aerospace engineering, said. “I had an interest meeting to talk about the requirements, and the people who were really committed to the idea stuck around.”  The team is comprised of ten members: nine aerospace engineering majors and one mechanical engineer. Anna Winslow, a senior in aerospace engineering, is the only female representative on the team. All the members of Tacho Lycos are seniors.  Reed Goodwin-Johanssen, a senior in aerospace engineering, said he joined the rocket team because he has been interested in rocketry since high school.  “I’ve been building and flying rockets for a while, so when I heard Isaac talk about the contest of course I

MORE INFO: The team keeps a Web site with current information on how they are progressing with the design and building of the rocket. They hope to launch a small-scale model by the end of the month. Check out www. ncsurocketry.com for more info on Tacho Lycos!

wanted to be a part of it,” GoodwinJohanssen said.  Goodwin-Johanssen’s official title on the team is safety officer, or in his words the one who “makes sure everyone doesn’t blow themselves up.” He also draws from his past experiences with rockets to help purchase and acquire parts and get other team members involved with construction.  To be accepted into the Launch Initiative, the team members had to submit a proposal to the program’s selection committee outlining the team’s plan of work, initial designs for the rocket and safety precautions. After receiving approval, the team also had to request money from the N.C. Space Grant for supplies.  “We’ve already had to do a lot of preparation, and we are just now starting to build the small-scale model,” Owolabi said. “The support we have received from faculty advisers and the University has been helpful as we hit the ground running.”  The purpose of the NASA Student Launch Initiative is, according to a NASA press release, to “inspire students to parlay their interests in sci-

photo courtesy alan brown

The members of the University Rocketry Team, better known as Tacho Lycos. The name is Greek for “speedy wolf.”

ence, technology, engineering, and mathematics into rewarding careers in fields critical to NASA’s mission of exploration and scientific discovery.”  Students participating in the contest have to design their own rockets, including a working science payload, and launch them to an altitude of one mile. The payload is an on-board science experiment that contestants design to last the course of the rocket’s flight and gather data that can be studied when the rocket returns to Earth.  “Apart from the actual rocket launching, we will also have the chance to tour the NASA facility in Alabama, meet engineers and scientists working in the field, present our findings to other students and attend a banquet for all participants,”  Owolabi said. 

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Call 919-828-6278 www.universitysuites.net

“Despite it being our first year in the competition, I think we still have a good chance because we have a lot of enthusiasm and knowledge on our team,” Bowe said. “It’s a learning experience for all of us. We hope to make a good impression as first-time competitors.” The current team members of Tacho Lycos are all seniors, but the team hopes to find students interested in keeping the club going for next year’s competition.  “We want to start showing presentations to junior level classes and find students who want to keep the club going,” Bowe said. “Since I will still be here next year as a graduate student I can continue to help out. “ 

New Year, New You  How to meet your fitness resolutions in 2010 and beyond  Jessica Neville Science & Tech Editor 

Whether you want to run a marathon, lose a few pounds by Spring Break or just have a healthier body image, New Year’s resolutions can be a great way to jumpstart your fitness goals. So why do so many people have a hard time keeping their commitments longer than Feb. 1st?  Nutrition professor Sarah Ash said the key to staying on track with fitness is fundamentally about the approach students take toward weight loss.  “People put a lot of emphasis

FREE Stuff!

FREE ee! F App

Tacho Lycos is actively involved in outreach campaigns to local schools in the Raleigh area, according to Owolabi.  “Our goal is to reach 500 students by the end of the year,” Owolabi said. “We do a PowerPoint presentation and show kids the rockets we are working on. We are excited about the response we are having from younger students who are really interested in rocketry.”  Even though the team will be competing against other schools with established teams, they hope to still present a strong presence at the competition April 15 to 18. Aaron Bowe, a senior in aerospace engineering, serves the team by researching the recovery system to make sure the rocket will safely land on the ground.

