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THE SENTINEL OF THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN COMMUNITY AT N.C. STATE UNIVERSITY

NUBIAN MESSAGE RALEIGH, N.C. n VOL. X, ISSUE 16 n THENUBIANMESSAGE.COM n MARCH 21st, 2012 The story Trayvon Martin n 3

of

Reflections of Dr. Lawrence M. Clark n5

Wolfpack Basketball Team Gets New “Anthem”: Wolfpack Back n6

Off the Court Performance: NCAA Graduation Rates Released CJ GUION | EDITOR - IN - CHIEF

Recently, the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport (TIDES) at the University of Central Florida released its annual study “Keeping Score where it counts: Graduation Success and Academic Progress Rates for the 2012 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams.” This study breaks down the Graduation success rates (GSR) and Academic Progress Rates (APR) for tournament teams as reported by the NCAA. This study also compares graduation rates between white and African American male basketball student athletes. Dr. Richard Lapchick, the primary author of the study, is the director of TIDES and Chair of the DeVos Sport Business Management Graduate Program at UCF. This study was co-authored by Sean Williams and Aaron Trigg. This year there was a slight improvement in the graduation rates for 2012. In addition to this, the “enormous” gap between White and Black athletes narrowed by four percent. The overall GSR for men’s basketball student athletes rose to 67 percent from 66 percent in 2011. However, the GSR for White male athletes dropped from 91 percent in 2011 to 88 per-

cent in 2010; while, the GSR for African American athletes slightly increased 1 percent from 59 percent to 60 percent. Lapchick stated, “While all of that is positive news, the most troubling statistic in our study is the continuing large disparity between the GSR of white basketball student-athletes and African-American basketball student-athletes. ” NC State University has an overall 74 percent graduation rate for all student athletes. The men’s basketball team currently holds an 80 percent graduation rate. One interesting tidbit from that information is that the graduation rate of African American males is 83 percent, while the graduation rate for White basketball players is 50 percent, which is usually not the case Photo by John Joyner/Student Media Archives in comparison to other schools around The Institute for Diversity and Ethics recently released it’s annual study on the nation. Graduation Success and Academic Progress Rates for the 2012 NCAA Division I UNC-Chapel Hill currently gradu- Men’s Basketball Tournament Teams.

GRADUATION CONTINUED ON PAGE 8

BET 106 & Park Host Rocsi Visits NCSU CHELSEA GARDNER | STAFF WRITER

Photo by CJ Guion Rocsi, co-host of BET’s 106 & Park visited NC State on this party in an effort to encourage college students to go out in vote. Four years ago, Rocsi was not able to vote, because she was not an official citizen of the United States. This drives her passion for voting.

“Fired up, ready to go!” Those were the words resonating through Riddick 450 on this past Saturday. The reason behind this unification and excitement was due to a well-know guest, BET’s 106 & Park co-host Rocsi Diaz. Diaz and her team paid a visit to Wolfpack nation to campaign in support of President Obama. They voiced their thoughts on the upcoming election and encouraged students to vote. Diaz and her team are visiting various colleges to inform students about election updates and the opportunities they have to exercise their vote. She expressed how important it is to register to vote because, as young people, our voices matter. During her time at NC State, Diaz shared her stories and experiences as an illegal resident of the United States. She is Honduran but lived in Chile until she came to the United States at the age of 2. As she grew older, she became frustrated with the fact that she could not vote but could still work and pay taxes in America. Diaz also felt like a hypocrite because she was encouraging people to vote, but she could not actively participate. In 2008, right before the election, Diaz almost faced deportation

BET CONTINUED ON PAGE 7


NEWS

PAGE 2 |MAR. 21ST, 2012

What’s Happening on Campus

Nubian Message Continues Search for 2012-2013 Editor

WEDNESDAY

21 CHASS-MAS Presents: Unforgotten Women 6PM Washington Sankofa Rm Witherspoon Student Center (AACC) Diversity Debate for Student Body Candidates 7PM Harrleson 314

