Issuu on Google+

TECHNICIAN          

technicianonline.com

 

 

Raleigh, North Carolina

MEGAN MYERS/TECHNICIAN

DAVID MABE/TECHNICIAN

People take shelter under an umbrella from the inclement weather at the Hillsborough Street Renaissance Festival Saturday.

A steady rain fell throughout the day at the Hillsborough Street Renaissance Festival Saturday.

DREIER CARR/TECHNICIAN

Members of Pi Lambda Phi fraternity prepare barbecue for the ATO Pig-N-Pie Cook-Off during the Hillsborough Street Renaissance Festival Saturday

Weather dampens festival WEATHER KEEPS ATTENDANCE DOWN DURING ALL-DAY FESTIVAL ON HILLSBOROUGH STREET SATURDAY John Cline

mated closer to 3,000 had been by. “We had a good day,” Lovette said. “The weather impacted it [a lot.]” The Hillsborough Street RenaisMerchants were impressed with sance Green Arts and Music Festival the turnout in spite of the elements. kicked off at noon Saturday despite “I’m impressed with all the people steady rain all day. The event marked who made it out despite the weather, the first time since the streets con- it’s awesome!” Bethany Chatfield, struction in 1792 that Hillsborough an N.C. State alum and owner of Street was closed off completely for ohcallmeb.com, a handmade jewthis sort of festival. elry company, said. “I think people The Hillsborough are still coming out Street Renaisbecause they want sance Festival was to support this and planned to high- TECHNICIANONLINE.COM they want this to light the aesthetic Check out photos by Dreier Carr, Christin be able to happen changes planned Hardy, Brent Kitchen, David Mabe and Megan again.” for the area over the Myers, and Wolf-TV video of the Hillsborough Harper Pridgen, Renaissance Festival Saturday in our a senior in textiles next two years and Street interactive map online, designed by Biko featured a variety of Tushinde. Send your thoughts on content to engineering, said eco-friendly ven- photo@technicianonline.com. she agreed with dors, informative Chatfield. booths, a pie and BBQ competition, “The whole concept of this is great, and live music throughout the day. I just wish it hadn’t rained,” Pridgen Students and community mem- said. “But either way I’ve still had a bers turned out for the event despite great time and lots of great barbecue the drizzle, but attendance was well and pie.” below planners’ estimates. One of the main attractions at Alan Lovette, owner of Mitch’s and the festival was the Barbecue and 5 O’Clock Sports bar, said planners Pie tasting competitions that were had said upwards of 20,000 people put on by the Alpha Tau Omega would fill the streets, while he esti- fraternity, where people crowded Staff Writer

VIEW MORE

BBQ COOKOFF:

PIE TASTING WINNERS:

1st 2nd

1st 2nd

PI BETA PHI

1st 2nd

CHI PSI

Sororities

Sororities

Q SHACK RED HOT & BLUE COMPILED BY JOHN CLINE

throughout the afternoon. Here festival-goers could purchase a ticket for 7 dollars that allowed them to taste entries and submit their vote for best tasting. David Orr, a representative from the fraternity, said the group wanted to take initiative to put on such an event. “As a newer fraternity on campus, we wanted to create a signature event,” Orr said. “We wanted something that would get our whole chapter, and even the community involved. It’s something that allows us to have fun, get some exposure, and raise some money for a good cause.” Funds raised from ticket sales went to benefit “Soles 4 Souls”, a charity that takes donated shoes and distributes them to needy families. Orr also remained optimistic despite the dreary conditions, saying forward thinking and determination

TRI DELTA

Fraternities

PI LAM COMPILED BY JOHN CLINE

allowed the planners to get this festival together over the past year. “You can’t plan for the weather,” Orr said. “As someone told me, first they said we couldn’t get the money for this event, then they said we couldn’t get the street closed off. We got through all that, and this rain is just another obstacle.” Jacqui McLaughlin was one of the official judges for the barbecues and pies. “This is a great event for the community and N.C. State,” McLaughlin said. Aside from the food, patrons could browse through a collection of ecofriendly, unique vendors such as FESTIVAL continued page 3

Campus vote names new Engineering open house makes connections with future students sound meter Howlometer Annual event intends to interest students in N.C. State, engineering

Write-in name voted as title of senior design project Ty Johnson

Staff Report

r Student entry winner - Brittany r

CHRISTIN HARDY/TECHNICIAN

Prospective student Matthew Graham, looks inside the wind tunnel, which is located on campus in Broughton Hall. Andrew Roberts, a senior in aerospace engineering, told Graham of the many merits of the N.C. State engineering program, during the open house — the engineering department’s time to recruit future students. There were many senior design studios open to the prospective students, showcasing the range of things engineers can do. “I like the idea of engineering because it is science applied,” Graham said.

Without Borders among others. Event planners also encouraged attendees to attend Hillsborough

Street’s renaissance festivities along with its exhibitions and information seminars.

NC State Bookstores Now offers Staples® brand office & school supplies right here in our store.

The still-in-progress noise meter for Wolfpack athletics has a name as of early Friday morning. The student vote revealed that the preferred name for the noise meter was “Howlometer,” the only student-generated choice on the ballot. The design team for the new meter, along with Student Body President Jay Dawkins, came up with a short list of possible names for their project which will be an eight foot replica of the Memorial Bell Tower with lights that flash in accordance with how loud fans yell. The poll also allowed for student input for a name to be considered, and, after narrowing the field to five possible names, freshman Brittany

insidetechnician

HOWLOMETER QUICK FACTS

News Editor

Centennial and Main Campus were both full of people Saturday as the College of Engineering held its Open House to inform and entice prospective undergraduates with displays, experiments, and tours of campus. Exhibits were held from Talley Student Center to Centennial’s Engineering Buildings in an effort to show possible engineering majors the wide variety of degrees offered by the college. A demonstration, “What is Engineering?” was also given to middle school students to inform future students about the concepts of engineering. The event featured displays from the University Career Center, the Ben Franklin Scholars Program, Women In Science & Engineering and Engineers

DAVID MABE/TECHNICIAN

Kaci Torres, a 2007 alumnus in economics, perfoms with a hula hoop while balancing on a piece of pipe during the Hillsborough Street Renaissance Festival Saturday.

r r r r

Hall Modeled after Memorial Bell Tower Portable Height - 8 feet Base - 3 feet by 3 feet Senior design project deadline - April 28

Reuse. Revamp. Redress See page 6.

SOURCE: HOWLOMETER DESIGN TEAM

Hall’s name, Howlometer, was added to the ballot. Because of her entry, Hall will be the first technician to operate the meter after it’s completed. Robbie Shute, a junior in aerospace engineering, said he likes the name choice. “It’s corny,” Shute said. “But funny, and fitting.” “You have a speedometer, a tachymeter and now we have a Howlometer,” Dawkins said, METER continued page 3

Duke beats FSU, wins ACC Touranament See page 8.

viewpoint life and style classifieds sports

All the supplies you need. All right here.

4 5 7 8


Page 2

1"(&t.0/%": ."3$) 

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

TECHNICIAN

THROUGH DAVID’S LENS

Ag Week starts today

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Saja Hindi at editor@ technicianonline.com.

Today:

56/46

Showers throughout the day with highs in the mid 50s

Tuesday:

Colorful tug-of-war takes place

Partly cloudy with only a 10 percent chance of showers.

G

The Department of Political Science is hosting Melissa Harris-Lacewell today beginning at 7:30 p.m. Harris-Lacewell, an associate professor of politics and African American studies at Princeton University, will discuss racism in this era, especially in like of the election of President Barack Obama. Harris-Lacewell has had writings published in newspapers nationally and is the author of “Barbershops, Bibles and BET: Everyday Talk and Black Political Thought,� an award-winning book. The author has also been featured on several television and radio shows for her expertise on elections, racial issues and gender issues. The event, called “Race and Racism in the Obama Era,� will be held in Withers Hall room 140.

