Page 1

Technician          

monday november

2

2009

Raleigh, North Carolina

Hillsborough Hike boosts local businesses costumed hikers brave construction, traffic to patronize local bars, restaurants Laura Wilkinson Staff Writer 

Though construction and other location options had businesses concerned about Halloween sales, students turned out en masse for the Haunted Hillsborough Hike Saturday.  Tread Snedecor, a senior in business, said he enjoyed the Hike and was glad to support Hillsborough Street businesses.  “We’re right here,” Snedecor said. “These guys are trying to get business.”  Anthony Navarro, manager of Red, Hot and Blue, said he was looking forward to the Hike because it is good for business.  “Business has been kind of slow with the construction, so [the Hike] is the kind of thing we need to get us back on track.”  Although construction on Hillsborough has been a major issue this

“We knew there would be a lot of school year, Lucy Phillips, a junior in arts applications, said she chose Hill- people here that we know,” Carter sborough Street over other Halloween said. “We get a lot of attention.” Carter said he will be back for next hot spots like Chapel Hill’s Franklin Street because of the proximity and year’s Hike out of Wolfpack pride. “It’s our home turf,” Carter said. availability. “Forget Franklin.”  “We live here. Phillips said her We drink here. favorite part of the We pa s s out Hike was looking at here,” Phillips people’s costumes.  said.   “I saw this guy Liz Gra ndbeing Patrick Batechamp, a junior man. We saw Danny in parks, recreZuko and Sandy,” ation and tourPhillips said.  ism, also said Anthony Navarro, Grandchamp, the easier access manager of Red, Hot and Blue however, said she was a big factor had a few comin her choice of plaints with the Hike, though she said party place.  “It’s easier to walk [to],” Grand- relaxed security and more bars could champ said. “I don’t want to have to have enhanced the experience. “Way too many cops,” Grandchamp deal with drinking and driving.” Luke Carter, a junior in civil engi- said. “I wish there were better bars on neering, dressed with friends as plastic Hillsborough.” army soldiers and said his favorite part of the night was posing for pictures.

“... [the Hike] is the kind of thing we need to get us back on track.”

Football toss

Amanda Wilkins/Technician

Michael Jaworski, a senior in computer science, and Christina Emerson, a student from Meredith College, hand out free bread outside of Bruegger’s Bagels during Hillsborough Haunted Hike Saturday. Jaworski and Emerson were with Chi Alpha christian fellowship. “We’re just giving out free bread and water. And free rides. That is the main thing. To keep people safe and sober,” Jaworski said.

University hosts eighth annual law school fair Tuesday  Eighty-four law schools present, students from all majors encouraged to attend  Jessica Neville Staff Writer 

Amanda Wilkins/Technician

Jennifer Spillman, a senior in business administration, and Drew Bowman, a junior in business administration, try to throw footballs at the Football Toss at Homecoming Kickoff Sunday. “I just came to get a T-shirt for the game,” Spillman said. Campus Recreation had a disc golf course and a football toss set up.

The University’s eighth annual law school fair will be held Tuesday in Talley Student Center from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Mary Tetro, coordinator of Pre-Law Services, said the past law fairs have all been extremely successful, with between 300 and 400 students attending.  “We have 1,200 students signed up on our list-serve that say they are interested in applying to law school,” Tetro said. “We would love to see all of them come out, as well as other students from all majors and disciplines.”  Lauren Lamontagne, a senior in English, is president of the Pre-Law

workshops available: Workshops will be presented starting at 11 a.m. and 84 law schools will have booths set up for interested students from 12:30 to 3:30 pm. Students from all majors and disciplines who have an interest in applying to or attending law school are invited to attend. No preregistration is required for the event. Source: ncsu.edu

Students  Association, a club that works to help students in applying to law school.   Lamontagne advises students to look over the list of questions on the PLSA Web site to prepare for the fair. She also said students should wear business casual to business attire, depending on their reasons for at-

LAW continued page 3

H1N1 vaccine clinic brings prevention, wait to Talley  Students turn out to get the first vaccine for H1N1  Alanna Howard Staff Writer 

Friday students waited in long lines to receive the H1N1 vaccine in Talley ballroom. The vaccine was free with a student I.D. and available in a shot or nasal spray form. The clinic ran from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and served roughly 1000 students. In an e-mail sent by Student Health officials to the University, it described who would receive the shot versus the nasal spray.  The shot is administered to “highrisk” people whereas the majority of the population receives a nasal spray vaccine. Brian Wells, a freshman in textile engineering, got in line after class and waited until he got the shot, or supplies ran out, whichever came first.  “I’ve been here since class got out at 1:05 p.m. and it’s now 2 p.m. If they run out that’ll suck but I’m not too worried about getting the flu, I’m just getting this as a precaution and it’s free,” he said.  Jerry Barker, director of Student Health Services, said the main goal was to provide the vaccine to all students.  “We didn’t want to put any barrier

H1N1 Shot vs. nasal spray vaccine: • The shot would be given to pregnant women, people who live with or care for infants younger than six months of age and anyone from 25 through 64 years of age with certain chronic medical conditions or a weakened immune system. • The spray would be given to healthy people through age 24 who are not pregnant and do not have certain health conditions (heart, lung, kidney, liver, endocrine, immune, blood or neurologic) and healthy people age 25 to 49 who are health care or emergency medical personnel or who live with or care for infants younger than six months of age. Source: Student health services e-mail Kevin cook/Technician

on students, it’s too critical to have. This is the first free vaccine we’ve given out,” he said.  Barker said it’s unfortunate students had to wait in line but said he is happy with the turnout.  “I hate that students had to wait in line. The people we contracted to do the clinic started out understaffed but we got more staff in. I’m pleased with

After waiting in line for over two and a half hours, Christopher Tile, a senior in mechanical engineering, receives the H1N1 influenza vaccine shot from a nurse in the ballroom of Talley Student Center Friday. “I just don’t want to get sick,” Tile said. The clinic was held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday and was free to anyone with a valid NCSU student ID. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention defined one of the priority groups for receiving the vaccine as anyone under the age of 24, which includes most of the student population.

the patience of the students and we’ll keep going till everyone currently in line is served,” he said.  Supplies expected to hold through the end of the clinic but some students wondered if there would be enough. 

“I’ve been in line since 12:50 p.m. and it’s now 2:15 p.m. I’m close, but I will be frustrated if it runs out before I get there,” Lauren Popham, a graduate student in psychology, said.  Maxium Healthcare, who admin-

Red means go.

2 for $20 @ NC State Bookstores

istered the vaccines, said they had at least 500 people receive the vaccine by 2 p.m. and expected 500 more.  Elaine Hark, a registered nurse with

H1N1 continued page 3


Page 2

page 2 • monday, november 2, 2009

Corrections & Clarifications

Technician

Through kali’s lens

Campus CalendaR

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-inChief Ty Johnson at editor@ technicianonline.com.

