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Raleigh, North Carolina

Ticket return switches to bracelets Weather forces switch from scanners for Wake Forest game Derek Medlin Managing Editor

DREIER CARR/TECHNICIAN ARCHIVE PHOTO

Savannah Pratt, a senior in mathematics education, helps serve Rachel McClure, a junior in parks, recreation and tourism management, and Dan Miller, a junior in electrical engineering, at the Ram Roast Pep Rally outside the free expression tunnel last year.

Ram roast plans being finalized STUDENT LEADERS PLAN EVENTS FOR FOOTBALL PEP RALLY James Layman Deputy News Editor

With the football game against UNC-Chapel Hill less than a week away, student leaders are putting the final touches on the Ram Roast this Thursday night. Several events have been planned to get students excited about the game and to gather support for the team. “Carolina used to come in and paint the tunnel the Thursday before we played them in football or basketball and it would be Carolina Blue on Friday morning when students walked to classes,� Adam Compton, senior class president, said. “The Ram Roast was

started by the senior class president a The event, which is planned by the few years ago. It started where you just Alumni Ambassador Association, spent the night and guarded the Free Student Government and the Senior Expression Tunnel. This is our way of Class Council, begins with a pep rally taking our tunnel back.� which is led by the football coaches Since the Ram and players and is Roast began, it has “It’s an opportunity to followed by perevolved into a pep forma nces f rom meet new people and the dance team, rally to get students excited about the cheerleaders and have a good time� game. the band. “We actually paint “We’re having a Maggie Reaves [the tunnel] comwing eating consophomore, business pletely red that night, test, a Pig Pickin’, and it’s also a mix of performances from a pep rally, and we toss around our different student groups and certain favorite Carolina jokes, and it’s just prizes such as t-shirts,� Morgan Donbeen a huge tradition since 2005.� nelly, campus community committee

BALLROOM DANCIN’

Saja Hindi Editor-in-Chief

RENEE BAKER/TECHNICIAN

David Sulock, a senior in computer science, and Esther Ichugu, a junior in biological sciences, contra dance in the Talley Ballroom.

The Student Senate formed the “select committee on hate crimes,� which held its first meeting Friday to discuss the resolution introduced at the last Senate meeting about the incident at the Free Expression Tunnel. Four students admitted to painting hateful messages about president-elect Barack Obama in the Free Expression Tunnel the day after the election. The final vote for the bill will take place Tuesday and another meeting where students can voice their concerns will take place today at 5 p.m. Morgan Donnelly, Senate Campus Community Committee chair and junior in po-

Grad Fa ir CB Graduation Announcements

ROAST continued page 3

Committee meets to hear student input on hate speech Senators, students disagree on punishment for tunnel incident

Balfour

chair, said. “People stay all night and they go and paint the tunnel, or tell their best Carolina joke as long as it is in good nature.� The Alumni Ambassador Association recently suffered a budget cut and couldn’t allocate as much money as normal to the Ram Roast. Student Government and the Senior Class Council increased their budgets for the event so it didn’t suffer. “The Alumni Association has had to cancel some of the things we have done in the past,� Donnelly said,� such as some of the prizes and the publicity, so they came to student government

litical science, said the turnout have thought of anything like was as expected. that just because the original “People were kind of confused content of the bill was so sewith what the purpose of the bill vere,� she said. was, whether it was to create a During the forum, each perpolicy, to punish the students son was allowed one minute who wrote the things in the and 30 seconds to speak. Free Expression Tunnel — reSen. Maritza Adonis, junior ally the resolve was to punish in lifelong education and authe students by thor of the bill, expelling them said the bill’s or suspending intent was to them,� Donnelly bring attensaid. tion to the inAnd the ideas cidents. students came up “T h i s bi l l with were benefiis not about cial, she said. establishing Maritza Adonia “ We h e a r d a hate crime junior, lifelong education from a lot of the polic y,� she students and they said. thought of things Ben Mazur, that we didn’t, and they kind of senior in religious studies, wanted to recommend that they said the University already do community service or take has a hate crimes policy in cultural diversity classes and place. educate students more rather However, other students at than publishing them, and we the forum had other concerns got some really good feedback COMM continued page 3 because we probably wouldn’t

“This bill is not about establishing a hate crime policy�

NC State Bookstores November 18, 19 & 20 10am - 4pm

Ticket return workers used different colored bracelets instead of stamps and electronic scanners at Saturday’s football game to assign students to seats because of concerns over the weather damaging scanners. Student Body President Jay Dawkins, a junior in engineering, said he found out about the switch to paper bracelets on Saturday. “It was one of those things where they weren’t sure what the forecast would be,� he said of the decision to use or not use the scanners. “When it got closer to kickoff they decided not to use the scanners.� The high priced scanners, Dawkins said, could have been damaged by the combination of wind and rain. “They have the covered areas to handle some scanning when it rains but when it’s windy it becomes pretty much impossible to keep them dry,� Dawkins said. Tim Canty, a sophomore in physics, said he didn’t notice any adverse effect from using the paper bracelets when trying to enter the stadium. “It was pretty straightforward, I didn’t really see anything too different,� he said. “It took about the same amount of time getting in [using the bracelets].� David Earley, a junior in English, agreed and said the bracelets caused no problem getting into the game. “I thought it was pretty seamless,� Early said. “I got there a little later than usual so we just walked right up and they gave us a wristband. There was a never a line to get in [section] seven and eight.� Although Canty said it was no problem to get into the stadium, he said he thought some students may have been waiting outside to get certain seats. “I got there right when they were switching from section seven and eight to the south end zone,� Canty said. It seems like people might have been abusing the system.� Canty said he thought students were waiting outside to get front row seats in the south end zone rather than seats in the upper rows of section seven and eight. Canty said he thought the system may have been easier than the stamps used throughout the season to this point. SCANNERS continued page 3

insidetechnician

Scientists warn of side effects to genetic ancestry testing

Tests that determine families’ origins help some understand how ancestry evolved. See page 6.

viewpoint life & style classifieds sports

4 5 7 8

r i a F d a r G 10% off all Caps & Gowns and Diploma Frames

University Frames


Page 2

PAGE 2 • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2008

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

TECHNICIAN

THROUGH RENEE’S LENS

CAMPUS CALENDAR November 2008

In Friday’s page-one story, “Communication department’s graduation returns to schedule,� News Editor Chris Allred incorrectly identified Kenneth Zagacki. He is the Communication Department head.

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In the same article, the Communication Department’s graduation costs $3000 to $4000 every semester, not every year.

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Monday STUDY ABROAD SYMPOSIUM Talley Student Center, Walnut Room, 1 to 4 p.m.

Technician regrets these errors.

SCHOLARSHIP AND GRADUATE EDUCATION IN THE 21ST CENTURY D.H. Hill Library, Room 2304, 3 to 4 p.m.

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Saja Hindi at editor@ technicianonline.com.

JACK WILSON MEMORIAL LECTURE AND RECEPTION Nelson Hall, Room 2405, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.

WEATHER WISE Today:

ARCHITECTURE LECTURE Kamphoefner Hall, Burns Auditorium, 6 to 8 p.m. Tuesday GRAD FAIR AT N.C. STATE BOOKSTORES All day Wednesday GIS DAY 2008 D.H. Hill Library, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

57/34

Feeding in film

Mostly sunny throughout the day. Chance of rain at 20 percent.