Agriculture Awareness Week begins today on the Brickyard and will go through Thursday. The annual event promotes agriculture and is sponsored by Alpha Zeta Fraternity. Different clubs in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences will have informational displays at various booths in the Brickyard. There will be an Alpha Zeta booth on the Brickyard as well, with raffle tickets and T-shirts sold throughout the week. Several live animals and exhibits will be open each day until 5 p.m. More information can be found at Alpha Zeta’s website.

WEATHER WISE

58 41

Author speaks at racism seminar

IN THE KNOW

SOURCE: ALPHA ZETA

PHOTO BY DAVID MABE

erry Antony, a graduate student in textiles, Jaspreet Saluja, a graduate student in electrical engineering, and Juhi Jain, a graduate student in civil engineering, play tug of war while celebrating Holi—the Hindu Festival of Colors Sunday. Jain said the festival was important to her because the colors represented unity and diversity.

SOURCE: DPS

Wednesday:

WORLD & NATION

69 41 Partly cloudy with temperatures rising to almost 70. SOURCE: WEATHER.COM

Cheney says Obama raises risk of terrorism

Dick Cheney, the former vice president under George W. Bush, defended the Bush administration’s anti-terrorism policies and claimed that changing those policies would actually put American lives at risk. “President Obama campaigned

CAMPUS CALENDAR March 2009 M

T

W

Th

F

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

SOURCE: CNN

Man kills four, then himself

A man, whose name has not been released, apparently murdered four people and then fled the scene and committed suicide early Sunday in a home in Miami, Fla., according to authorities. Authorities got a report of shots fired early Sunday, and showed up to find four bodies with no sign of the shooter, although some witnesses

reported a pickup truck left the area before officers arrived. However, 911 dispatchers soon received a call regarding shots and a house and vehicle engulfed in flames. Police found the alleged shooter dead in the area. The four dead were once the alleged shooters friends and family: his wife, who he was separated from, the daughter of the wife, the daughter’s boyfriend and the boyfriend’s grandmother, the Miami affiliate of CNN reports. “Based on the evidence, detectives have determined the findings at both locations to be consistent with a murder-suicide and possibly domestic related,� authorities said in a statement.

Test Your

Energy IQ! From:  U.S. Department of Energy

In a family of four, if each member takes  one 10­minute shower using a standard  showerhead, how many gallons of water  will the family use per year?

SOURCE: CNN

Sa

Today AGRICULTURE AWARENESS WEEK DAY 1 DOCUMENTARY FILM: “WHEN MOORS RULED EUROPE� Erdahl Cloyd Theater, 4 to 6 p.m. TMF INFO SESSION: ROTARY SCHOLARSHIPS Clark Hall fourth floor conference room, 5 to 6 p.m. HOW WE COMMUNICATE IN CERTAIN SITUATIONS First Year College Commons room 106, 5:30 to 6 p.m. MOCK ADMISSIONS FOR LAW SCHOOL Witherspoon Student Center, 7 to 8:30 p.m.

GET INVOLVED IN TECHNICIAN Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copyedit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday - Thursday 9 a.m. - midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m., or e-mail Editor-in-Chief Saja Hindi at editor@technicianonline.com.

POLICE BLOTTER March 12 1:28 A.M. | CHECK PERSON Coliseum Deck Officer spoke with group making loud noise. Everything was all right. No further action taken. 2:01 A.M. | TRAFFIC STOP Dan Allen Drive Student was issued citation for stop sign violation. 2:32 A.M. | TRAFFIC STOP Dan Allen Drive Non-student was issued citation for stop sign violation. 8:27 A.M. | CHECK PERSON Coliseum Deck Report of subject pulling on doors

of vehicles. Officers canvassed area with negative results. 10:13 A.M. | MEDICAL ASSIST Student Heath Center Student in need of medical assistance was transported to hospital. 11:13 A.M. | MEDICAL ASSIST Student Health Center Student in need of medical assistance was transported to hospital. 11:20 A.M. | FIRE ALARM MAF Science Building. Units responded to alarm caused by blown light ballast. 3:37 P.M. | ASSIST OTHER AGENCY Public Safety Center Students reported simple assault which occurred off campus. Officer assisted in reporting incident to RPD. Concerned behavior report wascompleted.

7:23 P.M. | SUSPICIOUS INCIDENT Equine Facility Staff reported suspicious subjects in the area. Officers were unable to locate anyone.

Answer: 73,000 gallons

Su

against it all across the country, and now he is making some choices that, in my mind, will, in fact, raise the risk to the American people of another attack,� Cheney said on CNN.

!"#$%&'"&()%*+,&-.).+%/%)0

1112)$342%546%)%*+,

  !"#$%&'&('))&#*+$&,*%-.&+'/$&0.&1$..$234      !"#$%&'()*+,-*'./0/1/2'   '''''''''''''''',)*+,-*'0'   '''''''''''''''',)*+3443'%)5678)9!!            

 

     

on­campus specialists in college health  your on­campus specialists in college health    !  Board Certified Physicians  !  Physician Extenders  !  Appointments online at SHS  Web site or call 919­515­7107   !  !"#$%&'()$*+,-(./.­515­7762  !  Allergy Injection Clinic  !  Immunizations 919­515­7233  !  International Travel Clinic 

  !    !    !    ! 

Health Promotion (919­515­WELL)  Laboratory & X­ray   

Pharmacy 919­515­5040 

Physical Therapy 919­513­3260    !  Confidential Medical Records  !  Routine office visits at no charge  !  Charge for some services 

(919) 836-1555

Mon ! Fri* 8 am ­ 9 pm Tues 9 am ! 9 pm Sat 8 am ! 11:30 am *Limited services M­F 5­9 pm and Sat morning   

GET BOTH FOR $13.99

For more information, call 919­515­2563 or visit us online at  www.ncsu.edu/student_health   

VALID MONDAY & WEDNESDAY ONLY

 

Located at Cates Avenue & Dan Allen Drive                    

Accredited by AAAHC 

GAG TAG TEES   "  

 !!

John Pizzarelli has cultivated a winning career by singing classic standards and late-night ballads, and by playing sublime and inventive guitar— all delivered with playful charm and humor.

this week

  "  

 

Music @ NC State is proud to present special guest cellist Alan Toda-Ambaras, accompanied by Misako Toda. TodaAmbaras captured the attention of the musical world when, at the age of fourteen, he received the Most Promising Contestant Prize at the 2005 Rostropovich International Cello Competition in Paris.

!"#$%"&'($)*$(+*$,-.($("$"%&$"&*$)#($/"&'($)*$(+*$01.(2

www.gagtagts.com

NCSU Center Stage The Crafts Center Dance Program Gregg Museum of Art & Design Music @ NC State University Theatre

Ticket Central: 515.1100 2nd Floor, Talley Student Center

ncsu.edu/arts


News

TECHNICIAN

FESTIVAL continued from page 1

Iron Mountain Glass with their assorted hand-blown items or dolldesign and ohcallmeb, each with handcrafted jewelry. Photographers and natural clothiers were also seen peddling their wares.

Those interested in new ecofriendly advances in technology could learn from the Biodiesel Education Trailer and other similar booths. “There was a great variety of cool, local artists and designers,” said Sherri Raye, a native of Raleigh. “It was great because you wouldn’t normally find stuff like

this at a mall or typical shop.” All in all, the day was still a success despite the rain, according to Josh Saville. “I’m surprised at how many people did show up despite the rain,” Saville, an event worker, said. “Had it been sunny, this would’ve been fantastic.”

Own a piece of

history.

Remember the 2008-2009 year with an Agromeck.

Pre-order yours now at www.ncsu. edu/agromeck/

.0/%": ."3$) t1"(&

METER

“You never know how loud we can be until we try.”

continued from page 1

adding that the addition of the meter will benefit all of N.C. State Athletics. “It will definitely give us a little more incentive to yell and that always helps the home team.” Jack Roney, a senior in history, remembers back when the crowd responded to a sound meter back when the Wolfpack beat UNC-Chapel Hill back in 2003. “They put up a decibel reader on the mega-tron [in

Jay Dawkins, student body president Carter-Finley Stadium], I remember it jumping up to 135.1 and breaking the then-current record,” Roney said. “I haven’t seen the decibel reader on the megatron since then.” Dawkins thinks having the meter up will help the crowd compete to be louder. “We’re trying to push the envelope,” Dawkins said.

