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Bowles joins Facebook board Erskine Bowles joins Mark Zuckerberg in social media leadership position.

16 2011

Fee increase a possibility for national newspapers Representatives will vote next week on an increase in student fees for a wider range of newspapers.

Caroline Gallagher Staff Writer

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Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Facebook announced Sept. 7 that former UNC system President Erskine Bowles joined as the seventh member of the company’s Board of Directors. Prior to serving as the president of the 17-campus UNC System from 2006 until 2010, the North Carolina native established a career in politics and the government. In 1993, Bowles was appointed to lead the Small Business Administration under President Clinton before serving as the White House Deputy Chief of Staff from 1996 until 1998, according to the Associated Press. In 2002 and 2004, Bowles ran as a Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate, and most recently held a cochair in President Obama’s National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform, according to an article by WCNC. In addition to his political career, Bowles has proven to be a successful businessman. Bowles also holds board positions for several companies in various industries. These companies include General Motors, Morgan Stanley, Belk Inc., Cousins Properties Inc., Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, and Norfolk Southern Corp, according to his profile on Forbes. During his term as UNC system president, Bowles had a major impact on making the universities more ef-

friday

Brooke Wallig Senior Staff Writer

John Mickey Jr./Technician archive photo

The Chancellor Liaison group meets in the Alumni Association building with Board of Governors President-elect, Erskine Bowles. Chairs and presidents from various student organizations reported to Bowles on activities that went on at N.C. State.

Two Student Government committees held a rare joint meeting Wednesday night to discuss a bill that would increase the number of national newspapers on campus— but would also increase student fees. According to Patrick Devore, a senior in meteorology and chair of the Tuition and Fees Committee, the bill was created after a sales representative from USA Today approached members of Student Government about buying into their Collegiate Readership Program. “The pilot program entails them coming and setting up the nonlock box distribution points, the ones that are just in the residence halls, dining halls, and other semirestricted areas that only students should be in,” Devore said. “The main thing this bill does is say ‘We like the idea and we want to do the pilot program.’” However, Devore said while the pilot program is free, student fees would increase by up to $10 should the University decide to participate in the full program. The bill passed through the Tuition and Fees committee neutrally—with no committee member actively supporting the bill—and

will move on to the Student Senate early next week for a wider vote. Emerson Barker, chair of the Academics committee and a junior in political science with a public policy concentration, said if the bill is approved by the Student Senate Wednesday, the trial program would begin soon. Participation in the full program, Barker said, will only happen if students respond well to this free trial program. “[The bill] only authorizes the pilot program—it does not authorize the full program,” Barker said. “If the results of the pilot program were to return favorably, this bill states that we’ll look into [funding for the full program].” While USA Today’s pilot program would survey students before and after the trial period, Barker said Student Government is looking into other potentially more reliable research options.  “The bill specifically states we can use other statistical data-gathering methods if we feel they’re necessary,” Barker said. “Personally, I do not trust a survey run by the company that is trying to sell me something.” However, before a decision is made on the pilot program, Barker said it is important to think for the long term and decide if the University wants the full package. “We really need to not only think about the logistics of the pilot program, but also whether or not we actually want to do the full program,” Barker said. “If we’re pretty sure we don’t want the full program, then there’s really no need to drag the pi-

sg continued page 3

GLBT to fight gay marriage ban Both the state senate and house passed a bill to constitutionally ban same-sex marriage. John Wall News Editor

N.C. State’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Center has plans to fight the ban on same-sex marriage passed by both houses of the N.C. legislature Tuesday. Citizens statewide will have the opportunity to vote on whether to ultimately pass the constitutional ban, called SB514, in May. GLBT representatives, both on and off campus, have spent the week working to organize a

response. Director of GLBT programs and services Justine Hollingshead said on Thursday that it had been a long week. “[The news] is still very fresh,” Hollingshead said. Hollingshead has been in meetings all week trying to mobilize support. There are currently no concrete plans for on-campus action, but planning will continue for the next couple of weeks. The GLBT Center is working with the GLBT Alliance and Equality N.C. of Raleigh, according to Hollingshead. Protesters picketed the vote this week at the legislature in Raleigh in hopes of turning the tide in favor of the GLBT community.

Wording on the bill:

An act to amend to constitution to provide that marriage between one man and one woman is the only domestic legal union that shall be valid or recognized in this state. Source: North Carolina legislature

Although North Carolina has never had a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage, other states have put one in place. Seven U.S. states recognize gay marriage, according to an NPR report. Stay with Technician for updates on how the GLBT Center will fight the constitutional ban.

psychedelic tees

megan farrell/Technician

Hundreds of protestors gathered outside of the General Assembly Legislative Building on Halifax Mall Tuesday to participate in an organized rally against North Carolina’s “Anti-LGBT Amendment.” The North Carolina Senate approved Senate Bill 514, the “Anti-LGBT Amendment,” 30-16 Tuesday afternoon.

insidetechnician Pack looks to hand Jaguars first loss See page 8.

Spotted in the Brickyard See page 6.

Folk-blues singer returns to campus See page 5.

tyler andrews/Technician

Todd, known as Tie-Dye Todd for the last 20 years, is showing his artwork to students in the Brickyard Thursday. Todd said after selling tie-dye products for 20 years, the best part is still seeing the results after finishing his designs.

viewpoint features classifieds sports

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Bookstore Specials Win a Dell Tablet! RALLY for NC STATE vs. S. Alabama

SEPTEMBER 17

Atrium Food Court Open

go.ncsu.edu/redzone


Page 2

page 2 • friday, september 16, 2011

Corrections & Clarifications

Technician

Through tyler’s lens

POLICe BlOTTER

In Thursday’s “Obama visits to sell bill,” the Young Americans for Liberty party is more appropriately described as “libertarian-leaning.” They are not associated with the Libertarian Party. Thursday’s page 8 “Did you know?” misspelled President Ronald Reagan’s name. In Thursday’s page 6 photo, the caption said President Reagan visited in 1986, when he actually visited in 1985.

11:29 p.m. | Domestic Dispute Watauga Hall Two students were involved in ongoing verbal dispute. Housing notified to resolve dispute. Both students were referred to the University for disorderly conduct/ roommate dispute.

7:44 a.m. | Breaking and Entering - Auto Thurman Drive Officers located vehicles that had been broken into. Eighteen vehicles had been entered and items stolen.

2:20 p.m. | Communicating Threats Nelson Hall Staff member reported receiving threatening letter in staff mailbox.

10:57 p.m. | Drug Violation Avent Ferry Complex Report of possible drug violation. Officers checked area but did not locate any problems.

Weather Wise Today:

Quote of the day

Much cooler with evening rain.

63 55 Overcast and rainy.

Support the troops

Sunday:

75 58 Sources: Brandon Bouche and Melissa Mainhart

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Provocations All Day D.H. Hill Library Gallery The exhibit features drawings and sketchbooks by College of Design Dean Marvin J. Malecha, FAIA.