Tuesday:

47 27 Sunny throughout the day with temperatures dropping into to 40s.

Wednesday:

49 32 Sunny throughout the day with temperatures dropping into to 40s. SOURCE: WWW.WEATHER.COM

ON THE WEB Check out Saturday’s slideshow of the football game. Answer the online poll. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline.com. Check it out!

PEACE CORPS EVENT Daniels Hall, Room 434, 1:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m.

PHOTO BY RENEE BAKER

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atthew Harris, a junior in film studies, feeds film through the brain of the project system at Campus Cinema. “My favorite part of working here is working with the projector, using the projector, running the projector. It intrigues me,� Harris said. Campus Cinema shows films to the campus community every week.

International Lenovo CEO to speak Education Week begins today at seminar Tuesday

Memorial lecture to be held for professor

IN THE KNOW

President and CEO of Lenovo, William Amelio, will be presenting at the Wachovia Executive Lecture at the N.C. State College of Management on Nov. 19 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. Amelia left Dell Inc. in 2001 and joined Lenovo as senior vice president with responsibility for strategy and operations across the region. He previously held leadership positions at Honeywell International Inc., AlliedSignal Inc. and a wide range of senior management positions with IBM. Amelio will be discussing winning strategies in today’s world and economic climate. The Wachovia Executive Lecture Series is open to the public at no charge and no reservations are required.

The Office of International Affairs will be holding International Education Week beginning today. Several events will be available to students to attend. The recently inaugurated Honorary Consulate of the Republic of Poland will be on N.C. State’s campus today to speak to students on the largest and most influential county in East-Central Europe, a nation that recently celebrated its 400 years of close relations with the United States. U.S. Department of State officials will be on campus Thursday to assist students with passport applications and to take passport photos.

A memorial lecture and reception honoring the late Jack Wilson, professor of business management, will be held today in Nelson Hall. Richard Sylla, Henry Kaufman Professor of History of Financial Institutions and Markets at Stern School of Business, will speak on the topic of business corporations, entrepreneurship, and economic growth in the U.S. Wilson joined N.C. State in 1964 as an assistant professor and retired in June 2002. He served as head of the Division of Multidisciplinary Studies and the Department of Business Management. He was also awarded the Holladay Medal, the University’s highest award for faculty, in 2003.

SOURCE: OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS WEB SITE

SOURCE: COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT WEB SITE

SOURCE: N.C. STATE COLLEGE OF MANAGEMENT WEB

QUOTE OF THE DAY “It’s about everyone coming together to rally support for our team and help them win against Carolina.� Jackie Varner sophomore, food science

SITE

WORLD & NATION

Space shuttle docks with station

Seven astronauts arrived at the International Space Station Sunday to help install more living areas and upgrade the stations amenities. The space shuttle docked with the station more than 200 miles above India. Greg Chamitoff, the station’s flight engineer, will get to go home after being aboard the sta-

tion for the past six months. He will be replaced by Sandra Magnus. While aboard the space station the astronauts will double the living space, taking the capacity from three to six occupants. The new amenitites will include another bathroom, a better water system, more exercise equipment and a bigger refrigerator. SOURCE: CNN.COM

World’s second economy now in recession

Japan, the second largest economy behind the United States, announced that it is now in recession on Sunday.

The country’s GDP has fallen 0.4 percent this year. The economic downturn in the United States has had a large impact across the globe since late September. Russia’s stock market is down more than 65 percent this year while Japan has lost 42 percent and the U.S. 33 percent. The European Union also announced on Friday its 15 nations were in recession. The EU’s gross domestic product is down 0.2 percent for the second straight quarter. SOURCE: CNN.COM

Gas prices drop for two months

cline for 60 consecutive days, bringing the national average to $2.10 a gallon. On July 17, a gallon of gas was at an all-time high of $4.11. Some states’ prices have remained high despite the trend across the country. Alaska and Hawaii still have averages more than $3 a gallon. In Missouri, where gas is at its cheapest, the average is $1.81 a gallon. The main reason for the fall has been the rapid fall of crude oil prices, which makes up nearly half of the price of gas. Crude oil prices have fallen 60 percent since July 11, when a barrel of crude oil cost $147.27. On Friday, crude oil fell to $57.04 a barrel.

Gas prices have been on the de-

SOURCE: CNN.COM

INTERNATIONAL TEA AND COFFEE Caldwell Hall, Caldwell Lounge, 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. SOIL SCIENCE SEMINAR Williams Hall, Room 2215, 3:40 to 4:40 p.m. WACHOVIA EXECUTIVE LECTURE Nelson Hall, Room 3400, 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. KEPT AND DREAMLESS Witherspoon Cinema, 7 to 8:45 p.m. THE DARK KNIGHT Witherspoon Cinema, 9:30 to 11:55 p.m.

GET INVOLVED IN TECHNICIAN Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copyedit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday - Thursday 9 a.m. - midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m., or e-mail Editor-in-Chief Saja Hindi at editor@technicianonline.com.

POLICE BLOTTER November 13 12:22 A.M. | FIRE ALARM/ MOLESTATION Becton Hall Units responded to alarm. Investigation revealed pull station had been activated. No fire or smoke. 9:57 A.M. | CHECK PERSON D.H. Hill Library Officers spoke with non-student. No further action taken. 11:11 A.M. | MEDICAL ASSIST Partners I Units responded to non-student in need of medical assistance. 11:38 A.M. | CONCERNED BEHAVIOR Off Campus Campus Police received Concerned Behavior Report. Investigation pending. 1:30 P.M. | LARCENY Jordan Hall Student reported jacket taken. 2:29 P.M. | SAFETY PROGRAM Admin Services II Officer conducted safety program. 6:02 P.M. | TRAFFIC ACCIDENT Cates Avenue/Morrill Drive Students were involved in traffic accident.

   Of !ce!of!Energy!Management

www.ncsu.edu/energy

6:08 P.M. | SUSPICIOUS INCIDENT Yarbrough Drive Report of suspicious incident. Officer determined subject had locked keys in vehicle. 7:54 P.M. | TRAFFIC ACCIDENT Jensen Drive/Cates Avenue Students were involved in traffic accident.

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8:33 P.M. | DAMAGE TO PROPERTY Avent Ferry Complex Report of subject attempting to damage property in the area. Subject left prior to officer’s arrival.

     

10:00 P.M. | VEHICLE STOP Dan Allen Drive/Sullivan Drive dent was issued citation for stop sign violation.

             

       Report!any!leaky!faucets,!concerns,!or!questions!to!s"#e%ener(y*n+su-edu

10:28 P.M. | VEHICLE STOP Dan Allen Drive/Sullivan Drive Student was issued citation for stop sign violation.


News

TECHNICIAN

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2008 • PAGE 3

International Education week begins today Multiple events to highlight different cultures Courtney Bolin Staff Writer

LUIS ZAPATA/TECHNICIAN

The crowd cheers on the Wolfpack after its 21-17 win on Saturday against Wake Forest. Fans had to deal with the rain for the second home game this season.