“You never know how loud we can be until we try.” Roney is glad to see the return of a sound meter to athletic events as well. I’m very excited to see they have it coming back,” Roney said. “[It] should help keep the crowd on their feet and loud for all the home games.”

!"#$%&'()*%+(

23?% !"336@+ !"#"$"%&'() &'**+,-.-/01%23.))3 4/)+5"6%789:

;<%4&<=<>

March 23 in the Playzone in Carmichael March 24 in the Brickyard 10-3 Meet properties, find out ways to go green and don’t forget the free food!

The Preiss Company

IS COMING TO RALEIGH!

Our Goal Raise the standard of student living without raising the cost.

PLAYBOY IS LOOKING FOR NORTH CAROLINA STATE COEDS TO APPEAR IN THE MAGAZINE’S OCTOBER 2009 “GIRLS OF THE ACC” PICTORIAL.

AUDITIONS: MARCH 23 & 24

We offer individual leases, roommate matching service, apartments with 2,3, and 4 bedrooms, and 24-hour clubhouse and amenities! 10 Different Locatons in Raleigh “I WAS A STUDENT AT OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY WHEN I APPEARED IN PLAYBOY—NOW I AM THE MAGAZINE’S 2007 PLAYMATE OF THE YEAR! IT’S BEEN ONE OF THE BEST EXPERIENCES OF MY LIFE.” -Sara Jean Underwood 2007 Playmate of the Year

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SCHEDULE AN AUDITION,

call (312) 401–7343 or visit www.playboy.com/pose Candidates must be at least 18 years of age and registered as full–or part–time students at an ACC university They must bring two forms of ID with them to the audition—one that verifes enrollment and one that shows date of birth. ©2009 Playboy. PLAYBOY and PLAYMATE OF THE YEAR are marks of Playboy.

University Woods University Oaks University Meadows University Glen Red Wolf Crossing Method Townhomes Collegeview Apartments University Village at Raleigh Gorman Street Village Blue Ridge Apartments

3333 Melrose Club Blvd. Raleigh, NC 27603 919.835.7835 Fax: 919.835.7801 www.universitycondos.com


Viewpoint

1"(&t.0/%": ."3$) 

TECHNICIAN

{OUR VIEW}

Hillsborough Street Renaissance has potential THE ISSUE:

Only about 2,000 of people attended the Hillsborough Street Renaissance Saturday.

OUR OPINION:

Hillsborough Street needs events like these in order to grow, and the only way to help it grow is to plan ahead.

THE SOLUTION: People should continue to support events like the Hillsborough Street Renaissance and Hillsborough Hikes and the events should be planned well.

A

bout 2,000 people attended the Hillsborough Street Renaissance Saturday — much fewer than the planners’ estimate of 20,000 people. Though rain and cold weather are partially to blame for the scant turnout for the Hillsborough Street Renaissance, those in charge should have been prudent when it came to the planning of the event. For an event like this to become a tradition and a success, there needs to be preparation, which includes a comprehensive rain plan and a better date. Planners of the Hillsborough Street Renaissance sent out Facebook messages that told attendees the event was still going on, despite the 43 degree temperature and rain.

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board excluding the news department and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

Though Facebook is an effective tool for reaching out to students and young adults in the area, the Hillsborough Street Renaissance was also marketed as a family event. The planners should have used its Web site to let people know the event was still going on and reassure them that the rain would not affect the goings on. With continued efforts and hard work, the Hillsborough Street Renaissance can become a big event like Artsplosure in Raleigh, the N.C. Seafood Festival in Morehead City or the Merlefest in Wilkesboro. After all, getting Hillsborough Street to close down for an all-day event for the first time in 217 years is

a big achievement. But, all of the preceding events take place in warmer times of the year, such as April, early October or May. Having the event at a time when temperature is not going to be a hindrance to attendees is a change that needs to be made. The Hillsborough Street Renaissance is a great idea and is a great way to help make Hillsborough Street a desirable place to visit, and we have faith it will come back with vengeance next year but only if it is planned well and the planners of the event have good communication with attendees. Students and anyone who wants to see Hillsborough Street grow should support events like the

Hillsborough Street Renaissance and Hillsborough Hikes. Also, overestimating the number of people who are going to attend the event could be detrimental. The planners overestimated the number of people who were going to attend by 18,000 people —that’s almost 90 percent. We ask the planners to be realistic in the future when estimating the number of attendees, otherwise the City of Raleigh will be less inclined to allow Hillsborough Street to close for events. We have con f idence t he Hillsborough Street Renaissance has the potential to become one of the biggest events in North Carolina, but that potential can only be met with better, smarter planning.

What happened to office hours?

A

lot of people were excited when Al Gore invented the Internet. Not only could we now read about the three-toed sloth, but we could print out pictures of it on paper, whose production was destroying its natural habitat. Realistically, the InRussel Witham t e r ne t a nd Senior Staff Columnist 21st century technology have contributed enormously to educational experience. What thesis nowadays isn’t written without the help of e-mail and Wikipedia? So over the next several weeks, I will be writing on some of the ills of technology in education and some of its benefits. This week begins with some thoughts on e-mail. A myriad of factors contribute to our instruction at NCSU, both those in and outside the classroom. And while no one factor can be singled out as essential to educational advancement, some important elements inevitably receive the short end of the stick. Office hours, the time a faculty member sets aside for students in his or her schedule, are one of the least utilized and understood resources available on campus. Many students, well into their junior and senior years, view office hours as a last resort when studying has stalled the day before an examination. This is a horrible mischaracterization, though, and fails to address why faculty members have Office Hours in the first place. It is true that faculty members hold office hours to help students understand the material of the class. But that is certainly not the only reason. As Carmine Prioli, professor in English, explained to me, office hours are not just about practical concerns. “Ideally [they are about] getting together to

{

talk about ideas.” Prioli said students seemed content to let the faculty-student relationship end at the classroom door and that for the most part, when a student does contact him, it is via e-mail. E-mail has brought enormous convenience to faculty-student contact, enabling questions on anything from Hemingway to Hitler to be answered, often at non-conventional times. E-mail comes with its own set of problems. Its convenience has led to it overtaking one-on-one contact as the primary source of question and answer between students and teachers. While having easier communication with teachers, is certainly not a bad thing, it is undermining the intimacy of the mentoring role of educators. Of the professors I spoke with this week, few said even a third of their students come to office hours, many saying that number was a stretch. E-mail is replacing genuine contact with teachers. Information is easily conveyed via e-mail, but discourse and learning come through interpersonal contact and erudition. We pay exorbitant sums of money to attend this University. Part of it goes toward paying our educators. So not attending teachers’ office hours is really just wasting your own money. The rewards can not always be measured in your GPA, but Office Hours and the act of getting to know your teachers are part of the educational experience. And if my pleas to your intellectual curiosity aren’t enough then I encourage you to view this issue through a different lens. Would you rather have your graduate school recommendations written by a professor who knows you by the letters in his or her grade book or by one who can speak to your character and effort? E-mail has many positives, but it would be foolish and rash of us to let it replace discussion.

IN YOUR WORDS

}

What was good about the Hillsborough Street Renaissance, and what needed improvement? BY JADE JACK

It seems that the Hillsborough Renaissance has caught a bit of the plague.