FREE T’s

on weight because it is something we can see, and we are all image-conscious,” Ash said. “But fitness has to be about more than just losing weight . Students need to see the benefits from a health perspective.”  Exactly what benefits can students expect to see from a commitment to maintaining a healthy weight?  “There is a correlation between body weight and diabetes, cholesterol and heart disease, among other health problems,” Ash said. She said being physically fit also leads to a better mood and increased energy level.  Beth Harvey, a freshman in fashion merchandising, agrees

FITNESS continued page 6


Sports

TECHNICIAN

TUESDAY, JANUARY 12, 2010 • PAGE 7

THROWS continued from page 8

“You have to step up there and make free throws,” coach Sidney Lowe said. “They did. We just didn’t make them. If you’re going to your main guys and they’re the ones getting fouled, most people feel good about that.” The Pack missed seven free throws in the first ten minutes of the second half to keep the Cavaliers within striking distance. On the other hand, Virginia shot 19 for 20 from the

WRESTLING continued from page 8 PHOTO COURTESY OF CLUB SWIMMING/TECHNICIAN

deep and come back to win 13-11, securing the victory for the Pack. “To come back like that — there’s not a lot of freshman that can do that,” Jordan said. “He really needed that win. Dale was going through a tough spot there, and that typically happens as a freshman and he just pushed through it.” Shull’s motivated work ethic and raw talent are gifts Jordan said are way beyond his years. They are traits Jordan saw in 2009 national champion Darrion Caldwell, as well as Shull’s teammate, freshman Eloheim Palma. “He’s one of the few wrestlers that will sit there and continue to work on a technique no mat-

Members of the club swiming team gather after a meet. The club swiming team will host its next meet on Jan. 30 in Cary.

SWIM

continued from page 8

doesn’t have a coach. They can try out a few practices for two weeks before club dues are required. “We don’t really give any instruction, so anyone who doesn’t know how to swim isn’t going to gain a lot from our practices,” White said. Interested swimmers are invited to take part in the meet the club is set to host Jan. 30 at the Triangle Aquatic Center

in Cary. Kirkpatrick said event decisions are left up to the meet host. “Some meets have 25 meter swims of every stroke,” Kirkpatrick said. “A couple years ago, there was a distance meet where they had 400 IM and the mile. It all depends on the team hosting the meet and what they want to do. Duke occasionally hosts a meet where you only swim relays.” White said State’s meet will feature “a standard mix” of events, including short distance swims and three different

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relays – one freestyle, one medley and “one kind of fun, silly relay,” which will consist of non competitive strokes. Beforehand, the team will likely hold one of its regular pasta dinners in order to load up on carbohydrates and build camaraderie. “We like to get to know people outside of the pool and have a good time,” White said.

Classifieds

foul line, making its final 17 in a row while outscoring the Pack 37-19 over the game’s final 12 and a half minutes. State finished the game 16 for 26 on free throws. “Free throws can make or break a game,” senior forward Dennis Horner said. “They made the last 17. That’s going to finish a team off. It’s an easy basket and you have to make them.” Freshman forward Scott Wood said after the Virginia game free throws have been a point of emphasis and also said the team will work even more on them in the practices to come.

“We’ve been doing a lot of free throws the last couple days in practice,” Wood said. “I can guarantee we will probably be [at the line] a little more tomorrow during practice.” Lowe said part of the difficulty of improving free throw shooting is how hard it is to simulate pressurized game-like situations in practice. “You can work on them all you want,” Lowe said. “But it’s hard to simulate the atmosphere of a game and pressure, real pressure, of stepping up there and shooting free throws.”

“Dale’s a good guy. He’s done ter how many times he fails at it,” Jordan said. “I count on what he’s supposed to do,” him in line up — there’s no Moreno, a redshirt sophomore at 125, said. “His motivation is question.” up there — he Shull has acdoesn’t like to cepted his role lose, and he’s as a standout learned a lot on the team, so far. Dale’s a nd sa id he going to have wants to keep a good future improving. here.” “I wa nt to Mike Moreno, redshirt sophomore Wit h lots end the season of ACC duals on a positive ahead, this is note and keep learning and keep growing,” only the beginning for Shull, Shull said. “Really this is a big according to Jordan. “He’s made a choice, he wants learning experience, I want to come back next year 10 times to compete at this level,” Jordan better than when I came in this said. “I expect him to compete year.” for the conference championPractice partner Mike More- ship by the end of the year and no has also seen this improve- go out to the national tournament in Shull’s performance ment and win matches — he’s and said he greatly respects that talented.” him.

