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TECHNICIAN

friday february

7

2014

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Rhodes Scholar speaks at N.C. State Vishwas Rao Correspondent

Mary Hale Tolar, a Rhodes and Truman Scholar and director of Kansas State University’s School of Leadership Studies, spoke to N.C. State students today regarding authentic and ethical leadership. Rhodes Scholarships are offered to postgraduate students from around the world. If awarded, the student will be given the chance to study at the University of Oxford in England. To date, no N.C. State student has ever been named a Rhodes Scholar, which makes this lecture a rare opportunity for students to learn from one. Tolar concentrated on one main idea throughout her lecture, which was a unique approach towards leadership—what she called authentic leadership. “It’s about one’s values and one’s purpose, and it’s also about a narrative,” Tolar said. Tolar said leaders should be able to confidently share genuine stories about themselves. She said genuine narratives are an act of leadership that give purpose and influences others. A story can be a good indication of someone’s values. “Sometimes it’s hard to be true to yourself when you haven’t really figured out who yourself is, but you have dig deep and follow your inner purpose and stick to it,”

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CHRIS RUPERT/TECHNICIAN

Harriet Washington, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award and author of the Medical Apartheid and Deadly Monopolies, signs books Thursday in the Washington Sankofa Room of the Witherspoon Student Center.

Author discusses history and medical injustices of slavery Mona Bazzaaz Staff Writer

Medical ethicist and author Harriet Washington spoke on Thursday about the unjust medical treatment slaves received in the past. The presentation, which was part of the Lawrence M. Clark Lecture Series, was held in the Witherspoon Student Center and packed the Washington Sankofa Room to the brim. Washington travels internationally to universities and conferences to speak.

She said it was gratifying for her that so many people came to the lecture and that her work has meant something to them. “I have spoken in this area twice before,” Washington said. “I like the people here, and I am very moved by the fact that this area has such a rich history in terms of medicine. I feel as though the people here deeply understand things that have happened in the past and the livery of healthcare today.” Washington spent most of her lecture speaking about the medical history revolving around

slavery, and spent some time answering questions as well. During her lecture, Washington said the way that female African American slaves were treated was immoral. She said enslaved women were constantly being used as test subjects for procedures because they were not allowed to say no. According to Washington, white physicians did not need the consent of African American women in order to conduct surgery on them and would

TALK continued page 2

Moodle usage increases regardless of complaints Katherine Kehoe Staff Writer

Despite persisting complaints leveled against Moodle by several professors, usage reports show an increase in the number of faculty members using the learning management system, which will eventually completely replace its outdated counterpart, Wolfware Classic. According to usage reports from Distance Education and Learning Technology Applications, N.C. State’s company for creating and administering learning technologies, 2,866 course sections used Moodle in the spring of 2012. For the spring of 2014, the number has risen to 3,566 course sections. A professor still has the option to use Wolfware Classic, the software that was used prior to Moodle, if he or she prefers. However, the number of sections taught by professors using Wolfware Classic has also declined since 2012. In two years, the total number of class sections still using Wolfware Classic has dropped from 1,332 to 1,131. So what exactly is it about Moodle that always seems to spark complaints from some professors? “The problem with Moodle is that it has so many features that are complicated for the instructors to use,” said Bob Larson, a communication lecturer. “A lot of us don’t run our classes that way and don’t need all of those things.” For Larson, however, the thought of using Moodle isn’t entirely dismal. Moodle has gotten much easier to use since it was first implemented, Larson said, but he also said he wished a simpler version of the program would be made available for professors who are less techno-

logically literate. “I would like to see them come up with a Moodle lite, or something like that,” Larson said. Fortunately, for Larson and anybody else who dreams of a more user-friendly Moodle, DELTA, a division of the Office of the Provost whose stated goal is to “foster the integration and support of learning technologies in NC State’s academic programs,” is working to bring these dreams to fruition. According to Martin Dulberg, senior coordinator for DELTA, the division is currently fielding suggestions regarding how to make Moodle more user friendly. Any student or faculty member who would like to submit a suggestion pertaining to Moodle can do so via the WolfWare home page. However, though Larson’s “Moodle lite” may seem only a suggestion away, submitting a request doesn’t necessarily mean DELTA will make it happen, Dulberg said. “We have about 270 [requests] in the system, and there are about 120 that are being worked on right now,” Dulberg said. “There were about 49 that we just said ‘no were not doing it.’” Cyber suggestion box and “Moodle lite” aside, the increasing complexity of software will inevitably confuse some professors, Dulberg said. “If you look at my bookshelf, I have a lot of books on usability, and that’s what my degree is in,” Dulberg said. “I am very mindful of how hard or easy it is to use something. The most we can do is try to make the best tools that

MOODLE continued page 2

ARCHIVE/TECHNICIAN

Kate VanVorst, a senior in parks, recreation and tourism management, raffles off a PBR hat at Double Barrel Benefit on Feb. 2, 2013. The two-night concert raised money for N.C. State’s radio station WKNC.

Double Barrel begins tonight at Cat’s Cradle Staff Report

The Double Barrel Benefit concert, hosted by 88.1 WKNC, is beginning its two-date festival tonight at the Cat’s Cradle in Carrboro and will continuing Feb. 14 at the Lincoln Theatre in Raleigh. It will be the 11th annual DBB, and this year it will be bigger than ever. For one thing, this will be the first year DBB will be taking place in more than one place, as it previously had just took place at one venue in Raleigh. According to Michael D’Argenio, program director at WKNC, the station is heard throughout the Triangle, and having shows in both Carrboro and Raleigh will allow more of its audience to be reached. Additionally, both the Cat’s Cradle and the Lincoln Theatre offer significantly more seating than the previous venue, which will help bring more money to the station and replace the need to go out and ask for private donations,

D’Argenio said. “It will help keep the station upand-running and help us keep doing all of the things we want to do,” D’Argenio said. The two dates will feature a total of eight bands. The Love Language, Hammer No More the Fingers, T0W3RS and Ghostt Bllonde will be performing tonight. Mount Moriah, Bombadil, Loamlands and Daniel Bachman will be the performing at Lincoln Theatre for the second show. “It’s crazy to have both The Love Language and Mount Moriah this year,” Walt Lilly, production manager and co-creator of “The Lounge” video series, said in a press release. “These are two incredible acts that have a national presence while staying rooted in the Triangle, and we are glad to have their homecoming at Double Barrel.” D’Argenio said both The Love Language and Mount Moriah are part of Merge Records, which is a nationally renowned record label

based in Durham. He said supporting labels and musicians from around the Triangle has always been important to the station. “Supporting local music has always been a staple of WKNC,” D’Argenio said. “We not only consistently DJ local music, but we also hold local concerts such as our annual festival Double Barrel Benefit, our on-campus concert series Fridays on the Lawn and our weekly Local Band-Local Beer concert.” D’Argenio said those working at WKNC believe the Triangle has a lot of very talented musicians that need to be showcased. “We want to bring the community together to help show the world what North Carolina has to offer,” D’Argenio said. All proceeds from ticket sales will benefit WKNC. Both shows will begin at 9 p.m., with the doors opening at 8. Tickets may be purchased for $12 or $14 at the door. Additionally, two-night passes may be purchased for $22.