Conrad Plyler, freshman in political science

Take care when tweaking law system

W

hen most people, college students i ncluded, he a r about a crime wave in the news, the response is always the same: get tough on crime. So when something like the email alert s ent out 6:59 a.m. March 11 by Ca mpus Police Paul McCauley reporting Senior Staff Columnist a robbery on Da n Allen Drive comes out, people are going to come out demanding action (and possibly an increased right to defend themselves). And for the past week, the News and Observer has run stories regarding multiple calls for reforms to the parole and probation system in North Carolina. The reason? Criminals apparently commit more crimes after being released early or sentenced to probation — in particular,

the tragic Eve Carson murder in 2008 is held up as the prime reason why the probation system needs to be fixed. But before we demand the N.C. General Assembly pours millions into the corrections system or scream at Campus Police to make crime on campus go away, we need to take a step back and apply some logic and science to the problem. The News and Observer reported 580 people have been killed since 2000 by a person out on parole or probation. But the FBI’s annual Uniform Crime Reports show that North Carolina has seen 532 murders in 2004, 585 in 2005, 540 in 2006 and 585 in 2007. If we assume there were about 550 murders each year since 2000, then parolees and convicted criminals sentenced to probation have accounted for a little more than one-ninth of the murders since 2000. Thus, there is little reason to believe people on parole and probation are accounting for a wave of homicide that is flooding the streets of Raleigh and other N.C. cities in a tidal wave of blood.

There is even less of a reason to believe armed vigilantes will be at every street corner to rob us, forcing the state to put more probation officers on the streets to keep an eye on criminals out on parole. I urge caution in demanding any overhaul that gets “tough on crime” — an article in the The Prison Journal reports expanded supervision has been associated with negative probation and parole outcomes. Studies show intensive supervision parole and probation programs have no significant differences in rearrest rates. Translation: watching a prisoner who is out on parole won’t reduce the chance of said prisoner committing a crime while out of the pen. I’m not saying the system isn’t broken. When parolees commit 11 percent of all murders in the state since 2000, there is plenty of room for improvement. But we can’t throw more law enforcement at crime and expect it to crush criminals instantly — we need to think it through.

“I thought they had a large variety of shops and actives, such as the cooking show, the fashion show and the bands were pretty good, too. It was fun to walk around. I wish Raleigh would have let them reschedule it.” Brittany Smith freshman, microbiology

“Overall, I had a great time and I thought the bands were awesome. I’m really glad they came out. I felt that it was spread out a little too much. The stages were a bit too far a part, and it took some time to walk back and forth. ” Vinicius Sa senior, textile engineering

{ONLINE POLL} Last week’s poll results:

Where did you go for spring break?  4UBZFE UIFJOUIF DPVOUSZ  5SBWFMFE BCSPBE

{

CAMPUS FORUM

}

 #FE

Men’s basketball in dire need of improvement Thank you, N.C. State Basketball fans. Your wish for a basketball coach who could take us “to another level” has come true. Too bad that new level is three floors DOWN. Thanks to Herb Sendek for taking his team from 8-22 in 2006-2007 to 23-8 within three years, I guess I will be watching Arizona State play in the NCAA Tournament. Once again, N.C. State has failed to make the NCAA tournament for the third straight year and will not have any postseason for two consecutive years. Maybe

we can play Wake Tech next postseason? Blake Hamlin 2007 Alumnus

Boycott meat during Ag week During Ag Week, the NCSU student animal rights group will have an information table in the Brickyard to expose the hidden reality of exploiting nonhuman animals for food. Because we can all live healthfully eating only plant-based foods, to continue to breed, confine and kill billions of individual beings to consume their flesh, milk and eggs is unneces-

Editor-in-Chief

Saja Hindi

editor@technicianonline.com

Managing Editor

Derek Medlin

Features Editor

News Editor

Ty Johnson

news@technicianonline.com

Deputy News Editors

Preston Boyles Samuel T.O. Branch

Letters to the editor are the individual opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Technician staff or N.C. State University. All writers must include their full names and, if applicable, their affiliations, including years and majors for students and professional titles for University employees. For verification purposes, the writers must also include their phone numbers, which will not be published.

Sports Editor

Viewpoint Editor

Advertising Manager

sports@technicianonline.com

viewpoint@technicianonline.com

advertising@sma.ncsu.edu

Deputy Features Editor

Deputy Sports Editors

Taylor McCune

Cheyenne Autry Alison Harman

ae@technicianonline.com

Arts & Entertainment Editor

Dan Porter

ae@technicianonline.com

Daniel Ellis

Taylor Auten Jonathon Laughrun Kate Shefte

Jane Moon Photo Editor

Dreier Carr

photo@technicianonline.com

Design Co- Editors

Ana Andruzzi Lauren Blakely

design@technicianonline.com

Next week’s poll question:

EDITOR’S NOTE

features@technicianonline.com

Science & Tech Editor

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695 Editorial .............................................................................................................................. 515.2411 Advertising ......................................................................................................................... 515.2029 Fax ...........................................................................................................................................515.5133 Online ................................................................................................... technicianonline.com

sary and unjust. We encourage everyone to take a stand against this oppression by becoming vegan. We support plant-based agriculture, urging the teaching and adoption of vegan organic farming. Visit FarmKind.org to learn more about veganic farming and WhyVegan.com to learn more about veganism. We’ll be tabling all week, so please stop by if you have any questions. Brandon Becker 2008 Alumnus

David Mason

Did you go to the Hillsborough Street Renaissance? t:FT t/P t*EJEOULOPXXIBUJUXBT

Visit www.technicianonline. com to cast your vote.

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2008 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features LIFE & STYLE

TECHNICIAN

.0/%": ."3$) t1"(&

Raleigh chefs take to the street Four local chefs battle it out in Hillsborough Street’s own ‘kitchen stadium’ for Iron Chef title

John Lawther said. Jeremy Wood and Grant Williams, alumni in animal science, came up with the idea to have an organic cook-off event as plans for the street festival got underTaylor McCune way about a year ago. Features Editor “We just thought it would be a good addition,” Williams said. Although the weather — 43 “It’s going with the theme.” degrees and wet — chased away The organizers planned to inmany possible Hillsborough clude eight local chefs, but realStreet Renaissance Festival goers, ized the logistics would be tough it didn’t seem to bother Aaron to hammer out. Wood said he Vaughn of Green Planet Cater- wanted to see the event grow at ing, who had his sleeves rolled future festivals. up to his elbows as he chopped, “We will have this again next mixed and sauted during the year and make it bigger and Iron Chef competition. better. There will be more local “I don’t mind [the cold]. We chefs involved,” he said. work in a hot kitchen, so it’s actuIt was big enough to garner ally been nice,” he said. support from local business The cold, rainy weather may though. have made things easier for the Sushi Thai of Cary sponsored competition. The makeshift the event and Earth Fare, an oroutdoor kitchens had no sinks ganic supermarket, supplied all or refrigerators, which should of the food. have made it tough to keep pots The organic angle reinforced and pans clean and food at a safe the festivals theme of revitalizatemperature, but Mother Nature tion and sustainability. All of the provided. The butter that was proceeds from the festival will go cold at the competition’s begin- to community supported projning was rock solid by the end of ects and green research. the first round. The Iron Chef contest wasn’t “We’ve had no problems with exactly like the television show. refrigeration,” Vaughn said. In addition to food and space Space was an issue, though, ac- limitations, the chefs had to cording to the chef. The dueling compete twice for the title. The “kitchens” were set up under a contest was modeled on “March bedroom-sized tent that had to Madness basketball brackets,” cover two work spaces, two gas according to the festival’s Web stoves, a judging table and all of site. the chefs and their equipment. Each of the four chefs comEach team had a long folding peted in an initial round, with table to work on and about 30 the winners of the first rounds square feet of facing off in the space to maneufinal. Each of the ver around in. three rounds was Judge Richard assigned a seKu g e l m a n , a cret ingredient, chef instructor which the chefs at Fayetteville were expected to Technical Compresent in a cremunity College, ative and tasty said space would manner for the be the biggest isthree judges — sue. in just one hour. “ T h e d o n’t The first Aaron Vaughn, contender have a kitchen and executive chef of Green round, between to work in,” he team Scott SchPlanet Catering said. “That will abat and Daniel be tough.” Taylor of Porter’s The ingredients list was Tavern and Lawther, who decramped as well — all food was scribed himself as a “free agent organic, and only so much of it ... because of the economy,” drew was available. a crowd of about 30 people. “You pull the trigger on what Christine Craven was one you got,” competitor and chef of the students who clustered

“I don’t mind [the cold]. We work in a hot kitchen, so it’s actually been nice.”