August 2009

Weather Wise Today:

Su

M

W

Th

1

2

T 3

4

5

F 6

Sa 7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

Today Wear Red, Get Fed Brickyard, 11 a.m. Wear Red, Get Fed College of Textiles, 11 a.m.

56/44

Networking for Industry Careers Williams Hall Room 2405, noon to 1:30 p.m.

Mostly cloudy with a slight chance of rain. North winds at 5 to 10 mph.

Which Way Home Witherspoon Cinema, 7 to 8:30 p.m.

Tuesday:

67 40

Tuesday Pre-Law Services Law School Fair Talley Student Center, 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Fraternity presents new members

Mostly sunny. Northwest winds at 5 to 10 mph.

Wear Red, Get Fed Brickyard, 11 a.m.

photo By Kali rogers

T

Wednesday:

errence Nelson, a sophomore in mechanical engineering, and Devon Day, a sophomore in criminology, greet the ladies of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority as part of their initiation into the Xi Zeta chapter of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity. The chapter hosted their new member presentation to the campus Sunday outside of the Free Expression Tunnel.

60 39 Sunny. Light northeast winds. source: www.weather.com

on the Web See exclusive audio/photo slideshows. Answer the online poll. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline.com. Check it out!

In the know

Doc Hendley speaks to students

Doc Hendley, an N.C. State alumnus and founder of Wine to Water, is speaking as the keynote speaker for Homecoming. Hendley has been named a Top 10 CNN Hero for his nonprofit business centered in Boone that brings clean water to needy people

around the world. Hendley will address students, faculty and staff on Wednesday in the Talley Student Center Ballroom at 7 p.m. source: ncsu.edu

Law school fair There will be a law school fair Tuesday starting at 12:30 p.m. in Talley Student Center. Students will be able to visit with admission representatives from schools across the country. source: ncsu.edu

World & Nation

Obama keeps top battlefield commanders at arm’s length As much as President Barack Obama and former President George W. Bush disagree in their views of war, they differ more on a key question of presidential style: their relationships with their top battlefield commanders. For Bush, Gen. David H. Petraeus

assumed the role of a trusted presidential adviser, frequently visiting and calling the White House. But for Obama, Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal occupies a defined place in the chain of command, and the two have met face-to-face only twice. The reasons for the marked contrasts run deeper than personal preferences, however. Under Obama, top Pentagon officials have worked to keep McChrystal out of the spotlight, in part to avoid creating “another celebrity general.” source: mctdirect.com

Wear Red, Get Fed Engineering Building II, 11 a.m. SMART-Shop Series Workshop: Finance and Success Talley Student Center Room 3118, 1 to 2 p.m. Wednesday The Protected Class of Race and Color Talley Student Center Room 3118, 9 a.m. to noon SMART-Shop Series Workshop: Finance and Success Talley Student Center Brown Room, 10 to 11 a.m. Wear Red, Get Fed Brickyard, 11 a.m. Hang It Up! Gregg Museum of Art & Design, noon to 8 p.m. Recent Gifts of Native American Art from the Collection of Drs. Norman and Gilda Greenberg Gregg Museum of Art & Design, noon to 8 p.m. Doc Hendley: Top 10 CNN Hero Talley Student Center Ballroom University Theatre presents Re:Design Thompson Hall, 7 p.m. Thursday Wear Red, Get Fed Brickyard, 11 a.m. Hang It Up! Gregg Museum of Art & Design, noon to 8 p.m. Recent Gifts of Native American Art from the Collection of Drs. Norman and Gilda Greenberg Gregg Museum of Art & Design, noon to 8 p.m.

for all ARTS NC STATE performances Exhibitions are free.

Physical Environment Committee Meeting Winslow Building, 3:30 to 5 p.m.

this week

Moon Witherspoon Cinema, 7 to 8:40 p.m. Realizing Real Estate Dreams Talley Student Center Room 3118, 8 to 9 p.m.

Wednesday-Sunday, Nov 4-8 Kennedy-McIlwee Studio Theatre

Re:Design by Craig Baxter Re:Design chronicles the relationship between Charles Darwin and Asa Gray over nearly forty years, with particular reference to their intimate discussions of the implications of their scientific work for their personal beliefs and for religious belief in general.

Thursday, Nov 5 at 6pm • Gregg Museum of Art & Design Artists & Objects Lecture Series:

Hang It Up! Discussion

Harry Potter and the Half Blood Prince Witherspoon Cinema, 9 to 11:35 p.m.

FREE!

Eight senior graphic design students addressed “values for sustainable and engaging futures” (from John Thackera’s text, In the bubble, designing in a complex world) as content themes for artwork they created and submitted for Hang It Up!

Join them as they speak about their work. Saturday, Nov 7 at 8pm • Stewart Theatre

Daniel Bernard Roumain: Darwin’s Meditation for the People of Lincoln The wildly popular Haitian-American artist Daniel Bernard Roumain (DBR) – renowned for seamlessly blending funk, rock, hip-hop and classical music – returns to Center Stage for the last of a three-year arc of performances.

Pre-show discussion with Daniel Bernard Roumain and Dr. Randolph Foy; 6:45pm, Walnut Room.

Ticket Central: 515.1100 2nd Floor, Talley Student Center

University Theatre presents Re:Design Thompson Hall, 8 p.m.

ncsu.edu/arts

Get involved in technician Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copy edit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday to Thursday 9 a.m. to midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or e-mail Editor-inChief Ty Johnson at editor@ technicianonline.com.


News

Technician

monday, november 2, 2009 • Page 3

LAW

Next H1N1 clinic: When: Wednesday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Where: Talley Student Center Ballroom

continued from page 1

Source: Jerry Barker, director of Student Health Services,

H1N1

continued from page 1

Maxium Healthcare, said they would cut the line at 3 p.m., taking those in line but not letting anyone else in.  “We predict to have enough supplies,” she said.  Hark said she told students there are no adverse reactions to the vaccine but those who received the nasal spray may experience some minor symptoms for a few days.  “The shot, or the dead virus, will not give someone the flu. Neither will the nasal spray, or the live virus, but one might have flu symptoms like a runny nose or sore throat for a couple days. Those will go away though,” Hark said.  Karen Laut, a sophomore in religious studies, said she received the nasal spray and waited the recommended 10 minutes before leaving the clinic.  “I was pretty worried about getting the flu. I have friends who have had H1N1. I waited two hours but I liked the nasal spray, it wasn’t bad,” Laut said.  Alicia Smith, a junior in plant biology, said she needed

Peggy Boone/Technician

After a two and a half hour wait, Laura Sharpe, a sophomore in fashion brand management and marketing, receives the H1N1 vaccine in a nasal spray from Registered Nurse Cara Weissman. “My mom sent me an e-mail about the vaccine, she put pressure on me to go,” Sharpe said. The vaccine was offered as a nasal spray or injection at Talley Student Center Friday. The line for vaccinations spanned out the door and down the steps of the student center, and most students reporting waiting two to three hours.

the shot.  “I have a chronic illness so I’m getting the shot because I’m a higher risk. I’ve been in line an hour so far, but I’ll wait as long as it takes,” she said.  The shot and spray were free to students with a valid student I.D.