Thursday

22 NUBIAN MESSAGE STAFF/INTEREST MEETING Today 5PM WITHERSPOON 325

Friday

23 NC State vs Kansas University : Sweet 16 Matchup 10:17 PM (Eastern time)

INTERESTED IN JOINING THE NUBIAN MESSAGE? SEND US A MESSAGE AT: EDITOR@ NUBIAN.NCSU. EDU

NUBIAN MESSAGE

CJ GUION | EDITOR - IN - CHIEF At the March Student Media Board of Directors meeting, the editors and general managers were hired for the Technician, Agromeck, WKNC, Windhover, and the Business Office. There were no applicants for the first round of applications from the Nubian Message. Student Media has reopened the applications for the Nubian Message Editor - In Chief until Thursday March 29th, 2012 at noon. Next year, the Nubian Message plans to celebrate its 20th year of publication in November 2012. However, the first step is finding someone to take on the grueling position that is the Editor. Before anyone starts believing that the Nubian Message is in danger, let me say this. The Nubian Message is definitely not the first publication to have to reopen its application, and will not be the last. There is a certain fear that lies within all organizations of staff/general body members that aren’t sure that they can take the big step to the top of the hierarchy. I will say that last year, I wasn’t sure if I would be able to handle the position, but I overcame certain fears and applied for the job. I ended up getting hired for it, and would like to believe that I’ve handled it fairly well. While it hasn’t been a smooth road laid in gold, it has been a success. During my time as editor, I’ve had the opportunity to sit in the skybox at the first home football game, created a brand new website for the Nubian Message that won an award, had

the opportunity to meet rapper Common, and even had the chance to cover a visit from the President of the United States. Last year, Nubian Message was budgeted to make $500 worth of advertising for the entire year, but that number was surpassed before the first official edition was even released, and we’ve raised over $2000 in advertising in one semester. This is also a paid position, so you are not leading for free; but you have to be willing to actually put in the work that comes with a paid position. This position, also comes in handy with that nice parking pass. But that has little importance. The chapter of the Nubian Message is far from over. The Nubian Message still has a story to tell. The African American community extends way farther than the stories of crime and basketball, and those stories deserve the chance to be heard. There are stories like Trayvon Martin and Troy Davis, that are not the focus of most media outlets; but this is one place where their stories are told. There are the stories that show that Greek organizations are more than just stepping; there are the stories of students giving back to the community. Almost 20 years ago, this was the mission of the late Tony Williamson, the founder of the Nubian Message, who passed away before he even had the chance to graduate. There are students and staff who will offer support. There are the professional members of Student Media and the staff members of the African American Cultural Center who have offered the most support during those hard times. Hopefully, someone out there will take the opportunity. Hopefully, someone will continue the success that the Nubian Message has had this year.

Nubian Message Sentinel of the African-American Community at North Carolina State University since 1992

CJ GUION | EDITOR - IN - CHIEF JASMINE HARRIS | MANAGIING EDITOR

STAFF WRITERS: CORDERO SLASH CHELSEA GARDNER SYLENA FLOYD KIERRA LEGGET YOLANDA RAY ALEXIS TEASDELL TEVIN BYRD HIND MALIK KELVIN CARTER SAMPSON BLOH PHOTOGRAPHERS: MELVIN MOORE

Only with the permission of our elders do we proudly produce each edition of the Nubian Message. Dr. Yosef ben-Yochannan: Dr. John Henrik Clark: Dr. Leonard Jeffries: The Black Panther Party: Mumia A. Jamal: Geronimo Pratt: Tony Williamson: Dr. Lawrence Clark: Dr. Augustus McIver Witherspoon: Dr. Wandra P. Hill: Mr. Kyran Anderson: Dr. Lathan Turner: Dr. M. Iyailu Moses: Dokta Toni Thorpe and all those who accompany us as we are STILL on the journey to true consciousness. COPYRIGHT 2011 BY NORTH CAROLINA STATE STUDENT MEDIA, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Locations Avent Ferry Complex Brooks Hall Caldwell Hall Harrelson Hall DH HILL LIBRARY Witherspoon Student Center Biltmore Hall

325/326 Witherspoon Student Center Box 7138 NC State University Raleigh, NC 27695-371 PHONE NUMBER: 919.515.1468 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR: ncsu.nubian@gmail.com TWITTER: @NUBIANMESSAGE Facebook.com/NubianMessage