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Today Kirk Adam – Modern Abstracts All Day Crafts Center An exhibition of acrylic paintings by local artist and Crafts Center instructor Kirk Adam. Intramural Sports Registration All Day Online Registration is open for NFL Pick’M. Sign up online at http:// ncsu.edu/stud_affairs/campus_ rec/intramural/. The Urge to Draw, the Cause to Reflect: Drawings, Sketchbooks,

Women Empowered: iInspiring change in an emerging world All Day African American Cultural Center Gallery Conflicts of Interest 12:00-1:30 p.m. 3118 Talley Student Center Join David Resnik, author of The Price of Truth: How Money Affects the Norms of Science, for an informative presentation on the different types of conflicts of interests scientists may face in their research endeavors. Resnik will provide guidance on how scientists can ethically and effectively face these dilemmas. artSPARK Gallery 12:00-5:00 p.m. 131 S. Wilmington Street Fun Photo Booth Tent 12:00-6:00 p.m. Hannover Square - City Plaza Presented by artSPARK.

Amazing Alumni - Robert B. Jordan III ‘54 3:00-4:00 p.m. D.H. Hill Library Assembly Room Robert B. Jordan III ’54, former chair of the N.C. State Board of Trustees and former lieutenant governor, will discuss and sign copies of the new book about his life, The Man from Mount Gilead, written by Ned Cline. Jordan will also talk about his experiences as a student at N.C. State (including working in the stacks at D. H. Hill Library), where he graduated with honors in forestry. Club Sports Field Day 3:00 p.m. Lower Miller Fields geekSPARK: Digital Motion Showcase 4:00-9:00 p.m. 133 Fayetteville Street - Fish Market Gallery Experience and interact with digital experiential creations, designed by local artists, programmers and engineers. geekSPARK: Fab Lab 4:00-9:00 p.m. Hannover Square - City Plaza Come and be creative using high-tech equipment such as laser cutters, milling machines,

programming tools and a shop bot. 2011 Greek Festival 5:00-10:00 p.m. Expo Center - N.C. State Fairgrounds Food, pastries, marketplace, live music and dancing. General admission is $3. comedySPARK: Improv Show 6:30-7:30 p.m. 150 Fayetteville Street - Wachovia Courtyard SPARKparks 6:00 p.m.-midnight 13 West Davie Street Downtown parking spaces converted to mini-parks as part of Park(ing) Day 2011, an international event conceived by Rebar. geekSPARK: Gaming Showcase 6:00-9:00 p.m. Fragment at 226 Fayetteville Street Try out new video games (mobile and console) and engage with the local developers who created them.

“ NCSU CENTER STAGE PRESENTS

Get involved in technician Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copy edit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday to Thursday 9 a.m. to midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or e-mail Editor-inChief Laura Wilkinson at editor@ technicianonline.com.w

El Salsabor! 6:30-7:30 p.m. Ballroom, Talley Student Center Come out and celebrate at our annual cultural show, Salsabor, hosted by Mi Familia, Multicultural Student Affairs and the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers. Along with musical and dance performances, there will be food to enjoy and free dance lessons. The cost is $2, including a delicious traditional meal. Learn to Swing and Salsa Dance 6:30-9:30 p.m. Thompson Hall The Hangover Part II 7:00-9:00 p.m. 11:30-1:30 a.m. Witherspoon Cinema Two years after the bachelor party in Las Vegas, Phil, Stu, Alan, and Doug jet to Thailand for Stu’s wedding. Stu’s plan for a subdued pre-wedding brunch, however, goes seriously awry. Admission is $1.50 with a valid college student ID and $2.50 for the general public.

 BRILLIANT.”

“GOSLING ... IS A JOY TO WATCH.” – Stephanie Zacharek, MOVIELINE

“BOLD, DARING AND UNPREDICTABLE!”

Pre-show talk w/ Darrell Stover at 7pm

NCSU STUDENTS $5

919-515-1100 ncsu.edu/arts

RYAN

GOSLING

THERE

ARE

NO

Center Stage presents Ruthie Foster 8:00 p.m. Stewart Theatre Ruthie Foster’s rich, robust, soulful voice draws repeated comparisons to Aretha Franklin and Ella Fitzgerald, but she’s a major force on her own. An extraordinarily gifted singer and songwriter from Texas, she mixes contemporary folk with old-school gospel and blues with dazzling efficiency.

music/artSPARK: Scratch DJs & Graffiti Style Wars Battle 9:00-10:30 p.m. Hannover Square - City Plaza Scratch DJs play while two artists fight it out in a graffiti battle.

– Scott Mantz, ACCESS HOLLYWOOD

NCSU faculty/staff $21-$25 Public $26-$30

Windhover Open Mic Night 7:30-9:30 p.m. Crafts Center Windhover, N.C. State’s prizewinning literary arts publication, invites you to enjoy a relaxing evening of literature and music -- an opportunity to listen to students, faculty and staff read or perform their works of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, spoken word or music. There will be refreshments as well.

circusSPARK: Fire Conclave 9:00-10:30 p.m. Fayetteville Street and Martin Street Fire Conclave with the Triangle’s hottest fire performers and some of Raleigh’s finest drummers.

– Peter Travers

– Eric Kohn, indieWIRE

Friday, Sept 16 at 8pm Stewart Theatre

the spoken word. Snacks and beverages are included. Open to everyone.

fashionSPARK: “Wear What You Are” Fashion Show 8:00-9:00 p.m. Hannover Square - City Plaza Fashion show featuring the very best local talent.

LGBT Open Mic Night 7:00-10:00 p.m. LGBT Center of Raleigh Come and share what’s on your mind through song, poetry or

“A TOTAL BLAST.”

Ruthie Foster

See exclusive audio/photo slideshows. Answer the online poll. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline.com. Check it out!

Emerson Barker, Student Government press secretary

ustin Troche, a sophomore in math education, plays cornhole in the Brickyard Thursday. Troche and his friends were raising money for supportusarmedforces.org, a non-profit organization which sends out care packages to troops and their families.

Mostly cloudy and warmer.

on the Web

“Personally, I do not trust a survey run by the company that is trying to sell me something.”

Tomorrow:

5:52 p.m. | Skateboard Violation Caldwell Hall Report of skateboarders performing tricks. Officer located and observed several students skateboarding in the area, but none were in violation of policy. 8:49 p.m. | Fire Watauga Hall Fire Marshal responded to small grease fire in kitchen. Fire was extinguished upon arrival. No damage.

11:07 p.m. | Suspicious Person Mann Hall Report of suspicious subject

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September 14 11:52 a.m. | Fire Alarm NCSU Daycare Units responded to alarm caused by accidental activation of pull station.

9:15 a.m. | Suspicious Person Brooks Hall Report of suspicious subject loitering. Officers checked the area but did not located anyone.