The vaccine was paid for by the federal government and Student Health partnered with Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina to reduce the administration costs for the vaccine to $12, which Student Health was able to cover under student fees. 

Barker said it’s very important to get the flu shot.   “With all the national publicity and H1N1’s current status as a pandemic, we think it is crucial for students to receive the shot. It’ll do the whole University good,” he said.   The next clinic is expected

to run faster and more efficient. “We will have another large clinic on Wednesday to better serve more students, however this clinic will be nasal only,” he said.

Businesses are open

tending.  “Freshmen and sophomores can go just to get more information,” Lamontagne said. “Juniors and seniors may want to have specific questions prepared beforehand and make contacts at schools they are really interested in, but all students should research schools they want to talk to at the fair.”  All of North Carolina’s seven law schools will be represented, as well as 77 schools from all over the nation, ranging from California to New York. All of the attending law schools’ average GPA and LSAT ranges and bar passage rates can be found on the PLSA Web site, so students will not need to ask those questions at the law fair.  “We are very fortunate to have excellent law schools in North Carolina,” Lamontagne said. “And now Campbell Law School, which has wonderful facilities, is right here in Raleigh.”  The PLSA encourages all students to attend because law schools do not require a certain major or specific classes to be accepted, according to Tetro.  “Law schools look at a student’s grades, LSAT scores and resume,” Tetro said. “They do not give preference to any major over another. All students should take this opportunity, even if they have just started thinking about law school as an option.”  Daniel Rowe, a sophomore in philosophy and business administration and treasurer of the PSLA, went to the fair last year and said he learned a lot of valuable information.  “It is a good opportunity to meet with representatives from different law schools you are interested in, especially outof-state,” Rowe said. “Just make sure you write down questions beforehand so you don’t forget what you were planning to say.”  Tetro said continuing education past a bachelor’s degree has become increasingly popular due to the economic recession.  “We are opening the fair to all members of the community because many people are going back to school now,”  Tetro said. “Although the law profession is difficult to walk into at this point in time, the profession also has a high turnaround rate. That means that when the economy picks up lawyers will likely be some of the first people in demand.” 

Amanda Wilkins/Technician

People walk up Hillsborough during the Hillsborough Haunted Hike Saturday. Businesses were open despite construction and traffic congestion caused by renovations to the street.

Smokers Wanted

Turn the dial — to something good.

Devon A. Glick Attorney at Law 919-415-1783 Traffic DWI’s Misdemeanors Felonies Expungments

*Student Discounts

Researchers at Duke University Medical Center are conducting a study to see if an investigational procedure is able to block craving for cigarettes in smokers. Healthy, drug-free participants between the ages of 18 — 50 are needed for a physical screening, 1 practice session and 3 study visits.

Compensation up to $600!

Call Today! 888-525-DUKE www.dukesmoking.com (IRB# 2339)


Viewpoint

page 4 • monday, november 2, 2009

Technician

{Our view}

The Facts:

The cost of a new West lot parking deck will be funded, in part, by the Talley renovation project. A University policy requires that Transportation be compensated for every slot lost during construction of a new building in the amount of $17,000 per slot.

Our Opinion:

The policies for Transportation compensation unfairly alter construction costs, placing an undo burden on taxpayers and students.

N

Another Talley fleecing

CSU Transportation recently said it is waiting on funding from the Talley renovation project to finance an expansion of the West Lot parking area. The initial plan calls for a deck to be built on the western half of the lot at a cost of $14 million — the deck would boost parking in the area by 429 slots. Additional parking slots on campus are always welcome news, especially as the campus continues to expand. But the funding structure for these slots is misguided and places an unnecessary burden on students and taxpayers. The primary funding for the project will come from a mortgage taken out by Transporta-

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board excluding the news department and is the responsibility of the Editor-in-Chief.

tion. It would amount to 57 percent of the $14 million the project requires. This is a logical approach; students who buy parking permits will pay for the construction of the deck through the cost of their permits. Some of the remaining balance would be paid for by reserve funds from the Transportation budget ($2 million). The remaining funding is driven by a strange city ordinance. According to the policy, the University must build one additional slot for every 600 square feet of academic space it adds and one slot for every two beds it adds in on-campus

housing. Additionally, the University must be compensated for every slot lost during construction. These policies have added millions to campus building costs (the SAS building for example, which added academic space and eliminated parking spots). It is taking additional money from taxpayers in academic building construction expenses and diverting it to Transportation at the cost of $17,000 per slot. The policy is contributing another $2 million towards construction of the West Lot parking deck. The ordinance only necessitates that the University build

parking spots for academic construction, but the University policy concerning displaced parking spots affects all structures. The cost of the new Talley is $2 million more as a result. Students are burdened by a policy that takes money from campus construction and diverts it to Transportation. Does a new Talley really need $2 million worth of new parking in West Lot? It doesn’t make sense and is needlessly increasing construction costs — fleecing students. The policy needs to be revised and the cost of Talley adjusted accordingly.

{

Did you paint those clothes on?

A

merican fashion has come a long way since the days of the Puritans. The conservative nature of clothing was tested during the 1920s flapper uprising and again with the dark, tight fighting, garments of the Beatnik culture. Fashion Marlena again went to a new extreme Wilson Staff Columnist with the free flowing hippie attire and the flashy, neon colors of the 1980s. All these subcultures presented more than clothes; they were a way of life. Now, it seems as if clothing is less about expression and more about exposing. What’s considered trendy now can be described in two words: tight and uncomfortable. There are probably a good amount of people who disagree with me, but I will stick to my opinion. Granted, no one should be proud to walk around in clothes that resemble the early days of Roseanne. I understand that clothes have to f it, but they do not have to look like a second epidermis. One of the biggest disappointments of 2009 has been the emergence of skinny jeans. I don’t dislike them because of the style, but for the mere fact that they are one big misconception. The sales people (aka devils in disguise) that work the floor of the stores tell you how good they fit and how comfortable they are, but it is all one big lie. You will not have a comfortable experience in these form fitting bottoms if your body shape does not resemble that of a 12 year old boy. I am a fan of the assorted colors they come in and how they look with a pair of Converse shoes, but I do not think these jeans are a realistic fit for the majority of

the population. It has nothing to do with whether someone is overweight. They just aren’t made for people who have curves. So, if you’re like me, and find the skinny jean to be unappealing, I suggest you move onto something more form flattering. It appalls me that people can walk around in those jeans day in and day out. They look like they were painted on. I’m a realist and would rather not spend 30 minutes of my day trying to get those jeans over my hips. Another item of clothing that is big on exposure is those dresses that can easily be mistaken for shirts. I’m not saying you should be a nun and cover up from head to toe, but these dresses are a bit of a stretch. I always have to ask someone if what I’m looking at is a shirt or a dress. Just like the skinny jeans, they have appealing designs and look good on TV, but they tell a different story when you actually put one on. If you are a curvier person, even more of your body will be hanging out. Some people believe t hat t hese dress/shirt disasters can be thought of interchangeably; I have to disagree. Just by looki ng at it I can tell that if I walked outside wearing one of them I would probably be arrested for indecent exposure. Choose your clothes wisely. If you enjoy skinny jeans and dress/shirts, wear them. If you have second thoughts about them, your best bet may be to return these items to the rack. You can look respectable and trendy at the same time. Just because something is “in,” doesn’t mean you have to be “in” it.