SCANNERS continued from page 1

“I felt like it was easier,” he said. “When you left your seat and came back it was easier to just show your bracelet instead of your stamp and ticket.” Early agreed and said the lines to get back into sections were negligible. “All you had to do when you came back to the section was raise your hand,” Earley

ROAST

said. Earley said the bracelet system may make more sense than the stamps, regardless of weather conditions. “It works really well and it’s easy,” he said of the bracelet system. “As long as [ticket return] still scans the tickets so people get loyalty points the bracelets seem easier.” Dawkins said ticket return will most likely return to the stamp system for the last home game, Nov. 29 against Miami. “They’ll probably end up sticking with

stamps,” Dawkins said. “The reason this went so much faster is because they weren’t having to scan tickets.” Dawkins also said every student who received a ticket to Saturday’s game will receive a loyalty point. “Basically, everyone who received a ticket is going to get a loyalty point,” he said. “If you can’t prove somebody wasn’t there they should get a point.”

HIKE

continued from page 1

and we helped them out.” Compton said they three groups have planned events lasting up to midnight. “We’re going to have T-shirts, events and prizes, and some student leaders are going to dress in blue and we’re going to have a ‘Pie the Blue Guy’ contest. After midnight it’s going to be a bunch of small things. We want to get everyone hyped up.” Maggie Reaves, a sophomore in business, said she has never been to a Ram Roast but she looks forward to going to one. “I think it would be a lot of fun. You get to hear the coaches and the players speak,” Reaves said. “Everyone’s going to be there and it’s an opportunity to meet new people and have a good time and to come together as a campus community.” Reaves said she wants the University to come together and help the football team win against Carolina. Jackie Varner, a sophomore in food science, said she’s excited to go to the Ram Roast and show support for her school. “It’s about everyone coming together to rally support for our team and help them win against Carolina,” Varner said. Carolina is really cocky and they think they’re better than everyone and this is our chance to prove them wrong.” Varner also said the events are well planned out and help students to get excited about the game.

The Office of International Affairs is hosting the 9th annual International Education Week this week. Beginning today and running through Friday, daily events will attempt to encourage students to experience different cultures. During the week, thirteen events will take place. Each event will focus on different cultures and some of the traditional styles of art they possess. Korea, China and India are three of the countries that will be highlighted through the multiple events taking place this week. The events will feature dancing, photography and ethnic foods. Caitlyn Suber, a sophomore in communication, said she was not aware that the events were happening this week. “The Indian Cultural Celebration looks like it would be really interesting to go to,” Suber said. “I’ve never seen any Indian dancing and I think it would be cool to experience first-hand.” Stephanie Conner, a sophomore in environmental science, received an e-mail informing her of the events but hasn’t had the time to read about the specific details yet. “I’m planning to go to at least one of the events,” Con-

COMM

continued from page 1

TIM O’BRIEN/TECHNICIAN

With Carter-Findley stadium in the background, Kyle Rohweder receives the snap from Miles Wurtsbaugh while playing two on two touch football before the game.

with the bill, like its punishment for the students. “There’s no reason to expel someone for that behavior,” Courtney Parnell, a CALS senator and senior in biological sciences, said. Mazur agreed. “It would create a precedence that we’re not going to give anyone second chances,” he said. Others, like Rishi Patel, a junior in biochemistry, said the Ku Klux Klan is a terrorist organization and by censoring the members’ speech, the University is acting out of fear. But James Hankins said speech is the not the issue at stake. “The point is violent language,” he said. Hankins said the response is the problem.

ner said, “It is important to have a strong grasp on the different cultures in the world so we can be more accepting of their customs.” Connor also said it is important for students to support cultural activities on campus and the Office of International Affairs. Will Lampe, a sophomore in engineering, hadn’t heard about all of the International Educational Week’s events but was aware of the Study Abroad Symposium. Lampe is planning to study abroad in the upcoming fall semester and wants to learn more about the programs offered. “I’m going to the symposium to hopefully help me choose where I should go to study abroad,” Lampe said. “Anyone looking to broaden their horizons and get a taste of culture should consider going to it.” But not enough students seem to be well-informed about the International Education Week and all that it has to offer, Suber said. “I wasn’t aware of the event last year,” Conner said. “I think that there should have been more information put out for students to see.” The first event planned is the Study Abroad Symposium. It’s designed to assist students in planning their study abroad experiences. The event will be held in the Walnut Room located in Talley Student Center from 1 to 4 p.m. Monday afternoon. For the full list of events students can go to the Office of International Affairs Web Site, www.ncsu.edu/oia.

“[The Student Senate] can’t change laws on campus,” he said. “We make strong recommendations.” And for this reason, he said he thought it would be a good idea to amend the resolution, rather than starting it from scratch as Student Senate President Greg Doucette suggested should happen. But Doucette, a senior in computer engineering, had his reasons for suggesting the change. “The statement needs to be structured in a way that’s effective.” Donnelly said the next step is to continue working on the bill and getting student feedback. “We really want this to be the student’s bill because it affected everyone, and we don’t want just the senators’ voices heard — we want the University’s voice heard,” Donnelly said. Deputy News Editor James Layman and Staff Writer Chris Allred contributed to this report.

Picture this: Your favorite photo on a T-shirt.

We are now able to offer reprints of our photographers’ work on high-quality Kodak photographic paper. Posters, T-shirts, coffee mugs, BBQ aprons and other items are also available, printed with the staff photo of your choice. technicianonline.com/reprints


Viewpoint

PAGE 4 • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2008

TECHNICIAN

{OUR VIEW}

Create downtown connector bus, be wary of costs THE ISSUE:

The Transportation Department is working on plans to create a weekend connector service to downtown Raleigh.

OUR OPINION:

While the proposed downtown connector would be a benefit for students, costs could play a major role in the plan.

THE SOLUTION:

Transportation needs to work to limit the costs of the new route to students and ensure the route is established in a timely manner.

{

CAMPUS FORUM

HOW TO SUBMIT

}

Letters must be submitted before 5 p.m. the day before publication and must be limited to 250 words. Contributors are limited to one letter per week. Please submit all letters electronically to viewpoint@technicianonline.com

Don’t threaten violence against hate speech Jane, your column on the act committed in the Free Expression Tunnel is completely full of hypocrisy and ludicrous presuppositions. To begin your column, you insinuate they are all male. How do you know they are all males? Do you have some inside information about these “naive boys” that we do not. I do not believe the identities have been revealed yet. I do not mean to defend what was done by those people, but you threaten them with violence multiple times in your article. You claim that responding to their violence with violence of your own by whooping them is wrong. However, I must beg the question, have they actually committed an act of violence? Last I checked, hate speech was NOT synonymous with committing an act of violence. Are their threats to Barack Obama any worse than your threats that these people should “thank their lucky stars that cruel and unusual punishment isn’t around anymore?” Perhaps YOU should be put under investigation for your threats to them. Stop implying that everyone thinks we are an entire campus full of close-minded idiots. The actions of four people should not and do not represent the attitude of our entire campus. Nobody in their right mind thinks our entire campus is full of white supremacists, and this one act is not causing people to reconsider coming to N.C. State for fear of racism. Stop blowing this out of proportion. Ben Hackney senior, engineering