DAVID MABE/TECHNICIAN

Chef John Lawther stages plates for the Iron Chef competition during the Hillsborough Street Rennaisance Festival Saturday. DAVID MABE/ TECHNICIAN

DAVID MABE/TECHNICIAN

Iron Chef judges Alexandra Barnett, Richard Kugelman and Victoria Bouloubasis taste the food from the competitors after the first round.

around the Iron Chef tent to get a peek at the action. She said the “barbecue and pie” brought her out to the festival, but she was enjoying the cooking contest as well. “I’m trying to learn some new tricks,” she said. “It’s cool to see it in person.” The chefs battled for an hour, working five different kinds of bacon — the secret ingredient — into pastas, soups, sauces and even a dessert. Although Lawther steered clear of adding sugar to his bacon, Schabat and Taylor dove right in, covering strips of the stuff with milk chocolate. As soon as the chocolate came out, the judges perked up. Anyone who watches Iron Chef America on Food Network knows that savory secret ingredients sometimes find their way into desserts — anyone remember the trout ice cream from season one? The risky move excited all the

Daniel Taylor, chef de cuisine at Porter’s City Tavern, prepares spaghetti carbonara for the Iron Chef competition during the Hillsborough Street Rennaisance Festival. Taylor won the title, “Iron Chef.”

judges, especially Alexandra Barnett, the guest judge picked from the crowd. Every time Wood, who was commentating, asked her which dish she was looking forward to most, Barnett would yell, “Chocolate covered bacon!” The judges must have been impressed with the stuff, as the two-man team from Porter’s won the first round. Round two, between Vaughn and Chris Gantt, both of Green Planet Catering, and Keith Getchell and John Stephan of Two Guys, introduced mushrooms to the contest. The chefs worked four different kinds of mushrooms into potatoes au gratin and on top of salmon. As the teams worked, Schabat and Taylor hung around, giving pointers to Vaughn — an old friend of Taylor’s.

SIGHTS AND SOUNDS...AND SMELLS Two gas stoves hooked up to propane tanks sitting on the side of Hillsborough Street. The stoves were the only actual kitchen appliances at the competition. The smell of bacon fat rendering in a pan. Bacon was the first secret ingredient, and the chefs used it diligently. Chefs teasing and joking with each other during the competition. Things didn’t get too tense in the kitchens. During the final battle, Chef Daniel Taylor started a tortilla fight. The sound of sizzling, bubbling and clanking, as the competitors crowded their pots and pans on the burners. A small crowd of wet, shivering onlookers who occasionally cheered or offered encouragement to the contestants. Words like “complexity,” “great flavor,” “tangy” and “unique” coming from the judges’ table. The earthy smell of mushrooms emanating from the tent during round two. Hillsborough Street’s famous panhandlers stopped in occasionally to see what was going on. Volunteers sneaking pieces of chocolate covered bacon, which most agreed was surprisingly tasty. —COMPILED BY TAYLOR MCCUNE

CHEF continued page 6

' " * % " & ) ( ' " & % !"#$

!"#"$%&'"()*+%(,*-)(./0( !"#$#%&'()%#%*$()+*%,)$"#&-,'.-)'",($

y  a d es 5,  n d We RIL 1 AP 009*  2

! "#$!%&'()!!!!!!!*+,,! ! -./!%&'()!!!!!*-,,! ! +&/!%&'()!!!!!!*",,!

!"#$%&'"() **+*,-./0) *Rain date for event is April 17 

REGISTER BY MARCH 23  !"#$%&'($)*(+",%'#+$#%-)(.(( ///0)1'20"*234"$&#456+-7-#%-)( 8&%19(-)(#4"(8"&":+$#"(;-2+(<-*;(%1-)(


Features LIFE & STYLE

1"(&t.0/%": ."3$) 

LIFESTYLES

TECHNICIAN

Model wannabes brawl Tyra Bankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Next Top Model attracted some rather passionate models-to-be at a New York City audition. As contestants stood outside the Park Central New York hotel a riot broke out, injuring six people. Two sought medical attention. Organizers shut down the audition after the incident.

SOURCE: CNN.COM

Museum opens pirate exhibit

Any closet pirates out there will be happy to know that the North Carolina Museum of History, located in downtown Raleigh, opened a pirate exhibit March 6. The exhibit, titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Knights of the Black Flag,â&#x20AC;? showcases weapons, clothing and â&#x20AC;&#x153;the largest collection of artifacts ever exhibited from... Blackbeardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flagship Queen Anneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Revenge.â&#x20AC;? The exhibit aims to educate the public about the pirate life and to bring their exploits to life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Knights of the Black Flagâ&#x20AC;? will be on view until Jan. 03 2010.

DAVID MABE/TECHNICIAN

One of Chef Daniel Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dishes for round one, â&#x20AC;&#x153;battle bacon.â&#x20AC;? The chef prepared roasted sweet potatoes and white potatoes, topped them with greens, a lightly fried egg and organic back bacon.

CHEF

continued from page 5

SOURCE: N.C. MUSEUM OF HISTORY

APPLE A DAY Doctors find tentative allergy cure

Doctors at Duke University Medical Center and Arkansas Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital have found that it may be possible to cure people with peanut allergies. Researchers gave allergic children tiny bits of peanut and observed their response. Over several years, five of the childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s immune systems learned to tolerate peanuts, and several more had reduced reactions. Peanut allergy is the most life threatening food allergy. SOURCE: CNN.COM

Headaches linked to temperature

A new study shows higher temperatures may be linked to headaches. The research revealed that headache complaints went up 7.5 percent for each five degree Celsius temperature increment. The researchers canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t say why temperature would affect headaches, and some doctors are denying that the study shows anything at all.

After the judges tasted the dishes and Vaughn and Gantt took the round, the real fun began. The friends prepared to face off in â&#x20AC;&#x153;battle cheeseâ&#x20AC;? for the title of iron chef. Wood unveiled a selection of hard, soft, aged and green cheeses and sent the competitors to their kitchens. The competition between the teams was noticeable, but their friendly rapport was obvious. The chefs egged each other on, and Taylor started a small tortilla throwing fight with Vaughn. The chefs incorporated apples, custard and scone pastry into their cheese-centered dishes. And just like the chocolate covered bacon did for round one, Ganttâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hunks of cheese wrapped in phyllo did for round three. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You win!â&#x20AC;? Wood shouted into the microphone as he saw Gantt wrap the cell phone-sized slabs of cheddar in shredded phyllo.

But this time the crowdfavored dish wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough for a win. The judges awarded the title â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iron Chefâ&#x20AC;? to Taylor. Winning and losing werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the most important things to the chefs or the organizers though. Wood reiterated the community aspect of the event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a fun time,â&#x20AC;? he said. It was good to have students and the community come out.â&#x20AC;? The Green Planet Catering team saw the contest as a way to extend the vision of their company, which specializes in using and promoting local food and community projects. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We believe in supporting the local community,â&#x20AC;? Vaughn said. Even though heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d been cold and getting rained on all day, Wood beamed as he watched the final round of Iron Chef come to a close. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think this has been a great success, despite the weather,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve raised awareness about local businesses.â&#x20AC;?

SOURCE: WRAL.COM

* ! # $ $ " % ) ! &$'%( +(,'%,-'.'(/ S.E.E "

what is going on at

!!!"#$%&"'(&)%'' *+,-./0+1/2%/*3',1/0+1

S

o c i e t y

E n v i r o n m e n t

E c o n o m y

CHRISTIN HARDY /TECHNICIAN

A model strikes a pose for the fashion show, Redress, an event at the Hillsborough Street Renaissance Festival, Saturday. The model is wear a piece from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enchanted Frocks 2009â&#x20AC;? by designers Kristen Martinez and Kelly Sambrick.