“Dale’s going to have a good future here.”

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Announcements Around CAmpus The NCSU Outreach Center at the Dorothy and Roy Park Alumni Center is now hiring energetic students to make fundraising calls contacting NC State Alumni. Pay starts at $7.75/hr. and you must work 2 of the following shifts: Mon-Thurs 6-9, Sun 4-8. Please apply at http://www.ncsu.edu/annualgiv­ing/ outreachjobs.html

EmploymEnt Help Wanted Coffee Shop, part-time/full- time ev­enings/weekends, flexible hours for friendly, dependable person. Coffee & Crepes. 315 Crossroads Blv­d. Cary. Call 919-971- 2601 Hab Techs Needed! Maxim Healthcare needs staff to work w/dev­elopmentally disabled clients in Wake County. Flexible hours in afternoons, ev­enings, and weekends. By The $10-$15/hr based on experience. Need own transportation. 676-3118.

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Professional services Personal Injuries, DWIs, speeding tickets, & other criminal matters, contact attorney Dominique Williams at 919-3348394 or dominique@hardisonwood. com to protect your legal rights.

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2018 Clark Avenue, Raleigh, NC 27605 · Located in Cameron Village, beside the Party Store 919.755.2231 · www.cameronbargrill.com

ACROSS 1 Rating for many HBO shows 5 Capital of Morocco 10 Vise parts 14 Twice the radius: Abbr. 15 Funds for online buys 16 Make spelling corrections to, e.g. 17 Burlesque act 19 Camper driver, for short 20 Baghdad’s river 21 “Tobacco Road” novelist __ Caldwell 23 Pioneer in pistolgrip hair dryers 24 Lang. of Lombardy 25 Repair, as a tear 26 “... boy __ girl?” 27 Antidiscrimination agcy. 29 Forensic evidence threads 31 Surrealist Joan 33 Allegiance 35 University governing body 41 Tummytightening garment 42 Sailor’s patron saint 43 Pour into a carafe 46 __ prof. 49 Newbie reporter 50 Rose of Guns N’ Roses 51 Resistance units 53 Bathroom hangers 55 “You cannot be serious!” tennis great 57 Dolts 58 Pre-migraine headache phenomenon 59 Baseball’s Big Papi 62 Certain NCO 63 Hoop-shaped gasket 64 Picard’s counselor 65 South Florida vacation destination

1/12/10

By Allan E. Parrish

66 Simultaneous equation variables 67 __ Kong DOWN 1 100-plus-yd. kickoff returns, e.g. 2 Director De Sica 3 Tomato-based sauce 4 Pedro’s girlfriend 5 Call it a night 6 Top pitchers 7 Sheep’s cry 8 Pitcher’s pinpoint control, say 9 Cold relief brand 10 Dolt 11 Recommend 12 Hot dog 13 Spreads, as seed 18 __-dieu: kneeler 22 Narrow apertures 23 Search high and low 24 Summer coolers 28 Slays, mobstyle 30 Computer memory unit 32 Marine predator 34 Martial __

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36 Blood drive participant 37 Greek __ Church 38 City east of San Diego 39 Liquid-in-liquid suspension 40 Cries convulsively 43 Table linen material 44 Forgive 45 Pastors and priests

1/12/10

47 Unduly formal 48 Corrida competitor 52 Stiller’s partner 54 Value 56 Washington team, familiarly 57 It can be changed or made up 60 Sportscaster Scully 61 Turn sharply


Sports

COUNTDOWN

• 14 days until State plays UNC at the RBC Center

INSIDE

• Page 7: A continuation of the club swimming story

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 8 • TUESDAY, JANUARY 12, 2010