NUBIAN MESSAGE

PERSPECTIVES

MAR. 21ST, 2012 | PAGE 3

Being Black in America: Punishable by Death

a month of outcry, it is still a wonder how the shooter’s self defense claim, which was almost implausible, could work to completely preAs many people all around the country have alvent him from being arrested. In this writer’s opinion ready heard, on February 26th, 2012 a 17 year old laws like this have no business in the America we live in Black male named Trayvon Martin was horrifically today. gunned down by a neighborhood watch volunteer In addition, it is known that in the five months after named George Zimmerman while walking home this law was passed there were approximately 13 self defrom a convenience store in a family member’s fense shootings. This begs the question: is this Florida neighborhood. law really giving people in the state a license to kill? InSince the shooting occurred there has been a cidents like the Trayvon Martin shooting, and subsequent torrent of nationwide outcry from the Black cominaction in regards to bringing justice to his family, just go munity and rightly so; when you listen to the 911 to show how little value the state of Florida places on a tapes, eyewitness accounts, and realize the fact that man’s life, let alone the life of a Black man. Martin had no criminal record and no reason to Trayvon Martin is also a symbol of the continued indifbe shot that night you don’t need to be an African ference and high disregard many people have in regards American for your heart to go out to the family afto Black America, and my heart goes out to the family as fected by this heinous murder. In fact Martin had well as everyone else affected by this avoidable murder in committed no crime this particular night accept becold blood. This young man could have been any Black ing Black while walking, which it seems has been parents’ son, and it is unfortunate that there had to be a crime in The United States of America since its such a salient response to the murder before the Justice beginning. Zimmerman simply relied on his own Department decided to do anything about it. In fact, if personal prejudice in making the assumption that the family of young Martin were not willing to step up Martin was the perpetrator behind a series of breakPhoto from Martin Family Files so voraciously and try to get the justice they deserve abins in his gated community because he looked “sussolutely nothing may have been done about this murder at all. It is plain the picious” and was “Black”. What is even worse about this murder is that the 911 recordings and witness local police department were unwilling to do anything and are still unwilling to. accounts paint a picture of a scared young man screaming and pleading for his “They always get away with it” is one statement that Zimmerman exclaimed to life as a 28 year old adult, who was almost twice his size and weight, pursued the police operator he talked to that night in regards to Trayvon Martin and the and ultimately killed him. The only weapon Martin had in his possession at the presumed crime he never committed. Though it is unclear whom “they” was, I for one think this statement was in time of his murder was a pack of Skittles that he had purchased during a break in reference to all Black males specifically when any crimes are committed they are the NBA all-star game he was viewing with a member of his family. Another outaccused of. This time let us hope that George Zimmerman himself does not get rageous aspect of this murder is the fact that Zimmerman was not apprehended away with the robbing of a young man’s life just because of the color of his skin. for his actions or even investigated initially. In fact, the police that visited the Let’s hope he gets what he deserves for the pain and suffering he caused to this Florida neighborhood that night did not even question his so called self defense young man’s family, and above all, let’s hope justice is finally served in the trial story in the least. to come. Though the US Justice Department is now investigating this case after almost

CORDERO SLASH | STAFF WRITER

The Bumper Sticker Said “What”?

KELVIN CARTER | STAFF WRITER

Bumper stickers are usually interesting to read on the back of cars. Usually they are used to support a cause, represent a school, or to campaign for a candidate. Not only are bumper stickers an option to use; they also can be the best way to express one’s self. Recently there has been a picture online of a bumper sticker that is against the re-election of President Obama. Although it’s main purpose its to vote against Obama, this sticker alone could cause a racial uproar. The new slogan for people who are not voting for Obama for another four years in office is, “Don’t Re-Nig in 2012”. While this sticker is suppose to persuade people to vote a certain way it also insults a specific race. For most spades player we know the meaning of reneging, to play a card that is not in the right suit, when one is capable of playing the right suit. Applying the card game to this sticker it can be interpreted to mean be cautious of voting for the wrong individual when it’s not the right suit, or race, on the playing field. Regardless of how one may interpret the sticker the main issue is that this sticker is offensive. The actual terminology for Spades is reneging. When you

look at the bumper sticker the word has been changed to add the letters NIG, short for the “nword.” When referring to our president this sticker is calling him that derogatory name. This word does not apply to a president who was capable of obtaining a degree from an Ivy League school. How can an ignorant person be voted in office and be capable of accomplishing economical goals during his term? If one was to call our current President inferior, or ignorant then you are calling the nation ignorant for voting this man into office. As a black individual, I worry about seeing these stickers on a car ahead of me or behind me. To know that someone would present this derogatory bumper sticker in the streets Photo: Facebook Global Sharing makes me worry about what other brave things an individual would be willing to post on their car; or what kinds of actions this individual with the bumper sticker is willing to commit. I wouldn’t support a sticker that embraces ignorance by using the words “Re-Nig”.

Published by the Student Media Authority of NC State University

The Nubian Message is written by and for the students of North Carolina State University, primarily for the AfricanAmerican community. All unsigned editorials are the expressed opinion of the editorial staff and do not represent the university in any way. The Nubian is published every Wednesday of each month during the fall and spring semester, except during holidays and exam periods. The Nubian Message encourages letters to the editor. The Nubian Message will consider fairly all letters to editor, but cannot guarantee the publication of any.