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Laura Wilkinson at editor@ technicianonline.com.

Su

looking into vehicles. Officers checked area but did not locate anyone. No damage was found.

Super 8 9:30-11:30 p.m. Witherspoon Cinema After witnessing a mysterious train crash, a group of friends in the summer of 1979 begin noticing strange happenings going around in their small town, and begin to investigate into the creepy phenomenon. Admission is $1.50 with a valid college student ID and $2.50 for the general public.

CLEAN

GETAWAYS

LOCAL LISTINGS THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES SEPTEMBER 16 IN THEATERS EVERYWHERE FOR CHECK

3.4” X 5"

Artist:

(circle one:)

NC STATE TECHNICIAN RALEIGH DUE FRI 12PM AE:

(circle one:)

FRI 09/16

ART APPROVED


Technician

sg

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lot on.” Devore said while he feels this program is interesting, it may be a luxury the University cannot afford at this time. “We love the idea of this program. The problem is with the funding, with where we are economically at the University right now,” Devore said. “It’s an increase of up to $10 per year—$5 per semester—on top of all of the other fees you have to pay now and will continue to pay, for a standing order of about 5 percent of the student population.” For a university the size of N.C. State, which advertises enrollment numbers at more than 30,000, the program would cost the entire student body roughly between $150,000 and $300,000. While both Devore and Barker said there have been discussions with other campus organizations to find partners in funding, no other organization has agreed to help offset this cost with their own funding. But for Abbi Davis, a second year in livestock and poultry management at the Agricultural Institute and CALS Agricultural Institute Senator, this program may not be one of particular interest for the students she represents. “I know my constituents, being in the Agricultural Institute, do not care about the newspaper. They may read the Technician, but the USA Today…they’re not going to pick up a USA Today and read it,” Davis said. “So I can’t support this because my constituents would not.” According to Davis, while her constituents may not approve of this program—and its fee increase—the idea itself should not be thrown out completely for the future, as she said a smaller scale version may be of use to other colleges. “I feel like this is a great program, but maybe this is a program better implemented within certain colleges. For example, I feel like CHASS would enjoy that,” Davis said. “That’s the kind of thing they have.

News They have the English Department, students will use this as an opporjournalism minor, international re- tunity to voice their opinions on the lations—that kind of atmosphere— potential increase. “We wanted to give students the and I feel like the Poole College of Management would also be one of opportunity to voice their opinion on the program—we don’t want to those. But CALS…maybe not.” However, Barker said this isn’t push this on students,” Devore said. currently possible. Even if a lower “There are other fees on campus that number of papers were requested, do a similar thing, where everyone the entire student body would have pays for something not everyone may choose to use. An example is to incur the fee. “We can cut it down to fewer news- the Carmichael fee. Everyone pays it, papers, but they still make it a fee but not everyone chooses to use Carfor everybody,” Barker said. “That michael,” Devore said. “We want to gives [USA Today] security in know- know if enough students will want ing that they’re going to get their to use this program to increase their fees.” money—one way or another.” When asked how they thought the In light of this year’s tuition increases and the probability of an- Student Senate would vote on the other increase next year, Davis also subject, both Barker and Devore said said now may not be the time for a it will likely be a very close call. “If this bill passes the Student Senfee increase, even one that seems like ate, it will be by a very a good deal. close vote,” Barker “I don’t feel said. “And not every like students senator may have a would be hapstrong opinion on this py with this. issue, so if you want Yeah, it’s $10, to comment on it, be and if I were to sure to contact them get a newspaor come to the Student per every time Senate meeting.” it came out of According to Barkthe three edier, although space in tions they had Patrick Devore, chair of the the meeting room is it would benTuition and Fees Committee saved specifically for efit me because students who want to that’s a great deal. But, right now, the way things attend and voice their opinions, it is are happening, our tuition is not go- rarely used—often proving to be a ing to go down any time soon—it frustration for senators who may not could increase, and more than likely know what their constituents think will—so I feel students would not be about an issue. “There is a section of the room okay with doubling our fees for this,” Davis said. “It’s another fee increase reserved for students who want to when you have fees increasing all the come and have their comments heard,” Barker said. “You have three time.” Although the USA Today Colle- minutes to tell the entire Student giate Readership Program presen- Senate what you think about this… tation states one of the benefits of or anything else for that matter.” The Student Senate meeting will their program as being able to “reach over 90 percent of your student body be held in room 314 in Harrelson every week,” Barker said even the Hall at 7:30 p.m. Barker and Devore USA Today representative claimed both strongly encourage students to the actual readership number would attend—even if they aren’t sure what their opinion is on the subject. be much lower. “We want to do what students According to Devore, while Student Government has had trouble want,” Devore said. “If you hate what gathering enough student com- we’re doing, tell us. If you don’t know ments on every issue—minus the what we’re doing, ask us.” Talley renovations—he hopes more

“If you hate what we’re doing, tell us. If you don’t know what we’re doing, ask us.”

friday, september 16, 2011 • Page 3

bowles

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ficient and effective. This is evidenced through Bowles’ major achievements during his term, highlighted by UNC Board of Governors spokeswoman, Joni Worthington. “Shortly after his arrival, President Bowles established a blue-ribbon President’s Advisory Committee on Efficiency and Effectiveness (PACE) to examine the administrative costs of the University and to make recommendations for where costs might be avoided and savings incurred. As a result of the PACE initiative, the University has realized $32 million in annual cost savings and another $16 million in annual cost avoidance since 2006,” Worthington said. The savings, although a minuscule part of the statewide higher education budget, are permanent. “These recurring savings have largely come from more efficient uses of information technology, standardizing and consolidating operations in key areas, and greater use of collaborative purchasing to leverage collective size and buying power. The PACE initiative has fostered a culture that continues to focus on streamlining administration and implementing improvements that generate cost savings,” Worthington said. Bowles also encouraged UNC universities and North Carolina community colleges to work together to improve the state’s overall economy. Despite his success as UNC system president, Bowles planned his retirement prior to accepting his position. “President Bowles retired as UNC President on December 31. He made clear when he was elected to the po-

sition that he planned to retire at age 65 and would serve for five years,” Worthington said. In response to how valuable Bowles’ experience could be for Facebook, Art Padilla, Management Innovation and Entrepreneurship Department Head, said he doubts Bowles’ appointment was related to his academic service. “I am not sure his service in the UNC system would have much to do with this appointment, other than the recognition of having a former UNC officer would bring to the Facebook board,” Padilla said. Padilla suspected Bowles’ connections with the private sector, and his experience in finance, venture capital and government made him a prime candidate for the Facebook board position. “It is not unusual for companies to put such individuals on their boards,” Padilla adds. Mark Zuckerberg, founder and board member of Facebook, recognized Bowles’ diverse background as an opportunity to add value to the company. “Erskine has held important roles in government, academia and business, which have given him insight into how to build organizations and navigate complex issues. Along with his experience founding companies, this will be very valuable as we continue building new things to help make the world more open and connected,” Zuckerberg said in a statement. Bowles said he is excited about his new position for the social media site. “Facebook has clearly emerged as a transformative force in the world. It’s no wonder given the talent Mark has put in place and the company’s focus and dedication to its mission. I’m really looking forward to getting to work and helping Facebook however I can,” Bowles said.