News

PAGE 2 •FRIDAY, FEB. 7, 2014

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

TECHNICIAN POLICE BLOTTER

THROUGH VICTORIA’S LENS

February 5 2:12 A.M. | SUSPICIOUS PERSON Dan Allen Deck Report of suspicious subject. Officer located employee picking up trash in deck.

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Mark Herring at editor@ technicianonline.com

February 5 7:30 A.M. | HAZMAT INCIDENT Biltmore Hall Lot Report of strong odor of gasoline. Further investigation showed odor was coming from truck and it was determined to be transmission fluid.

WEATHERWISE Today:

9:50 P.M. | ASSIST OTHER AGENCY Wolf Ridge RPD requested assistance serving arrest warrant for Violation of Domestic Violence Protection Order on staff member. Subject was located and arrested. NCSU PD issued trespass warning. Personnel notified.

54/35 Partly Cloudy

Saturday:

49 35

Taking a stamp for injustice PHOTO BY VICTORIA CROCKER

T

he USA Network launched a “I won’t stand for..” college bus tour as part of their year-long ‘Characters Unite’ campaign. They’re visiting seven university campuses and asking the public to “take a stance for an injustice that they won’t stand for,” states Gina Stefani, a tour producer. “It’s just brining an awareness to the causes and the issues in today’s society.” Students had the opportunity to get their photo taken and make a customized t-shirt stating what they refuse to stand for in the Brickyard, Thursday.

Showers

SOURCE: WWW.WEATHER.COM

TALK

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women in order to conduct surgery on them and would therefore do so whenever they pleased. Washington reiterated how unjust and unethical this system was and how crucial it is for people today to be aware of what has happened. “It’s really important that people know about these issues because science and medicine are predicated on facts,” Washington said. “For too long, a lot of historical facts have been either hidden or neglected and that makes it impossible to understand the things that have transpired today.” Washington said understanding the history of the nation helps to explain the reasons for healthcare disparities today and not looking into the past “is like trying to treat a patient without taking a medical history of them.” She went into detail about how economics played an important role in the conf licts between physicians from different races. For example, she said white physicians who felt threatened by African American doctors would take them to trial if one of their patients passed away during a procedure. If the African American physicians did not have a white person to testify for them, then they could end up being sentenced to death. Tova Williams, a senior in polymer and color chemistry, was part of the audience Thursday evening. “I came to this event because I love to support the African American Cultural Center and learn more about my history,” Williams said. Williams heard about the event through the AACC event flyer. “I think it is very important that people are educated on this sort of medical history in order to prevent it from happening to groups of people in the future,” Williams said.

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Chancellor’s Residence, Open until May 23rd POOLE COLLEGE SPRING CAREER-INTERSHIP FAIR 10 A.M. to 3 P.M.

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MOODLE

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is try to make the best tools that we can, and it is up to the instructor to decide how they want to use it, if they want to use it. We can’t appeal to the lowest common denominator.” This, however, is not to say that programs, such as Moodle, are impossible to master, Dulberg said. In fact, DELTA offers workshops, seminars, online tu-

FRESHMAN HONORS CONVOCATION Witherspoon Cinema, 4:30 P.M. to 7 P.M.

Saturday KRISPY KREME CHALLENGE Belltower, 8:30 A.M. to 10:30 P.M. MOVIE: DON JON Witherspoon Cinema, 10 P.M. to 11:30 P.M.

9 P.M. to 10 P.M. Tuesday GLM INFORMATION SESSION College of Textiles 5 P.M. to 6 P.M.

MOVIE: DON JON 9:45 P.M. to 11:15 P.M.

Wednesday FOOLING THE NINE BILLION:WHY WE NEED GOOD FOOD, NOT MORE FOOD, & THE ROLE OF LAND GRANT UNIVERSITIES University Club 3:30 P.M. to 4:30 P.M.

MOVIE: CAPTAIN PHILLIPS Witherspoon Cinema, 9 P.M. to 11:15 P.M.

Monday BLACK HISTORY MONTH WEST AFRICAN DANCE SERIES Carmichael Recreation Center 1st Floor

Thursday CHICAGO Thompson Hall - Titmus Theatre 7:30 P.M.

torials and custom trainings to help faculty members get comfortable using Moodle and all of its features, according to Dulberg. “We will come to a faculty member’s house and teach them exactly how to do whatever it is they personally need to be able to do on Moodle if they request it,” Dulberg said. For some faculty members, however, the mystery that is Moodle is not so easily solved, and while DELTA is working to change this, Dulberg said there is much to be done. “I’m not going to lie to you

and tell you that [Moodle] is all easy peasy to figure out,” Dulberg said. “The grade book is particularly challenging. It’s been something on our list to do for a while now. It’s a huge undertaking, but at some point in time we are going to make that easier.” In the meantime, some professors, such as Tracy Appling, an external relations director teaching assistant professor of public and international affairs, have taken to using Wolfware Classic’s grade book instead. Appling said she didn’t

have any complaints about Moodle. However, she did say Wolfware Classic’s grade book was much easier to use. Dulberg confirmed Appling’s observation, noting that Wolfware Classic’s grade book is very simple and similar to an Excel spreadsheet. Though Moodle still has a thing or two to learn from its predecessor, Wolfware Classic won’t be around forever. In fact, its imminent demise, though a ways off, is already in motion, Dulberg said. “There are certain features in Wolfware Classic that we

MOVIE: DON JON Witherspoon Cinema, 7 P.M. to 8:30 P.M.

Sunday MOVIE: CAPTAIN PHILLIPS 7 P.M. to 9:15 P.M.

12:33 P.M. | DAMAGE TO PROPERTY Jordan Hall Report of damage to water fountain caused by student kicking fountain. Student was located and referred for Damage to Property. 6:34 P.M. | DRUG VIOLATION Tucker Beach Report of two subjects smoking marijuana. Officer did not locate anyone. 8:02 P.M. | ASSIST OTHER AGENCY Off Campus Student was referred after being arrested by RPD for maintaining a dwelling to sell narcotics from off campus address. 9:35 P.M. | DRUG VIOLATION Wood Hall Report of possible drug violation. Officer did not detect odor of marijuana, however, two students were located and referred for underage possession of alcohol.

need to duplicate in Moodle before it will be going away,” Dulberg said. “After that we will give people two years to migrate their stuff, so it’s at least two and a half years away.” Though some teachers may be unhappy that Moodle will inevitability be a part of their future, Larson said it is important to recognize that it is still doing its job. Despite the fact that he doesn’t like the program, Larson said he has never heard students having any problems with it.