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Popik recieves regional honor Pack men’s soccer associate head coach Dan Popik recieved the distinction of being named the 2009 NSCAA South Region Assistant Coach of the Year on Monday. Popik will receive his award during the 2010 NSCAA Convention in Philadelphia, Pa. on Jan. 14. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Hill and Sutton recognized as two of the best Golfer Matt Hill, who won an NCAA title, was recognized as the number two Canadian amateur golfer by the RCGA and the seventh best amateur in the world by R&A World Amateur Golf Rankings. Mitchell Sutton was also named as the top junior golfer for the 2009 season by the CN Future Links Junior Boy’s Order of Merit. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Former State football players recieve honors Former Pack wide reciver Mike Quick will be inducted into the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame. Jim Donnan, a former Georgia coach and Wolfpack quarterback, will also be inducted into the hall. The ceremony will take place on May 13. SOURCE: WRAL

ATHLETIC SCHEDULE January 2010 Su

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Charity stripe plagues Pack Loss to Virginia was second time in three games free throws have cost Pack in close contests Tyler Everett Deputy Sports Editor

With losses in four of the past seven games, N.C. State is learning the hard way about the importance of free throws, especially in crunch time. After an 8-1 start to the season, due in part to a team free throw shooting percentage of .648, State is now 11-5 and 0-2 in the ACC going into tonight’s trip to Florida State. The Pack took on the Arizona Wildcats Dec. 23 and trailed 69-61 with 53 seconds remaining. Due to three missed free throws by Arizona and a furious one-man rally by junior point guard Javier Gonzalez, who scored 10 points in the final 30 seconds, the Wolfpack and Wildcats were tied at 74 with six seconds left. A last second layup by Arizona’s Nic Wise allowed his team to survive its late misses and escape with a narrow 7674 victory. But in erasing an eightpoint lead to tie a game that appeared to be a foregone conclusion with less than a minute left, State made the type of comeback that is possible only when an opponent fails to knock down last-minute free throws. In a Jan. 3 showdown with the Florida Gators, the Pack again experienced a situation where a team failed to capitalize on a chance to put a close game out of reach at the free

THROWS continued page 7

31

Tuesday MEN’S BASKETBALL AT FLORIDA STATE Tallahassee, Fla. , 7 p.m.

throw line. This time, it was State’s own players who struggled enough to keep the game interesting until the final seconds. Despite leading by five with 22 seconds to play, the Pack found itself ahead by only two points with two seconds remaining after the third missed free throw in the final seconds, which left the Gators with the ball and a chance for an improbable victory. Gator forward Chandler Parsons’ subsequent 75-foot heave found nothing but net and gave his team the stunning win. Junior forward Tracy Smith said he and his teammates need to avoid fading away, something he believes is playing a role in the late misses at the free throw line. “We just have to keep practicing our free throws,” Smith said. “We have to keep on working at it, concentrating on staying at the line and stop falling back. We fall back too much at the line instead of staying at the line and concentrating on the free throw. We’re kind of running back on the second one like we know it’s going to go in, then we miss it.” The Pack’s most recent loss, which it dropped Saturday to the visiting Virginia Cavaliers, lacked buzzer-beating heartbreak, but served as yet another harsh example of the significance of free throw shooting. State led the Cavs by 10 points, at 43-33, with 12:35 to play, but missed free throws, among other things, keyed Virginia’s comeback and eventual eight-point victory.

KEVIN COOK/TECHNICIAN FILE PHOTO

Senior forward Dennis Horner shoots a free throw at the end of the N.C. State– Winthrop game in the RBC Center. Horner scored a team high of 12 points, including two free throws, during the game. The Wolfpack beat the Eagles 68 to 52.

WRESTLING

CLUB SPORTS

Club swimming provides relaxed workout environment

Friday MEN’S TRACK VIRGINIA TECH INVITE Blacksburg, Va., all day WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD VIRGINIA TECH INVITE Blacksburg, Va., all day GYMNASTICS VS. RUTGERS Reynolds Coliseum, 7 p.m.