Technician was there. You can be too. The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www. ncsu.edu/sma for more information.


Viewpoint

page 4 • friday, september 16, 2011

Technician

{Our view}

The Facts:

The North Carolina Senate passed a bill, SB 514, allowing for an amendment to the North Carolina State Constitution to be put on a ballot in May. The amendment, if passed, would establish that the only type of marriage recognized by the state is between a man and a woman.

Our Opinion:

To make a constitutional amendment is to make a stance that is practically immovable. With the issue of same-sex marriage still strongly debated, it is premature to ingrain a stance either way into our constitution.

T

The debate is not over

his Saturday is Constitution Day throughout our nation. The awareness this day will bring could not come at a better time. In North Carolina we find ourselves at the beginning of an eight-month debate on whether or not our own constitution should be amended to specifically detail that heterosexual marriage will be the only marriage recognized by the state. On Sept.13 a bill, SB 514, passed the North Carolina Senate that would put a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage on a ballot to be voted on by North Carolinians in May. The bill was passed by the House with a vote of 75-42 in

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

favor of the bill and passed the Senate with a vote of 30-16 Same-sex marriage is currently illegal in North Carolina. The amendment, whether it is passed or killed by voters in May, will not impact the legal status of same-sex marriage in North Carolina. What the constitutional amendment does do is make it more difficult for the legal status of same-sex marriage to be altered in the future. It is difficult for something to be taken out of the North Carolina Constitution once it finds a place there. Since the

constitution’s inception 235 years ago, there have only been 28 amendments to it. There are some surprising parts of the North Carolina Constitution that have survived despite changing times and perspectives. Article 6 Section 8 makes public office unavailable to “any person who shall deny the being of Almighty God.” Article 6 Section 4 makes literacy a requirement for voter registration, a tactic of the Jim Crowe era. Although these sections should have been amended long ago, attempts to do so

have failed as that which is in the constitution has tremendous staying power. The decision to attempt to ratify an amendment that touches on a topic still in the middle of a heated debate is perplexing. The illegal status of same-sex marriage does not find itself in flux whilst it remains outside of our constitution. Until a firm stance is established on the issue, a stance that cannot be accurately polled in the next eight months, there should not even be the opportunity for a position, either way, to find its way into our constitution.

{

Uniting Centennial

H

aving lived on campus my freshman year, this year I decided to shift off-campus to save money. Little did I know, this decision would greatly change my perception of the Shivalik University. Daga As a freshStaff Columnist man I had all my classes on Main Campus, just a short walk from my dorm. The only time I ever had to go to Centennial Campus was to meet with my adviser. Centennial felt like a different world back then. But now that I have matriculated into my major, chemical engineering, Centennial is where I spend the majority of my time. Shifting to offcampus living not only put me closer to Centennial, but I also ended up getting more involved with the Centennial community than I had been with students in my dorm. To have a different zone earmarked specifically for this quarter of the student population ma kes s e n s e , bu t Centennial is much more than just that. It is one of the best examples of successful partnership between industry and academia in the country. It is a major contributor to the Research Triangle Park and is a major job creator for the region. D.H. Hill Library is among the very few reasons I still visit Main Campus now, and after Hunt Library is complete in Spring 2012, I wonder if I will come here as often as I do now. What’s more, Centennial Campus will soon have its own residential buildings; a lot of engineers who now live on Main Campus would find it beneficial to migrate to these new homes. The creation of a “satellite” campus to N.C. State will soon be complete. While the need to develop Centennial is understandable, we should keep in mind it is not just a collaborative space for corporations, researchers and professors. It holds a huge chunk of the student population—around 8,000 students. I sometimes come across people on Centennial who

say they have never been to or even seen the Atrium. While this might sound impossible to regulars on the Brickyard, the fact is there are such people. We have precious little interaction between students on both sides of campus, and there’s even less opportunity for students on Centennial to interact among themselves. We need to stem this divide in time before, to invoke Churchill, the University becomes two different entities separated by a common boulevard. Some of my best friends are in majors other than engineering, and this would not have been possible had I not lived on Main Campus my first year. But now that I live in an apartment, I feel this bond weakening slightly, even as I continue to forge new bonds with students within my major. Students need to be reassured that even though Centennial is a bit far away from Talley or the Brickyard, it’s still only a bus ride away. The same goes for students who inhabit Centennial. One of NCSU’s biggest strengths is the strong bond students feel for the University. This can be seen in the unity we put on display every time the Free Expression Tunnel is misused. The wide range of majors offered here brings students together with as many varied perspectives and ideas as can be. We must ensure we are able to share these ideas not only with our classmates, but spread it throughout the Wolfpack. It is only through interaction and engagement with others and among ourselves that we can build a stronger community on campus, the love for which will be with us for the rest of our lives.   

“We have precious littler interaction between students on both sides of campus. ”

S e n d S h i v ali k yo u r thoughts on Centennial Campus to letters@technicianonline.com.

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695 Editorial Advertising Fax Online

515.2411 515.2029 515.5133 technicianonline.com

in your words

}

What is your opinion on the SB 514 as a constitutional amendment? by Greg Wilson

“From a political standpoint, it might avoid controversy later on as it is much more difficult to change the N.C. Constitution than a law.”

Crash the Jaguar! University of Alabama vs. North Carolina State University.

Mark McLawhorn, editor-in-chief emeritus

Graham Snyder junior in mechanical engineering

A

Some things never change

fter President Obama’s visit to N.C. State was announced Monday, I, along with the majority of the student body, had one goal—to get a ticket to see him speak. Not an hour after the announcement, my dad texted me to see if I was going to see Obama, and that he had seen Trey Reagan when he Ferguson came to campus Viewpoint Editor in 1985. After talking with him, I realized the times might have changed, but the issues remain the same.  The two days leading up to Obama’s speech involved nearly 12 hours of waiting and some sleeping on bricks to receive a ticket for a mere 25 minutes of inspirational remarks on the new piece of legislation geared to create jobs. Acquiring tickets for Reagan in 1985 was a lot less painful. They were distributed through a raffle system, much like our current football tickets today. The day of the speech involved the same security measures seen in 1985; however, the arrival of the guest of honor reflected the difference in their personalities. Reagan made his grand entrance by landing Marine One, the president’s helicopter, on the intramural fields. Obama, who is not nearly as ostentatious, arrived taxied by car