RHODES

continued from page 1

inner purpose and stick to it,” said Karli Moore, a sophomore in chemistry. Tolar also talked about the importance of leading ethically and how someone should act according to his or her values. She said differences arise because of differing values, which ultimately form the basis of many political and social debates. “To lead ethically requires decisions and actions in response to the world,” Tolar said. “It requires an energetic self-reflection and selfawareness of being part of larger community…resolving dilemmas takes action and requires making a decision.” Tolar also talked about the role of a college education and how it contributes to the development of an authentic leader. “The college career is about learning, growing… and discovering your purpose,” Tolar said. “The curriculum is designed intentionally to help you through that process…

CAIDE WOOTEN/TECHNICIAN

Mary Tolar, Rhodes Scholar, Truman Scholar, and current Director of the School of Leadership Studies at Kansas State University, speaks to students and faculty in Daniels Hall Thursday. Tolar facilitated a discussion about making authentic and ethical decisions as a leader in today’s society.

and your professors, club advisors, academic advisors, administrators, staff, etc. all take it as their charge to help you through that process.” During her lecture, Tolar talked about what competition creates in a society. “I was very fond of the ideas about competition,” Moore

said. “It’s something I’ve been pondering here at N.C. State and how we can best serve our world.” Tolar said a benefit of competition is that it raises aspirations and dedication. However, she said it can also, unfortunately, become more about the competition itself

rather than the end purpose. “If you lose sight about the opportunity, you might lose the whole trophy thing and pay the price,” Tolar said. Colt Bradley, a freshman in physics, said he thought the lecture very interesting. “I found it very insightful,” Bradly said. “I especial-

ly liked the idea of having a story, having something you stand for. It comes from values and from purpose, and I think it’s really important to have that direction and it really shows when you have those opportunities.”


TECHNICIAN

News

FRIDAY, FEB. 7, 2014 • PAGE 3

DOUBLE BARREL BENEFIT 11


Opinion

PAGE 4 • FRIDAY, FEB. 7, 2014

TECHNICIAN

What the creation debate says about science I

’ll cut to the chase. I’m issuing an invitation to anyone interested in having an open conversation about the communication gap between the scientific community and the general SAM LOOMIS public : what its Guest Columnist roots are and how we can fix it. This conversation will take place in the Brickyard at 1 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 9, and all are welcome, regardless of belief. The following article explains my motivation for this discussion. On Tuesday night, thousands tuned in to watch a live debate between AIG director Ken Ham and science communicator Bill Nye about the validity of creationism as a scientific model. Though many were entertained by the spectacle, all came away with the same realization: Nothing is different. So why does this issue matter? The endless back-and-forth argument about human origins was temporarily revived last semester when a group of creation scientists came to the Brickyard to present

their views. The campus reaction was widely polarized. The primary reaction was well represented by Technician Staff Columnist Tim Gorski’s column, “Creation ‘scientists,’ get off campus!” As Gorski notes, a college is a place of science. When it comes to evolution, the scientific consensus is clear: Darwin’s theory of evolution is simply the best fit to the data we have. The figure Gorski quotes from Brian Alters is that 99.9 percent of scientists believe in evolution; the Pew Research Center reported a more modest but still overwhelming 97 percent in 2009. With this level of scientific consensus, it seems that the argument is irrelevant. And yet, that same PRC poll reported only 32 percent of the general public believes evolution is “due to natural processes such as natural selection.” A Gallup poll in 2012 placed the percentage of creationists in America at 46 percent. This number has hardly changed in the past 30 years, during the peak of the “culture wars.” What’s the deal?

It’s typical for scientists to use this as a warning sign for the United States’ scientific literacy, but I want to posit another explanation. As noted in Michael Berkman and Eric Plutzer’s book, Evolution, Creationism, and the Battle to Control America’s Classrooms, only 52 percent of Americans are aware that there is a scientific consensus. It is no wonder that so many choose to believe in creationism: They truly believe that scientists are undecided. Therefore, though there may be an overwhelming consensus within the scientific community, that consensus has completely failed to permeate into the general public, despite all the best efforts of science communicators. Unfortunately, most supporters of evolution seem unaware of this extreme divide. Often they will marginalize the creationists they argue against, as Nye did occasionally—perhaps unintentionally—in Tuesday’s debate. We cannot marginalize creationists. They comprise almost half of our nation. There are creationists

teaching in schools, working in various fields of scientific research and serving in public office. They matter, and their minds cannot be changed by pretending that they are irrelevant. Creationists and evolutionists are partners in education, in business, in charity and in government. And creationists can be just as intelligent as evolutionists: I say this as a person who was raised in a primarily creationist community. Gorski said one rarely sees scientists going out, spreading their message—why not? I claim that scientists can take more of a responsibility of actively inviting creationists into discussion. How often does one see a safe environment for creationists to pose their questions without the threat of being mistaken as “uneducated?” The ultimate purpose of a university is for education; we ought to facilitate, rather than marginalize, discussion of these issues at N.C. State. Therefore, I would like to invite anyone interested to join me in the Brickyard on Sunday, Feb. 9, at

1 p.m., for a conversation on how to bridge the communication gap. Everyone is invited: creationists, evolutionists and anyone undecided. Come with questions, as well as answers to questions you may be asked. I only ask that you do not come if you don’t think there is any way your perspectives might shift. The reason why creationist scientists and evangelicals come to the Brickyard is simple. As the Christmas story goes, when Jesus was born, an angel appeared to nearby shepherds, saying, “Do not fear. I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people.” For 2,000 years since, this has been the basis of evangelical ministry: that the Gospel is meant for the entire world. Science tells us, ultimately, that we don’t need to accept what we’re told. You don’t have to be afraid to question things: All who seek the truth with honesty and integrity will ultimately find it. That’s good news, if I ever heard it—it is certainly good news for all people.