Don’t look to punish — address diversity Perusing through the WRAL Web page this evening, I came upon a quote by Amina Turner, the N.C. NAACP Executive Director, stating that “we have to hold all of our institutions accountable” for managing hate crimes cases by implementing “a system-wide policy on hate speech.” Is N.C. State really to be held accountable for implementing and enforcing this proposed policy? NCSU should begin to promote diversity awareness with more fervor following this incident. However, I think that calling upon the University to implement a “system-wide policy” enforcing a moral code is an irrational expectation from outside this University. Instead, we should continue to build ties with the community, including the NAACP, to address the issue further. The NAACP open forum on Nov. 11 was a step in the right direction towards this goal. However, must an incident like this arise before these festering conflicts are addressed? My proposal is this: If the state NAACP organization wants to see our academic institution develop “accountability” in responding to these incidents, then they should first help us develop more accountability in “preventing” them. More programs to promote diversity and hate crime awareness must

T

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board excluding the news department and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

he Transportation Department is planning an overhaul of the Wolfline system with a proposal to extend the nightly hours of some routes and add a new bus service to take students downtown on weekend nights. A service expansion is a welcome idea, but discussions about Wolfline service to downtown Raleigh have been going on for years. With the current financial crunch, planners need to prioritize limiting costs and implementing any downtown connector service in a quick, efficent manner. Jay Dawkins, student body president, said the push for the new downtown connector bus came after a survey in the

spring of 2008 on night service optimization. Dawkins said the students surveyed showed interest in weekend service to the downtown area and on-demand busing. A downtown connector bus would have several benefits — students would not have to drive downtown on weekends, and having a bus service between downtown and campus could reduce drunk driving incidents. Transportation is not subject to the state-mandated budget cut, as student fees and permit costs make up the bulk of its budget, and Dawkins said students may see an increase in their transportation fee as a result.

But Ronnie Wright, assistant director for finance in Transportation, said there are no proposals for an increase in student fees to cover the night services. Wright said the night service expansion is getting funds from other area transit providers to help Wolfline better integrate with existing transit systems. He did not have any of the specifics regarding costs, but Wright said Transportation is not looking for a student fee increase in the fall of 2009 to cover any of the costs of a night service expansion. Minimizing the cost to students should be the top priority. Students pay enough in fees as it is,

and with the current economic situation they should not be burdened with additional costs until any changes are established. While there may be no additional costs from the connector service, Wright said later improvements may require an increase in student fees. Transportation needs to continue to work with other transit providers to fund the extended night service, with a focus on the downtown connector bus. As the current proposal for the new route does not require a fee increase, Transportation should work to implement the new service while coming up with ways to pay for extended hours in the future.

{

EDITOR’S NOTE Letters to the editor are the individual opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Technician staff or N.C. State University. All writers must include their full names and, if applicable, their affiliations, including years and majors for students and professional titles for University employees. For verification purposes, the writers must also include their phone numbers, which will not be published.

BY DANIEL TANAKA

Let’s move on

Give four students a second chance The four individuals who wrote the hate speech in the Free Expression Tunnel should be undoubtedly dealt with. We must remember though that adolescents make mistakes. Everyone deserves a second chance either here or at another university, expulsion would make that impossible because an expulsion at any of the universities within the UNC system means that you are ineligible to attend the others. These kids have already ruined their lives at N.C. State — the University should not be the judge of whether or not their lives are ruined forever. Chester Wells sophomore, political science

“Maybe have some big fundraiser.”

Parents learning how to text is the downside of text messaging.

Emily Baldwin, freshman, industrial engineering

Kirsten Southwell, freshman in design

Enforce double parking rules

P

arking enforcement is probably not the most popular group at N.C.

State. I have heard many people say less than pleasant things about parking tickets they have gotten. Even though people don’t apJane Moon preciate Assistant Viewpoint them, they Editor certainly do their jobs, and this is evidenced by two $50 parking tickets I got my freshman year. If I could ask parking enforcement to do one thing and something that might help its popularity (and help me keep my cool), it would be to please ticket more for double parking. According to the N.C. State Department of Transportation’s Web site, the “encroachment of two spaces” gets a person a $20 fine. This means any bit of car that sits outside of the two lines warrants a ticket. This is not a new concept — didn’t we all learn to stay inside the lines during art class in kindergarten? It is frustrating to drive around the Coliseum Deck or Cates Avenue and find a spot that is only occupied by someone’s front tire. As much as I see cars that

are double parked, I have never heard someone get a ticket for double parking, and I know a lot of bad parkers. I have also seen a lot of tickets on cars, but I have never seen one for double parking. A n d h e r e’s a message for people who continue to double park: STOP IT! It’s annoying, inconsiderate and it makes me want to put a Post-it Note under your winds h ie ld w ip e r that says, “You suck at parking, jerk!” I can think of only three re a s on s w hy someone would double park. One: his or her car is much too lovely to potentially get chipped by the door of a careless person in the next parking spot. Yes, the parking spaces around campus are tiny, but even if someone parks a foot into the next parking spot, someone can still put a ding in the side of the car. People also double park probably because they are bad parkers. I can sympathize with this, for I profess to be an imperfect parker. I am one of those people who

has trouble parking parallel within the lines. Another theory for why people double park is because they are just lazy. They don’t want to take the extra initiative to back out once or twice to park better. The main problem I have w it h double parking is that t he re a re not enough parking spaces on campus, and it just adds fuel to the fire. Hopefully, parking enforcement officials will do everyone a favor by ticketing more double parked cars. It will teach people to learn how to park properly and open up more spaces.

“This means any bit of car that sits outside of the two lines warrants a ticket. This is not a new concept — didn’t we all learn to stay inside the lines during art class in kindergarten?”

Send your thoughts on people who take up more than one parking spot to letters@ technicianonline.com.

“[They should] find a better way to split tuition money that we are already paying.” Chad Batten freshman, aerospace engineering

“With all the tuition money, isn’t that what we’re doing already?” Dillon Howard freshman, aerospace Engineering

“I don’t know — that’s a hard question.” Eliza Marth freshman, First Year College

This week’s poll question:

Should the University punish the four students who admitted to painting the Free Expression Tunnel on Election Night? • Yes • No • I don’t care

Visit www.technicianonline. com to cast your vote. Editor-in-Chief

Saja Hindi

editor@technicianonline.com

Managing Editor

Derek Medlin

Features Editor

Alison Harman

Deputy News Editors

Daniel Ellis James Layman

Sports Editor

Taylor Auten

features@technicianonline.com

sports@technicianonline.com

Deputy Features Editor

Deputy Sports Editors

Cheyenne Autry Arts & Entertainment Editor

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695 Editorial ..................................515.2411 Advertising ...........................515.2029 Fax..............................................515.5133 Online .................................... technicianonline.com

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How should the University pay for a proposed Wolfline route to downtown Raleigh?

come before legislation is passed for prosecution, and they must come without hateful events to precipitate them. We cannot punish these students ex post facto and we can especially not persecute them without having previously extended them a helping hand. To do so is simply passing on the hate. Garrett Swindlehurst senior, engineering