Designers â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Redressâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; runway Sarah Ewald Staff Writer

The Redress Raleigh fashion show, part of the Hillsborough Street Renaissance, proved that thinking green can be couture too. Models sashayed down the runway, showing the 20 designersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 18 collections with inspiration coming from various influences and all designs made from recycled clothing. The idea for a fashion show featuring eco-friendly and reworked materials was sparked when Mor Aframian, a senior in textile and apparel management and founder of MorLove, met CHRISTIN HARDY/TECHNICIAN Jamie Powell and Beth Stewart The fashion show Redress, was held during the Hillsborough Renaisover the summer of 2008. Powell sance Saturday. There was a grand total of 19 collections, all of which owns American Vintage Cloth- were created with the showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mantra, â&#x20AC;&#x153;REcreated, REfashioned & ing & Classics, a vintage apparel REcycled clothing.â&#x20AC;? The showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal was to promote â&#x20AC;&#x153;eco-friendly destore, and Stewart is cochair for signersâ&#x20AC;? and to show â&#x20AC;&#x153;green is in all aspects of life, including fashion.â&#x20AC;? the Triangle Emerging Green Powell. colors to asymmetrical hemlines, Builders. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worked very hard, and halters, and short skirts. The garStewart said the New York Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very proud of her,â&#x20AC;? McFar- ments would not be out of place chapter of the Emerging Green lane said. for a club kid who wanted to see Builders has a fashion show, and Ginger Wise came from Hicko- and, more importantly, to be that she had previously contacted ry to attend because her daughter seen. Aframian about putting one toworked behind the scenes at the Accessories also made their gether for the Triangle. Powell show. She was particularly im- presence known throughout got involved through a connecpressed with all of the creativity the show, mostly as hair adorntion with the Triangle Emerging that she saw. ments. Grasses and oversized Green Builders and knew Stewâ&#x20AC;&#x153;There are so many tal- leaves appeared cocked over art. ented students here. I see people eyebrows in the collection of â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to show accessible that really have a future in the Allison Szatek, sophomore in and affordable fashion, with emfashion industry,â&#x20AC;? Wise said. textile and apparel management. phasis on eco-fashion,â&#x20AC;? Stewart A few col lect ions stood Strings of hippie flowers flowed said. out from the crowd at the loose as locks from the collection Stewart, Powshow. of Claire Stanhope and Jessica ell and AframHannah Goff, Marmor, seniors in textile and ian spent about junior in tex- apparel management and textile eight mont hs tile and apparel technology respectively. pla n ni ng t he management, The clothes werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only event, which was showed sepa- things of notice on the runway. to be held outrates that would Many models strutted their stuff side. But when be suitable for a in front of the crowd as well. the inclement business enviWhitney Medlin, junior in weather made ronment. Her de- textile and apparel management, an outdoor signs were struc- modeled for Amy Grayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collecevent unlikely, tured and ar- tion. Medlin is Grayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s friend, and they spent three chitectural. The many close friends of Gray modBeth Stewart, organizer days planning simplicity was set eled for her showing. Medlin said for an indoor off by including that her strut in the spotlight fashion show, held at Aurora details such as a ruffle around went well. nightclub. the neck and color-blocked â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was really nervous, but evStewart said that she was panels. One notable piece was erybody was really supportive speechless about the number of an Alice-in-Wonderland-style and there was a great vibe. I just people that attended the show, dress that included an obi sash went for it,â&#x20AC;? Medlin said. and that so many people came around the waist. Proceeds from ticket sales went that some had to be turned away The collection of Kelly Sam- to the Amani Baby Cottage, an at the door. brick and Kristen Martinez, se- orphanage in Jinja, Uganda. The People came from an array nior and junior both in textile orphanage has been MorLoveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of different places to attend the and apparel management, drew labor of love since the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fashion show. inspiration from the 1980s and inception in summer 2006. Emily McFarlane came from marine life â&#x20AC;&#x201D; themes the designNew York to see Powellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s designs. ers translated into eveningwear. McFarlaneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s older sister had atThe looks incorporated black tended college with Powell, and tulle, sequins and bright cool McFarlane is also a friend of

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to show accessible and affordable fashion, with emphasis on eco-fashion.â&#x20AC;?

Technician was there. You can be too.

The Technician staff is always looking for new NFNCFSTUPXSJUF EFTJHOPSUBLFQIPUPT 7JTJUXXXODTVFEVTNBGPSNPSFJOGPSNBUJPO


Sports

TECHNICIAN

ACC

.0/%": ."3$) t1"(&

GYM

continued from page 8

continued from page 8

attendance than anybody else. We’ve done extremely well. In terms of the things we can control, we’ve done very, very well.” Hicks also spoke of the importance of having the tournament in different venues and different areas of the southeast. Greensboro is the most recognized home of the tournament and has hosted the event 21 times, but Hicks said having the event in cities like Atlanta allows fans to take in the amenities of larger markets. “We don’t go to another city that’s as large as Atlanta,” he said. “The added amenities make it a little more special for the fans. The different things you

on the floor and did an awesome job.” Seaman led the team on the night finishing first on the all-around, bars and the floor exercise. Seaman scored a 39.325 on the all-around, her third highest score of the season. Freshman Jess Panza was a close second in the allaround with a 39.125 and finished first on the beam with a 9.900. Friday night was the first time Panza competed in the all-around all season. “It felt really good and of course I still have room to improve. It was really nice competing in four events,” Panza said. “I didn’t expect to do that good. It was my first time competing on floor since the first meet. I still have a lot of room to improve but I am definitely happy.” This weekend the team will host the EAGL championships in Reynolds Coliseum. This event will be the last opportunity for the team to notch a score for placement in the NCAA Regional Tournament, and with a 195.475, the team is on the right track heading to regionals. According to Stevenson, the team is reaching a high at a point in the season when it needs it the most. “I feel like we are peaking at the right time. We had all those young kids like Jess Panza and Brooke Barr and that whole group that had to learn how to compete at this

MATT MOORE/TECHNICIAN

Fans cheer during Duke’s 79-69 victory over Florida State in the 2009 ACC Championship game in the Georgia Dome Sunday.

BASEBALL continued from page 8

a two-run homer to right field. Errant pitching by Maryland in the top of the eighth inning sealed the fate of Saturday’s game, as the Pack scored two runs on a single, two walks, a wild pitch and a passed ball. Maynard’s RBI double to the center field wall accounted for the final score of 8-3. Another key contributor to Saturday’s victory was junior starting pitcher Jimmy Gillheeney, who rebounded from a troublesome first inning to hold the Terps to just three earned runs in eight and one-third innings. After giving up two runs

can do here make it a great experience. Greensboro is our home and probably always will be our

home because Greensboro is a special place.”

on three hits in the top of the first, Gillheeney recovered and gave up four more hits and one run the rest of the way. Sunday’s first game got off to a slow start, with neither team scoring until the Pack finally got on the board in the top of the sixth on a two-out RBI single by freshman Harold Riggins that drove in junior second baseman Kyle Wilson. Unfortunately for the Pack, the Terps responded in a big way in the top of the seventh inning. Maryland center fielder Dan Benick led off the inning with a double and scored on a throwing error that occurred while fielding a base hit by shortstop Alfredo Rodriguez. Two more singles and another error, this

one on a fielder’s choice, brought home two more runs for the Terrapins, and this proved to be all they would need for the win. After falling behind 0-2 in the count with two outs and runners on second and third, Devon Cartwright grounded out in the bottom of the 9th to allow Maryland to hang on for a 3-1 victory to even the series at 1-1. The third and final game of the series was played shortly after the conclusion of Sunday afternoon’s game, but did not come to a close in time for publication.

POLICY

The Technician will not be held responsible for damages or losses due to fraudulent advertisements. However, we make every effort to prevent false or misleading advertising from appearing in our publication.

DEADLINES

Our business hours are Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Line ads must be placed by noon the previous day.

Classifieds

LUIS ZAPATA/TECHNICIAN

Junior Taylor Seaman does her routine for the floor exercise Friday night in the meet against George Washington University. Seaman won first place for the floor, a score of 9.900, and all-round first place total score of 39.325. N.C. State beat George Washington 195.475 to 193.050.

level,” Stevenson said. “This team has a lot of potential to do nothing but get better. “ The Regional tournament will

be held in Reynolds Coliseum Saturday and is slated to begin at 3 p.m.