Raising the minimum wage is good for business I

n his 2013 State of the Union Address, President Barack Obama urged Congress to raise the minimum wage from $7.25 to $9.00 an hour. Unsurprisingly, the most unproductive Congress in history responded with a collective yawn. Letting the United States government shut down for half a month was apparently more important to legislators than repairing the ailing economy. So it was all the more interesting when, in this year’s State of the Union, the president didn’t just double down on the minimum wage, he raised the stakes. Thanks to Obama, federal contract workers got a raise, a minimum wage of $10.10. That position is worth applaud i ng. T he president should do more to cut through the false hype against a living wage. Obama has repeatedly invoked Henry Ford to back up his claim. Ford knew he had to pay his workers a wage that allowed them to afford the product they were making. That’s more than just rhetoric— Ford’s strategy makes for sound economic policy. A person making the minimum wage in the U.S. right now earns slightly more than $15,000 a year, before any tax payments. After taxes, that person still makes an income near $14,500, subtracting local and state taxes and adding back in likely refunds and benefits. If this person pays $700 a month in rent, he or she is down to $6,100 to feed his or her family, pay the bills, maintain transportation, etc. For perspective, consider that the median rent in Raleigh in 2011 was more than $830. Conservatives usually offer a pro-business rebuttal to an increase. If the government forces businesses to pay their

Wes Kyatt

employees Guest Columnist more, conservatives say that will lead managers to cut positions and maintain profit margins. This approach is overly simplistic, and upon scrutiny, the position collapses. It may seem like an increase in the minimum wage cuts into profit margins of businesses, but adherents ignore that consumption drives growth. After the wage increase, minimum wage workers can suddenly afford to buy new clothes, better food and rent better homes. This happens because the poorest members of society almost have to spend their money, because they can’t

“7.25 may be good for greed, but a livable wage— that’s good for business.” afford to save. If the most disadvantaged had money to save, poverty would disappear, a fact conservatives discount in every possible policy debate. The added spending goes back into retail stores, grocers, restaurants, gas stations, property managers—the people who employ minimum-wage workers. To argue that raising the minimum wage would slice up profit margins is absurd. What’s equally absurd are reports from The New York Times that a Domino’s Pizza in New York was requiring immigrant workers to clock in 60 hour weeks while receiving just 45 hours of pay. This astonishing malpractice was

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ongoing, but the employees claim they were afraid to give up their jobs, as it is difficult to find steady employment these days while simultaneously supporting a family. According to one worker, management told him this practice was necessary for managers to receive bonuses—maybe that’s the same kind of employer opposed to raising the minimum wage. It’s common knowledge that such odious practices occur nationwide. CBS reported 100 workers in 20 cities nationwide participated in a strike on Dec. 5. The Domino’s in question fired 20 striking workers that day. Practicality is the father of good policy, and practical thinking about economics and morality clearly indicates a minimum wage increase is necessary in 2014. If conservatives wish to oppose a livable income, that’s their prerogative. However, putting their claims about harmful economic consequences to scrutiny is like shattering a glass house. The real reason conservative interests are opposed to the increase is because of human greed, not economics—the president needs to make that clearer in his rhetoric. Henry Ford didn’t raise his wages because of philanthropy. In 1913 Ford hired 52,000 to maintain a workforce of 14,000. The next year he started paying linemen $5 a day so that the lowest ranking worker could afford a Model-T. Thousands surged into Detroit in 1914, giving rise to the legendary Motor City boom. $7.25 may be good for greed, but a livable wage— that’s good for business.

James Knight, freshman in computer science

‘America the Beautiful’ (and diverse) W

ith all the recent propaganda created to inspire acceptance and openmindedness of others unlike ourselves, it is boggling the arguments people have come up with in protest to the Coca-Cola ad that aired during Super Bowl XLVIII, concerning the singing of “America the Beautiful” in a number of languages that were not English. The Super Bowl is the most-watched sporting event in the United States. It is so big, in fact, that there Richard Fenimore is a petition to make it a national holiday. Guest Columnist With it being so popular and publicized, it is no wonder advertisers and commercial companies put so much into commercials and ads. More potential viewers nationwide will come in contact with these ads than any other day of the year, so no doubt you are more than likely familiar with the ad in question. What has irritated Internet users all across the country seems to be that there is something profoundly un-American in having the song performed in a variety of languages—an abomination to “America the Beautiful.” I hope you see the irony in that statement. I like to think that this is a minority of the population that is as inversely small as it is boisterous and that a majority of people don’t agree with the sentiment that being American means to speak a certain language. The counter-argument is that the U.S. is founded on a basis of immigration. The fact that it can be sung in a number of languages is a tribute to our national heritage. A reporter for the New York Daily News cautions against the idea of multiculturalism, using Europe as an example of where identity was necessary. Granted, the dynamics between

“The fact that it can be sung in a number of languages is a tribute to our national heritage.” the countries of Europe and those of North America are in no way identical, but it is a point to consider. Still, it makes as much sense to argue against the ad as it does to argue against gay marriage, which, for all intents and purposes, should just be called marriage. The differences today will be considered as ridiculous one day in the future as protesting desegregation was in the 1950s. English is not the national language of the U.S.; it is the common language, and to pick on those who choose not to speak it is ignorant. I, in no way, support not learning English, if not for anything other than to simplify one’s own life, but in the same way, the rest of us should not be averse to learning the languages of others. It is haughty to consider one direction and not the reciprocal. Personally, I picture Coca-Cola executives wiping their tears with $100 bills, because, let’s be honest, a corporation like that doesn’t have anything to worry about when it comes to our opinion of their commercial. If anything, the company gained even more brand recognition being the only soft drink company in the media at the moment. The fact that it gets under anyone’s skin proves a company’s ability to influence opinions of the masses. Does it really bother people if another person chooses not to speak the same language as them? Or is it the influence of the masses that directs their mood and opinion?

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The Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on theTechnician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2014 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features

TECHNICIAN

FRIDAY, FEB. -7, 2014 • PAGE 5

Doughnut athletes train for glory for Saturday Taylor Quinn Assistant Features Editor

For this challenge, it takes guts to get the glory… literally. Competitors usually spill their guts at the finish line – or before, if they didn’t train hard enough. It takes a special kind of athlete to complete this challenge in the allotted time, but if you do it, the victory is sweet – almost as sweet as the Krispy Kreme doughnuts one has to down in order to acquire this critically acclaimed honor. Twelve doughnuts. Sixty minutes. Five miles. These statistics make up what is called the ‘Krispy Kreme Challenge’ that is coming to N.C. State Saturday morning. In the midst of this challenge, a group of competitors were born. They go by the name, “The Cast of Wicked,” and claim they have been training hard for a few weeks and are ready for the Krispy Kreme challenge. The Cast of Wicked is made up of four young men: Andy Masten, a sophomore in textile technology management, Peter Sherk, a freshman in psychology, Paul McNeely a freshman in first year engineering and Alex Smith a freshman in physics. I wanted to get inside the minds of these disciplined athletes, so I asked them the tough questions – and they answered to the best of their ability, just like the amount of effort they will exert Saturday morning. How long have you guys been training? Masten: We have been training as a group for three to four weeks. McNeely: Pretty much since we got back from winter break. Sherk: We’ve been on very high calorie diets with very long runs. What has your daily regimen been? Masten: Well, most days we just do a few mile runs, but for the past week we have been eating a dozen doughnuts before our runs – and Peter has thrown up after every single run we have done. McNeely: Even after the ones when we didn’t eat doughnuts before. Sherk: It’s true. How do you think your preparation will help you come Saturday? Sherk: Well, we are probably going to get first place. McNeely: Um, we can eat doughnuts really fast now. Sherk: Yeah, like, even if we don’t win, it’s about the fun of the competition. Masten: And also how fast we can eat our doughnuts. McNeely: Yeah, I’ve got-

