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Raleigh, North Carolina

DAVID MABE/TECHNICIAN

Technician news editor Ty Johnson speaks during the selection process for next year’s Student Media leaders Tuesday night.

Board announces future leaders Media Board chooses future leaders [Editor’s Note: The students quoted in this story work for Student Media.]

Taylor McCune Features Editor

The Student Media Board passed down decisions on 200910 leaders for Student Media organizations Tuesday evening. The board approved Ty Johnson, a junior in history, for the position of editor-in-chief of the Technician and the position of general manager of WKNC 88.1 FM to Mike Alston, a senior in civil engineering. The other position in contention was that of business office manger, and the two candidates and the board came to an agreement that split the position into two new ones. Laura Frey, a junior in parks, recreation in tourism management, will fill the position of business manager and Charlie Weinfeld, a junior in business administration, will be the the sales manager. Several of the new hires ran for their positions unopposed. Helen Dear, a junior in graphic design will be the editor-in-chief of the Windhover and Bryant Robbins, sophomore in business management, will be editorin-chief of the Agromeck. The editor-in-chief position for the Nubian Message has reopened for applications. The candidates for the positions took part in a public forum Monday night where they answered questions about leadership, expansion and budgets. The candidates for the Technician and WKNC made their final statements and responded to questions from the board. Alston presented a plan to in-

crease campus involvement with the radio station through an oncampus concert. “We are a very fragmented campus,” he said. “[A concert] could bring students and organizations together.” Alston said the concert is a tough goal to attain, but he hopes the concert would become a “tradition” on campus. Johnson’s main goal for next year is the newspaper’s online presence. “Let’s not kid ourselves — online is the way of the future,” Johnson said. “The Technician should be a 24 hour news service.” The editor-elect said he will implement a Web team to oversee online content and would like to work with the other media outlets on campus. The board made the decision to split the business manager position, which came as a surprise to the two candidates. “I was surprised ... they told us they couldn’t set their mind on one person,” Weinfeld said. “They decided it would be best to have a business manager and a sales manager.” The new sales manager position will oversee the sales reps and training and the business manager will work mainly with the design and classifieds teams. “I’m really glad that they made that decision... I’m really glad that we both get to have a part,” Frey said. Weinfeld said his major goal for next year is to keep the ad staff on track and to maintain current advertisers through the economic crisis. Frey said she would focus on developing “new marketing techniques.” The new editors and managers will take their positions at the conclusion of the spring semester.

TIM O’BRIEN/TECHNICIAN

Chancellor James Oblinger talks to media at the State of N.C. State address in Stewart Theatre Tuesday. Oblinger spent most of the speech talking about the achievements the University has made in the past year, such as the successful mapping of a plant parasite’s genome by Associate Professor Rick Davis.

Oblinger discusses year JAMES OBLINGER CHRONICLES UNIVERSITY’S ACCOMPLISHMENTS STORY BY TAYLOR MCCUNE & JAMES COX

I

n front of an overwhelmingly nonstudent crowd Tuesday, Chancellor James Oblinger made his yearly State of N.C. State speech. Oblinger spoke mostly about the achievements of the previous year, touching on research breakthroughs, awards and recognitions before spending time recognizing alumni and faculty who have made achievements in the past year. He also gave a shout-out to President Barack Obama but spoke little of the University’s present economic state or how the administration plans to proceed. Instead, Oblinger asked — but didn’t answer — eight questions about whether the University would be able to maintain it’s history of innovation and leadership. Michael Nguyen,a freshman in political science, did not attend the event, but said he read the chancellor’s speech afterward. He said the questions Oblinger raised are questions people wanted answers to. “That’s why you would go see him talk, is to get answers to those questions,” Nguyen said. Aaron Vander Bee, a sophomore in German, was another of the students who didn’t go but read the speech later. He disagreed with Nguyen and said the chancellor was trying to open people’s eyes with his list of questions. “He’s trying to raise concerns about the budget,” Bee said. Oblinger did mention the loss that the University ADDRRESS continued page 3

TIM O’BRIEN/TECHNICIAN

Chancellor James Oblinger recognizes Mathews Medal recipients at Tuesday’s address.

insidetechnician

Governor Bev Perdue: N.C. State is leading the nation State of the State speech focuses on economy, education James Cox Staff Writer

In her first State of the State address Monday, Gov. Bev Perdue said research conducted at the University has led to the creation of 1,000 jobs at SpiritAero Systems. “N.C. State is leading the nation in developing lightweight textiles that are used in the aerospace industry,” she said. House Majority Leader Tony Rand said Perdue’s speech recognized the great job North Carolina universities do with research and education. “It’s fitting she choose N.C. State,” he said.

The rest of the Perdue’s speech focused on the economy. “We must go after every federal recovery dollar that is available. We need to get that money into North Carolina,” she said. In the Republican response, Senate Republican Leader Phil Berger placed the blame entirely on the shoulders of the Democrat majority. “Over the past half dozen years, Democratic leaders in North Carolina have adopted state budgets that have seen general fund spending grow by almost 50 percent,” he said. Berger said during the same time, the Democrats more than doubled the State debt. “These rates of spending and borrowing can not be sustained. The current economic situation is an opportunity to get North

Meet the Author!

Carolina’s financial house in order,” he said. In her speech, Perdue did not give details about her budget that will be submitted next week. She did, however, say her budget will cut state government programs and services that have proven effective but ones the state “simply cannot afford.” She followed her statement about cutting effective programs by saying she will increase spending. “Even in these tough times we will increase per-pupil spending in our public schools,” she said. Berger, in response, said throwing more money at education won’t make the quality better. In addition, Perdue promised new jobs in her address. “We will put our people back to

work by building bridges, paving roads and expanding and renovating our infrastructure,” she said. To do this she called on careers that majors at the University prepare students for. “It will take engineers, architects, contractors, technology experts and laborers of all types,” Perdue said. The Governor said the government cannot let the citizens’ dream of a better future diminish. “We must do whatever it takes, our own, here in North Carolina, to create jobs, help displaced workers get new jobs, and keep families in their homes,” she said. Perdue also said North Carolina has become a “Mecca for biotech, pharmaceuticals, and

Sylvia Nasar

Author of the biography of John Nash, A Beautiful Mind.

life sciences.” According to the Purdue, the interaction between government, higher education and private business in North Carolina allows ideas to “springboard from the lab into the marketplace.” “Just look around. There’s Quintiles, Merck, Bayer, Biogen, PPD and more,” she said. Perdue said she was serious when she said she would take South Carolina’s federal recovery funds. “I’d drive a truck down to pick up his share,” she said. Tim Lipka, a senior in political science, said the speech was more of a rally-the-troops speech. “The get-down-to-work speech will come with the budget,” he said.