PAGE 4 |MAR. 21ST, 2012

Mrs. Irene Clark Dr. Clark first came to NC State in 1974. He was Associate Provost and a Professor. He knew there was much work that needed to be done. He increased the involvement of faculty and the running of the university. He developed various organizations and wanted people to be more involved than just holding a job on campus. I remember him going to many small meetings. He and his buddy Dr. Augustus Witherspoon created Who Am I? which presented various sketches and historical figures so that students could learn more about the history of African Americans . He was also the brainchild of the Brotherhood Dinners. These dinners began in 1982. He brought in outstanding people who contributed to the state and to the world. People ate and interacted with great personalities. Benjamin Mays was the first person to come... He was a retired president of Morehouse who was instrumental in shaping successful Black males in the nation. He was a major mentor to Martin Luther King Jr. He also brought in John Hope Franklin, Angela Davis, and Dr. Ben Carson to name a few. It was one of the most striking projects for black and white faculty. He created global outreach programs that introduced faculty and staff to Africa. He developed exchange programs to West Africa where he gained many acquaintances. Dr. Clark wanted very much to strengthen the roles of males as fathers and husbands. He wanted them to realize that they had to accept their responsibilites and not just run away from them. He was very much concerned with genalogy and history. He made sure there were family reunions. He wanted his family to know where they came from. Dr. Clark was inspired by people like Paul Robeson who felt their purpose in “multipurpose.” He had difficulties with written words, but was quantitatively strong in math and analytical reasoning. He was very good in math. He was indeed a “Renaissance man.” He often laughed and could sing very well. He would often tell me when I was offkey. However, he had a hard time dancing. He even ventured out to be an artist. He loved to paint historical sites. I remember when we took a trip to Boston, and I took a picture of a church that was involved in the underground movement. Dr. Clark took the photograph and painted a beautiful night scene based on the photo. He also loved to make paintings about his fraternity Alpha Phi Alpha, Fraternity Inc. He would teach you while involving you in a way that you were involved in the learning expereince. He helped me learn how to use different programs on the computer and then used that experience to teach it to students.

NUBIAN MESSAGE

Refle Dr. Lawrenc Gentle Lion

“UNTIL THE THE TALE GL ~

Artist

“Renai

DR. LAWRENCE CLARK WAS BORN ON A

Ms. Toni Thorpe I was so fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with and learn from Dr. Clark. He was a poet, community advocate, family man, and a great storyteller. He was a dreamer that could build his dreams. He dreamed of a community center and he built it brick by brick. When I saw it, I was speechless. Dr. Clark would always visit the Cultural Center. He engaged students, and knew their names. He would listen, and he was free with knowledge He was very down to earth, and had a strong sense of humor. He often said “No one is going to do everything right. ” I enjoyed hearing him recite proverbs and talk about them. He believe that education should be applicable. Dr. Clark wanted everyone, particularly African Americans to have a sense of self and not depend on other’s definition of what it means to be Black. He was truly a gentle lion. He let everyone know that they had the responsibility to take the baton. If you are carrying the baton, you have to finish... If you don’t finish your part, then others can’t finish. If students don’t do their part, students in kindergarten can’t do their part. One of my favorite quotes from Dr. Clark was “When spider webs unite, you can tie up a lion. “ I was grateful to learn proverbs and stories from him... He truly took the time to care about the development of the African American Cultural Center and cared about the community and others.

Dr. Kevin Clark (BS 1989, MS 1991 Computer Science) North Carolina State University Dr. Clark was instrumental in helping me connect my identity to my education. What I remember most is a trip we took to West Africa. It was a lifechanging experience. Dr. Clark was an excellent mentor; He was very artistic; He and Dr. Witherspoon always discussed the importance of history. He was extremely intellectual and was the elder/father figure that everyone looked up to. He was indeed full of wisdom and a very distingished man of integrity. Everyone felt that.

HE IS SURVIVED BY HIS WIFE OF 51 YEARS JONES, LINDA PARKS, DR. LAWRENCE M DREN. DR. CLARK GRADUATED JOHN MER THE COMMITTED EDUCATORS AT LANGSTO ING COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR DANVIL WHERE

DR. CLARK ATTENDED VIRGINIA STATE CO PHYSICS IN 1960. HE LATER RECEIVED HIS OF VIRGINIA IN 1964 AND 1967, RESPECTI START OF HIS CAREER, DR. CLARK TAUG GINIA. HE LATER SERVED AS A MATHEMATI FLORIDA STATE U

IN 1974, DR. CLARK JOINED NC STATE UNI FULL PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS EDUCA PLAN. STUDENTS AND FACULTY AT NCSU CEED AT THE UNIVERSITY AND CHALLEN NCSU PROVOST NASH WINSTEAD ONCE W ING PROGRESS IN EQUAL OPPO

FROM 1995-2000, HE SERVED AS THE EX LISHED CULTURAL EDUCATIONAL PROGR GHANA, TOGO, ETHIOPIA, AND BENIN. HIM TO ORGANIZE MANY EDUCATIONAL AN