ten much faster with eating doughnuts, but I haven’t really improved my running that much. Sherk: How fast we can eat the doughnuts is really the main challenge between us and not puking. Masten: Puke-ers are disqualified on our rules. Do you all like Krispy Kreme doughnuts? Masten: I’m sick of them. Sherk: I love Krispy Kreme! They’re my favorite brand. Ma s ten : E xc e pt t he y gypped us on pirate day! Sherk: So, a few months back, Krispy Kreme was doing this thing where if you dress up like a pirate, you get a dozen doughnuts for free. So, we all go as pirates, and as you know we are college kids so we don’t really have costumes, so we improvised. They said we aren’t good enough. Smith: They said we needed to buy our costumes. McNeely: Yeah, like why were we going to buy costumes for free doughnuts? So, is this training to get back at them? McNeely: Yes, this is all because of revenge. Masten: I’m going to eat all of their doughnuts, and then puke all over the desk. McNeely: Yeah, that money is for children, not for Krispy Kreme. But, I still love Krispy Kreme – it’s really not a revenge run. Do you think you will like Krispy Kreme doughnuts after Saturday? McNeely: I will love them even more. Masten: Not for at least a week. McNeely: Yeah now that I think about it, we might have to go Dunkin’. Did any of you do this last year? Masten: Yes, I did. The rest of us are freshies. How did it go for you? Masten: Good, I did it in under an hour and I’m proud to say that I didn’t throw up. I jumped over the lake of vomit at the finish line. Smith: That’s disgusting. Ugh, the sounds really disgusting. Are you going to eat anything on race day? Masten: Maybe a granola bar. McNeely: Peter is going to drink some milk. We are going to drink water. Okay, so do you think you guys will finish under an hour? Sherk: I am not Hussein Bolt, I am Peter Dafoe Sherk from North Carolina, have high blood cholesterol and my doctor told me to ‘lay off taco bell.’ So this is probably not something my doctor

TAYLOR QUINN/TECHNICIAN

[From left to right] Peter Sherk, Alex Smith, Andy Masten and Paul McNeely from, “The Cast of the Wicked,” practice eating doughnuts as fast as they can for their intense training for the Krispy Kreme Challenge on Saturday morning.

ARCHIVE/TECHNICIAN

Miko Clark of Charlottesville, VA was the first runner to recieve his doughnuts during the Krispy Kreme Challenge Feb. 9, 2013. Clark would go on to finish third in the race.

would recommend for me to do, but it’s for the children. That’s all I got to say about that. McNeely: Oh, absolutely not. There is no way that I can do it in under an hour unless I can eat doughnuts faster than I can breathe. Masten: I have a chance! Is there a reason for the short shorts? Masten: Well long shorts chafe. Sherk: Yeah, long story short, that’s what they do. Masten: But with that aside, we want everyone to know how serious we are about this and that we are here to win. McNeely: Also skies out, thighs out. Sherk: Also to tell kids that obesity is wrong. McNeely: To show them what happens. Masten: And to promote good body images. McNeely: Pale thighs. What will you guys be wearing on race day?

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY CAIDE WOOTEN/TECHNICIAN

The tenth annual Krispy Kreme Challenge begins Saturday at 8:30a.m., and student competitors like Sam Richards, a junior in criminology and history, are making their final preparations. “I’m excited to finally participate in an NCSU tradition. I have the chance to scarf down a dozen doughnuts and help out the N.C. Children’s Hospital; it’s going to be a great day,” said Richards.

Masten: Well, we are getting paint splattered on us Saturday and also wearing short shorts. McNeely: We have like twelve colors, so look out for us.

Is there anything you would like to add? Masten: I’d like to dedicate this run to my mom. I guess the spectators of this challenge Saturday will truly find out if the short-

shorts and weeks of training have paid off for The Cast of Wicked. How many doughnuts will it take to stop this crew? The world may never know.

‘Go Red for Women’ aims for heart disease awareness Sara Awad Staff Writer

N.C. State will make wearing red healthier on Feb. 7 with it’s support of “Go Red for Women,” a campaign sponsored by the American Heart Association. “Go Red for Women” aims to raise awareness about heart disease, which is the leading cause of death among women, more so than any other cancer put together, according to the campaign’s website. Lisa Eberhart, dining and catering operations dietician and a member of the AHA Mission Committee for the Triangle, said that because the University already asks students to wear red on Fridays, it made sense to support the campaign’s message by holding events heart-disease-related events throughout campus on that day as well. WRAL and North Carolina A&T State University will also support the cause.

“A lot of the students probably don’t think about heart disease a lot because it usually affects people in their fifties, sixties, seventies and so forth,” said Michelle Borges, University Dining Nutrition Department Coordinator. “But you can still make a lifestyle change in your twenties to extend into your old age.” Heart disease develops when plaque accumulates in the arteries, thereby restricting blood and oxygen to the heart, according to the AHA. Though men often see the blockage in their coronary arteries, women usually have the disease in tinier arteries, which can cause pain in their jaws and arms instead of the usual chest pain associated with the disease. “Lots of times, women will die from heart disease because they ignore the symptoms, and the symptoms for women are a little bit different from the symptoms for men,” Eberhart said. “For some reason, women are less likely to call an ambulance themselves, so they wait too long, and that’s when they die

of heart disease.” A lot of people also believe breast cancer is the number one killer of women, which “is not even close,” according to Eberhart, who said society needs to recognize the dangers of both of these killers. “People don’t realize how common [heart disease] is among women, and they don’t realize how preventable it is, and they don’t realize they need to be watching for the symptoms in women,” Eberhart said. To reduce your risk of heart disease, the AHA recommends people learn about their family history of the disease, stay physically active, don’t smoke, drink in moderation and eat healthy, balanced meals. To support the campaign, walk through the freshly painted red Free Expression Tunnel and stop by any one of these events or places on campus: “Know Your Numbers” Student Health Services will check your

body mass index, weight circumference and blood pressure in the Recreation Center’s lobby from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., according to Borges. Dining Halls University Dining will highlight hearthealthy menu items to students eating in Clark and Fountain dining halls in addition to offering low-fat, pink ice cream and water with a watermelon twist, Eberhart said. Carmichael Gym Students who wear red to the gym will receive prizes in order to remind them how forty minutes of exercise three to four times a week can reduce their risk of heart disease, Eberhart said. Brickyard University Dining will pass out red apples and give tips about how to be “heart-healthy,” manage stress, work out more and eat better. This will be taking place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., according to Borges.