Like so many students, I was annoyed by what happened in the tunnel last week. And like so many students, even more annoyed by the University reaction the past week. Yes, the fantastic four should be punished to the correct extent. However, it continuously irks me to read some of the crazy things I’ve read in this paper. You’d think that these losers committed murder! I was baffled when I read the quotes “Terrified to go to school” or “Act of terrorism (personal favorite).” Although the term terrorism is (sigh) technically correct, come on! These guys were idiotic, self-centered bigots. They obviously couldn’t think of anything better to do when the man they didn’t want to win the election did. I’m in no way trying to downplay what they did that night and it was absolutely 100 percent wrong. They’re stupid, and rest assured, they’ll pay for their actions. However, my question is this: by expelling these students, what will we really solve? The answer is nothing. If anything it’ll only instill more hatred and racism in each and every one of them. I’m a proud supporter of the African-American community, and even prouder that this country has finally elected an African-American as President. However, it says a lot to the rest of N.C. State when the NAACP gets involved, and wants nothing less than for these guys to get kicked out instead of exploring other options. How about University sponsored counseling? Whatever happens, let’s seriously move on. Vince Taylor sophomore, environmental engineering

IN YOUR WORDS

Josh Harrell Ty Johnson

Dan Porter

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Viewpoint Editor

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Photo Editor

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Matt Moore

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Classifieds Manager Design Co- Editors

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Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2008 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features LIFE & STYLE

TECHNICIAN

Rings on display on one of the tables at Tough Love. Photo by Laura Fausch.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2008 • PAGE 5

LIFESTYLES Keeping warm from the inside out New research published in the Science in October says that keeping your hands warm could make yourself more approachable and brighten your outlook. Assistant professor at the University of Colorado, Lawrence Williams, and professor of psychology at Yale, John Bargh, teamed up to lead the investigation and test the link between physical warmth and emotions. Forty-one undergraduates were used in the study which involved using a series of questionnaires. Students were asked to describe the personality of a person, whom they had never met, after the person was described to them. On the elevator ride to the testing sight, students were given either a hot cup of coffee or an iced coffee to hold for the duration of the ride. The students who held the hot cup of coffee described the unknown person more warmly than those who held the iced cup of coffee. The test administrations noticed that though the coffee was only held for 30 seconds, those who held the hot coffee were more sociable and talkative. Another experiment was conducted using 53 volunteers who held either a hot or cold therapeutic pad and asked to evaluate the product. After the evaluation was concluded, each participant was offered a gift. They could either choose one gift for themselves or one to share with a friend. Fifty-four percent of those who held the warm pad chose the gift to share while only 25 percent of those who held the cold pad chose the shared reward.

Customers can sit in these vintageinspired chairs. Photo by Laura Fausch.

Tips on handling holiday temptations This time of year tends to bring families together, lots of decorations and extreme amounts of food. Experts agree that have a strategy to handle the holiday dinners will help you survive the long nights of eating and drinking. Listed below are the top eight recommendations for enjoying the holidays without too much bulge around the middle. 1. Trim back the trimmings. Go easy when adding nuts, cheese, cream sauces, gravy, butter and whipped cream. 2. Wear snug clothes and keep the dominant hand occupied. 3. Chew gum. Keeps the mouth too busy to snack. 4. Be a food snob. If you don’t like it, don’t eat it. 5. No skipping meals. Skipping meals throughout the day causes overeating. 6. Alternate alcohol with nonalcoholic beverages to cut calories. 7. Skip the appetizers. 8. Limit the variety SOURCE: WWW.WEBMD.COM

Adding the holiday spirit on a budget It’s almost the holiday season and decorating takes time — a luxury students don’t have this time of year. But, there are many ways to bring the spirit into your dorm or apartment without a lot of hassle. Decorative bows give a festive feel to any room. Put them on everything, chairs, plants, doorknobs and stair railings. Using holiday tableware is another easy way to embrace the holidays. Find a fun design that suits your holiday theme and use it through the whole season. Candle arrangements and ornamental wreaths also work as great decorations and add a cozy feel to any room.

SOURCE: WWW.HEALTHNEWS.COM

SOURCE: INTERIODEC.ABOUT.COM

MEREDITH FAGGART/TECHNICIAN FILE PHOTO

Tough Love is a boutique located on Hillsborough Street that features many hip and funky clothes and accessories.

Local designers’ fashions a few blocks from campus TOUGH LOVE SELLS JEWELRY, CLOTHES, ACCESSORIES FROM LOCAL DESIGNERS Laura Fausch

items to sell in her store. ReynStaff Writer olds attends trade shows for independent designers and said she takes a lot of her inspiration from You many have passed the big cities like New York. Tough Love boutique a few times She also carries the brands before you realized it was there. Almighty and Gentle Fawn, the And even when you did, you latter of which is a popular label might not have gone inside. she said is not found anywhere But Tough Love isn’t an average else in Raleigh. clothing boutique. So what’s selling this season? Ashley Reynolds, the owner of Reynolds said vintage-inspired, Tough Love, set up shop about a cotton-knit dresses, jackets and year ago in a quirky little build- anything organic is very popuing off Hillsborough Street, with lar. bright walls and decorations acAnd prices are right, as well, centing clothes that are, by her she said. own admittance, “different.” Prices range from $20 for a Tough Love top to $110 ca rries i ndefor a dress or pendent labels jacket. and local cloth“I tr y to ing and acceskeep price sories. Reynolds points pretty said the store moderate so doesn’t carr y everybody mainstream can shop,” Ashley Reynolds, owner of brands. Reynolds Tough Love “A s f a r a s said. trends, I’m not Her pa sthe anti — but I try not to do sion for fashion, and her desire what everyone else is doing,” to make it affordable, can be a Reynolds said. welcome gesture for the fashThe boutique carries one-of-a- ion-savvy girl during economic kind pieces, many of which are times in which jobs are scarce made by local designers. and financial investors expect Reynolds chooses to carry 500-point Dow plunges more three local designers: Mi Scusi, than they expect the market’s Domino and Frou, a jewelry success. line. The building where Tough With some research, she said Love is located used to be a she has found other independent Hispanic grocery store, and the

“I try to keep price points pretty moderate so everybody can shop”

this week

Wednesday-Sunday, Nov 19-23 • Talley Ballroom

University Theatre presents

Christmas Belles

Tough Love is located at 3114 Hillsborough St., and is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Sunday from noon to 5 p.m., and is closed on Mondays.

building itself has been around for at least 25 years, she said, but the brightly painted walls give it a fresh look. Mi Scusi, which means “excuse me” in Italian, is one of Reynolds’ local brands. The designer, Andrea Iacobucci, is from Winston-Salem and said she has always made clothing. She knits and sews using all-recycled materials. For example, Iacobucci said she reclaims yarn from sweaters that she finds in thrift stores, washes them, sometimes dyes them, and then reuses them in her own pieces. She does the same with fabrics, as well. Lauren Youngman, a designer for Frou, is a teacher but used to work at jewelry stores. Her love for vintage buttons, she said, has inspired her collection. She started making jewelry on the weekends, and now her line is taking off at Tough Love. Youngman makes rings out of vintage buttons that she finds at “flea markets, Grandma’s jewelry box, and other people’s grandma’s jewelry boxes.”