from Air Force One. Audience members showed up nearly four hours prior to both events, filling Reynolds to maximum capacity and sweating through their clothes from the lack of AC. During each president’s speech, the crowd went crazy, cheering in support for the respective presidents and what they were endorsing—restatements of their plans to fix America. During Reagan’s pep rally, he discussed t he i mportance of his proposal on tax reform to the American people a nd what it would mean for the students in t he c rowd . Obama demonstrated how his American Jobs Act would create jobs for young people graduating college. Each president promised positive impacts on students in and leaving the collegiate atmosphere. Whether Obama will deliver on his promise is still questionable. As with Reagan, Obama’s main challenge for the act is to get it passed through Congress and gain the appropriate support from the public. We have the ability to voice our concerns to our representatives, but aside from that we can only wait and see until Con-

gress decides whether to pass the bill. The tax reforms Reagan speech dealt with in 1985 carried America’s economy back to a state of well-being and security. We can only hope this plan provides the same since of sanctuary for our economy. Similarly to Reagan’s condition, Obama’s main challenge for the American Jobs Act is to get it passed through congress and gain the appropriate support from the public. However, much like in Reagan’s day, his popularity will aid him in pushing this bill into action. After talking with my dad about his experience seeing Reagan and comparing it with my experience with Obama, I feel while there are many differences, the issues remain the same. Just as students were holding their breath in 1985, we shall be doing the same. 

“As with Reagan, Obama’s main challenge for the act is to get it passed through Congress.”

Send Trey your thoughts on his comparison to letters@technicianonline. com.

Editor-in-Chief Laura Wilkinson

News Editor John Wall

Sports Editor Josh Hyatt

Design Editor Catie Yerkes

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Managing Editor Taylor Cashdan

Features Editor Mark Herring

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“I don’t think they should add it. More and more states are legalizing gay marriage, so we shouldn’t be banning it.” Greg Mauser freshman in psychology

“I think that if you love someone, you should have the right to be with them. It doesn’t negatively affect the people around a couple of the same sex, so why should it matter?” Lauren Rakes junior in nutrition science

“I don’t think it should be in the N.C. Constitution because it would go against the U.S. Constitution’s protection of freedoms.” Megan Garren freshman in animal science

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2011 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features

Technician

friday, september 16, 2011 • Page 5

Perceptions of Muslims change over the years Since 9/11, Muslim students have dealt with adverse judgements, but have found solace in faith. Philip Baker Correspondent

Zainab  Baloch  attended Al Iman, a local Islamic private school as a child. On 9/11, by the time the second tower was hit, the school “had received so many bomb threats, and people threatening our school, they thought it was safer for us to leave.” An anti-Muslim sentiment had suddenly taken hold in the U.S., and according to Baloch, junior in psychology, the nonMuslim majority in the nation began to misconstrue the faith and liken it to the acts of terrorism witnessed in New York and Washington, D.C. In the years between the attacks on the World Trade Center and today, this resentment toward Muslims on the part of many non-Muslim Americans has shifted drastically. After steadily rising for the better part of a decade, in recent years, it has slowly begun to subside. In a 2006 article of the Washington Post, a study showed 46 percent of Americans held negative views about Islam. This growing resentment toward the religion manifested itself not only in numbers but in a display of ignorance toward the faith. Terms such as jihad, an inner struggle for God, and Allah, which literally translated from Arabic means “the God,”

Photo Courtesy of ruthiefoster.com

tim o’brien/Technician file photo

The Muslim Student Association prays in Riddick Hall Aug. 18 during Ramadan. “Muslim prayer incorporates movement and speech, asking for guidance from God and glorifying God,” Mohammad Moussa, a senior in electrical engineering, said. The Muslim community has relied on each other after facing negative perceptions after 9/11, but the MSA is working to educate the public about their peaceful faith, according to their mission statement.

became words associated not change in American sentiment. “I feel there has been some with a peaceful religion, but with holy war and extremists positive cultural advancesuch as al-Qaeda and its lead- ment,” Emily Ford, a junior in communication, said. ers. These An article improving published on sentiments the University are echoed of Wisconsin in more reat Madison cent pol ls website for conducted Islamic and this calenMiddle Eastd a r y e a r, ern studies showing a fou nd t hat reversal of two-thirds of Zainab Baloch, trends, as 61 Americans junior in psychology percent of admit to have Americans little or no now claim to have a favorable knowledge about Islam. Despite these numbers, there view of Islam and Muslims, achave been signs of progressive cording to an article published

“[Our school] had received so many bomb threats, they thought it was safer for us to leave.”

in January in USA Today. “Before 9/11, I don’t think people knew much about Muslims. Ten years later, I still don’t think people know much about Muslims,” Baloch said. Despite militant Islamist political thought and violence from a small number of Muslims, Baloch said her religion is based on acts of charity and good will that are basic tenants of the religion. But Baloch believes the experience has made her stronger, bringing her closer to her faith. “It made me more focused on learning my religion and how to answer questions,” she said. 

Ruthie Foster, a musician with roots in soul, is returning to N.C. State to perform Friday. Foster describes her music as a mix of influences from her life.

Folk-blues singer returns to campus Want to go?

Ruthie Foster to play at Stewart Theater Sept. 16. Daniel Dean Correspondent

Ruthie Foster brought the Texas heat in 2008 when she rocked campus with her soulful blues-rock. Foster, an accomplished young musician— said she’s a Texan by birth but a wanderer in spirit. She began playing piano at the age of 11, later discovering that she possessed equal talent in both guitar and vocals. Foster’s public performances took off in her high school years when she started singing in her church choir. Encouraged by her family of musicians, Foster sought out her career in music at a young age. She studied commercial music production at McLennan Community College, and it was from this platform that she launched into the music industry. Foster became so immersed in the music industry that she began to yearn for a taste of the outside world; she then joined the Navy. Even while ser ving her

Where: Stewart Theater When: 8 p.m. Friday Cost: $5 for students, Genre: A mix of blues, folk and alternative More info: ncsu.edu/ centerstage Source: Arts N.C. State

country, she couldn’t escape her calling. She joined a Navy ensemble, Pride, and began performing again. Foster credits Pride as being a sort of musical education—it was with the Navy band where she learned the rigors of touring on the road weekly. W hile performing w ith Pride, Foster’s life began to revolve around musical performances again. She started to search for a sound of her own by blending her experience in gospel with her love for other styles of music.           Inspired by artists like African American gospel stars Sam Cooke and Mahalia Jackson,

blues continued page 6

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Features

page 6 • friday, september 16, 2011

Technician

Spotted in the Brickyard T

echnician’s weekly “Spotted in the Brickyard” highlights a fashionable student found in the Brickyard. From eclectic and vintage to classic and chic, Technician will be sure to bring you fresh looks every week.