Pack drops ball against Patriots

wolfpack falls to george mason 4-11. See page 8.

Pack sweeps doubleheader See page 8.

Entrepreneurship Initiative See page 5.

viewpoint business & money classifieds sports

Stewart Theater

7:00 pm to 8:30pm Book signing immediately following the lecture.

4 5 7 8


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CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

THROUGH GINA’S LENS

Page 2

TECHNICIAN CAMPUS CALENDAR March 2009

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Saja Hindi at editor@ technicianonline.com.

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Today LAST DAY TO CHANGE FROM CREDIT TO AUDIT AT ALL LEVELS LAST DAY TO CHANGE TO CREDIT ONLY LAST DAY TO SUBMIT REQUEST FOR COURSE REPEAT WITHOUT PENALTY FORMS

82/49

LAST DAY TO WITHDRAW OR DROP WITHOUT A GRADE AT ALL LEVELS

Mostly sunny skies with high temperatures reaching into the low 80s.

SUMMER SESSIONS AND FALL 2009 ENROLLMENT (REGISTRATION) BEGINS

Thursday:

53 32

SYLVIA NASAR: “GLOBALIZATION THEN AND NOW: HOW NATIONS CREATE THEIR DESTINIES” Talley Student Center, 7 to 8:30 p.m.

Temperatures drop as highs only reach into the 50s. Lows will dip down near freezing.

Friday:

48 31 Temperatures in the upper 40s with a chance of rain showers. SOURCE: NCSU BROADCAST METEOROLOGY PROGRAM

IN THE KNOW

Ladies in Red perform Friday The Ladies in Red, a female a cappella group made up of alumni, have been performing since the early 1990s. The music group can perform in many different styles and will showcase that during the performance. They will be at Stewart Theatre on Friday from 7:30 to 9 p.m. Tickets are $10 for the general public, $8 for faculty, staff and senior citizens and $5 for students. Ladies in Red albums will be available for sale at the concert for $15. SOURCE: NCSU

POLICE BLOTTER

Get in the hole PHOTO BY GINA VACCARO

M

elissa Ricker, junior in Biological Sciences, and Jason Jones, sophomore in Philosophy, play cornhole in the Brickyard Tuesday afternoon. Campus Recreation is hosting outdoor events to promote the nice weather and healthy lifestyles. “Cornhole -A- Palooza” is scheduled for Friday, March 20 on the Lower Middle Fields from 3:30-9:00pm. “I think it’s great that Campus Rec is out here promoting programs to get people active,” Ricker said.

WORLD & NATION

Report found 1 in 50 children are homeless A report released Tuesday noted one in 50 children is homeless in the United States each year. The National Center on Family Homelessness who composed the report analyzed data from 2005-06. The data showed more than 1.5 million children were homeless. The study ranked states on different criteria, including child well-being and the state’s policy and planning efforts. Results indicated that Texas, Georgia, Arkansas, New Mexico and Louisiana were among the poorest. In addition, the report showed 42 percent of homeless children are younger than six, more than one in seven homeless children

have moderate to severe health conditions and an estimated 1.16 million homeless children will not graduate from high school. Recommendations included support to guarantee schooling despite homelessness and proper education. SOURCE: CNN

GET INVOLVED IN TECHNICIAN Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copy edit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday through Thursday 9 a.m. to midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or e-mail Editor-in-Chief Saja Hindi at editor@technicianonline.com.

March 7 10:23 A.M. | FIRE ALARM Western Manor Apartments Units responded to alarm caused by shower steam. 12:10 P.M. | FIRE ALARM Wolf Village Units responded to alarm caused by cooking. 2:28 P.M. | BREAKING AND ENTERING — VEHICLE Wolf Village Student reported vehicle had been broken into and GPS system stolen.

Forestry predicted to create jobs

The United Nations is encouraging countries to invest in sustainable forest management jobs to address current unemployment problems. An estimated 10 million jobs could be created according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. The chief economist in the U.N. Forestry Department said all countries could benefit from investing in the jobs but Asia and Africa could receive the most improvement. The United Nations said it is already seeing indications that the United States and South Korea are interested based on economic stimulus plans. SOURCE: CNN

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TECHNICIAN

ADDRESS DPOUJOVFEGSPNQBHF

has experienced through the budget cuts that have already cycled through and said the University is, “planning bud-

get reductions strategically.� Throughout the speech, Oblinger stated and restated N.C. State’s importance despite economic hardship. “People are counting on N.C. State,� Oblinger said. “...We owe a debt of thanks

to those who came before us and we pay that debt with our contributions to the future.� The final State and University budgets have not yet been announced.

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Jeffrey Fowler, a freshman in mathematics and physics, practices juggling in the Quad on Monday afternoon. “When I was in middle school I went to a renaissance fair and it looked like fun. I like doing things that no one else can do,� Fowler said. The change in weather has prompted many students to engage in outdoor activities around campus.

SEE PAGE FIVE FOR MORE ON THE STATE OF N.C. STATE ADDRESS

ATTENTION SENIORS! WANTED: Student Speaker for 2009 Spring Commencement Exercises Applications available at 1008 Harris Hall or http://www.ncsu.edu/registrar/graduation Application Deadline: Thursday, March 19, 2009 Return applications to: 1008 Harris Hall

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Viewpoint

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TECHNICIAN

{OUR VIEW}

Are we in denial, chancellor? THE ISSUE:

Chancellor James Oblinger did not address core issues facing the University in his State of N.C. State address Tuesday.