Features

PAGE 6 •FRIDAY, FEB. 7, 2014

TECHNICIAN

Laughfest Comedy Kickoff presents Raleigh comedians SOURCE: HEAVYHITTERSOFCOMEDY.COM

Katie Sanders Assistant Features Editor

Laughfest Comedy Kickoff wasn’t a large venue, but it was full of artists trying to make it big. The little show, hosted by Burning Coal Theatre Company Saturday, showcased seven Raleigh comedians and a singer, all of whom are working on building their presence in the city. “[Making a career out of comedy] is difficult and it’s up and down,” Joe Perrow, who started performing 11 months ago, said. “You might have a great show one night and then not have a good night the next night. You just got to try to even it out.” However, Perrow said Raleigh was a good place to get started, as there are a lot of open microphones and a supportive community, and he said he’s been able to perform about four nights a week. The comedians at the kickoff began performing for different reasons, but stayed for a love of the genre.

For example, the host of the event, who introduced each of the comedians and told some jokes himself, was Karim Bishop Jarrett, known on stage as Bishop Omega. Jarrett got into comedy because he used to rap, host open mic-nights and introduce other artists. In order to do this, he said, he had to be entertaining and funny. Jarrett said he found it easy to transition into comedy shows, which he loved from day one. He therefore switched art forms, but kept his stage name to make sure he kept his audience. “You can be a 50-year-old comedian, but you cannot be a 50-year old comedy source,” he said. Hardly Worthington, a performer who goes by Hardly Strange, started performing in 2012, but said he has wanted to his whole life. “When I was 13 or 14, I told my parents ‘Hey, I want to be a comedian!’ and they told me to get out of their room, and so that was the end of that,” he said, laughing. “I didn’t circle back around until I was already too old, which is right now.” Josephine Mwamba, who goes

“For me, whether it becomes an ongoing career or not, either way I just want to have fun. I’m okay if I never become an A-list comedian. I can survive with a B.” Rob Wright, comedian

by Jos*E on stage, also said she was born funny and has been performing since 2009. “It makes people feel good, it makes me feel good and I enjoy doing it,” she said. She said she really started to invest her time in comedy about three years ago, however. “I suffered a loss,” Mwamba said. “My mom died in 2011, and so I had to find something to keep the happy going.” Mwamba said she has been working on expanding her fan base by posting clips to Youtube – for instance, she’s currently working on her filmed autobiography, “I am Famous.” In her videos and shows, she usually partners with Rob Wright,

a singer, rapper, promoter and producer who has been a comedian for about three years now. The comedians had a wide array of subject matter to pull from. Mwamba said her dating life was her favorite joke, while Wright loved anything dealing with his family, and most of the comedians said they most often pulled from daily life. “If you get some laughs, you just stick with it. But the majority of [the jokes] come from life experiences,” Mwamba said. “Or other people’s life experiences,” Wright added. When asked where she hoped to go with her comedy, Mwamba said, on stage. The idea that the performers were

telling jokes for personal enjoyment seemed to be the general consensus. “For me, whether it becomes an ongoing career or not, either way I just want to have fun,” Wright said. “I’m okay if I never become an A-list comedian. I can survive with a B.” However, Perrow said he was there to make it big. “Honestly, I hope to be a nationally-known, touring comic, and to go beyond that, to be well-known, respected for my jokes, to be someone that people look to and they are like, yes it’s funny but he’s talking about something that matters, it’s not just sex jokes and fart jokes,” Perrow said. Worthington said he was also planning on making it big, but his plan was to do it by “mostly riding on other people’s coattails.” “I’m going to make sure I stay friends with Joe and Jos*E and Rob, and if they ever blow up then I’ll be like ‘Hey guys, remember me?’” he said. “Someone at this show is definitely going to be famous someday.”

Gregg Museum displays new exhibit that explores Japanese culture Alex Fleming Correspondent

“Remnants of the Floating World: Japanese Art from the Permanent Collection” is the newest exhibit of the Gregg Museum, which had its opening reception Thursday evening. Roger Manley, director of the Gregg Museum, said the museum is like the old tale of the five blind men and the elephant. All five men put their hands on different parts of the elephants and can fully decide what it is they are touching. “That is like the Gregg Museum,” Manley said. “Some people come to our quilt show and think we are museum of quilts, some come to our pottery exhibits and think it is a museum of pottery, but really we are an art museum with diverse exhibits on rotation throughout the year.” “Remnants of the Floating World” showcases a wide variety of Japanese art, dating back to the 1830s and 1840s. When going into the exhibit, one may not have any inclinations of what the exhibit consists of. However, when they leave, they have just experienced a whole new world, and to be exact, a whole new floating world. The ex hibit ta kes the viewer back to a world when Japanese art was mysterious, comical and even sometimes scary.

“It was nothing like they had ever seen before,” Manley said. “This wood block art differed so much from what Italian, French or even Spanish artists were doing.” The term, “floating world,” came from the isolated nation of Japan after exiling all missionaries and then locking the doors, neglecting any outsiders who wanted to enter. By shutting its doors, Japan was in control of any trade, and the city’s industrial growth f lourished. Finally, the United States govern-

“It was nothing like they had ever seen before. This wood block art differed so much from what Italian, French or even Spanish artists were doing.” Roger Manley, director of Gregg Museum

ment threatened Japan to start trading with the rest of the world or they would declare war. “Japan willingly agreed,” stated Manley, “but I don’t really know why. The Japanese

could have easily outnumbered the Americans.” Nevertheless, I for one am glad they did because once trade began, the Japanese then started to deliver this amazing wood work to the Americans and can now be seen in N.C. State’s own Gregg Museum. “29 out of the 60 prints donated by a society in Japan are on display,” Manley said. The artwork and items that decorate the walls of the museum take the viewer back to a different world. The paintings ranged from comical pieces showing humorous, overweight Japanese men wrestling to dramatic pieces such as women in a knife fight. Manley compares these pieces to what would be our “sci-fi” channel today. “They are just nothing like anything we have seen and we have the Internet and TV streaming all day,” Manley said. “Could you imagine receiving this off of a boat and looking into a world you could never even possibly imagine? It would stir up some intense emotions.” Not only does the Gregg Museum display paintings and art, it also has a kimono, which is a long, loose robe that is usually worn as a formal garment in Japan. The inside and the outside of the kimono are viewable. The inside is just as impressive as the outside and displays a pattern of a dog unraveling

SOURCE: GREGG MUSEUM

“Remnants of the Floating World” present Japanese ceramics, textiles and woodblock prints. Many of the woodblock prints include the people wearing kimonos, which are elegant robes worn as a formal garment in Japan.

string. There are also patterned prints, knotted by hand in the museum. This article of clothing is one of the most impressive things because the viewer can see every knot, but it has no wear to it at all. If you are ever looking for a way to enter into a new world, gain some culture or simply kill time, it s highly worth it to see “Remnants of the Floating World” and all this new collection has to offer. The museum has given so much culture and life to the city of Raleigh and now it brings another world to it.

The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/ sma for more information.

SOURCE: GREGG MUSEUM

This print is one of the treasures found in the Gregg Museum’s newest exhibit, “Remnants of the Floating World: Japanese Art from the Permenant Collection,” which opened Thursday night.