The authors of Dearly Departed have created a hilarious holiday spectacle guaranteed to bring joy to your world! It’s Christmastime in the small town of Fayro, Texas, and overdue twins, inadvertent fires, and a church Christmas program that is spiraling into chaos are keeping the Futrelle Sisters - Frankie, Twink and Honey Raye - from enjoying the holiday festivities.

Thursday-Friday, Nov 20-21 at 8pm • Stewart Theatre

Dance Program Fall Concert

Dances inspired by women’s roles during World War II, by manners, by a lack of communication between a husband and wife, and by a comedienne at the end of her career. These and more will be a part of the Dance Program Fall Concert, featuring choreography and performance by NCSU students, alumni, and the Dance Program directors.

Saturday, Nov 22, 10am-5pm • 516 Brickhaven Drive

Holiday Crafts Fair & Sale

Enjoy complimentary refreshments while shopping for unique items for yourself or those special people on your holiday gift list! Featuring work by The Crafts Centers’ own artists and craftspeople. Admission is $1 per person, $2 per family, and is FREE to NCSU students with student ID.

Sunday, Nov 23 at 4pm • Stewart Theatre

Raleigh Civic Chamber Orchestra

Music @ NC State in conjunction with the Raleigh Civic Symphony Association presents the Raleigh Civic Chamber Orchestra Premiers II concert. Featuring W.A. Mozart’s Don Giovanni Overture, K. 527, Gabriel Fauré’s Dolly Suite, op. 56, and the premier of Bill Robinson’s Ananda Concerto with guest violinist Eric Pritchard.

NCSU Center Stage The Crafts Center Dance Program Gregg Museum of Art & Design Music @ NC State University Theatre

Ticket Central: 515.1100 2nd Floor, Talley Student Center

www.ncsu.edu/arts


Features LIFE & STYLE

PAGE 6 • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2008

TECHNICIAN

Scientists warn of side effects to genetic ancestry testing PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY MATT MOORE

Tests to determine families’ origins help some understand how ancestry evolved, but results should be taken cautiously Alison Harman Features Editor

Caroline Shaver knows where her family came from. Well, at least part of her family. Her mother has a genealogy bulletin that, before her grandfather passed it down, “came from some family reunion that took place before I was born,” Shaver, an undeclared freshman, said. It’s within these sheets of paper where she has found information about her family’s ancestry. Her great grandfather traveled from Ireland through Ellis Island, and he came out with an immigration certificate that serves as physical proof of his voyage. She knows less about her father’s side of the family, which she said has “some German in it.” “I know from my grandmother telling me,” she said, “but I don’t know much about it because both of my grandparents’ parents died at early ages.” Shaver’s mother also tried an online ancestry, which confirmed that her relatives

originated from France and Ireland. And her mother is not alone in looking toward an outside source for information about her family. More than 460,000 people have purchased genetic ancestry tests that can reconstruct family trees and pinpoint geographic origins of their ancestors, according to a study published in Science magazine last October. The American Society of Human Genetics released a report on, as well as five recommendations for, genetic ancestry testing Nov. 13. These tests can range in price from $100 to $900, but scientists who wrote the study prefaces genetic testing with a warning, writing that such tests might negatively impact communities. “Assumptions and limitations” of genetic ancestry tests might also make the results less informative, and such tests’ commercialization has “led to misleading practices that reinforce misconceptions,” the article states. Although many people who request genetic ancestry tests do so recreationally, others take test results seriously. In searching for a “homeland” — a mission that is especially prevalent among African-Americans — or filling in missing parts of a family’s history, these testings could “have serious conse-

quences,” the article states. One such consequence is that, in reshaping an identity, a person might “suffer emotional distress if test results are unexpected or undesired.” Shaver, for instance, said she found out a fact from her family history that she preferred not to talk about. Test results can also influence how people fill out their races on college and job applications, government forms or medical questionnaires, the article states, continuing to state that this could “make it more difficult to track the social experiences and effects of race and racism.” And as for accuracy, genetic ancestry tests use either mitochondrial DNA or Y-chromosomes to determine a person’s haplotype — a set of alleles, which are parts of genes — and compare it to other tested individuals. In this case, the article states, genetic tests can find information on one member of each generation. More reliable tests, like AncestryByDNA, exist, but they still have flaws. AncestryByDNA, a test that measures 175 autosomal markers (traits that are inherited by both parents), suggests most people whose ancestors originated from the Middle East, India and the southern region of Europe have Native American ancestry, according to the

testing agency’s Web site. However, no evidence exists to support these findings, the article states. “Thus, these tests should not be seen as determining the race or ethnicity of a testtaker,” the article states. “They cannot pinpoint the place of origin or social affiliation of even one ancestor with exact certainty. Although wider sampling and technological advancements may help, many of the tests’ problems will remain.” Another problem lies in the genetic ancestry testing companies themselves, which the article states can mislead customers into thinking the test results will accurately determine race. A person’s race, though popular thought indicates race is “rooted in one’s DNA,” is not genetically determined, the article states. But such tests have helped Shaver confirm where her mother’s relatives came from — and it’s something that adds to her identity. “Knowing the history throughout the family is very interesting,” she said. “I mean, I’m not exactly proud of aspects to it, but at the same time it all has its place in how my family came to be the way it is.”


Sports

TECHNICIAN

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2008 • PAGE 7

CROSS COUNTRY

Cross country receives at-large national qualifying bid Men finish 3rd, women 18th at Southeast Regionals Daniel Ellis Deputy News Editor

The men’s cross country team found out Sunday that they would be making the trip to Terre Haute, Indiana for the NCAA Championship meet. The team received one of thirteen atlarge bids to the meet based on their performance at past meets, including their 10th place finish at the NCAA Pre-National meet in October. “We’ve really only not made

it twice in about the past 15 years, so it feels good to make it as a team,� sixth-year runner Bobby Mack said. “Individually, I haven’t been there since 2004, so I’m pretty excited about it.� On Saturday, the N.C. State men finished 3rd at the NCAA Southeast Regional meet behind the University of Virginia and William & Mary. The team needed at least a 2nd place finish to qualify outright for nationals. “Third isn’t what we were looking for,� Coach Rollie Geiger said. “But the whole goal of the program is to qualify for nationals and that’s what the purpose

James Oblinger Chancellor

Lee Fowler

Athletics Director

of regionals is.� Bobby Mack, a sixth-year runner, led the way for the Wolfpack, taking 2nd overall behind Liberty’s Samuel Chelanga. Mack finished the 10K course in 30:17.8. “Bobby was second to one of the favorites (Samuel Chelanga) to win a national title,� Geiger said. “This course is Bobby’s home and for him to run on that level at that day at home is terrific.� Geiger praised the veteran’s strong effort after returning to the program. In addition, the coach noted that Mack and redshirt junior John Martinez

Joseph Davenport

Debra Morgan WRAL Anchor

Western Boulevard

Overall Standings

6th 8-2 70-50

T-3rd 7-3 75-45

7th 6-4 69-51

10th 4-6 63-57

(8th, 30:32.7) were critical to the team’s chances of qualifying. “For us to qualify, they both had to have very big races and, they did,� Geiger said. “They both ran at a very high level and essentially carried us to the National Championship. Qualifying is good for the seniors and a plus for everyone in program. In fact, I believe our best race may be ahead of us.� On the women’s side, the Pack finished 18th out of the 33-team field. Freshman Emily Pritt paced State finishing 16th with a time of 21:30.3. “Her race was off the charts,�

Jay Dawkins Student Body President

Geiger said. “For Emily to run so well with just four or five days of practice over a three week period is terrific.� Pritt, who was recovering from a minor leg injury, was followed by freshman Caroline Kirby (68th, 22:30) and redshirt freshman Amanda Burger (117th, 23:16.8). “It’s bright for the future of the program,� Geiger said. “The freshmen have learned about the competitiveness of college and hopefully they will run at a higher level next season.�

Saja Hindi

Kishea Phillips

Technician Editor

Nubian Message Editor

9th 5-5 67-53

8th 6-4 68-52

5th 6-4 74-46

Taylor Auten Sports Editor

CLASH

continued from page 8

Michigan State and Wisconsin matches. “I was real pleased, especially with the way we wrestled Wisconsin,� Jordan said. “I thought we were the more aggressive team.� Darrion Caldwell defeated 14th ranked Troy Tirapelle of Illinois and 7th ranked Kyle Ruschell of Wisconsin by a score of 8-4. Caldwell also pinned David Cheza of Michigan State, in just one minute and six seconds. “Wrestling against the best guys in the country is what I love to do,� Caldwell said. “I love the challenge.�

Josh Harrell

Deputy Sports Editor

1st 7-3 80-40

T-3rd 7-3 75-45

Langdon Morris

Deputy Sports Editor

2nd 8-2 78-42

No. 24 Wake Forest @ N.C. State

N.C. State

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Wake Forest

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No. 11 Ohio State @ Illinois

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Northwestern @ Michigan

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Duke @ Clemson

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Notre Dame

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No. 10 Georgia @ Auburn

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No. 25 South Carolina @ No. 4 Florida

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No. 16 North Carolina @ Maryland

Maryland

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Nebraska @ Kansas State

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Florida State

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Boston College

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Notre Dame @ Navy

Boston College @ No. 19 Florida State

Classifieds

POLICY

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For students, line ads start at $5 for up to 25 words. For non-students, line ads start at $8 for up to 25 words. For detailed rate information, visit technicianonline.com/classifieds. All line ads must be prepaid.

To place a classified ad, call 919.515.2411, fax 919.515.5133 or visit technicianonline.com/classifieds EMPLOYMENT HELP WANTED BARTENDERS ARE IN DEMAND! Earn $20-$35 per hour. 1 or 2 week classes & weekend classes. 100% job placement assistance. Raleigh’s bartending school. Have fun! Make money! Meet people! Ask about our Fall tuition rates and student discount. CALL NOW!! 919-676-0774. www. cocktailmixer.com

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Hab Techs Needed! Maxim Healthcare needs staff to work w/developmentally disabled clients in Wake County. Flexible hours in afternoons, evenings, and weekends. $10-$15/hr based on experience. Need own transportation. 676-3118.

SUPERSTAR LEASING CONSULTANT NEEDED PART TIME. (ABOUT 25 HOURS A WEEK). GREAT PERSONALITY AND COMMUNICATION SKILLS A MUST. MUST BE ABLE TO WORK SATURDAYS. FLEXIBLE SCHEDULE. PLEASE EMAIL RESUME TO PARKWOODAPTS@ MINDSPRING.COM OR FAX IT TO 919-834-9874.

FT Veterinary Receptionist/Assistant needed for one of the best equipped small animal hospitals in the state. Practice is 15 miles east of Raleigh. Ideal position for pre-veterinary student on sabbatical or out-of-state student trying to establish North Carolina residency. Veterinary School Scholarship available for FT employee working for one year. Call Dr. Mike at 553-4601.

Seeking mature individual with pleasant personality to show rental houses to NC State students. Fun work. 10-20 hours/ week. January through August 09. Excellent salary. Office furnished. Call 833-7142 for more information.

HELP WANTED Earn Extra Money. Students needed ASAP. Earn up to $150 per day being a mystery shopper. No experience required. Call 1-800-722-4791.

Valet drivers for downtown hotel parking service are needed immediately for 3rd shift. Pre-employment drug screening, DMV, and criminal background checks performed. Pay is $10.00/hr. Call for interview 743-9579.

REAL ESTATE APARTMENTS FOR RENT Remodeled apartments available immediately and also pre-leasing for Spring and Summer 2009. Directly on the Wolfline. Mention this ad and we will waive your application fee. Check out our website at www.parkwoodvillageapts. com. or call 832- 7611 for more information

HOMES FOR RENT Home for Rent: 5118 Simmons Branch $995. Adorable 3bdrm 2.5bath minutes from NCSU. New paint, carpet, refrigerator. Lg FR w/ FP. Contact Stevens Realty & Relocation 919-465-2202

DUPLEX FOR RENT RENTAL SALE Brent Rd. 3BD/ 2.5BA Duplex. Rent now for second semes. and get November & December free. 3BD/$850 or 1BD/$325. 919-454-7701.

TOWNHOMES FOR SALE Quiet Neighborhood Near NCSU and I-440/Gorman Street. 1178 SF, 2 Bedroom, 2.5 Bath, Nice Front Porch& Rear Deck. Tax Value $123,000; Job Relocation: Best Offer. Day 910-4282106, Nite 910-428-4524, Harry or Teena See Wake Co Real Estate ID: 0282098

THE Daily Crossword

LEVEL 4 # ('#"'#'(%,/&$(-- 

ROOM FOR RENT FOR RENT: Bedroom in Lake Park Jan 2009. Year lease. $375 per month w/d utilities included. Private bath. Contact Danielle @ 637-8064 or dmmille2@ncsu. edu.

SERVICES SPRING BREAK BAHAMAS SPRING BREAK $189 5-DAYS or $239 7- DAYS. All prices include: Round-trip luxury cruise with food. Accommodations on the island at your choice of thirteen resorts. Appalachia Travel. www.BahamaSun. com 800-867-5018.

FOR RELEASE NOVEMBER 17, 2008

1 2 3 4

LEVEL 1

Level:

HELP WANTED English/Journalism students needed for creative and promotional writing to promote Sugar Hollow Retreat. $9/hour. Computer skills desired. 828-2245

/ %"&$)% '(&)(-&)#&*' !!&('&'&*

Technician was there. You can be too. The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information.

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Sports

&2817'2:1

• 6 days until the football game at UNC-Chapel Hill

• Page 7: A story on cross country team’s qualification for nationals.

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 8 • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2008

WOLF FACTS

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FOOTBALL

Men’s basketball takes opener The men’s basketball team opened up the 2008-2009 season with a win, taking down New Orleans in Louisiana 65-59. Redshirt junior Brandon Costner led the Wolfpack with 19 points as State collected a win against the team that gave the Pack its first loss of the season a year ago. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Lowe inks three recruits Three players have signed National Letters of Intent to play for the Wolfpack men’s basketball program beginning in the 2009-10 season. Lorenzo Brown, a guard from Georgia, Scott Wood, a guard from Indiana, and Richard Howell, a forward from former standout J.J. Hickson’s hometown of Marietta, Georgia were announced as part of Sidney Lowe’s third class Sunday. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Volleyball drops match to Duke The volleyball team lost in straight sets to Duke Friday night in Reynolds Coliseum. State was led by Arlee Tamietti’s ten kills as the Pack fell to 9-23 overall and 3-14 in conference play. Duke continued its recent dominance of the Wolfpack as State has not defeated the Blue Devils since a win in 2000. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

ATHLETIC SCHEDULE M

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Wilson, defense lift Pack over Deacs Russell Wilson throws for two TDs, rushes for another in win

November 2008 Su

LUIS ZAPATA/TECHNICIAN

Senior halfback Andre Brown gets tackled by the Wake Forest defense in the first quarter of Saturday’s game.. Brown had a total of 67 rushing yards during the game. N.C. State won 21-17.