OUR OPINION:

Oblinger should have taken this opportunity to address major problems facing N.C. State.

THE SOLUTION:

Oblinger must use the State of N.C. State to address issues, such as the budget cuts, and explain how these are going to affect students, faculty and staff.

C

hancellor James Oblinger gave his State of N.C. State address in Stewart Theatre Tuesday at 11 a.m. and failed to tackle the most important problems facing the University. His speech was about accomplishments the members of the Wolfpack family have had and ended with a cheesy statement about “Red means go.” Oblinger was trying to stay positive throughout his speech, and it is reassuring to know our University has successful students and alumni, in a time that is financially unstable, but it is unacceptable to blanket core problems with blatant public relations. We must be realistic, not idealistic. Also, toward the end of the speech, he asked questions

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board excluding the news department and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

but answered none. Oblinger’s speech was disappointingly vague and did not give the University any real answers to problems it is facing. People didn’t listen to the State of N.C. State address to find out what people at the University did in 2008. People listen to it to find out answers, especially when the University is facing a at least a $36 million budget cut next year. Not mentioning how Oblinger is going to solve the budget crisis leaves the University in an uncomfortable and unsure situation. Maybe Oblinger was so busy working on the budget he did not have enough time to write an effective speech. The chancellor must realize the only

way to solve these problems is to face them head on and also be transparent. The State of N.C. State address would also have been an opportune time to discuss the budget because he has not commented on it on Budget Central since Feb. 16. Besides missing the mark by not discussing the budget in more detail, the chancellor neglected to mention students much in his address. Though he did mention a few dozen students, he did not address the student population as a whole. He did not mention specific ways the University is going to tackle the budget issues it is facing. He did not mention how this was going to affect students. Students must know how these

issues are going to affect them, especially if it affects classes or creates a situation where students begin to have trouble graduating on time. Former Chancellor Mary Anne Fox was known for communicating with students. Oblinger is known for raising funds for the University well. Both are extremely important in working to make N.C. State better but Oblinger must find a balance between the two if he wants to be an effective leader. Gov. Bev Perdue’s State of the State address Monday was more specific than Oblinger’s. Perdue has an entire to state to manage and Oblinger has just 40,000 people to lead. Just saying “people are counting on N.C. State” is not enough to solve our problems. Let’s look to the “autobahn of innovation” for our solution.

{

Standardize breaks for maximum happiness

S

pring break is over. We are finally getting back into the swing of school work, and yet everywhere we look, we are bombarded by reminders that we are ver y nearly t he only university with such a ludicrously early spring brea k. Everyone on TV Kate Kosinski seems to be in title some tropical location, and don’t even think about logging onto Facebook because the statuses of all of your friends will be bragging about their amazing vacations in the sun while we are walking to class on a campus that the hotter temperatures seem to transform into a brick oven. This sad picture could be improved with a change in the way our breaks are chosen. If we could delay our break a week or so to match up with most of the other major universities, then we could have more fun on break and have a break that is less reminiscent of winter break and more like a sunny summer vacation. As much as I know I would hate waiting longer than I absolutely had to for my spring break bliss, I think we can all agree that anticipation is definitely a lot of the fun of any break and that delaying something you are looking forward to (so long as you don’t get hit by an aggressive Wolfline bus before you can skip town) can actually enhance your enjoyment of it. Naturally, I assume that the reason we are burdened by an intensely early spring break is that some big wig really likes to ski

{

or play outdoor hockey or curl (if anyone actually does curling outside of the winter Olympics). Please, important person, do us all a favor and branch out into the wide world of summer sports. Even if the powers that be can’t give up their icy adventures in favor of something a bit more “spring” and a little less winter, I think that just making them consistent across the system would be a huge improvement. As much as I love my school, I’d appreciate the opportunity to go on vacation with friends from other schools and I know that this year in particular the timing of our break ruined a lot of plans for a lot of people. I can understand that the University is worried about budget cuts and a million other things and that they probably don’t consider the timing of breaks to be of paramount importance, but how hard would it be to call up a few schools and agree on a week? Right now N.C. State is kind of the rebel loner, taking breaks when we want like a majestic lone wolf with no friends. But in all seriousness, could we please just be lemmings and pick the week everyone else is picking? Everyone else is doing it, Calendar Committee, don’t you want to be popular? If my schoolyard taunting won’t work then please let my honest entreaty soften your hearts. I know that when our breaks are is of little concern to people whose focus is on educating us, but to us it’s an important part of our experience and we’d love to be able to share it with our friends in the sun.

CAMPUS FORUM

}

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Submission does not guarantee publication and the Technician reserves the right to edit for grammar, length, content and style. High priority is given to letters that are (1) critical of the Technician and its coverage and (2) of interest to the student body. Additional letters and full versions of partial letters may be published online. Once received, all submissions become the property of the Technician.

}

Did you watch Chancellor James Oblinger’s State of the N.C. State address? BY JADE JACK

President Barack Obama’s infamously perfect universal health care isn’t going to “change” anything for the better.

Conrad Plyler, freshman in political science

“I only watched parts of it. Because Oblinger was not a dynamic speaker, I will read the highlights later.” Tania Bembridge senior, biochemistry

Bring back the live wolves

I

know what we need to get over the hump in football next season – a pack of live wolves. Yes, real, snarling, growling, live wolves held on leashes by some poor intern working for the Athlet ic Department or maybe Benton Sawrey an actual Senior Staff Columnist trained handler through the Vet school. How intimidating would it be to place a handful of wolves behind the visiting team’s end zone during the game and have a player hold the leash for one of the wolves as they run out onto the field!? Before everyone gets too worried, I’m not advocating getting rid of Mr. and Mrs. Wuf. They’ve been too much of a fixture at the University since the 1950s when Mr. Wuf was introduced and in 1975, when Mrs. Wuf was introduced alongside women’s athletics at NC State. I don’t want to use live wolves as a replacement – but instead as

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used a Bengal Tiger for the past 17 years and housed him in a state of the art facility that would rival a zoo. Texas has Bevo the longhorn, Navy has Bill the Goat, Baylor has a bear and even UNC-Chapel Hill has its intimidating light blue ram. For a school that needs t rad it ion we could easily cra n k one back up that we let die in t he 1960s. A live wolf, or a pack of wo l ve s prowling the sidelines wou ld be pretty sweet, and would get the University some good publicity on TV (how many times have you seen shots of “Uga” on ESPN?). I’m pretty sure wolves are natural enemies of rams. Buy a few wolf pups or adopt rescued ones, let the vet school take care of them and name them after former football players. Bring back the live wolves!