Technician was there. You can be too.


Sports

TECHNICIAN MEN’S BASKETBALL

FRIDAY, FEB. 7, 2014 • PAGE 7

Hurricanes: next up for Wolfpack Luke Nadkarni Assistant Sports Editor

The N.C. State men’s basketball team (14-8 overall, 4-5 ACC) will look to pick up its second conference win on the road this season Saturday afternoon as it travels to take on Miami. The Hurricanes, coming off a 59-55 overtime loss to No. 25 Pittsburgh Wednesday night, have struggled of late. Head coach Jim Larranaga’s squad has lost four consecutive conference games and stands at 11-11 overall, 2-7 in the ACC. Last season, Miami took the pair of its meetings with the Pack. In the regularseason meeting in Raleigh, former Hurricanes center Reggie Johnson tipped in a late miss with 0.8 seconds on the clock to steal a, 79-78 win. The teams met again in the ACC Tournament semifinals in Greensboro, with Miami controlling the game and winning, 81-71. This time around, each team will be facing a newlook version of its opponent. Five of the Hurricanes impact players from last season’s ACC Championship team have either graduated or opted to enter the NBA Draft, most notably former point guard Shane Larkin,

the 2013 co-ACC Player of the Year. That charged Larranaga, in his third year with the ‘canes, with replacing his entire starting lineup from last season. The Wolfpack also boast a new starting five from last season. Only two players in State’s rotation this season, sophomore forward T.J. Warren and sophomore guard Tyler Lewis, saw significant minutes last year. But the Pack showed its tenacity by picking up gritty home wins over Florida State, Georgia Tech and Maryland, a great sign of things to come from State’s relatively young team. But for Miami, it’s been an uphill slog all the way this season. The Hurricanes opened the year with an overtime loss to low-major St. Francis Brooklyn, and their nonconference schedule also includes a loss to Central Florida (9-11 overall). Still, Miami is one of the top defensive teams in the nation, ranking 10th in Division I by allowing just 59.5 points per game. The Hurricanes’ opponents are shooting 39.9 percent per game, good for 42nd in the nation. On the flipside, the Canes are 342nd in scoring offense at just 61.3 points per game. Senior guard Rion Brown leads the way offensively, av-

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Forward freshman BeeJay Anya jumps to take a hook shot during the Wolfpack’s game against Georgia Tech in PNC Arena Jan. 26. The Wolfpack defeated the Yellow Jackets, 80–78, in overtime.

eraging 14.3 points per game. Brown is the only Miami player with a double-digit scoring average. The Hinesville, Ga. native also co-leads his team in rebounding, tying with senior forward Donovan Kirk at 6.1 caroms per game. Rebounding is an area where, when the Wolfpack struggles, it usually loses the game. State is coming off an, 84-70 loss at rival UNC-Chapel Hill, in which the Pack was outrebounded, 52-36,

and surrendered 22 offensive boards to the Tar Heels. In a blowout loss to Virginia on Jan. 11, the Pack was outrebounded, 40-28. State’s key to winning the battle of the boards Saturday is for its big men not to get into early foul trouble. In Chapel Hill, freshman forward Kyle Washington picked up two fouls within the first two minutes of the game, severely limiting his effectiveness the rest of the way.

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Washington, along with fellow freshman forwards Lennard Freeman and BeeJay Anya, and senior center Jordan Vandenberg, will be counted on to complement Warren on the glass against a Miami team whose rotation includes three players taller than 6’9”. Another key for the Wolfpack will be whether junior guard Desmond Lee can continue his strong offensive production. Lee, who had 18 points in the second half last Saturday, has scored in double figures in four straight games, raising his average to 10.5 points per game. That’s good news for the Wolfpack, which has been heavily dependent on Warren and freshman guard Anthony “Cat” Barber for points. Finally, State will be well served to make sure the game is as high scoring as possible, pushing the tempo to get the Hurricanes out of their comfort zone. Miami, by contrast, will try to slow the game down, use the entire shot clock and frustrate the Wolfpack into turnovers and bad shot selection. Tipoff at the BankUnited Center in Coral Gables, Fla., is set for 2 p.m. and the game will be televised regionally on Fox Sports Carolinas.

WAKE

continued from page 8

off her early game struggles, scoring 14 points and grabbing five of her six total rebounds on the night. “Brown is a great player,” senior forward Kody Burke said. “The foul trouble definitely slowed her down, but she came out with fire in the second half and played Len’Nique Brown basketball.” State led by as much as nine in the second half, but Wake responded, cutting the Pack’s lead to just two points with only 4:09 left in the game. The teams went back and forth for the rest of the night, with State coming out on top in the end, thanks in part to a pair of Burke free throws. State has now matched last season’s ACC win total, when the Pack finished 7-11 in the conference under former head coach Kellie Harper. The Wolfpack’s victory over Wake marked the 23rd time in its history that N.C. State has reached 20 wins in a season. The Pack will return to action Sunday, when it travels to Blacksburg, Va. to face Virginia Tech (11-11 overall, 1-8 ACC). Tip-off is scheduled for 2:00 p.m.

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Sports

COUNTDOWN

• One day until the N.C. State men’s basketball team plays against Miami in Coral Gables, Fla., at 2 p.m.

INSIDE

• Page 7: Hurricanes: next up for Wolfpack

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 8 • FRIDAY, FEB. 7, 2014

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Wolfpacker named National Swimmer of the Week Sophomore Christian McCurdy was named CollegeSwimming. com’s Men’s Division I National Swimmer of the Week on Wednesday. McCurdy won both his individual events in the Wolfpack’s meet against thenNo. 20 Virginia on Saturday, taking home first place in the 200m butterfly and the 400m individual medley. Following its win over the Cavaliers, State’s men’s swimming & diving team is currently ranked No. 20 in the nation, while the Wolfpack’s women’s team is ranked No. 21. SOURCE:: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Men’s tennis to play trifecta of matches this weekend N.C. State (5-1 overall) will take on No. 33 VCU on Friday at 3 p.m., before playing No. 26 South Carolina (5-2) and Longwood (1-3) on Sunday. VCU (7-2 overall) shut out the Wolfpack, 6-0, in the teams’ last meeting in Raleigh on Feb. 29, 2012. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Men’s soccer unveils 2014 spring schedule The Wolfpack will play six matches this spring in an offseason warmup for its regular season in the fall of 2014. Three of State’s matches will be at the Dail Soccer Stadium on campus in Raleigh, with another played at the nearby WakeMed Soccer Park. The Pack’s first match will be at home on March 22 against the Charlotte Eagles, one of two professional teams N.C. State will take on in the spring.

CAIDE WOOTEN/TECHNICIAN

Senior guard Myisha Goodwin-Coleman drives past Wake Forest’s senior guard Chelsea Douglas Thursday night in Reynolds Coliseum. Goodwin-Coleman scored 16 points against the Demon Deacons, becoming the 30th player in program history to score more than 1,000 points during her N.C. State career. The No. 14 Wolfpack women defeated the Demon Deacons, 74-69, taking State’s record to 20-3 on the season.