DR. CLARK IS ALSO CREDIT AFRICAN AMERICAN CULTURAL CENT COMMUNITY BROTHERHOOD DIN SYMPOSIUM, AND MANY

BASED ONHIS CONTRIBUTIONS TO NCSU SERIES BEARS HIS NAME. HE PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES AND O

MOST RECENTLY, HE WAS HONO COMMUNITIES WITH THE ESTABL AME


NUBIAN MESSAGE

ections of ce Mozell Clark

LION HAS HIS OWN HISTORIAN, E OF THE HUNT WILL ALWAYS LORIFY THE HUNTER.” ~AFRICAN PROVERB

Poet

MAR. 21ST, 2012 | PAGE 5

Vice Provost Joanne Woodard “Dr. Clark created a study abroad program with linkages to Africa. We first took a group of 50 students during Spring 1989 to Togo, West Africa. We spent 6 weeks in Togo. Then the trip moved to Ghana where the official language is English. In Togo, the language is French.

Dr. Clark created many other initiatives such making sure that there was an African American Coordinator present in each of the colleges, as well as programs such as DUAP and the First Year College. He was a Renaissance man, who was very creative and artistic. He buildta retreat center in Danville, VA brick by brick on his own. He had a gift of imagining things and seeing it to fruition. Dr. Clark wanted very much to improve the atmosphere of the university. African Americans were treated badly when they came on to campus most times, and Dr. Clark wanted to improve the experience for all and reshape the image of NC State for African Americans. He started African American Student Advisory Council (AASAC) as a way for students to inform faculty and administrators on the climate of African Americans on campus. Guaranteed that students would be treated well if they attended the university. Dr. Clark had a common touch. He interacted with everyone from the top administrators to the housekeepers. It was very common to see people from all walks of life visiting Dr. Clark’s office. He also started the CT Vivian Race Awareness Seminar on campus which forced both African American and White staff and faculty face issues with diversity. During the CT Vivian, participants spent two entire days at the seminar location and didn’t have the option of leaving. It was at a time when there were no cell phones, so participants had to be engaged at all times. Dr. Clark was also instrumental in the African American Cultural Center and pushed for it. “

Leader

issance Man”

APRIL 4, 1934 IN DANVILLE, VIRGINIA. HE PASSED AWAY ON JANUARY 23RD, 2012.

S, MRS. IRENE REYNOLDS CLARK. HE HAS FOUR CHILDREN DEBRA CLARK M. CLARK, JR., AND DR. SHELIA STALLINGS. HE HAS SEVEN GRANDCHILRCER LANGSTON HIGH SCHOOL IN 1952 IN DANVILLE, VA. IN HONOR OF ON, HE WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN ORGANIZING REUNIONS AND ESTABLISHLLE YOUTH. UPON GRADUATION FROM LANGSTON, HE JOINED THE ARMY E HE SERVED IN THE MILITARY POLICE.

OLLEGE WHERE HE RECEIVED A B.S. IN MATHEMATICS WITH A MINOR IN S M.ED. AND ED.D. IN MATHEMATICS EDUCATION FROM THE UNIVERSITY IVELY. HE ALSO ATTENDED SHAW UNIVERSITY DIVINITY SCHOOL.AT THE GHT MATHEMATICS AT LUCY ADDISON HIGH SCHOOL IN ROANOKE, VIRICS PROFESSOR AT VIRGINIA STATE COLLEGE, NORFOLK STATE COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY, AND SAINT AUGUSTINE’S COLLEGE.

IVERSITY (RALEIGH) IN DUAL ROLES AS ASSOCIATE PROVOST AND AS A ATION. HE ALSO COORDINATED THE UNIVERSITY’S AFFIRMATIVE ACTION U VIEWED HIM AS A BEACON OF STRENGTH AS HE AIDED THEM TO SUCNGED THEM TO EMBRACE THEIR UNIQUE AND DIVERSE GIFTS. FORMER WROTE, “ONE OF THE MOST VALUABLE AND CONSTANT FORCES IN MAKORTUNITY AT NCSU WAS THE APPOINTMENT OF DR. CLARK.”

XECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE NCSU AFRICA PROJECT. DR. CLARK ESTABRAMS BETWEEN NCSU AND SEVERAL COUNTRIES IN AFRICA INCLUDING HIS PASSION FOR A CONNECTEDNESS TO THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY LED ND INSPIRATIONAL TRIPS TO AFRICA FOR STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND THE COMMUNITY.

TED AS ONE OF THE “FOUNDING FATHERS” OF THE NCSU TER, THE MATH SCIENCE ENRICHMENT NETWORK, THE UNIVERSITY NNER, THE PEER MENTOR PROGRAM, THE AFRICAN AMERICAN MORE SIGNIFICANT INITIATIVES STILL IN PLACE TODAY.