“The University in 1950s through the 1960s used live wolves whenever the school could get a hold of them for games.”

features@technicianonline.com

Derek Medlin

Features Editor

a compliment. Unfortunately, I can’t take credit for the thought of using lives wolves, much less call it an original idea for our mascot. The University in 1950s through the 1960s used live wolves whenever the school could get a hold of them for games. Our last wolf, Lobo III, who was used to commemorate the opening of Ca r terFinley Stadium, caused a bit of an embarrassment for the school after a zoology professor found out that our beloved wolf was actually a coyote. Students embraced the coyote, though, and for a period of time he was known as the “Kool Koyote.” Nationally, it’s not unheard of – most famous perhaps is the University of Georgia’s long running tradition of using English Bulldogs as a mascot alongside their regular costumed mascot. The University of Memphis has

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Saja Hindi

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“No.” La’Quita Williams sophomore, computer engineering

“Yes. I thought it was a good highlight of all the things that the University is accomplishing. I also thought it was a good message of everyone counting on State.” T.J. Willishigher doctoral student, education administration

This week’s poll question:

Where did you go for spring break? t4UBZFEJOUIFDPVOUSZ t5SBWFMFEBCSPBE t#FE

Visit www.technicianonline. com to cast your vote.

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2008 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features BUSINESS & MONEY

TECHNICIAN TWO CENTS Citi boosts Wall Street Tuesday the Dow Jones jumped up almost 400 points, the highest in all of 2009. The surge came after Citigroup annonced that it was profitable in the first two months of the year. All 30 components of the Dow finished the day in the positive lead by JPMorgan Chase, Citi, Bank of America and General Electric. McDonald’s and Coca-Cola also finished in the positive but had more modest gains. Technology stocks also had a large impact on the rally as stocks like Google had huge rallies. The market is still trading at it lowest levels since April 1997 and is off by 21% of the year-to-date. SOURCE: FOX NEWS

Senate pushes spending bill through The Senate passed a $410 billion spending bill Tuesday that will fund the US government for the duration of the fiscal year. The huge spending bill passed even though critics were opposed to the almost $8 billion that has been allocated to congressional “earmarks,” which conflicts with President Barack Obama’s plan to stop all wasteful spending, according to critics. According to CNN, “Obama administration officials say the bill is a holdover from the previous Congress.” After a debate, the Senate proposed to end the talks and vote immediately. The vote to end the debate won 62-35, and the Senators sent the bill through after that. SOURCE: CNN

Congress discusses possibility of second stimulus With a $787 billion economic stimulus package already enacted by Congress, talk has begun on the need for a second stiumulus package among delegates. Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Tuesday that lawmakers must give the first package a chance, but also said the legislature should not rule out further action. “We have to keep the door open,” Pelosi said.

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Entrepreneurship Initiative attracts future business owners PROGRAM SETS ITS ROOTS, EXPANDS ITS VISION FOR COMING YEARS STORY BY SARAH EWALD

I

nstead of working under some lofty CEO or spending most of their twenties and thirties fighting for promotions, some students dream of starting their own businesses and being their own boss. The University is taking steps to help these people by offering classes and clubs and fostering an overall inclination toward entrepreneurship. The idea to focus on entrepreneurship as a university was first made public when Chancellor James Oblinger delivered his address, “The State of N.C. State,” on Sept. 27, 2007. “By expanding minds and igniting imaginations, N.C. State will develop an educated and entrepreneurial work force and the leaders of tomorrow,” Oblinger said in a statement about the entrepreneurship focus. What developed was the Entrepreneurship Initiative, which was launched on Nov. 3, 2008 with a program at the McKimmon Center. CEO of Cleartricity Joe Forbes was the featured keynote speaker. “There are several existing entrepreneurship programs in various colleges, and we want entrepreneurship to be multi-disciplinary and campuswide,” Autumn Mauney, associate director for external relations for the Entrepreneurship Program, said. The program began in July 2008. Lecturer Erin Powell Smith represented the College of Textiles, along with Tim Clapp, in the development of the EI. “The EI is designed to create multidisciplinary interaction among students from all colleges on campus to foster the culture of entrepreneurship,” Smith said. “We serve on sev-

eral planning committees ranging from undergraduate curriculum development to graduate level research to K-12 interaction to extracurricular and industry relationships.” Smith works with most colleges from the University, including the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences and the College of Natural Resources, in an effort to make sure that COT students are integrated across campus. “By developing these relationships and building upon strengths of varied disciplines, the students are exposed to an outstanding set of resources and opportunities,” Smith said. Smith is specifically involved in the areas of graduate level research, K-12 interaction and integration of the academic curriculum into the planned physical infrastructure. K-12 outreach programs, research and graduate programs, and the Entrepreneurship Institute are longterm plans for the EI. Mauney said that the Entrepreneurship Institute should be implemented by summer 2009. Mauney said that the EI will have something for everybody in the curriculum, for each level of involvement. Students will have the opportunity to take introductory courses, thematic tracks to go along with their chosen course of study and a certificate program. The uppermost level