“... no one should be proud to walk around in clothes that resemble the early days of Roseanne. ”

Send Marlena your thoughts on American fashion to letters@technicianonline.com.

Editor-in-Chief Ty Johnson

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695 Editorial Advertising Fax Online

515.2411 515.2029 515.5133 technicianonline.com

What is the best part of Homecoming week? Why? by Ryann Pasquale

“The best part is the school spirit.”

There’s something wrong with this beast.

Victoria Adesanmi freshman, industrial design

Conrad Plyer, sophomore in political science

Celebrate Homecoming all week

I

t is that time of year — the time we put aside our books and break out every piece of red we own. Technician stated it best in an editorial in 2008, “Traditions. We have few of t hem on our ca mpus t hat we re not Adam imposed by Compton or self-proHomecoming committee chair claimed by the University, and the granddaddy of all traditions is Homecoming Week.” Homecoming is an awardwinning program, which is so big that it has been mentioned in the “U.S. News and World Report” as one of the most popular events on campus. Each year, the energy and excitement surrounding the weeklong festivities grows exponentially. And Homecoming 2009 will be the best yet. However, Homecoming is built around several important elements. It is built around welcoming our alumni home, supporting the Wolfpack and giving back. I encourage all of you to get involved and take part in what is one of the greatest weeks of the fall semester. Every day you wear red, you will get fed in the Brickyard starting at 11 a.m. For those of you on Centennial

Campus Monday, you can get fed at Textiles, and Tuesday at Engineering Building I. You can also take time to give back in one of our many avenues to do service. Buy cookies in the Brickyard on Thursday; give blood at one of our three blood drives; bring cans to the Brickyard or be a part of the Service Night 2009. Join us Wednesday night in Homecoming’s newest element; in the Talley Ballroom, we w i l l be honoring Doc Hendley, a 2005 alumnus. Hendley runs a Boone, N.C. nonprofit, “Wine to Water,” and raises money for his work. Hendley has brought clea n, su stainable water to regions all over the world. Join us as we hear about his amazing work — Hendley was also recognized as one of CNN’s Top Ten Heroes. Come and find out how you can help him in this effort. And on Thursday night, we will party the night away with the annual UAB All Night Bash! The busiest day of the year, however, will be Friday, as the community and Wolfpackers from many generations gather together for the Hillsborough Street Parade. Join alumni, Coach Tom O’Brien and many

Deputy Sports Editors Taylor Barbour Tyler Everett Jen Hankin

Managing Editor Ana Andruzzi

Deputy Features Editors Justin Carrington Christin Hardy Meredith Faggart Jane Moon features@technicianonline.com

Viewpoint Editor Russell Witham

Deputy News Editor Amber Kenney

Sports Editor Kate Shefte

viewpoint@technicianonline.com

news@technicianonline.com

sports@technicianonline.com

Assistant Viewpoint Editor Zakk White

editor@technicianonline.com

}

in your words

notable guests at this event. Enjoy the sites of all the student f loats and the many other entries. Immediately following the parade, come out to the Pack Howl Pep Rally and Concert featuring the College Humor Tour and the band, Roman Candle, a free event for all N.C. State students. Homecoming is not only a busy week but also one of the best weeks of the fall semester. There are ver y few times a yea r t he campus comes together as a Wolfpack family. By coming out, you are taking part in the “granddaddy of all traditions.” Each year, Homecoming grows and becomes a stronger force on this campus. However, without the support of past students, it would not be the celebration it is today. So, come out, get involved, get behind our team and Terminate the Terps! Go Wolfpack!

“Homecoming is an award-winning program, which is ... one of the most popular events on campus.”

Photo Editor Luis Zapata

Send Adam your thoughts on Homecoming to letters@ technicianonline.com.

design@technicianonline.com

Deputy Design Editor José Tapia

Shawn Valtin sophomore, aerospace engineering

“I like the float parade. Everyone works hard all week long for the families and students.” Julia Chalk junior, business management

{

Online poll

}

This week’s poll question:

Should marijuana be legalized in N.C.? • Yes • No • I don’t care because it doesn’t affect me Visit www.technicianonline.com to cast your vote.

Design Director Lauren Blakely

photo@technicianonline.com

Design Editor Biko Tushinde

“The free shirts obviously.”

Advertising Manager Laura Frey advertising@sma.ncsu.edu

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2008 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features Life & style

Technician

monday, november 2, 2009 • Page 5

Some students resort to pill-popping Over-the-counter and prescription medications keep some awake and studying Story By Laura Wilkinson

P

ulling an all-nighter to do last minute studying before the big exam day is a common occurrence for some students, but a few take it to the extreme: popping pills that keep them awake and focused.

Dani (last name left out for anonymity), a freshman in biology, said she has taken Adderall and Ritalin to help her stay awake to study. “They really do help you focus,” Dani said. “You can sit down for hours and just focus. If you want to do an allnighter, it helps you stay up longer.” Lisa Tichavsky, instructor for Social Deviance, said she asks her classes each semester about their use of prescription medications and is very surprised at what her students tell her. “We have a section in this class about drugs,” Tichavsky said. “Someone said Ritalin was passé, and Adderall was more popular. I asked how many students have taken one of these drugs and about two-thirds of the class raised their hands.” While medications like Ritalin and Adderall are beneficial for people who have disorders such as ADHD, Tichavsky said most students who are taking them do not have prescriptions or are obtaining prescriptions under false pretenses. “I ask them how they go about getting these; they said it’s easy, you can get a pill for $2,” Tichavsky said. She said students will look up the symptoms of disorders treated by the prescriptions, go to the doctor and pretend to have the symptoms. “The most disturbing thing I’ve been

drug penalties: Ritalin is considered a schedule II drug— which means is has high potential for abuse, has accepted medical use with severe restrictions and abuse may lead to physical or psychological dependence. For trafficking in schedule II illegal drugs, The N.C. General Statutes 90-90 states that any student shall be expelled and any faculty member, administrator or other employee shall be discharged. For illegal possession of schedule II illegal drugs, The N.C. General Statutes 90-90 states that the minimum penalty shall be suspension of enrollment or from employment for a period of at least on semester or its equivalent. Source: drugs.com, ncsu.edu/policies

told is they go to the Student Health Center and complain of these symptoms they found online and get a prescription,” Tichavsky said. Dani said she gets the pills from friends who either do not need the medication anymore or do not use the medication often, but said she has stopped taking the pills. “I took it about once every other week for the first time I was here,” Dani said. “I don’t take it anymore. It was really just to give me a good start.”