RATES

For students, line ads start at $5 for up to 25 words. For non-students, line ads start at $8 for up to 25 words. For detailed rate information, visit technicianonline.com/classifieds. All line ads must be prepaid.

To place a classified ad, call 919.515.2411, fax 919.515.5133 or visit technicianonline.com/classifieds EMPLOYMENT HELP WANTED 1-4 bedrooms near NCSU & Downtown Raleigh, Condos, Townhomes, and detached houses. Please visit our website at www.chelseamills.net

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HOMES FOR RENT

TOWNHOMES FOR RENT

TOWNHOMES FOR RENT

!"##$%&'(&)*'($

Egg Donor Needed: Height: 5,2” not more than 6’ Weight: 100-120 lbs Education: graduate or currently enrolled and working towards grad degree Hair color: Black or dark brown Ethnicity: East Indian but not limited to with similar features as described above. The reward will be provided and will be handled and administered by the medical office of Carolina conceptions. If interested please e-mail ersct1@yahoo.com

Hab Techs Needed! Maxim Healthcare needs staff to work w/developmentally disabled clients in Wake County. Flexible hours in afternoons, evenings, and weekends. $10-$15/hr based on experience. Need own transportation. 676-3118.

Want to volunteer for the Earth Day Concert on Lee Field April 24th? Contact volunteerncsu@ gmail.com

Near campus. 4BD/2.5 Bath. Availiable May or August. Email romalehall@gmail.com for more information.

Townhouse for rent - near I40 and downtown. 3BDR, 2.5Bath, all appliances, alarm, deck, plenty of closets! $1095/month. Call 919- 387-2058 and LM.

Males and Females. Meet new friends! Travel! Teach your favorite activity.

REAL ESTATE

Organized but fun babysitter needed for 11, 9, and 5 y/o this summer. Need own transportation and good driving record. $10/hr. Monday afternoon, Thursday morning, Wednesday and Friday all day. Approx. 20 hours/week. 810-4814

CONDOS FOR RENT

Near NCSU. Exceptional 3,4, and 5 Bedroom Houses. Close to Campus. Available August 1, 2009. Very attractive. Ideal for students. Call day: 833-7142 and evening: 783-9410. Please visit our website www.jansenproperties.com

FALCON RIDGE TOWNHOME. 3BR (avaliable August $1050/ month), 4BR (avaliable May $1350/month). On Wolfine. W/D included, large floor plan, deck, assigned parking. No pets. 919-303-1001

FREE SPRING BREAK MONEY! CALL 919-832- 7611 www.parkwoodvillageapartments.com

Sudoku Level:

One block from campus. Private BA & closet in 4BR/4BA condo. University Glen/Oaks. Full kitchen, W/D. Rent entire condo or individual rooms. No processing fee. $300/month. 919- 616-7677.

Swim !"4$+* ! Tennis Tennis Waterski Softball !":$3$; !"#$%&' Gymnastics Archery Silver Jewelry Rocks ! Theatre !"Water Ski English Riding Soccer !"Video !"(%)*+,-".+/+%) Copper Enameling Pottery !".&8', !"0&11'23 Basketball Lacrosse Field Hockey Office !"<ffice !"45+6 Theater Costumer Photo !"7$%/,8&21,"$%/"6&2'9 and more...

Near NCSU on Wolfine. 3 BDR, 3.5 Bath townhouse (avaliable July). Very nice, comes with many extras. Also avaliable 4 BDR, 4 Bath (avaliable July). Please call for details 427-3590.

JunetotoAugust. =>)>,19"".',+/'%1+$*9 June Residential Camp.

TOWNHOMES FOR RENT

(%?&3"&>2"Web site. Enjoy our website. =88*3"&%*+%'9 Apply Online

$8000 or live one year free!

919.830.5802 com

www.750own.

+,-..&/012&30). for Girls: 1­800­997­4347 www912+88*$;'@$689@&6

By The Mepham Group

1 2 3 4 FOR RELEASE MARCH 16, 2009

THE Daily Crossword Edited by Wayne Robert Williams

LEVEL 1

Lower Level tickets as low as $25* Upper Level tickets as low as $15*

Sudoku

By The Mepham Group Solution to Saturday’s puzzle Level:

1 2 3 4

3/16/09

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

© 2009 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

VS. Carolina Hurricanes

New Jersey Devils

Wednesday, March 18, 2009

LEVEL 2

To purchase tickets and for more information, skate to: www.carolinahurricanes.com/college *When purchasing through www.carolinahurricanes.com/college

Solution to Friday’s puzzle

3/29/08

Complete the grid so each row, column and

ACROSS 1 Diet beers 6 R.E. Lee's nation 9 Native Israeli 14 Stern or Babel 15 CD-__ 16 Dole out 17 Very large in scale 18 Receding tide 19 National symbols 20 Southernmost city in Texas 23 So-so grade 24 Glacial epochs 25 Gumbo veggie 26 Skeans and dirks 29 Arlene and Roald 31 "Over There" cont. 32 Botanist Gray 34 Choice morsel 37 Makes ready, briefly 40 Ambassador's off. 42 Verdun's river 43 Spanish dish 45 Call for help 47 Turned tail 48 Bellini opera 50 Stop-sign shape 53 Engaged 55 Boise resident 57 Poetic peeper 58 Town on Great Slave Lake 62 Mythical weeper 64 Writer Umberto 65 Conger catcher 66 Stuffed __ (kishke) 67 Future fish 68 Jamaican cultist 69 One-armed bandits 70 Low 71 Falling ice DOWN 1 Extremity 2 Munich's river 3 Salsa dipper

4 Solicit persistently 5 Wall bracket 6 Glacial chasm 7 1953 Jane Wyman movie 8 Meandered 9 Vault 10 Entirely 11 Virginia Tech location 12 Moore or Mudd 13 All confused 21 Evening in Venezia 22 Future D.A.'s exam 25 Shoppe sign word 26 Star of "Sleepy Hollow" 27 Intangible quality 28 Neighbor of Winston-Salem 30 That man 33 Wee hrs. 35 Aoki of golf 36 Ark. neighbor 38 Gambit

Lookin’ for the answer key? VISIT TECHNICIANONLINE.COM

39 41 44 46 49 51 52 53 54

Camera letters Cried Henri's girl Garbage boat Felix and Polly Buyers Temper Ties that bind One archangel

56 Aluminum company 58 Votes for 59 Singer DeLange 60 Gala 61 Q.E.D. word 63 NYC subway line


Sports

COUNTDOWN

sDAYSUNTILTHE.#!!"ASKETBALL#HAMPIONSHIP GAME

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s golf finishes 14th at LSU Golf Classic 4HE.#3TATEWOMENSGOLFTEAM SHOTATEAMSCOREOF  DURING THElNALDAYATTHE,35'OLF#LASSICON 3UNDAYTOSECUREATHPLACElNISH AMONGTEAMS&RESHMAN-EGHAN #HAPMANHADA  INTHElNAL ROUNDTOHELPTHE7OLFPACKENDWITH ASCOREOF   #HAPMANLED.#3TATEWITHHER 4 THPLACElNISHANDWASFOLLOWED BY,AUREN$OUGHTIE  AND %MILY3TREET  6IRGINIAWON THETEAMTOURNAMENTWITHASCOREOF   SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

ATHLETIC SCHEDULE

March 2009 Su

M

T

W

Th

F

1

2

3

4

5

6

Sa 7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

4UESDAY BASEBALL @ NC CENTRAL Durham, N.C., 6 p.m. 7EDNESDAY MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TENNIS @ DUKE Durham, N.C. 3 p.m. WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TENNIS @WAKE FOREST Winston-Salem, N.C. 3 p.m. SOFTBALL VS. EAST CAROLINA Curtis & Jacqueline Dail Stadium, 6 p.m. BASEBALL VS. ELON Doak Field, 6:30 p.m.