U AND THE COMMUNITY-AT-LARGE, THE LAWRENCE M. CLARK LECTURE E WAS A MEMBER OF NUMEROUS BOARDS,COMMISSIONS, ORGANIZATIONS INCLUDING ALPHA PHI ALPHA FRATERNITY, INC.

ORED BY THE DANVILLE, PITTSYLVANIA AND CASWELL COUNTY LISHMENT OF THE LAWRENCE M. CLARK CENTER FOR AFRICAN ERICAN CULTURE AND LEARNING.

Wandra Hill Dr. Clark was a mentor, teacher, outstanding statesman, and I knew him for 30 years. My most memorable experience was his leadership workshop for students first held in the 70s. The workshop taught students how to communicate and listen. The first one held in Chapel Hill and about 40 students from SAAC (Society of Afrikan American Culture) went. It was a teachable moment. Students were eager to learn. The faculty and students learned alot. We learned how to communicate with administrators and the media In 1989 I went on the trip to West Africa to Togo and Benin, as well as Ghana. It was an experience of a lifetime. All of students who went graduated with higher than a 3.0 GPA and went on to get Masters and Doctorates. Dr. Clark was an innovative leader and did an excellent job. He always would say “This too shall pass.” He treated everyone with respect from the top administrators to the part time staff and janitors.

Dr. Brenda Allen First Impression: I was a student at Virginia State University and Mrs. Clark was my biology teacher. When Mr. Lawrence Clark walked into the classroom one day to speak with Mrs. Clark and she blushed... At the time I thought that must be love to see my teacher blush like that... Then I came to NC to work on Master’s Degree and found out that Dr. Clark was at State. I was pleased to see him still i n the family mode. He valued family alot. Dr. Clark addressed and tackled many issues with diversity. He made faculty members speak to and conquer fears of situations that involved diversity. He helped all people overcome their fears of situation to battle diversity and overcome their fears of the situation and notice similarities and differences. He figured out what was needed for students to not only matriculate, but graduate.


PAGE 6 |MAR. 21ST, 2012 The Nubian Message’s Guide to What’s Goin’ On in Arts & Entertainment

BLAZIN 8 OF THE WEEK 1. Starships- Nicki Minaj 2. Take Care- Drake feat. Rihanna 3. Turn Me On- David Guetta feat. Nicki Minaj 4. Young, Wild & Free- Snoop Dogg and Wiz Khalifa feat. Bruno Mars 5. Wild Ones- Flo Rida feat. Sia 6. Good Feeling- Flo Rida 7. International Love- Pitbull feat. Chris Brown 8. Rack City- Tyga

WKNC’s UNDERGROUND Top 5 of the Week 1 MAYDAY Death March 2 DJ NU-MARK “Dumpin Em All” [Single] SelfReleased 3 QUAKERS Sidewinder 4 FLEETA PARTEE “The City” [Single] Animal Houze 5 ECID I Heart Gravity Listen to Underground Radio on WKNC 88.1 FM... Sunday 12 - 2AM Sunday 10PM-12AM Monday 8PM - 12AM Tuesday 12-2AM Saturday 10PM-12AM

Inspirational Songs of the Week James Fortune & Fiya - Still Able Earnest Pugh - I Need Your Glory William McDowell - I Won’t Go Back Donald Lawrence - Spiritual

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

NUBIAN MESSAGE

Wolfpack Basketball Team gets “new anthem” CJ GUION | STAFF WRITER

This weekend, the NC State Wolfpack Men’s Basketball team surged in the NCAA tournament to advance to the Sweet 16 after defeating both San Diego State and Georgetown University. Since then the Wolfpack nation has been buzzing about the win, and the new anthem for the team to celebrate their run in the tournament. The new anthem for the team entitled “Wolfpack Back” was released this past weekend by NC State alum Keyuntae Ward. The song salutes the team, and pays tribute to the late Jim “Jimmy V” Valvano who coached the men’s basketball team from 19801990, and lead the team to an 1983 NCAA Championship. Within two days of the release of the single, “Wolfpack Back” has managed to score close to 15,000 views on youtube. When asked what motivated him to make the song, Ward said “I was motivated by the greatness in our NC State Men's Basketball team. We have played very well and overcame a lot of things this season. I felt as if I needed to make something to show my appreciation for the team's hard work. I'm an alumnus of the university and I'm very proud to say this is my home.” After the San Diego State game, Ward congratulated CJ Williams via Twitter. He asked Williams if he should go ahead and make the song, and Williams pushed him to do it. The two had previously been enrolled in a class a couple of years ago. On Saturday, Keyuntae says that he thought of the entire

song, and went to the studio a couple of hours later and recorded it. It was released around 12:30 AM on Sunday morning to the team and the public. It appears that the song has been a big hit around campus, and has been reshared multiple times on the “Wolfpack Students” facebook group, as well as Twitter. “The basketball team deserves to be where they are and deserve to have an anthem; I wish them the best,” Ward said. The NC State basketball team will face Kansas University on Friday at 10:17 pm. Check Local Listings.