She said although they helped her stay pills to stay awake, but she does not apup all night, she did experience some prove of her friend’s choice. “There are other ways to stay healthy. negative side effects, such as loss of appetite while on the medication and lack You can improve your diet,” Williams said. “I guess she’s still taking them, so I of energy after it wears off. “The day afterwards, I’ll feel really guess she thinks they’re working for her. I guess it’s just like tired,” Dani said. an easy way out.” “My stomach will Tichavsky said hurt and I’ll feel students tell her low on energy for they need to take a long time. I know the medications, a lot of people take whether prescripAdderall to lose tion or over-theweight because it counter, because curbs your appeit is the only way tite.” they can possibly Dani said that do all their homewhile the medicaLisa Tichavsky, instructor for work and cram tion keeps a person social deviance for their exams. alert, the taking of Tichavsky said she it has very little effect on how well the person does aca- disagrees; there is a much better way to do well in school. demically. “There’s another solution to getting “It has no effect on your actual brain function. It helps you focus better,” Dani good grades that doesn’t involve risksaid. “It’s not going to make your grades ing your life or having a jail sentence,” better; you need to actually do something Tichavsky said. “Study.” school-wise.” Tichavsky said she has not seen a significant change in students’ grades, though it is difficult to tell if someone is actually taking the pills. “My grade distribution is fairly average,” Tichavsky said. “I would suspect that it probably doesn’t have as much of an effect as they think.” Rachel Williams, a freshman in elementary education, said she has a friend who takes fish oil

“I asked how many students have taken one of these drugs and about two-thirds of the class raised their hands.”

Photo illustration by ana andruzzi

Coffee: the caffeine of choice Brown bean spells major green for businesses 

[from Slovakia], I go [to Hill of Beans],” she said. Tatiana Illova, freshman in science, technology and society, Sarah Ewald drinks coffee because she likes Staff Writer it and it helps her wake up when  “Coffee, tea or me?” The ti- she’s tired. Like her friend Hojckoba, Illtle, 1967 stewardesses’ memoir, name-checked the basic airline ova likes mochas. She also frebeverage. Little did the authors quents Hill of Beans for coffee. “[The staff] already know[s] know the drink would usher in a highly lucrative market, ranging us there,” Illova said. She also makes Slovakian coffee on her from high to low price points. Around campus, caffeine is own. Demand for coffee has parpractically a food group unto itself, with coffee acting as anchor. layed into it becoming a big Tomoya Takeuchi, a post-doc- business. But there are differtorate student in mathematics, ences between different types usually drinks a latte or a mo- of coffee.   Megan Prucha. ett, manager “It helps keep of Royal Bean, me aw a ke ,” said there are Takeuchi said. different types He usua l ly of roasts for buys his coffee coffee. at Global Vil“[The degree lage. of the roast] Lenka Hodetermines jckoba, junior Sarah Abdala, manager of its boldness. in psychology, Reverie The hig her drinks coffee its boldness, when she has the more caffeine it will have,” class and is tired. “I drink it so it wakes me Pruett said. Pruett noted this is up,” Hojckoba said. She prefers sometimes not the case, since a drinking mochas and is partial less-bold bean could be more to those made at Hill of Beans caffeinated naturally.   Within her shop, one bean in D.H. Hill. “The coffee there is the best,” stands out in terms of caffeine Hojckoba said. She also brews voltage. “Espresso is ground fine and her own and drinks coffee she brought from her native country brewed at a very high pressure,” Pruett said. She said it’s of Slovakia. “But if I don’t have coffee darkly roasted and is the darkest

“All the coffee here is organic and has no chemicals.”

Local coffee shops: If you’re looking to grab a quick cup of coffee, then check out these places nearby. The Royal Bean 3801-137 Hillsborough St. Raleigh, NC 27607 (919) 834-2326 Cup A Joe 3100 Hillsborough St. Raleigh, NC 27607 (919) 828-9665 Reverie 2522 Hillsborough St. Raleigh, NC 27607-7249 (919) 839-2233

Global Village 2428 Hillsborough St. Raleigh, NC 27607 (919) 828-4567 Third Place Coffee House 1811 Glenwood Ave Raleigh, NC 27608-2323 (919) 834-6566 Helios Coffee Company 413 Glenwood Ave Raleigh, NC 27603-1240 (919) 838-5177 Morning Timesx 10 E Hargett St Raleigh, NC 27601-1426 (919) 836-1204 Source: Google Maps

roasted bean that isn’t defined as coffee. Pruett said that the customer flow varies. “In the morning, [I] don’t [usually] see many students,” Pruett said. She said they usually buy lattes and flavored mochas on their way to classes. Salah Abdala, manager of Reverie, has a differentiation point for his business. “All the coffee here is organic and has no chemicals,” Abdala said. All the coffee is also locally roasted. He mentioned he pays international fees to have coffee shipped in. “[In terms of business], it’s good for the farmers and good for us,” Abdala said. He imports coffees from a va-

riety of places, such as Africa, South America and Central America. Reverie carries different types of roasts as well, among them white, black and medium roasts. Abdala doesn’t think any one product has distinctively more caffeine than another. “It’s hard to say which [products have] the most caffeine, since everything has it [to some degree],” Abdala said. He noted that the shop also offers caffeine-free beverages such as tea. Abdala doesn’t see much of a noticeable difference in customer flow.                     “There’s usually a morning rush, but we stay steady all day,” Abdala said. 

Photo illustration by Amanda Wilkins


Features Life & style

page 6 • monday, november 2, 2009

Spotted in the Brickyard

Technician

Students show off their fashion sense Story & photos By Marisa Akers

S

potted in the Brickyard is a weekly glance at what students are wearing around campus. Because most on campus are not looking to break the bank when it comes to fashion, Technician found some students that know how to be stylish on a budget. Check back each week for more fashionable students..

Caitlin Jackson, a senior in zoology, shows off her outfit in the Brickyard Thursday. When shopping, she said she looks to buy clothes that are comfortable and flowy, and usually are colored with earth tones. “I try to stay away from trends and go more with style so I can find what I like and not keep changing,” Jackson said. Favorite store: Guess Shoes: DSW, $100 Jeans: Guess, $100 Shirt: Express, $50 Scarf: Dots, $6 Glasses: Flea Market, $10 Bag: Target, $15

Robert Marshall, a sophomore in biomedical engineering, stops outside of the Atrium Thursday. “I’m kind of casual, I guess,” Marshall said, when asked about his personal style. “I like button-ups, high-top shoes.” Favorite Store- Macy’s

Kimberley Fisher, a sophomore in business administration, stops in the Brickyard Thursday. “I just dress comfortably,” Fisher said. “I love rings and button earrings, boots.”