of involvement will eventually culminate in a building on Centennial Campus called “The Garage.” “The Garage will be a living and learning community for entrepreneurship students, with lab spaces where students will be able to meet and work on projects of interest,” Mauney said. The program currently has trips and tours available to students interested in entrepreneurship. It started with a trip to Silicon Valley and expanded from there. Students now have the opportunity to visit local entrepreneurs on guided tours on two specific days a semester. The next trip is one to China, planned for August. Students will travel to Beijing and Shanghai to observe the local culture of entrepreneurship, both through University programs and throughout the greater community. Mauney said the goal is that the University eventually wants students to attend for the entrepreneurship program. Students who are interested in entrepreneurship and would like to meet other like-minded individuals have different options on campus. The main campus entrepreneurship club is the University Entrepreneurship Network, formerly known as Entrepreneurs’ Club, which meets every other Thursday at 7:00 p.m. in Room 325 in Riddick Hall. Megan McCarthy, senior in animal science and co-president of the University Entrepreneurship Network, said, “The purpose of the University Entrepreneurship Network is to promote entrepreneurial thinking while developing leadership, networking

and risk management skills.” McCarthy said that all majors are welcome to join. According to McCarthy, “we provide the students of N.C. State an opportunity to meet others interested in entrepreneurial endeavors and even develop businesses.” The club routinely brings in outside speakers and local entrepreneurs, and presents educational workshops on various aspects of business. Many of the members also regularly attend networking events. In the College of Textiles, James Spratley, senior in textile and apparel management, is president of the Textile Entrepreneurs Club. The TEC is geared towards students who are interested in entrepreneurship as well as textiles, and was started in fall 2007 by Madison Owen, senior in textile and apparel management. “As a part of the National Entrepreneurship Week, the Textile Entrepreneurship Club hosted the Textile Entrepreneurship Forum to bring together local textile entrepreneurs, students and faculty members,” Spratley said. The event was structured as a forum where the entrepreneurs shared about their experiences and then took questions from the moderator and the audience. Panelists included Charles Stewart, owner of dyeing company Tumbling Colors, and Christina Wight of Rainyday Bridalwear. Stewart and Wight are alumni of the College of Textiles. According to Spratley, the event was a great success with over 70 students in attendance.

SOURCE: WSJ.COM

THE STATE OF

NCSU Undergraduate Research  Symposium: Call for Poster Presentations

N.C. STATE

When:  April 16, 2009 Time:    1:00 – 5:00 p.m. Where:  McKimmon Ctr, Gorman & Western Blvd.

This symposium is dedicated to our many undergraduate  researchers and their mentors at NC State.  All  presentations are with 3ft x 4ft posters.  A back board,  easel and pins will be provided.  Poster printing is free  but students must sign up online at the registration site  for a time to have their poster printed.  Two poster  sessions of 75 minutes each will be held in the afternoon.  The posters will be judged by faculty teams based on the  discipline of the research.  Casual dress is accepted.   Winners will be recognized at the annual Sigma Xi  Banquet on Wednesday, April 22; business attire.  You  are strongly encouraged to also submit your research for  publication in the Undergraduate Research Journal ­NCSU by contacting the editor at:   http://www.ncsu.edu/undergrad­research/urj/

ADDRESS CONTINUED FROM PAGE THREE

RHETORICAL QUESTIONS THE CHANCELLOR ASKED s s s s s s s s s s s

Deadline for Abstracts: Midnight, Monday, April 6th Mentor’s Approval no later than 5 pm, April 7th

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Details are available on­line at:  http://www.ncsu.edu/ugrs/2009_Spring/papers.htm

s s s

Just another year at N.C. State, right? Can we still be the university that licensed our faculty’s research to local farmers, allowing them to open a plant and create 63 jobs in Snow Hill? Can we still be the university that spins off successful organizations like SAS, Biolex and LipoScience? Can we still be the university that worked together with the Department of Commerce last year to bring Spirit AeroSystems to Kinston? Can we still be the university that creates cutting-edge programs like the world’s first master of science in analytics? So, how will the current budget situation change us? How will we view ourselves with the benefit of hindsight 10 years from now? Will we not be as good at helping the state create new jobs and attract new businesses? Would an entrepreneurial education initiative ever have been created under these budgetary constraints? If this budget crisis had happened 10 years ago, would we have given up and shut down Textiles or Nuclear Engineering? Can we continue to develop innovative programs like our proposed forensic science center that will help train the next generation of forensic detectives? In a world that increasingly relies on technology, can we continue to be a leader in helping society think about and act on policies pertaining to the use of technology? Can we continue to be the kind of institution that supports such widely divergent programs as agricultural leadership, open source innovation and a world class College of Design? Will we be able to help lead North Carolina and the nation out of the current economic crisis? How effective are we? How good are we? How strong are we?

SPEECH

BY THE NUMBERS Number of 17 Questions 0

Number of Answers

10

Number of times the word budget was used

4321

Number of words in the speech

47

Number of times N.C. State was referenced

94

Number of times the word “We” was used

781

Number of words spent on the topic of the economy

18.07%

percent of the Speech focusing the topic of the economy

9

Number of times “People are counting on N.C. State” was said

10

Number of times the word education was used

SOURCE: STATE OF N.C. STATE ADDRESS


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Sports

TECHNICIAN

DEFEAT

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GILLHEENEY

continued from page 8

continued from page 8

through its fingers by striking out. He also said the team did not deserve to win this game and it was time for the young kids to grow up. “We had to go to the bullpen early and they got some opportunities that we created with lousy defense and they took advantage of them. We had a couple chances to blow the game wide open and we struck out and didn’t put the ball in play,” Holliday said. “We committed every sin in a game like this that you could commit. We didn’t deserve to win. It’s time for a gut check to see if the young kids grow up.” The team will host North Carolina A&T today at 6:30 p.m. before hosting ACC opponent Maryland this weekend. According to Avent, the games this weekend are very important in the grand scheme of things. “It’s very important. It’s at home. We lost three games at Miami and two that we thought we should have won, it can be a bitter pill to swallow,” Avent said. “You have to understand what’s at stake. I remember last year playing very very poorly at one point heading into the Carolina series, and it was a game against Marshal that reminded you of this and we came back out and played very well that weekend.”

DANNY BOEMERMANN/TECHNICIAN

The softball team gathers around catcher Alyssa Allbritten as she crosses homeplate after hitting a homerun late in the second game of Tuesday’s double header against Michigan State.