Interview with Doomtree

WKNC UNDERGROUND 88.1 FM

The following is a write up of an interview with emcee Dessa from the hip-hop collective Doomtree. They recently released the album No Kings in November of last year. Dessa, is a spoken word poet and has released a book titled Spiral Bound. She had the following to say… 1. Who/what inspired you all to create hip-hop music? Before I was asked to join Doomtree those guys were some of my favorite hip hop artists. I like the aggressiveness, the emphasis on lyrics, wordplay, and innovative language. 2. You often incorporate non-traditional elements into your music, what really inspired you to make music outside of the basic hip-hop formula? I'd imagine that most of the members of Doomtree are more concerned with making good music than with making stuff that adheres to an established formula. Sometimes a non-traditional approach just works better. 3. What do you think the state of hip-hop is today? Do you believe that hip-hop is "dead"? Nope, I don't think that hip-hop is dead. I do think hip hop has changed since its inception. But, really, it'd be

strange if it didn't.

4. You recently played a show in North Carolina, on the subject of live music, what role do you think live music plays in Hip-Hop culture today? Has it in some aspects surpassed that of mixtapes and mixtape swapping? Live performances have always been a large part of what Doomtree does. In the current environment (of lossless replication, downloading, and immediate internet access), I think performance is becoming a bigger part of a musical career--in hip hop and in any other genre. 5. Do you have any good stories about your life on the road? Has anything really crazy happened while you've been touring? A few recent high (and low) lights: Dessa's first crowd surfing experience; Sims' dislocated finger; sold out shows in San Diego, Omaha, Denton, and Toronto. 6. Midwestern hip-hop, at least to me, seems to have its own more alternative style. Why do you think this is? Is there a tight community focused in that area? It'd be tough for me to make an objective guess as to why the Midwest sounds the way it does. I'll say, though, that I don't think the sound is quite as

homogenous as it's often perceived to be. We've got punk, country, hip hop, alternative, rock, and a mess of other scenes that are active and prolific. The thing that often seems particular about the Minneapolis scene is that we don't spend too much of our attention on genre distinctions. We mix bills, we split 7 inches, we have friends who dress different and play different stuff. I think that permeability probably has something to do with the output of the region. 7. You just released No Kings, were there any hardships you met during its production? We began, wrote, recorded, mixed, mastered and released the record within 9 months. I think our biggest challenge was meeting a bunch of pretty aggressive deadlines. 8. What is each member's favorite song on the new album? Cecil: Little Mercy Beak: Team the Best Team Dessa: Beacon Other dudes: In the other van and momentarily inaccessible (but no doubt listening to No Kings on repeat). If you’re interested in learning more about the group, check out their band page at http://www.doomtree.net/.


NUBIAN MESSAGE

LIFESTYLES

MAR. 21ST, 2012 | PAGE 7

Seeing Ourselves Through Different Mirrors

ALEXIS TEASDELL | STAFF WRITER

If there is one thing about African Americans that is something to notice, it is that African Americans come in all different shapes and sizes. African Americans can be light, dark, short or tall, and with all of this physical diversity, there is also diversity within African Americans psychologically. Have you ever walked across campus and seen another African American that you had never met, but because you were also African American they said “Hey” or smiled? Have you ever been around an African American who did not want associate with African American clubs or organizations because they feel as if race shouldn’t be a factor? One theory suggests that African Americans identify themselves differently in how they relate to their race. This is called Nigrescence, a psychological theory first proposed in 1971 by William E. Cross Jr., that describes the acceptance and affirmation of Black identity in an American context by moving from “Black self-hatred to Black self-acceptance.” The concept divided one’s nigrescence into five categories beginning with the Pre-encounter stage; the encounter stage; immersion/emersion; internalization; internalization-commitment; and ending in the Internalization-Commitment entitled the Black Racial Identity Development Model. The Pre-encounter stage is when an African American have adopted the views of dominant white culture in society. This is a phase where the African American may remove themselves from anything that