Shoes: Online, $115 Jeans: Macy’s, $60 Shirt: Kahn’s Fashion, $40

Boots: Fab’rik, $42 Socks: TJ Maxx, $5 Skirt: Store in Bermuda, $20 Shirt: Forever 21, $5 Bag: Gift

Favorite Stores: Urban Outfitters, Forever 21, Fab’rik

Send your poems, essays, short stories, photos, and art to

literary@windhover. ncsu.edu

SUBMIT

to windhover

by Dec. 1 for consideration for inclusion in this year’s copy of Windhover, N.C. State’s awardwinning literary & arts magazine.

NOVEMBER

5,2009 8PM – 12AM $1 AT THE DOOR WITH STUDENT ID $10 AT THE DOOR WITHOUT STUDENT ID ALL PROCEEDS GO TO STOP HUNGER NOW

C.A.M.P.U.S. NC STATE University Community Coalition

Advocating for cultural change. safer

smarter

choices

disabilities Persons with disabilities who desire any assistive devices, services, or other accommodations to participate in this program should contact Rick Gardner, Associate Director of Campus Activities, at (919) 5155161, Monday-Friday between the hours of 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. to discuss accommodations prior to the event.


Sports

Technician

monday, november 2, 2009 • Page 7

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Pack drops season finale Duke wins 2-0, spoils senior day Samuel T.O. Branch Senior Staff Writer

The Duke Blue Devils defeated the women’s soccer team 2-0 Sunday afternoon at Dail Soccer Stadium. The loss on senior day denies State its first winning season since 2002 and eliminates the Wolfpack from any postseason play. “In the first half I was extremely pleased. We played well, we possessed the ball, we got forward and I thought we were the more dangerous team,” coach Steve Springthorpe said. “In the second half, Duke made some adjustments, played a little different style and we ultimately faltered when the time came.” Needing a win to have any chance at an NCAA berth, State came out and played hard for the entire game, but could not pull out the win. “Our team battled, but we still have to find out how to win games and how to be more competitive when things are on the line. We haven’t done a good job of that so far,” Springthorpe said. “Overall, I’m pleased with the effort. We came out, we battled. But Duke needed the win and they found a way to do it.” Sunday’s contest was the end of the careers of five of State’s players. Katie Ruiz, Gia Cipollini, Kendall Irby, Meredith Parrilla and Chantalle Dugas all played their last regular season match. The five players have all played significant roles with the Pack over multiple seasons, combining for over 340 games played. “I’m sad that it’s ended for them, and I appreciate every-

Sarah Tudor/Technician

Junior forward Kara Baldy gets up after a Duke player knocks her down to get the ball. The Wolfpack fell behind in the second half, resulting in a 2-0 loss against Duke Sunday.

thing they did for us, helping through the first half when a turn our program around,” Duke player’s shoulder caught her on the cheek. In spite of Springthorpe said. Despite a somewhat sour a quickly-forming black eye, ending, the program did Ruiz played the entire second half. Accordmake strides ing to Parthis year unrilla, that is der Springjust one exthorpe. The ample of the 8-9-2 record dedication is t he best a nd drive State has had this team has since 2006. Katie Ruiz, senior defender shown, both The Pack also in this game picked up its and all season. first ACC win since 2007. “I have never played with “They’re moving in the right direction for sure,” Ruiz said. a group of girls like this that “The attitude change that I’ve just fight and claw, fight and seen is something that will scratch. [Ruiz] is over here with carry them forward. I felt that a big lump on her face, but she in games in conference, every- is back in the second half playing the game of her life,” Parbody believed we could win. Ruiz, one of the team cap- rilla said. “I am just so proud tains, was injured midway of this team.”

“They’re moving in the right direction for sure.”

Policy

The Technician will not be held responsible for damages or losses due to fraudulent advertisements. However, we make every effort to prevent false or misleading advertising from appearing in our publication.

Deadlines

Our business hours are Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Line ads must be placed by noon the previous day.

But despite the progress State has shown, Springthorpe knows the team needs to build off this year and continue to improve. “We were relevant this year. I think we made some improvements. Beating a good UVA squad was a good step for us, being in games with tough ACC opponents is a big step for us. We are nowhere near where we want to be, but I think we’ve made some good movement forward,” Springthorpe said. “We will have to keep moving forward, learning how to win tougher games and improving on some of the things that we did this year.”

Classifieds

XC

continued from page 8

catching the leader with about a half of a mile to go and from there it was a battle between four people and but the two Virginia kids had a little more left than we did, and they were able to pull away at the end.” With the win, the Pack reclaims the ACC title and wins the ACC championship for the 14th time, and its 11th in the last 15 years. “It feels great. We haven’t won a championship in three years,” Martinez said. “This is my first championship, and was something we were working towards all year.” With the race being held at Wake Med, which is the team’s home course, the Pack had a big advantage, due to its familiar-

SOCCER

continued from page 8

the 72nd minute. A confrontation erupted in front of the Clemson goal involving Clemson goalie Joseph Bendik and Pack junior defender Tyler Lassiter. The two players began to shove each other and the incident almost led to the benches clearing on both sides. Lassiter and Bendik were both issued red cards and ejected from the game, forcing both teams to play with 10 for he remainder of the game. After the ejections, both teams seemed to play with a newfound urgency. With minutes left in the game, Clemson took a shot that was initially blocked by redshirt senior Chris Widman, but before the Wolfpack could clear the ball, Clemson’s Austin Savage got the rebound and scored the

ity with the course. “That is our home course. It’s very hilly and the 8K course goes up the hill three times, so it is pretty challenging,” Campbell said. “We worked out a decent amount throughout the year on the course and it was defiantly an advantage having it in Raleigh.” Even with the Pack winning the ACC championship, it feels as if they still have a lot of room for improvement going into the rest of the season. “We are happy with our performance. Any time you can win conference championship it is really exciting and satisfying,” Martinez said. “We are really happy that we won but I still think our team has room for improvement and I think we could have ran better as a team.”

lone goal of the night. “They put the ball in the box, when the ball gets played in the box so many times eventually they are going to get some shots,” Widman said. “It was a shot and a save but they finished up the rebound.” State dominated the game in all aspects of the game except the score. The Pack led in total shots, corner kicks, and saves. Coach George Tarantini said he credited the Clemson team for capitalizing on its chances. “Sure, we played hard and Clemson played hard and the difference between us and them is that they scored a goal and we didn’t,” coach George Tarantini said. “Soccer is a game of great chances, and if you don’t finish, the other team will.” The soccer will return to Dail Soccer Field for the home season finale and senior night Tuesday night against Presbyterian College.

Rates

For students, line ads start at $5 for up to 25 words. For non-students, line ads start at $8 for up to 25 words. For detailed rate information, visit ­technicianonline.com/classifieds. All line ads must be prepaid.

To place a classified ad, call 919.515.2411, fax 919.515.5133 or visit technicianonline.com/classifieds

Help Wanted

Child Care Needed

Real estate

ApArtments For rent

Parking For rent

Smithfields chicken n’ Bar-B-Q(r) is hiring for entry level Management positions (shift leader, closing manager, assistant manager). Superior performers will be looked at for General Manager positions. I am looking for confident, hard working, open minded leaders who are ready to learn, capable of making decisions and shouldering ever increasing responsibility. Competitive Pay and Full Benefits available. No prior restaurant experience required, Good attitude and work ethic are however. If you are interested or would like more information send an email to smithfieldsbbq@ gmail.com.