QUOTE OF THE DAY â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over the years, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen so many great players, great coaching, great moments and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a special tournament.â&#x20AC;? -ENSBASKETBALL COMMENTATOR$ICK6ITALEON THE!##4OURNAMENT

DID YOU KNOW? 7ITHCHAMPIONSHIPS THEMENS BASKETBALLTEAMHASTHETHIRDMOST !##4OURNAMENTTITLESBEHIND #AROLINAAND$UKE

COMING SOON

Tuesday: A feature on the club baseball team

s0AGE#ONTINUATIONOFTHECOVERAGEOF THEGYMNASTICSMEET BASEBALLGAME AND !##TOURNAMENT

TECHNICIAN

1"(&t.0/%": ."3$) 

WOLF FACTS

INSIDE

MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BASKETBALL

ACC tournament title remains in N.C. PACK LOSES IN FIRST ROUND, DUKE BEATS FLORIDA STATE 79-69 IN CHAMPIONSHIP Derek Medlin Managing Editor

ATLANTA, GA. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball team may not have come back to Raleigh with the ACC Tournament trophy, but the trophy is returning to North Carolina for the 48th time in 56 years. The Duke Blue Devils won their 17th tournament title Sunday with a 79-69 win against Florida State. Duke is now tied with North Carolina for the most tournament title s. N.C. State is third with 10. The Seminoles reached their first title game after defeating No. 1 seed North Carolina by three in Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s semifinal round. Duke defeated Boston College Friday and Maryland Saturday before facing off against FSU Sunday. Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski said this tournament triumph was special because of the team that won it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re ecstatic about being ACC champs,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really happy for these guys, especially the guys in my junior class who have had to go through a couple years where they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any upper classmen.â&#x20AC;? The 2009 edition of the tournament, which was held in Atlanta for the fifth time,

nament on record, more than said the ACC Tournament has 36,000 fans per game packed the grown into the biggest conferGeorgia Dome. ence tournament in the country. Although the economy did â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the granddaddy of them appear to hurt turnout for the all,â&#x20AC;? Vitale said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over the years, weekend with regard to ticket Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen so many great players, sales, ACC Associate Commis- great coaching, great moments sioner for basketball opera- and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a special tournations Karl Hicks said this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ment.â&#x20AC;? tournament was still a success When the ACC held its indespite lower ticket sales than augural tournament in 1954 at 2001. Hicks said ACC officials Reynolds Coliseum, an average can only do so of 9,800 fans much to fight attended each the struggling c ont e s t a nd economy. t icket pr ices â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d give it a were anywhere n i ne,â&#x20AC;? Hick s between $6 and said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The only $9. reason why I Hicks admitdonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give it a 10 ted t hat t he is that we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ACC Tournasell 10,000 or ment is much 8,000 t ickets different now in the upper and has grown b ow l to ge t leaps and us to 36,000. bounds. But weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re over !##!SSOCIATE#OMMISSIONER Despite the FORBASKETBALLOPERATIONS+ARL continued 26,000.â&#x20AC;? Despite lower (ICKSONPLAYINGTHE!## success of the ticket sales, the event, Hick s 4OURNAMENTIN!TLANTA ACC Tournasaid the economent remains my could not be a solid model of ignored in this just how important basketball yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turnout. is in the ACC and shows how â&#x20AC;&#x153;I try to think of whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s difmuch the sport has grown since ferent between now and 2001 or the inception of the tournament 2002 and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a huge difference,â&#x20AC;? in 1954. Hicks said of the economy. Dick Vitale, who worked the championship final for ESPN, ACC continued page 7

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The added amenities make it special for the fans. The different things you can do here make it a great experience.â&#x20AC;?

MATT MOORE/TECHNICIAN

Guard Jon Scheyer shoots the ball during the second half of the 2009 ACC championship game in the Georgia Dome Sunday. Sheyer scored 29 points during Dukeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 79-69 victory over Florida State.

had the second highest attendance numbers in the history of the tournament. 152,112 fans at-

tended the six sessions in Atlanta for an average of 26,352. In 2001, the most attended ACC Tour-

BASEBALL

GYMNASTICS

Baseball splits first two games with Maryland

Pack takes all events on senior night

Pack battles rain and Terrapins in ACC homeopening series

In the final regular season home match of the season, the gymnastics team pummeled the Colonials

Senior Staff Report After spending much of the weekend waiting on the weather, which rained out Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game and caused them to play a delayed doubleheader Sunday afternoon, the baseball team finally took the field for the first of Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two games at 4:40 p.m. The team followed up Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 8-3 victory by losing the first game 3-1. N.C. State exploded for four runs in the third inning and three in the eighth to overcome a two-run first inning by the Terps in Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s series opener. The Pack took control of the game behind big performances from senior center fielder Devon Cartwright and freshman outfielder Pratt Maynard,

James Oblinger Chancellor

Jonathan B. Laughrun Deputy Sports Editor

The gymnastics team hosted George Washington University for senior night Friday and the last home meet of the season. The Pack posted its highest home meet score of the season, a 195.475, and second highest overall of the season. According to coach Mark Stevenson, he was happy with his teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance but was disappointed that all the officials were not on the same page. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was happy that we had our second in a row no-fall meet. I was a little disappointed that sometimes the officials disagreed on the quality of the routines,â&#x20AC;? Stevenson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was a gap

MEGAN MYERS/TECHNICIAN

Redshirt sophomore catcher Chris Schaeffer dives for first base after attempting a steal for second at the first game Sunday. N.C. State lost 3-1 to Maryland.

who both went 2-4 at the plate and combined to drive in five of the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eight total runs. After cutting the lead to 2-1 in the bottom half of the first inning, the Pack took the lead

for good in the fourth on a two-run triple by Cartwright that Maynard followed with BASEBALL continued page 7

Debra Morgan

David McKnight

Willie Young

Jay Dawkins

Kishea Phillips

WRAL News Anchor

Hillsborough St. Fiddler

Student Body President

Saja Hindi

Defensive End

Editor, Nubian Message

Editor, Technician

Taylor Auten Sports Editor

between their scores. But my team went out, did their job, hit their routines and we got a score that really helps us.â&#x20AC;? The meet was the last regular season meet for three seniors Ashley Shepard, Dru Davis and Elyse Adams. Shepard took second on the floor exercise with a 9.800 and finished ninth on the vault with a 9.650 in her only appearance in the event this season. Davis and Adams exhibitioned on beam and bars, respectively, Friday. According to junior Taylor Seaman, the seniors gave a determined effort. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[The seniors] did awesome. Elyse performed her really hard bar routine with a hard dismount and she hit it,â&#x20AC;? Seaman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dru made her beam routine and Ashley made her floor routine. They just went out and put all their heart into, left it out GYM continued page 7

Ty Johnson

Daniel Ellis

News Editor

Deputy Sports Editor

Standings

T-6th

4th

2nd

5th

T-6th

1st

10th

T-6th

9th

3rd

/VERALL2ECORD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-ARYLANDVS.#3TATE "OSTON#OLLEGEVS6IRGINIA 6IRGINIA4ECHVS-IAMI #LEMSONVS'EORGIA4ECH

.#3TATE

-ARYLAND

.#3TATE

.#3TATE

.#3TATE

.#3TATE

.#3TATE

.#3TATE

.#3TATE

"OSTON#OLLEGE

"OSTON#OLLEGE

"OSTON#OLLEGE

"OSTON#OLLEGE

"OSTON#OLLEGE

"OSTON#OLLEGE

"OSTON#OLLEGE

"OSTON#OLLEGE

"OSTON#OLLEGE

"OSTON#OLLEGE

-IAMI

6IRGINIA4ECH

6IRGINIA4ECH

-IAMI

-IAMI

6IRGINIA4ECH

6IRGINIA4ECH

-IAMI

6IRGINIA4ECH

-IAMI

#LEMSON

#LEMSON

#LEMSON

#LEMSON

#LEMSON

#LEMSON

#LEMSON

#LEMSON

#LEMSON

#LEMSON

!" NCSU Course Packs !" Digital Copying !" Laminating (All Sizes) !" Stationery & Forms !" Newsletters & Programs

!" Full Color Posters !" Bindery Services !" Mailing Services !" Scan to Archive !" Graphic Design

-ARYLAND

919.834.8128

www.sirspeedyhills.com


Technician - March 16, 2009