State defeats Demon Deacons Rob McLamb & Colin Phibbs Assistant Sports Editor & Correspondent

N.C. State grinded out a 74-69 victory over Wake Forest on Thursday in Reynolds Coliseum. With the win, the No. 14 Wolfpack improves its record to 20-3 overall and 7-2 in the ACC. Senior guard Myisha GoodwinColeman eclipsed the 1,000 careerpoint mark against Demon Deacons, making her the 30th player in Wolfpack history to hit the plateau. She finished 16 points on the night, with 13 coming in the first half. Goodwin-

Coleman connected on four-of-eight shots from three-point range. Senior center Markeisha Gatling dominated the paint, scoring 19 of the Wolfpack’s 36 points inside. At the half, N.C. State and Wake Forest went into the locker room with the score tied at 33 apiece. The Wolfpack shot 42 percent (14-for-33) from the field, including three-forseven from three-point range. Wake countered by going 13-for-27 from the field, led by junior forward Dearica Hamby. Goodwin-Coleman and Gatling combined for 11 of State’s 14 baskets, good for 25 points in the

first half. Points in the paint dominated first half scoring, with both teams recording 18 points in the paint. In the first half, the game was tied six times and there were three lead changes. Goodwin-Coleman led all players in scoring with 13 points as both teams scored 18 of their 33 points in the paint. State shut down Hamby in the second half, allowing her to score only four points after the intermission. She finished with 15 points, six points lower than her 21 point-pergame season average. N.C. State also

held senior guard Chelsea Douglas, the ACC’s second leading scorer, to 17 points, also below her season average of 18.8 points per game. In the second half, State went on a 7-0 run to take a 53-45 lead. At the 5:32 mark in the second half, Wake picked up its 10th team foul, putting State into the double-bonus for the rest of the contest. State’s junior guard Len’Nique Brown was in early foul trouble, playing just seven minutes in the first half. But after the half, Brown shrugged

WAKE continued page 7

SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

FOOTBALL COMMENTARY

Doeren’s recruiting class a necessary step

ATHLETIC SCHEDULE

Rob McLamb Assistant Sports Editor

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Today RIFLE V. ARMY West Point, N.Y., All Day TRACK AT VIRGINIA TECH ELITE MEET Blacksburg, Va., All Day MEN’S TENNIS V. VCU Raleigh, N.C., 3 p.m. SOFTBALL V. FRESNO STATE Tempe, Ariz., 7 p.m. SOFTBALL V. ARIZONA STATE Tempe, Ariz., 9:30 p.m. Saturday TRACK AT VIRGINIA TECH ELITE MEET Blacksburg, Va., All Day RIFLE V. NEBRASKA West Point, N.Y., All Day WOMEN’S TENNIS V. CHARLESTON SOUTHERN Raleigh, N.C., 12 p.m. MEN’S BASKETBALL V. MIAMI Coral Gables, Fla., 2 p.m. SOFTBALL V. BOISE STATE Tempe, Ariz., 5 p.m. SOFTBALL V. OREGON Tempe, Ariz., 7:30 p.m. WOMEN’S GYMNASTICS V. DENVER Denver, Colo., 8 p.m. Sunday MEN’S TENNIS V. SOUTH CAROLINA Raleigh , N.C., 1 p.m. WRESTLING V. VIRGINIA Raleigh , N.C., 2 p.m.

National Signing Day finally came Wednesday, and regardless of which recruiting service is considered most trustworthy, the consensus was unanimous: N.C. State acquitted itself well in the recruiting battle of 2014. Head coach Dave Doeren and his staff hosted a press conference and signing party inside Vaughn Towers at Carter-Finley Stadium Wednesday afternoon. Doeren itemized the signings in detail while videos played in a process that resembled a professor’s lecture. He had plenty to talk about, as the newest members of the Wolfpack—many of whom are from within the state of North Carolina—bring with them a bevy of talent that will be familiar to the casual football observer. A key to this class was the Wolfpack’s in-state success, which Doeren said would be his primary focus. Not only did Doeren, in his second year in Raleigh, ensure N.C. State secured talent within North Carolina’s borders, but he also locked up what could be considered recruiting steals from rivals. The Wolfpack more than held its own in North Carolina’s recruiting hotbeds of Winston-Salem, Charlotte, Durham and Greenville— where four-star recruit Kentavius Street could have essentially walked to East Carolina, but instead chose

JOHN JOYNER/TECHNICIAN

N.C. State head coach Dave Doeren makes the Wolfpack sign to the student section as he leaves field after State’s football game against the University of Richmond in Carter-Finley Stadium Saturday, Aug. 31. The Wolfpack narrowly defeated the Spiders, 2321, thanks to a 48-yard field goal from junior kicker Niklas Sade with 0:33 left in the game.

to attend school in Raleigh. Doeren’s tactics present an interesting contrast from the recruiting methods of State’s former head coach Tom O’Brien, who, for the most part, yielded the better high school players in North Carolina to other schools—both within the ACC and nationally—in an attempt to sign only the ‘right’ players. It is a fallacy to completely write off O’Brien’s method, as it brought some wonderful student-athletes to N.C. State. Former players like J.R. Sweezy and Nate Irving, both of whom participated in Super Bowl XLVIII, along with NFL impact players

Earl Wolff and Audie Cole were secured under O’Brien’s method. Of course, O’Brien brought in Tampa Bay quarterback Mike Glennon and famously allowed another current NFL quarterback to transfer so Glennon could start. What O’Brien did not do was bring in the needed depth to compensate when injuries inevitably occurred, and N.C. State had a ton of them in his six years in Raleigh— particularly in his first three years. O’Brien’s best season, in 2010, was also the only one in which his team did not lose many significant games due to injury.

But when it came to the on-the-field performance, O’Brien’s tea ms a lways seemed stuck in the mud, walking a tightrope between being mediocre and being championship contenders. The hope for N.C. State, which suffered mightily in 2013 by ending the campaign with eight straight losses, is it required a brief down period to get the wheels back on the road. Doeren now will begin the process of getting N.C. State above the seven to eight win threshold that, prior to last season, seemed to be an annual occurrence and was a source of consternation for

the Wolfpack faithful who aspire for league titles and major bowl berths. For the second-year coach, who eschewed a trip to the Orange Bowl with Northern Illinois after the 2012 season so he could potentially go to the exact same bowl one day with N.C. State, there is no longer a question of “if ” he has the wherewithal to bring in talent. A top-25 recruiting class after a three-win season answers that question. Doeren now has the burden of proof as to whether or not he can lead the Wolfpack to the next level and beyond. After all, that is what he came to N.C. State to do.


Technician - February 7, 2014