SOFTBALL continued from page 8

with one out in the top of the first inning after a double, an error and a walk. With Spartan second baseman Gina Mondo, who entered the double header hitting .444, at the plate, it looked like a long night was in store for the Pack. But Mondo hit a fielder’s choice back to McKenzie and she struck out the next batter to escape the inning unscathed. McKenzie then settled into a zone for the remaining six innings, striking out eight batters while giving up just three

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hits and one error en route to a complete game shutout. According to Desbois, McKenzie has pitched very well lately and has meant a lot to the team. “She has been really great, she has been on a roll and she has been hitting all her spots,” Desbois said. “We are all back behind her, and she really helps.” The nightcap remained scoreless until the bottom of the fifth inning, when sophomore catcher Alyssa Allbritten crushed a lead-off home run to give the Pack the lead. The team then utilized a double by sophomore shortstop Eliza Jacobellis and two wild pitches and an error by Michigan State to add one more

run in the bottom of the fifth. The Pack bats provided another insurance run in the bottom of the sixth, as freshman outfielder Bethaney Wells drove in freshman shortstop Morgan Barbour, who pinch ran for Desbois and moved to second on a single by Allbritten, who finished 2-3 on the night. Desbois said after the game that sweeping the double header has the team very confident going into this weekend’s road series against Virginia Tech. “We feel confident,” Desbois said. “We know we can go up there and sweep them so we are ready to go.”

Classifieds

into the rotation. There are not many situations that he will have to pitch in as a starter that he has not already done coming out of the pen. “He did the most difficult thing there is to do in baseball, which is close last year, and did it very very successfully,” Holliday said. “So transitioning back to starter he has already been in every crisis. We handed him the ball last year in every crisis and he knows how to deal with that.” Gillheeney is quick to note that almost all of his accomplishments are thanks to pitching coach Holliday, who he said taught him not only how to pitch better, but how pitch smarter. “I would give [coach Holliday] the most credit for my success since I have been in college,” Gillheeney said. “He not only has developed me more physically but he has actually really taught me how to think about the game. He taught me how to go after hitters and how to pitch ahead.” With Gillheeney being available to enter into the major league baseball draft this year, coming back for his senior year seems uncertain. Gillheeney acknowledges that if the right opportunity is there it would be tough to pass up; however, if it is not then he would not think twice about coming back to NC State. “If I have the opportunity this year to be drafted, fairly good, I would consider playing professional baseball for sure,” Gillheeney said. “But I wouldn’t second guess for a second that I wouldn’t come back to school .”

RATES

For students, line ads start at $5 for up to 25 words. For non-students, line ads start at $8 for up to 25 words. For detailed rate information, visit technicianonline.com/classifieds. All line ads must be prepaid.

To place a classified ad, call 919.515.2411, fax 919.515.5133 or visit technicianonline.com/classifieds ANNOUNCEMENTS INTERNET OPPORTUNITIES Identity Theft? Get your protection here http://36B.info

EMPLOYMENT HELP WANTED 1-4 bedrooms near NCSU & Downtown Raleigh, Condos, Townhomes, and detached houses. Please visit our website at www.chelseamills.net

Sudoku Level:

HELP WANTED ADULTS WITH ASTHMA needed for research study of investigational drug that evaluates the prevention of allergen-induced airway obstruction in adults with mild asthma. Men and women, 18 -55 years with mild allergic asthma may participate. Must not require daily inhaler medication for asthma, have smoked in the past 6 months or be pregnant/breastfeeding. Three screening visits for testing to determine eligibility. Seven treatment visits for study drug or placebo by injection. Six follow-up visits. Participation lasts 7 months following screening. Compensation provided. Contact Duke Clinical Research Unit at 919- 681-9192. #12178

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Hab Techs Needed! Maxim Healthcare needs staff to work w/developmentally disabled clients in Wake County. Flexible hours in afternoons, evenings, and weekends. $10-$15/hr based on experience. Need own transportation. 676-3118.

Seeking PT Nanny for a 3 yr old boy. W/TH/Fr 8am to 1pm in Morrisville. Education, Language or Psych majors preferred. $500/ month. Call 632-3494.

North Ridge Country Club Summer pool employment Certified lifeguards Assistant swim coach Welcome desk & snack bar Please call or email:846-9667 jwilkening@northridgecc.org Part-time job: Baja Burrito (Avent Ferry/Western). Flexible hours that work well for students. Apply at Baja Burrito, Mission Valley Shopping Center.

FREE SPRING BREAK MONEY! CALL 919-832- 7611 www.parkwoodvillageapartments.com

Resume Builder. Hair salon franchise seeking interns for local marketing campaigns. Must have personal transportation, flexible 10-15 hours/week; some weekends. Send resume to sportclips.ncsc@yahoo.com

CHILD CARE NEEDED Companion/Driver needed for 14 year old girl from 3- 6pm Monday-Friday. North Raleigh area. Call 819-6905 between 6-9pm.

REAL ESTATE HOMES FOR RENT Near NCSU. Exceptional 3,4, and 5 Bedroom Houses. Close to Campus. Available August 1, 2009. Very attractive. Ideal for students. Call day: 833-7142 and evening: 783-9410. Please visit our website www.jansenproperties.com

TOWNHOMES FOR RENT

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Townhome For Rent: 1820 sqft, 3 BD, 2 BA in Camden Crossing near NCSU $1300.00 /month for ’09-’10 school year. Call Nick: (919) 418-6362

Female housemate wanted: private room/bath in family home on Lake Johnson. $400/mo. includes cable and wireless internet. Near Wolfline, bike to NCSU. Email kristrol@yahoo.com

Males and Females. Meet new friends! Travel! Teach your favorite activity.

Near NCSU on Wolfine. 3 BDR, 3.5 Bath townhouse (avaliable July). Very nice, comes with many extras. Also avaliable 4 BDR, 4 Bath (avaliable July). Please call for details 427-3590.

TOWNHOMES FOR RENT

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$8000 or live one year free!