Photo & story by Ben Tran & Jade Loring

Anna Read, a freshman in First Year College, was spotted with a BCBG shirt ($20) with destroyed denim shorts from American Eagle ($45) and shoes from Toms ($40). Read described her style as “anything that would be comfortable for my 8 a.m. class.”

Ashlyn Djali, a sophomore in biological sciences, wore a pair of American Eagle jeggings ($20) with shoes ($30) and a shirt ($30) from Old Navy. Djali considers her style casual. “I just like to be comfortable and dress cute,” she said. “I don’t worry so much about style.”

tonight! Windover Open Mic Night Sept 16 at 7:30pm • Crafts Center

Windhover, NC State’s prizewinning literary and visual arts publication, presents an evening of literature, music and refreshments. FREE

Ruthie Foster

Sept 16 at 8pm • Stewart Theatre

This extraordinarily gifted singer and songwriter from Texas mixes contemporary folk with old-school gospel and blues with dazzling efficiency. Pre-show talk with Darrell Stover, 7pm, Walnut Room.

e down

$5 NCSU students

6:00 p.m.

919-515-1100 ncsu.edu/arts

Own a piece of

history.

go.ncsu.edu/tailgate

One Event. Two Locations. Harris Field and

Hillsborough Street

(Between Jimmy John’s and Hot Box Pizza)

Live Broadcast, Activities, Giveaways, Food BYOS (Bring Your Own Seating). Alcohol Not Permitted.

www.ncsu.edu/agromeck

Satoru Ito, a graduate student in applied mathematics, sported a pair of J.Crew shorts ($40) with a shirt from H&M ($15). His shoes were from Zappos ($65). Ito said his style is that of a typical graduate student— cool and casual.

Blues

have the ability to connect with a variety of audiences. Her rich, resonating voice left her crowd anxious for an continued from page 5 encore when she last visited the University in 2008. Foster has Fosters bears her soul as she since grown as a musician— deals with the issues of life in adding more guitar to her set as she began to expand her her lyrics. Foster’s music could be called outreach to the world of rock. a four-way collision of blues, Her music cannot be classified as any single fol k, rock genre. and gospel. Those who She said her attended music has “a her show in little bit of 2008 will everything” b e ple a s e d and def ines to hear that her genre as Foster is stay“spirit muing true to sic.” AccordRuthie Foster, blues musician her roots as ing to her, she plays hits t h i s mu sic makes her feel like she’s giving from all along her career and something back to the audi- her newest album: The Truth According To Ruthie Foster. ence. Foster said she strives to The album has been a hit, even please her crowd. She’s an art- claiming a Grammy nominaist who aims to provide her tion for the Best Contemporary audience with an engaging, Blues Album. “Don’t miss this show,” Fosentertaining show. Her songs speak to the heart ter said. “It’s gonna be a Halof all listeners as she sings lelujah time.” about love, loss and the good and the bad in life. Her lyrics are meaningful, personal, and

“Don’t miss this show. It’s gonna be a Hallelujah time.”

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Sports

Technician women’s soccer

friday, september 16, 2011 • Page 7

jaguars

Wolfpack women to take on No. 7-ranked Tarheels

continued from page 8

Women’s soccer team faces challenge in match against nationally ranked rival. Nate Pedder Staff Writer

The N.C. State women’s soccer team hopes to continue their season against the highly ranked North Carolina team on Friday in Chapel Hill. The Wolfpack has only lost once this year, to the only ranked squad they have played so far, Penn State. Meanwhile, the seventh-ranked Tarheels hope to bounce back from their first loss of the season. The Pack this season has been on fire, going 7-1 with 16 goals and only five goals against. However, three of the five goals State has allowed were against Penn State. While the team has been playing on a high level, giving them a strong record, Friday night is only the second time they will play against a nationally ranked team. It is a good test to see how the Pack has grown since their loss to Penn State. Senior Alex Berger talked about what the Pack has done to change their play after the Penn State game. “We felt like there were a lot of positives that came out of our game against Penn State, even though we did lose,” Berger said. “But we’ve been working a lot in practice on some of the mistakes we did make and hopefully we’ll be able to cut down on the mistakes for Friday’s game.” While State goes into this rivalry match looking to prove themselves as a competitive team in the ACC, the Tarheels come in hoping to turn around after a disappointing loss and

kevin cook/Technician

Former midfielder Alyson Santilli races down the field towards the ball during the game against UNC on Aug. 1, 2010. The Tarheels won 3-0.

show they deserved their No. 1 ranking they had last week. The team was dealt its first loss of the season on Sunday by Texas A&M in a 4-3 loss in overtime, causing them to fall from the first ranked team in the nation to the seventh. Coach Steve Springthorpe spoke about playing Carolina after their first loss. “It’s always an interesting time for a team to be playing Carolina, after they’ve lost a game, because it doesn’t happen often,”Springthorpe said. “I’m assuming that they’ve worked pretty hard to fix the issue they may have had that last game. It’s always a challenge playing them. But for us it doesn’t matter. Whether they won or whether they lost, we still prepare the same, we still have the same mindset. We’re expecting it to be a tough game,

and we know the challenges that will be ahead of us.” Some players to watch for State are seniors Alex Berger and Tanya Cain as well as freshman Stephanie Bronson. The two seniors have each scored four goals to lead their team to a strong start to the season while Stephanie Bronson is coming off a strong two-goal performance against North Florida, giving her three goals this season. After such a strong start, the team is feeling like this season will be different than the previous. Senior defender Paige Dugal spoke about how the Wolfpack has started off the season, as well as the issues the team has had in the past and how they are looking forward to the rest of the season. “I think it’s a little bit of a confidence boost but at the

same time, in the past, we’ve done decently well in our preseason before we hit the ACC schedule and then we hit the ACC and we don’t do as well,” Dugal said. “I’m not too focused on what we’ve done already, I’m just really looking forward to going to each game and getting better and leaving it all on the field as we go.” Dugal also spoke about how prepared the State team feels going into a rivalry game against a highly ranked Carolina team. “I don’t know if we’ll ever be fully prepared but I know that we’re emotionally prepared,” Dugal said. “We’re all just so excited to play Carolina. It’s a rivalry, so it’s a game we all really want to win.”