RIFLE AT PALMYRA TOURNAMENT Palmyra, Pa., all day

WOMEN’S SWIMING AND DIVING VS. GEORGIA TECH Atlanta, Ga., 11 a.m. MEN’S SWIMMING AND DIVING VS. GEORGIA TECH Atlanta, Ga., 11 a.m. MEN’S BASKETBALL VS. CLEMSON RBC Center, noon

DID YOU KNOW? The men’s basketball team will meet Florida State tonight for the 44 time. The Wolfpack leads the overall series 25-18

COMING SOON

Wednesday: A breakdown of the best basketball players at each position Thursay: A gymnastics season preview story

MORE INFO

Kate Shefte

Sports Editor

Saturday MEN’S TRACK VIRGINIA TECH INVITE Blacksburg, Va. , all day

WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD VIRGINIA TECH INVITE Blacksburg, Va., all day

Team allows members to work out at their own pace and preference

DAVID MABE/TECHNICIAN

Freshman Dale Shull practices with junior Bobby Ward at wrestling practice Monday afternoon in the Weisiger-Brown athletics facility.

Freshman’s performance earns respect of team Dale Shull, 2009 high school national champion, has proven his worth already Jen Hankin Deputy Sports Editor

On a Pack wrestling team consisting of mostly underclassmen, freshman Dale Shull, who hails from Fort Lupton, Col., found a way to quickly turn heads. Shull, who was unsure if he would even wrestle much at the beginning of this year, gained the starting position at the 141 weight class early in the season. According to coach Carter

Jordan, Shull has come a long way already this season. “He is a true freshman wrestling,” Jordan said. “It’s going to have its ups and downs. He works so hard and has such a great attitude and he wants to be good. That’s all you really need to be successful.” Shull is 11-8 on the season, with three falls, and has won both of his ACC matches. Over break, Shull suffered to find a groove, losing three matches in a row before winning the final three. “I did good in the beginning of the year, earning a starting spot,” Shull said. “I’ve taken some bumps and I’m now learning from them.” Shull has learned numer-

ous techniques from winning matches, and according to Shull, that’s when things start to click.    “It’s when I lose that my body shuts down, really every match I win I walk off knowing what I did right, when I lose it’s the opposite,” Shull said. “There really are only two matches this year that I’ve lost that I really was out-skilled; the others I shut down mentally.” During the Duke dual on Jan 9, Shull’s metal game was right on target and he delivered a standout performance, according to Jordan. Mike Bell from Duke took a dominating 8-3 lead early in the second period. Shull managed to dig

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Three nights a week, a few dozen swimmers take to the water in Carmichael Pool. Michael Phelps or Amanda  Beard, they are not. Some are preparing for upcoming meets and others just want to shed holiday weight. But Amy Kirkpatrick, a senior in biomedical engineering and the club’s president, said the beauty of the club is that it allows swimmers the option to be laid back. Kirkpatrick or club vice president Patrick White write the practice sets of each stroke up on a dry erase board and the swimmers branch off into their own lanes. After, Kirkpatrick said, it’s up to the club members how they want to customize their workout. “It’s like a template. Nothing is set in stone,” Kirkpatrick said. “You can change your practice however you want.” Some swam year-round before coming to State at their high schools and with swimming clubs. Some are just getting down the basics. Regardless, Kirkpatrick said what sets the team aside

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Approximately 60 active members – 30 male, 30 female Practices regularly held Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursday at 7:30 in the Carmichael Pool First practice of 2010 held Tuesday, Jan. 19 Meet held Jan. 30 at the Triangle Aquatic Center in Cary For more information, go to http://clubs.ncsu.edu/ swim/about.html SOURCE: CLUB SWIMMING

is that it allows for plenty of “freedom.” “Somet i mes [members] come for the workout and others come to just hang out with their friends,” Kirkpatrick said. “There are some that swim non-stop for the entire practice and there are others that do sets, stop in between and have a conversation.” White, a senior in chemistry, echoed those statements, saying the club caters to both the competitive and recreational swimmer. “It’s a more laid-back kind of atmosphere where you can get out of it what you want to get out of it,” White said. “You can come to practice every day, swim hard and maybe add on some extra yards or you can take some time and learn a few things.” However, some level of swimming knowledge is required for potential club members, as it

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Technician - January 12, 2010