Warm, responsible person wanted to babysit ~3 times/­month. Weekends (until about 10) and Wednesday evenings. Three sweet little girls! Cary Park. $12/­ hour. 919-461-2413

Homes For rent

One block to NCSU Belltower. 4 bedroom – 2 bath apartment. Rent until end of school year (June 2010) for half price. 2208 Garden Place $650/­month Contact Nelson 424-8130

Convenient Parking! Directly next to campus. Valpark saves you gas, tickets, and towing! www.valpark.com 919-821-7444.

EmploymEnt Help Wanted Careers in Marketing Entry Level Advertising & PR Positions. Full Training Provided. F/­T, P/­T & Paid Internships Available. Call us today!!: 919-876-4445 Hab Techs Needed! Maxim Healthcare needs staff to work w/­developmentally disabled clients in Wake County. Flexible hours in afternoons, evenings, and weekends. Habilitative services payrate $10/­hr. Need own transportation. 676By The 3118.

Sudoku Level:

PERFECT FOR STUDENTS!!!Darling 1915 house, 1 block from NCSU. 4 bedroom, 2 baths, 3 living rooms, 4 parking spaces. Available January 2010. $1400/­mo. Pets ok. 929-1714.

ApArtments For rent

Sudoku

Mepham Group

Level:

1 2 3 4

By The

One and two bedroom apartments available starting at $499/­mo. W/­D included. Pet friendly. Large Breeds welcome. Walking distance to grocery, gym and buslines. Call 919-851-0753. Mepham Group

Tired of loud party communities?­Check out Woodcreek Apts just mins away! Prices starting in $500s. FREE RENT UNTIL DEC 1ST. 919-467-5574. New Home for Rent! 1 block to campus. 3br 3ba Lease and pets negotiable. Hard woods and security. $1350/­month 3909 Jackson St. Call 919-424-8130.

1 2 3 4

ServiceS Spring Break BAHAMAS SPRING BREAK $189 5DAYS or $239 7-DAYS. All prices include: Round-trip luxury cruise with food. Accommodations on the island at your choice of thirteen resorts. Appalachia Travel. www.BahamaSun.com 800-867-5018.

FOR RELEASE NOVEMBER 2, 2009

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Level 2

Level 1

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Solution to Saturday’s puzzle

11/2/09

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Friday’s puzzle

nc state green transit tip: RedefineTravel.org is newly re-launched with all the NC State green transit tips you could want! © 2009 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

10/31/09

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

© 2009 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

Use our tips to make green commuting a part of your lifestyle!

ACROSS 1 Shapely legs, slangily 5 Peak 9 Makeup maven Lauder 14 Actor McGregor 15 Flightless South American bird 16 Not cloudy 17 *Like secret military facilities, to civilians 19 “Lucy, you got a __ ’splainin’ to do!” 20 High on the hwy. 21 Scatterbrained 22 Gillette razors 23 Slip by 25 Give life to 27 Artist’s support 30 401(k) cousin, briefly 31 Like horror films 34 Not worth debating 36 Chowder ingredient 40 Actress Spelling 41 Moisten the bird 42 One who saves the day 43 Screwy 44 Golden __: senior citizen 45 Part of VCR 46 Souse’s affliction, for short 48 Red-breasted bird 50 “The Avengers” heroine, to Steed 54 Log-on need 58 Old photo tint 59 Muscat resident 62 Suffix in enzyme names 63 Towels (off) 64 *Furniture with folding legs, usually 66 1/16 of a pound 67 Cancel, as a newspaper story 68 Ski slope lift 69 Villainous look 70 __ gin fizz 71 Given moment, which can begin both parts of the answers to starred clues

11/2/09

By Pancho Harrison

DOWN 1 Crystalline stone 2 Beyond bad 3 Cosa Nostra 4 NBC show with Baba Wawa skits 5 Military forces 6 IOU 7 Queens ball team 8 Unchallenging college course 9 Oblong cream puff 10 *One-armed bandit 11 Prefix with -cycline 12 Trouble greatly 13 Clear, as a tape 18 “My guess is ...” 24 *Movie that evokes prior times 26 TV’s Nick at __ 28 ’Zine on the Net 29 Runner-up 31 Initials on a Cardinal’s cap 32 Dove sound 33 Golf ball path 35 Other, in Mexico 37 Had followers

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

www.mswuf.com

(c)2009 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

38 “__ you kidding?” 39 Cow sound 41 Military command center 45 Stop in on 47 Ad to lure you in 49 __ of joy: new baby 50 Popular PC interface before Windows 51 Second showing

11/2/09

52 Chiropractor’s target 53 Secures using a key 55 Synagogue leader 56 Muslim’s faith 57 Tractor maker John 60 Letters in a box 61 Singer Guthrie 65 Lawyer: Abbr.


Sports

INSIDE

COUNTDOWN

• Page 7: A recap of the women’s soccer game.

• 6 days until the football teams’ homecoming game against Maryland

Technician

Page 8 • monday, november 2, 2009

FOOTBALL

Offense not enough to secure first ACC win Volleyball drops two home matches

Saturday in Tallahassee, the Wolfpack rolled up 538 yards of total offense and 42 points in a losing effort, falling to the Seminoles 4542. The defense surrendered 555 yards and 45 points, and State lost for the fourth week in a row despite a 349 passing yards and a career high five-touchdown effort by redshirt sophomore quarterback Russell Wilson. The Pack fell after taking its first lead of the game at 42-38 on redshirt junior wide receiver Jarvis Williams’ five-yard touchdown catch with 3:50 left. Williams had a career game catching three touchdown passes. The Noles responded with a 66-yard drive that gave them back the lead at 45-42 with 1:36 remaining in regulation. With two timeouts and more than a minute on the clock, the offense seemed to have a good chance to tie the game. Overtime looked even more likely, after Wil-

Source: N.C. State Athletics

Homecoming game time set The Pack will once again be playing during the day this weekend when it takes on the Maryland Terrapins. The game time is set for 1 p.m. and will be televised on ESPN360.com. Source: N.C. State Athletics

athletic schedule

November 2009 Su

M

W

Th

F

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

Football vs. FLORIDA STATE

Staff Report

The volleyball team lost two matches at home over the weekend. The Pack dropped its first match of the weekend to Clemson, then lost to Georgia Tech Saturday night. The team failed to win a set in either match, losing both matches 3-0.

T

By the numbers:

Offensive dominance offset by balanced Florida State attack

Sa

Today Women’s Basketball vs. North Greenville (Exh.) Reynolds Coliseum, 7 p.m. Tuesday Men’s Soccer vs. Presbyterian Dail Soccer Field, 7 p.m. Volleyball at North Carolina Chapel Hill, 7 p.m.