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have to work for it.” The USA offense runs primarily through the two-headed back system of freshmen running backs Demetre Baker and Kendall Houston. The two backs have averaged over 5 yards per carry and 121 yards per game through the first two games played. Another player to watch is Enrique Williams of the Jaguars. The 6-foot, 235-pound linebacker leads USA with 3.5 tackles for loss and a forced fumble that he recovered. Williams is strong and agile, as he split time in high school as a running back and linebacker. Though the Pack will be battling against the Jaguars on Saturday, senior wide receiver Tobias Palmer said his competition with Graham has helped him to get to a new level. “[The competition] has helped us a lot,” Palmer said. “It’s brought something to this offense that the coaches have said they haven’t seen in a long time.” While the Pack left Winston-Salem with a loss this

roundup continued from page 8

Last Week: Virginia 37, Indiana 34 This Week: at North Carolina (3:30 p.m., ESPNU) #13 Virginia Tech (2-0, 0-0 ACC): The Hokies didn’t make it look easy in a hard fought win at ECU, but Frank Beamer picked up his 200th career victory nonetheless. Staying alive as a dark horse national title contender, Virginia Tech moves in on non-conference play with warm-up games against the Sun Belt and C-USA. Last Week: Virginia Tech 17, East Carolina 10 This Week: vs. Arkansas State

past weekend, N.C. State fans had some confidence in the passing game thanks to the arm of redshirt junior quarterback Mike Glennon, along with Palmer and Graham. Both receivers hauled in touchdown receptions of over 60 yards, and Palmer said the speed of the defensive backs for the Jaguars might be a key to success for the Pack. “We think we can take advantage of their corners,” Palmer said. “The way they play is not really a different style from what we practice here. We’ve just got to be physical, more focused and ready to play on Saturday.” Though both Palmer and Graham seem to think the passing game might be the solution to earning a win over the Jaguars, Glennon is not so quick to pull the trigger on which way the offense should be run. “I think we are really just going to take what the defense gives us,” Glennon said. “That has always been our philosophy. I don’t think there is ever the mindset going into the game that it’s going to specifically be a passing or running game predominantly. We’re just going to go out there and take what we can get.”

(4 p.m., ESPN3.com) Duke (0-2, 0-0 ACC): It’s not the most compelling match up the ACC has to offer this season, but the loser of Duke’s contest against Boston College will likely be watching bowl season from their respective living rooms. Last Week: Stanford 44, Duke 14 This Week: at Boston College (12:30 p.m., ESPN3.com) Miami (0-1, 0-1 ACC): Being dubbed by much of the nation as “The Ineligible Bowl,” Miami hosts Ohio State down in South Florida. NCAA suspensions aside, the watered-down version of ‘Canes vs. Buckeyes should give the country a great indication of where each program is headed this season. Last Week: Idle This Week: vs. No. 17 Ohio State (7:30 p.m., ESPN)

Rates

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Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

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Sudoku

Level: 1

© 2008 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

Real estate

Level: 1

2

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FOR RELEASE SEPTEMBER 16, 2011

Complete the grid so each row, column and Times Daily Puzzle 3-by-3 box (inLos boldAngeles borders) contains every Crossword digit Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, ACROSS visit www.sudoku.org.uk. 1 Last of three Catherines

Solution5 Plot to Thursday’s puzzle

8/5/08

© 2011 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

Do you want FREE tickets? “Like” NC State Student Media Promotions Facebook Page

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10 Pathfinder org. 14 Natural balm 15 Last of the Oldsmobiles 16 Old Persian poet 17 Folio part 18 Word of thanks 19 Corn detritus 20 Approval from a Cádiz resident? 23 High-and-mighty 24 Cambridge business school 25 Pair of barbershop groups 27 Admission req. for 24-Across 29 Approval from Louis XIV? 33 Code on some NYC-bound luggage tags 36 Cambridge Conservative 37 Jack’s UN ambassador 38 Markers 39 They’re sometimes special 40 Approval from a shocked Scot? 42 “Fake is as old as the __ tree”: Welles 43 It has some smart Alecs 44 “Full House” co-star 47 Place to get bogged down 50 Approval from a sushi chef at the lunch counter? 55 Rough talk 56 Indira’s son 57 50-and-up group 58 Concerning 59 Encourage none too gently 60 Nursery rhyme tub assembly, e.g. 61 Sharpen 62 Rutabaga, for one 63 Squeezed (out) DOWN 1 Chiromancer’s reading material

9/16/11

By Donna S. Levin

9/16/11

2 Like the northern Lesser Antilles, vis-à-vis the Windward Islands 3 Sporty twoseaters 4 Sugar plant 5 Carved sardonyx 6 Bright-eyed 7 Smoothie ingredient 8 Conquistador’s chest 9 Tender cut 10 Margarita choice 11 __ acid 12 It might be caliente 13 “Catch-22” actor 21 “Africa” band 22 Morales in movies 25 Name of four Holy Roman emperors 26 Rough waters 27 Source of milk for chèvre 28 Sierra Club’s first president 30 Third-oldest U.S. university 31 Yemen’s chief port 32 Corp.-partnership hybrid 33 One garnering lots of interest

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

Lookin’ for the answer key? Visit technicianonline.com

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

34 Chaps 35 Cruising 38 Support for a Salchow 40 Ron Howard send-up of reality shows 41 Apple on a desk 42 Sniggling gear 44 Frozen margarita insert 45 Teeming (with)

9/16/11

46 Chansons de __: medieval French poems 47 Dead end, workwise 48 Drab color 49 Rootless sort 51 Aforetime 52 Mount Ka’ala is its highest peak 53 R&B singer India.__ 54 Touch or shuffle


Football Friday Technician

Page 8 • friday, september 16, 2011

football

focus on...

south

10 tennis squads head to Fab-4 The men’s tennis team will send four players to the 2011 Duke Fab-4 Invitational today at the Cary Tennis Park. N.C. State will be one of ten teams from the southeast to send a four-man squad to the competition. Among the four sent for the Wolfpack include redshirt sophomore Matt Thomson, sophomore Ivan Sanchez Gomez, Sean Weber and junior Dave Thomson. Play will begin at 9 a.m. as Matt Thomson/ Gomez go up against Radford’s No. 3-seeded doubles team while Dave Thomson/Weber head up against the duo from Louisville. Each of the four players will return to the courts for singles play at 1:30 p.m. The competition will continue throughout the entire weekend. Source: N.C. State Athletics

athletic schedule M

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Location: Mobile, ala. Total Enrollment: 15,007 Established: 2009 Conference: sun belt (in 2013) Stadium: Ladd-peebles stadium capacity: 40,646 alex sanchez/Technician

Redshirt junior Tobais Palmer braces for a hit from Liberty University’s Lee KaJuan at Carter Finley on Sept. 3. Palmer had 3 receptions for 46 yards in the 43-21 Wolfpack victory.

Pack looks to hand Jaguars its first loss Football team comes home to rebound from conference loss.

September 2011 Su

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After an entire offseason of media members describing the Wolfpack’s opening leg of the football schedule as a “cupcake schedule,” the team has proven that anything can happen. Following a tough conference-opening loss at the hands of Wake Forest, senior wide receiver T.J. Graham knows the Pack needs to take the Jaguars of South Alabama seriously. “We need to prepare for them like they are a Na-

Today WOMEN’S TENNIS AT UVA INVITATIONAL Charlottesville, Va., All Day WOMEN’S SOCCER VS. UNC Chapel Hill, 7 p.m. VOLLEYBALL VS. LIBERTY Raleigh, 7 p.m. MEN’S SOCCER VS. MARYLAND College Park, M.D., 7:30 p.m.