1BR in a 5BR House, share bath w/one other person. Walk-in closet and private balcony off the back. On Brent Road. Available Immediately. $296/mo plus share utilities, $400 security deposit. aawillia@ncsu.edu

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CONDOS FOR SALE Downtown Raleigh Condo Deal. For Sale, Built in 2002. 2 Bed/2 Bath, 9 Ft. Ceilings, All appliances, Steps From Moore Square, Bars. Best Deal in Downtown at $177,900 Call Frank DeRonja PruYSU 919-669- 7993

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TOWNHOMES FOR SALE NEW! TRYON PLACE TOWNHOMES - selling near Gorman Street and Tryon Road. $158,750+. 2-3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Classy. Accessible. Free info: 888- 221-5940x311. KWRealty.

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By The Mepham Group

1 2 3 4 FOR RELEASE MARCH 11, 2009

LEVEL 1

THE Daily Crossword Edited by Wayne Robert Williams

Solution to Monday’s puzzle Sudoku By The Mepham Group

Level:

1 2 3 4

3/18/08

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

LEVEL 2

© 2008 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

Solution to Tuesday’s puzzle

3/11/09

Complete the grid so each row, column and

ACROSS 1 Out-of-control 5 St. Louis pro 8 1997 20-game winner Denny 14 __ Valley, CA 15 180 degrees from WSW 16 Frills 17 Broadway moneymaker 19 Bernhardt and Siddons 20 Nautical rescue system 21 Cossack chief 23 NASA outpost 24 Wildebeest 26 Notes of scales 27 Mil. honor 30 Blast from the past? 32 Gobi location 33 Abominable 36 Vexed 38 Myanmar, by another name 39 Hwys. 41 Employment 42 Pass 44 Representative examples 46 Fewer 47 Soft drink 49 Numerical ending 50 Hot tub 51 C.S.A. soldier 52 Actress Meyers 55 Fanning of "Man on Fire" 58 Signaled 60 Connecting rooms 62 Launch 64 Lack of vigor 65 NRC forerunner 66 Heraldic border 67 Climber's spikes 68 '60s radicals 69 __-do-well DOWN 1 Very, in music 2 Actress Rogers and others 3 Sharif and Bradley

4 "Beth" singers 5 Displays a painting again 6 Colonial cuckoo 7 Prot. sect 8 Savings 9 Midterms and finals 10 Razor choice 11 Bases-loaded homer 12 __-di-dah 13 Part of CBS? 18 Flights to safety 22 Directional suffix 25 Over in Bonn 28 Military blockade 29 Aqua and motor endings 30 Goose or speed followers 31 Annexed 32 Biographer of FDR 33 Poplar tree 34 Flat face of a gem

Lookin’ for the answer key? VISIT TECHNICIANONLINE.COM

35 Radical food fad 37 Public vehicle 40 Practice boxing 43 Spanish mates 45 Emetine source plants 48 Livestock tidbit 50 Amount of yarn

52 53 54 56 57 59 60 61 63

Hold dear Long gun Surmise Sphere starter? Down with! Stiff collar Sucker Verse starter? Trailblazed


Sports 1"(&t8&%/&4%": ."3$) 

WOLF FACTS

COUNTDOWN

sDAYSUNTILTHE!##"ASKETBALL#HAMPIONSHIPGAME

INSIDE

s0AGE!CONTINUATIONOFTHECOVERAGE OFTHEBASEBALLANDSOFTBALLGAMESASWELL ASACONTINUATIONOFTHE*IMMY'ILLHEENEY FEATURE

TECHNICIAN

BASEBALL

Vontz named EAGL specialist of the week 3OPHOMOREGYMNAST"RITTANY 6ONTZ AFTEREARNINGCAREER HIGHSON BARSANDBEAM WASNAMED%!', 3PECIALISTOFTHE7EEK)NTHEMEET AGAINST.O,35SHEEARNEDAPER SONALRECORDOFONBARS ASWELLAS ACAREER HIGHOFONBEAM6ONTZS PERFORMANCEHELPEDTHE7OLFPACK SCOREITSTEAMSEASON HIGH4HE GYMNASTICSTEAMWILLHOSTTHE%!', #HAMPIONSHIPSON-ARCH SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Swimming & diving receives academic honor "OTHTHEMENANDWOMENSSWIM MINGANDDIVINGTEAMSHAVEBEEN RECOGNIZEDAS!CADEMIC!LL !MERICAN TEAMSFORTHEFALLSEMESTERBY THE#OLLEGE3WIMMING#OACHES!SSO CIATIONOF!MERICA#3#!! )NORDER TOBEACKNOWLEDGEDASAN!CADEMIC !LL !MERICANSQUADATEAMMUST MAINTAINOVERANAVERAGE'0! SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Henry to represent Wolfpack at the NCAA Indoor Championships 2EDSHIRTFRESHMAN,AWANDA(ENRY WILLREPRESENTTHEWOMENSTRACKAND lELDTEAMATTHE.#!!)NDOOR 4RACK&IELD#HAMPIONSHIPS(ENRY ISALREADYTHESCHOOLRECORDHOLDERIN SHOTPUT RANKING.ONATIONALLYIN THEEVENT3HEISALSOSECONDINSCHOOL HISTORYINWEIGHTTHROW SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Wolfpack falls to George Mason 11-4

Deputy Sports Editor & Staff Writer

March 2009 W

Pack drops ball against Patriots Jonathan Laughrun and Taylor Barbour

ATHLETIC SCHEDULE T

ANDY MUSSELMAN/TECHNICIAN

Junior infielder Dallas Poulk gets the out at second and attempts to turn the double play during Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game against George Mason. The Pack lost to the Patriots 11-4.