Saturday Rifle at SEARC #4 Dahlonega, Ga., all day Women’s Tennis at University of North Carolina Invitational, Day Two Chapel Hill, all day

James Woodward Chancellor

Standings

51

first-downs for both teams

combined point total for both teams

son and the offense moved the ball to the Florida State 43 with 31 seconds left. Needing just 18 yards to be in position for redshirt junior kicker Josh Czajkowski to attempt to tie his career-best 42-yard field goal, the offense imploded. Heav y pressure forced a screen pass to redshirt junior Jamelle Eugene, who was thrown for a loss of one yard. After the final timeout stopped the clock following Eugene’s catch in his own backfield, the game was all but sealed on a sack by Mister Alexander on the next play, second and 11 from the Seminole 44-yardline.

Jonathan Stephens/Technician file photo

Justin Byers, redshirt sophomore and safety, runs the ball against Gardner-Webb, Sept. 19.

The sack put Wilson and the offense in desperation mode for the game’s final play. Facing fourth and 17 from midfield with five seconds left, Florida State intercepted the Hail Mary pass to end the shootout. The defense struggled three weeks ago in the conference opener against Wake Forest and has not improved in the subsequent weeks, giving up

an average of 44 points a game in conference play. In its most recent debacle, it allowed FSU to gain 278 yards rushing on just 33 carries. The defense not only allowed 8.4 yards per carry on the ground, it also gave up 277 yards passing to Seminole quarterback Christian Ponder. With four games to go, for the second year in a row, N.C. State is 0-4 in the ACC. The

possibility of bowl eligibility remains, but the team will have to win all four of its final games to go to a bowl game for the second year in a row. With all but one of the four remaining games to be played at CarterFinley, the Pack will have the opportunity to do so in front of its home fans.

Pack upset by Clemson

The men’s cross-country team won the ACC championship this weekend as it edged two-time defending champion Virginia. The event was an 8K race held at Wake Med Soccer and Cross Country Complex. The Pack had six runners in the top 23, including senior John Martinez and sophomore Ryan Hill, who placed third and forth overall. The Pack credits its win to the fact it ran the race it wanted and executed the strategy for the race to perfection. “We were the better team yesterday. I think we ran and executed the race strategy perfectly,” Martinez said. “We capitalized on Virginia’s errors and I think

Volleyball vs. Virginia Tech Reynolds Coliseum, 7 p.m.

total yards for both teams

Pack races to ACC Championship Deputy Sports Editor

Friday Women’s Tennis at University of North Carolina Invitational, Day One Chapel Hill, all day

1,093 87

MEN’S SOCCER

Taylor Barbour

Men’s Basketball vs. St. Paul’s College (Exh.) Reynolds Coliseum, 7 p.m.

Smallest attendance at Doak Campbell Stadium in 16 years

CROSS COUNTRY

Team beats out Virginia to take title

Thursday Women’s Tennis at ITA National Indoor Championships New Haven, Conn., all day

67,712

2nd 61-29

Lee Fowler

Athletics Director

1st 62-28

Frustration boils over in 1-0 State loss Ely Yarbrough

we just ran a better race.” Martinez, Hill and redshirtfreshman Patrick Campbell, who finished eighth, all earned All-ACC honors by finishing in the top 14. “It is great. It was one of my goals at the beginning of the year to get All-ACC,” Campbell said. “I also set goals for my entire career here and one of the things I wanted to achieve was multiple times being AllConference in cross country. So it was great to start off my freshman year running well.” The race went exactly as the Pack planned with Virginia taking an early lead at the beginning of the race. But with just half of a mile left, it was a four-man race with two Virginia runners and two Pack runners, Martinez and Hill. “The race started pretty much how we expected it to start. Virginia took off and that was what we were anticipating,” Martinez said. “We ended up

The visiting Clemson Tigers upset the Wolfpack by means of a late goal this weekend, 1-0. The No. 13 ranked Pack was unable to manage a score and the Tigers capitalized on a rebound to score the game’s only goal. Missed opportunities plagued both the Pack (114-1, 2-4-1 ACC) and the Clemson Tigers (4-10-1, 2-5 ACC) but the Tigers came away with the victory. “We had our opportunities and sometimes we didn’t settle. We rushed shots,” junior midfielder Chris Zuerner said. The play in the second half took on a much more physical style with both coaches getting upset at the referees for missing calls. The frustration peaked in

XC continued page 7

SOCCER continued page 7

Debra Morgan WRAL anchor

T-3rd 60-30

Taylor Seaman Varsity gymnast

Staff Writer

Jim Ceresnak Student Body President

T-3rd 60-30

10th 51-39

Demi Olubanwo Nubian Message Editor

T-8th 53-37

Andy Musselman/Technician

Redshirt sophomore Kris Byrd looks for a teammate to pass the ball off to during Friday’s game against Clemson at Dail Soccer Field. The Pack was defeated by the Tigers 1-0.

Ty Johnson

Kate Shefte

7th 56-34

5th 58-32

Technician Editor

Sports Editor

Tyler Everett

Deputy Sports Editor

Jen Hankin

Deputy Sports Editor

T-8th

6th 57-33

53-37

N.C. State @ Florida State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

Florida State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

App State @ Furman

App State

App State

App State

App State

Furman

App State

App State

App State

App State

App State Texas

3 Texas @ 14 Oklahoma State 5 USC @ 10 Oregon

Texas

Texas

Texas

Texas

Texas

Oklahoma State

Texas

Texas

Texas

Oregon

USC

USC

USC

USC

USC

USC

Oregon

USC

USC

Miami

Miami

Miami

Miami

Wake Forest

Miami

Miami

Miami

Miami

Miami

19 Miami @ Wake Forest Duke @ Virginia 22 South Carolina @ Tennessee 25 Mississippi @ Auburn North Carolina @ Virginia Tech

Duke

Virginia

Duke

Virginia

Duke

Virginia

Duke

Duke

Duke

Duke

Tennessee

Tennessee

South Carolina

Tennessee

Tennessee

Tennessee

Tennessee

Tennessee

Tennessee

South Carolina

Mississippi

Mississippi

Mississippi

Auburn

Mississippi

Mississippi

Auburn

Auburn

Mississippi

Mississippi

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Cal

Cal

Cal

Cal

Arizona State

Cal

Cal

Cal

Arizona State

Cal

24 Cal @ Arizona State

Football Specials

CAMERON -BAR & GRILL-

Saturday, Sunday, & Monday:

2108 CLARK AVE. RALEIGH, NC 919.755.2231

$2 Drafts & 1/2 Price Appetizers

www.cameronbargrill.com

EAT. DRINK.. RELAX.

Join Us for Brunch Saturday & Sunday 11:00am - 3:00pm

Bring this coupon in to receive $10 off when you spend $25 or more (only on food)


Technician - November 2, 2009  

Hillsborough Hike boosts local businesses, Another Talley fleecing, Some students resort to pill-popping, Offense not enough to secure first...

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you