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Tuesday WOMEN’S BASKETBALL VS. ELON Reynolds Coliseum, 7 p.m.

QUOTE OF THE DAY “I think he has great amnesia too, and that is what you have to have to play that position.” said by Coach Tom O’Brien on the play of redshirt freshman quarterback Russell Wilson

DID YOU KNOW? ESPN.com’s women’s basketball analyst Charlie Creme included the N.C. State women’s basketball team in his first Bracketology prediction of the season. Creme has the Pack as a 12th seed in the Berkeley regional.

COMING SOON

Tomorrow: A hands-on feature about the rifle team and a preview of the women’s basketball game against Elon. Wednesday: Coverage of the women’s basketball game against Elon.

Jonathan B. Laughrun Staff Writer

Quarterback Russell Wilson used his legs, arm, and body to lift N.C. State (4-6, 2-4 ACC) over Saturday in Carter-Finley Stadium 2117. Wilson hit nine different receivers in the game, completing 16 of 33 passes for 152 yards and two touchdowns. On the ground Wilson carried the ball 14 times for 69 yards and a touchdown. “Wake Forest is a big manto-man defense team and

when you run man-to-man, you are running down the field and chasing guys,” coach Tom O’Brien said. “When they are running around down field, there is a lot of room underneath, which Russell is able to find. He is able to make one guy miss and that makes him even better. That’s part of his repute: one, two, take off and run.” Wilson came out strong on the first drive of the game, connecting on all but three of his seven passes to pick up 50 yards including an 11 yard touchdown pass to tight end George Bryan. The Pack was able to convert all four of its third down attempts on the drive which ate 5:31 off the clock. Coming out early was

big for the Pack and, according to redshirt freshman George Bryan, it set the stage for the rest of the game. “When we come out strong and we come out hard, everybody’s pumped up on the sidelines,” Bryan said. “It just carries over from series to series. Motivation is a great thing.” The only blemish on Wilson’s record was a fumble late in the third quarter on the Wolfpack 13 yard line leaving the Deacs in the perfect position to score. The defense held the Deacons to only three points on a field goal and Wilson led the offense back onto the field and into the end zone for a touchdown. “I think he has great amnesia

too,” coach O’Brien said. “And that is what you have to have to play that position.” Along with Wilson’s offense the Pack’s defense, led by Nate Irving, stepped up in the contest to push the Pack to victory. Irving has had his share of injuries this season and was sidelined for three games but put up numbers that mirror his performance from early in the season. Irving had 13 tackles with one sack and two tackles for loss. Irving came up big on key third and fourth downs preventing Wake from advancing drives toward points. The defense held Wake to 4 for 13 on third down conversions and just 1 for 3 on fourth downs.

“I have had complete faith in the defense all year to make stops,” Wilson said. “They’ve been making stops lately, they just keep working really hard in practice every day.” The Wolfpack will take this momentum to Chapel Hill, NC next Saturday to face the rival UNC-Chapel Hill Tarheels. If the Pack beats the Tarheels they will have beaten all the major teams in North Carolina and keep hopes bowl eligibility alive. “I feel like it’s the playoffs,” running back Andere Brown said. “We either wine or we dine and we have to go out there and take it one week at a time...play Wolfpack football and win the game.”

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

WRESTLING

Pack wins Wolfpack Invitational

Pack competitive in ACC/Big Ten Clash

State wins two in Reynolds over weekend to start season 2-0 Ty Johnson & Saja Hindi Deputy Sports Editor & Editor-in-Chief

The women’s basketball team won the Wolfpack Invitational in Reynolds Coliseum Sunday afternoon with a 62-55 win against Charlotte. N.C. State advanced to the finals by defeating UW-Milwaukee on Saturday 77-42. Saturday’s home opening win improved State to 20-1 all-time in home openers. Lone senior Shayla Fields scored a career-high 33 points to lead all scorers and lock up tournament MVP honors after her 17 point performance in the opening round. Fields, along with junior Nikitta Gartrell, was on the court the entire game. Gartrell, who was named to the all-tournament team, and Fields combined for 50 of the Pack’s 62 points. “Our backcourt dominated this game. We knew coming into the season we have a lot to prove as a team, but particularly our front line,” she said. Fields led the Pack in the first half putting up 13 points as State struggled to break away from the 49ers early

DIANNE SEXTON/TECHNICIAN

Senior guard Shayla Fields shoots over two Charlotte players in Sunday’s game. Fields was named MVP for the Wolfpack Invitational game. She scored 33 points and had 3 assists against Charlotte.

and went to the locker room at halftime up 32-30. One factor limiting the Pack’s performance was the lack of production from junior standout Lucy Ellison. Ellison was second on the team last season averaging

5.9 rebounds a game and pulled down 11 boards in this season’s exhibition opener to lead the team, but grabbed only two rebounds Sunday. “From day one, she’s not a natural scorer,” Yow said. “So

the way she really helps us is defense and rebounding, and when she’s not rebounding and if the other post that she’s defending is scoring, it really hurts because we’re counting on her for defense and rebounding.” State had its largest lead in the second half at 48-39, but it quickly disappeared as the 49ers hit key shots down the stretch to keep it close. Tied at 50 with close to four minutes remaining, State’s Brittany Strachan hit a three to put the Pack up 53-50. “Once we got the lead back, I thought they really managed the clock well.” Yow said. “That was important that we could play strong [defense] without fouling and not stop the clock that way.” The game appeared destined to go down to the wire until Fields took over. The senior had eight points in the final two minutes to help State grab the win. “I just wanted to take care of the ball. The more we took care of the ball, the less chances they had to score, so I felt like if we took care of the ball as a team and [buckled] down on defense, then they wouldn’t have as many opportunities to score,” Fields said.

Wrestling team loses in close bouts with Michigan State, Wisconsin Tyler Everett Staff Writer

The wrestling team traveled to Chapel Hill Saturday for their first match of the season in the ACC/Big Ten Clash and faced national powerhouses Illinois, Wisconsin, and Michigan State. N.C. State got off to a rocky start, falling to No. 9 Illinois by a score of 40-7. While it was not the start coach Carter Jordan and the Wolfpack were looking for, their effort throughout the rest of the day left them proud of their performance. “We improved after the first match,” Jordan said. “In the next two duals, while we did not win them, there was a lot of improvement in our intensity.” The Pack lost to Michigan State with a score of 23-13 and followed that with the team’s best effort of the day in a match against No. 12 Wisconsin. State fought extremely hard and nearly pulled off its first victory of the day before falling 20-15. Jordan was much happier with the CLASH continued page7


Technician - November 17, 2008