Technician’s

ACC ROUNDUP A look at the weekend’s football match-ups. Sean Fairholm Deputy Sports Editor

Last season, four ACC teams tested themselves by traveling to some of college football’s most storied and successful programs: Florida State played at Oklahoma, Clemson visited Auburn, Maryland went to West Virginia, and Miami made the trip to Ohio State. Although Clemson sent eventual

national champion, Auburn, to overtime, the four ACC teams lost by a combined 59 points. This weekend, those same four teams will carry the conference torch by taking on their exact powerhouse opponents from last season. Atlantic Division Maryland (1-0, 1-0 ACC): Sensational in his season debut, Terps QB Danny O’Brien now has to face No. 18 West Virginia and its stellar defense. The Mountaineers have only allowed 156 pass yards per game,

Randy Woodson Chancellor

Chandler Thompson

Offensive Stats

Rushing Offense: 77th (8th in ACC) Passing Offense: 51st (8th in ACC) First Downs: 84th (9th in ACC) 3rd Down Conversions: 70th (9th in ACC) Total Offense: 76th (9th in ACC)

tional Championship team,” Graham said. “We’re trying to win an ACC championship. So, we have to prepare like that and treat them like any other team.” The Jaguars might not be contending for a BCS title any time in the near future, but the FCS powerhouse has won 19 straight games since its inception in 2009. While the Jaguars are not in the same conference or the same division as the Demon Deacons, they do run a similar defense. The 3-4 scheme features only three defensive linemen and four linebackers as the front seven, which helped the Pack open up the passing game against the Deacons in the second half. Unlike the Deacons, the

Jaguars depend on their cornerbacks by using manto-man defense, which Graham feels the team should be able to exploit throughout the game. “They play a lot of man defense,” Graham said. “So we’re going to try to create mismatches and should be able to get open down thefield.” While Graham feels the Pack should be able to open up the passing game, he also understands the defensive schemes the Jaguars present might be challenging. “Nothing’s going to be easy,” Graham said. “They are pretty fast and pretty physical. We’re going to

and finished third in the nation for total defense last season. Last Week: Idle This Week: vs. No. 18 West Virginia (Noon, ESPNU) Wake Forest (1-1, 1-0 ACC): Gardner-Webb arrives to BB&T Field, which should mean the Deacs are one baby step closer to making a run at bowl eligibility. If Tanner Price (152.2 QB rating in the first two games) continues at his current rate, anything is possible. Last Week: Wake Forest 34, N.C. State 27 This Week: vs. Gardner-Webb (6:30 p.m., ESPN3.com) Clemson (2-0, 0-0 ACC): Despite nearly tripping on its own shoelaces last Saturday versus Wofford, Clemson hosts No. 21 Auburn as the favorite in Death Valley. In the battle of two orangeclad Tigers, Clemson will be looking to snap a 14-game losing streak versus Auburn, which dates back to 1951. Last Week: Clemson 35, Wofford 27 This Week: vs. No. 21 Auburn

(Noon, ABC) #5 Florida State (2-0, 0-0 ACC): They’ve had the Sooners circled on the calendar for the past year, and on Saturday night they finally get No. 1 Oklahoma at home. ‘Noles quarterback E.J. Manual has displayed potential to play in big games, but Florida State hasn’t defeated Oklahoma in 46 years. Last Week: Florida State 62, Charleston Southern 10 This Week: vs. No. 1 Oklahoma (8 p.m., ABC) Boston College (0-2, 0-0 ACC): Heading into the easiest game of its schedule, BC desperately needs to pick up wins to hang around the bowl eligibility discussion. The Eagles, who will get Duke, UMass, and Wake at home in the next three weeks, have seen their traditionally vaunted rush defense plummet to 110th in the country. Last Week: Central Florida 30, Boston College 3 This Week: vs. Duke (12:30 p.m., ESPN3.com) N.C. State (1-1, 0-1 ACC): The

Tom Suiter

WRAL Sports Anchor

Student Body President

Laura Wilkinson

Editor in Chief of Technician

2011 WOLFPACK FOOTBALL STATS

Defensive Stats

Rushing Defense: 43rd (5th in ACC) Passing Defense: 112th (11th in ACC) First Downs Allowed: 84th (11th in ACC) 3rd Down Conversions: 84th (10th in ACC) Total Defense: 94th (10th in ACC)

Special Teams

Punt Return Average: 4th (1st in ACC) Kickoff Return Average: 70th (5th in ACC) Punting: 82nd (7th in ACC) Field Goal Percentage: T-1st (T-1st in ACC) Opponent Punt Returns: 29th (4th in ACC) Opponent Kickoff Returns: 82nd (Last in ACC) Opponent Punting: 46th (4th in ACC) Opponent Field Goal Percentage: T-71st (T-7th in ACC)

Wolfpack Injury Report OUT FOR SEASON:  Jarvis Byrd, CB - knee Sterling Lucas, LB - knee Source: N.C. State Athletics

jaguars continued page 7

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Sports Editor of Technician

Sean Fairholm

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician

eye test tells us State’s defense has been atrocious and the stats agree – The Wolfpack has allowed 14 plays from scrimmage to go for 20 or more yards, which is good for third worst in the nation. Although only one of its two FCS victories can count towards the bowl eligibility win total, N.C. State jumps out of conference to play South Alabama. Last Week: Wake Forest 34, N.C. State 27 This Week: vs. South Alabama (6 p.m., ESPN3.com) Coastal Division Georgia Tech (2-0, 0-0 ACC): Leading the nation in yards per play, the Rambling Wreck has turned heads across the country with a more balanced attack throughout the first two games. Tech quarterback Tevin Washington, the commander of an option-read offense, will head into Saturday’s game against Kansas with an unusual early season stat - Washington has averaged 22.52 yards per passing attempt.

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Deputy Sports Editor of Technician

Molly Matty WKNC General Manager

Last Week: Georgia Tech 49, Middle Tennessee State 21 This Week: vs. Kansas (12:30 p.m., ESPN3.com) North Carolina (2-0, 0-0 ACC): The Heels launch into ACC play at home against the Virginia Cavaliers. With five turnovers in a chaotic win over Rutgers, UNC and quarterback Bryn Renner need to take care of the football against UVA. Last Week: North Carolina 24, Rutgers 22 This Week: vs. Virginia (3:30 p.m., ESPNU) Virginia (2-0, 0-0 ACC): A thrilling last-second victory at Indiana has Charlottesville in a buzz. Criticized in past years for having a weak secondary, the Hoos are currently the conference’s second best pass defense. However, the most important mission in Chapel Hill is to generate some rush offense against an athletic front seven which allowed precisely one rushing yard to Rutgers last week.

roundup continued page 7

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Technician - September 16, 2011