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4ODAY BASEBALL VS. N.C. A&T Doak Field, 6:30 p.m. WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TENNIS VS. COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON J.W. Isenhour Tennis Center, 2 p.m. 4HURSDAY MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BASKETBALL @ ACC TOURNAMENT Atlanta, Ga., TBA SOFTBALL @ WINTHROP Rock Hill, S.C., 3 p.m. &RIDAY BASEBALL VS. MARYLAND Doak Field, 3 p.m. GYMNASTICS VS. GEORGE WASHINGTON Reynolds Coliseum, 7 p.m. TRACK & FIELD @ NCAA INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS College Station, Texas, All Day SWIMMING & DIVING @ NCAA DIVING ZONES Knoxville, Tenn., All Day RIFLE @ NCAA CHAMPIONSHIPS TBA, All Day

QUOTE OF THE DAY â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was one of the worst games I have seen in N.C. State baseball memory.â&#x20AC;? "ASEBALLCOACH%LLIOTT!VENT ABOUT4UESDAYSGAME

COMING SOON

Thursday:#OVERAGEOFTHEWOM ENSTENNISMATCHAGAINST#OLLEGEOF #HARLESTON Friday:#OVERAGEOFTHEMENSBAS KETBALL!##TOURNAMENT

The baseball team fell 11-4 to the Patriots of George Mason Tuesday and played, according to coach Elliott Avent, as bad as a team has played in his memory of N.C. State baseball. The Pack fell to 7-6 on the season while George Mason improved its record to 8-3. According to Avent, the team did not show

a solid performance in any aspect of the game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play well. We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play well in any aspect from pitching to defense to offense to the mentality you need to have to play the game,â&#x20AC;? Avent said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was one of the worst games I have seen in N.C. State baseball memory.â&#x20AC;? According to assistant head coach Tom Holliday, this is the type of a game coaches are afraid of and rightfully so, as the team could not step up for a victory. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Today was a typical Tuesday baseball game that coaches fear the most. Every trap that was in there we feel into. Our kids

played terrible. We probably coached them terrible,â&#x20AC;? Holliday said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We needed to get out there and get a dominate start on the mound until your club wakes and realizes they are back at home. We have some young kids that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand that every game counts.â&#x20AC;? The Pack starter, freshman Zak Sinclair, started off the game by walking the first batter, Spencer Wiggins. Wiggins advanced to second on a walk to Chris Henderson and to third on a stolen base. Wiggins then scored on an RBI fielderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice. The Wolfpack answered back in the first, taking the lead by posting two

SOFTBALL

runs of its own. The Patriots tied the game back up in the third after Sinclair ran into more trouble with another leadoff walk. After an RBI double, freshman Cory Mazzoni took the mound and retired the next three batters to leave the score knotted at two. In the fifth inning, everything hit the fan for the Pack as George Mason scored four runs on one hit and three errors. The one hit of the inning for the Patriots was a three run shot into left field by Scott Krieger. In the bottom of the inning, the Pack was able to notch one run off two hits to make the score 6-3, leaving hope

for a comeback. The Patriots put the nails in the coffin in the eighth as they scored two runs. The inning started with a leadoff walked issued by redshirt freshman Vance Williams followed by a single. Both runners were driven in by a double down the left field line. This was followed up by a three run ninth inning for George Mason. According to Holliday, the team gave the Patriots opportunities by playing poor defense, and let opportunities slip DEFEAT continued page 7

BASEBALL

Pack sweeps doubleheader Gillheeney thriving in new role for Pack

Softball takes 3-0 shutout in second game after winning the first on an eighth inning walk-off from Bridget Desbois

Junior pitcher able to switch from closer to starter with relative ease

Tyler Everett

Taylor Barbour

Staff Writer

Staff Writer

The softball team followed up a 4-3 triumph in extra innings with a 3-0 win in the second game to sweep Tuesday afternoonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doubleheader against the Michigan State Spartans. The wins improved the Packâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s season record to 10-7 and dropped the Spartans to 8-10 overall. Sophomore third baseman Bridget Desboisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; walk off solo homer in the eighth inning lifted the Pack to a 4-3 win despite leaving eight runners on base and allowing the Spartans to come back from a 3-0 deficit to make the game tied up until Desboisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; decisive blast. Senior pitcher Mendy McKenzie said that Desboisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; home run was exciting and described the momentum it allowed the team to take into the second game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was very exciting, it was awesome that Bridget got a home run to win the game,â&#x20AC;? McKenzie said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was an awesome feeling, and we were so excited going into the next

After a season in which he was named to first team All-ACC and third team AllAmerican as a closer, junior Jimmy Gillheeney has transitioned himself from a closer into a starting pitcher for the baseball team this season. After losing all three top starting pitchers from last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s team, Gillheeney and coach Tom Holliday thought a transition from the bullpen to the starting rotation was needed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a little a bit of both,â&#x20AC;? Gillheeney said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We agreed on that I would be a better fit in the starting role this year, for leadership mostly.â&#x20AC;? But since his transition into the starting rotation Gillheeney has not lost one step. He was selected as first team preseason All-American, and is leading the Pack in wins and strikeouts through the first part of the season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It feels really good to be recognized as one of the better players in the ACC and in the country,â&#x20AC;? Gillheeney said.

DANNY BOEMERMANN/TECHNICIAN

Senior pitcher Mendy McKenzie pitches the ball during the second game of Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s double header against Michigan State.

game too, so it really helped.â&#x20AC;? The second game of the double header saw considerably less offense from both teams, as the Pack and Spartans combined for just three runs on nine hits after the two teams batâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s amassed

seven runs on 17 hits in the 4 oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; clock game. The game got off to a rocky start for the Wolfpack, as the Spartans had the bases loaded SOFTBALL continued page 7

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;But thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not something I am really trying to think about right now, I am just trying to get my team to win and do whatever I can to get them to win.â&#x20AC;? The success that Gillheeney has received in the beginning of the season is not just from his talent. Gillheeney focuses on each start he makes and pitches like it is game seven of the world series all while still being able to enjoy each and every game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He prepares himself now as a starter that one time a week and it really means something to him,â&#x20AC;? Holliday said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the one time of the week he gets to do what he loves to do.â&#x20AC;? The transition from closer to starter was not as easy. In the offseason he had to focus on gaining a lot more stamina to be able to pitch more than just one or two innings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I never threw more than two innings at any one time last year,â&#x20AC;? Gillheeney said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So that was the main thing just getting my stamina up so I could go into the six or seventh inning with some confidence that I can get some guys out.â&#x20AC;? Pitching in high pressured situations out of the bullpen last year has helped Gillheeney greatly as he has transitioned GILLHEENEY continued page 7

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