is “black” or from association with other blacks. This may be because of a subconscious view of African American Stereotypes or from a disconnection with African American society, to the point that it is foreign and uncomfortable to them. The encounter state is said to be a stage that is usually brought upon by a prejudice encounter. It could be brought upon by rejection by White friends or by connecting personally to a prejudice statement. This is when an African American may begin to believe that racism still exists and that the idea of “if we stop talking about it, it will go away,” may begin to fade. It is a time when the African American begins to understand that they are a part of a group that is in times targeted by racism. The third stage is Immersion/Emersion. This in some aspects is a reverse from the Preencounter stage. In this stage an African American may attempt to disassociate themselves with symbols of white culture and may desire to surround themselves with symbols of one’s racial identity. Thomas Parham describes this stage as, “everything of value in life must be Black or relevant to Blackness. This stage is also characterized by a tendency to denigrate white people, simultaneously glorifying Black people...” This is a stage where the African American seeks to explore Afro-centric Culture and history and seek support from those of their same racial background. This is a stage where one may redefine themselves and find security in their ethnicity.

The next stage is Internalization. In this stage the African American still interacts with other African Americans but is now willing to establish meaningful relationships with Whites who are respectful to them and their race. They are also ready to build coalitions with other groups that are oppressed. The Final stage is Internalization-Commitment. This is when the African American takes their “personal sense of Blackness into a plan of action or a general sense of commitment” to what is happening in the African American Community. In both this stage and the last stage the African American has become to have a positive view of themselves and their racial identity and have grown to view and interact with races proactively. In total, African American’s are walking across this campus in different stages in their racial identity. Some may be in a PreEncounter stage in which they don’t want to get support that is targeted for minorities. Others may be in the Immersion/Emersion stage, where they are only interacting with African Americans and want to solely learn who they are as an African American. Others may be in a Internalization-Commitment phase where they have an understanding of who they are and the state of African Americans and are making a direct effort to aid the interactions of different races and help all oppressed races. It’s a beautiful thing that African Americans can be so diverse inside and out isn’t it?


PAGE 8 |MAR. 21ST, 2012

Advice Column Dear Nubian Queen, The end of the semester is approaching and I want to find a summer internship. Can you provide me with information so that this search will be a successful one?

NUBIAN MESSAGE

Darius Little named “All-American” in NCAA Tournament YOLANDA RAY | STAFF WRITER

Sincerely, Hopeful Intern Dear Hopeful Intern, Internships are the best and most valuable way to gain real world experience as a student. Internships help by building your resume, choosing a career field, earn academic credit, and many even lead to full-time career opportunities. I challenge you to explore the resources available to you at NC State that includes NC State University Career Center, Co-op Program, Office of International Service, and your academic advisor. Finding an internship can be accomplished by adapting different strategies and being persistent. To prepare for career success your resume and cover letter should be updated and you should participate in on and off campus activities as well as demonstrate academic excellence. You should begin looking for internships early and talk with faculty, mentors, family, friends, and alumni about what type of internship you are interested in. Networking is vital because these informational interviews can help you gain valuable information and provide career options that you can pursue in the near future. As a student at NCSU you have access to ePACK which is a phenomenal tool where you will have access to hundreds of current jobs and internships, on-campus interviews, events, and employer contacts. You can set up your ePACK in three easy steps: STEP 1: Registration at www.ncsu.edu/epack STEP 2: Complete your profile STEP 3: Upload a resume/ CV In summary, NC State provides all students with the resources to ultimately attain career success. It is up to us to take advantage of these resources so that we can go above and beyond our career objectives and plans. I hope that you find these resources helpful and good luck with your internship search! Sincerely, Nubian Queen

Need Advice? If so, send your questions to the Nubian... Editor@nubian.ncsu.edu

Keep up with us 24/7 at TheNubianMessage.com “Let Your Voice Be Heard” BET CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 due to the expiration of her green card, but was able to become a legal citizen just in time to vote. Diaz said, “you don’t realize the importance of something [voting] until it is almost taken away from you.” With this in mind, Diaz challenged NC State organizations to register 400 people before the break. She stressed the importance of power in numbers and how organizations must work together and not as individuals. As a jumpstart to her challenge, NC State has organized a movement, The Students for Obama Chapter, on campus to help register as many people as possible to vote. To help meet the school goal, Diaz’s team provided three helpful tips to encourage people to vote: (1) Be personable, relatable, and friendly (2) Inform people of how important their right to vote is and what it would be like if their vote was ever in danger (3) Discuss something in the election that affects you personally or as a young person (in other words, do your research!). Diaz said that she would return to NC State in the fall to check on our progress.

Darius Little (a senior in Science, Technology, and Society) finished his collegiate wrestling career this past Saturday as an All-American after advancing to the seventh place match in the wrestleback bracket. Little picked up four wins in the NCAA Tournament. He is a native of Thomasville, NC. Little opened the tournament with a 6-4 win over Luke Goetti of Iowa State, but later was defeated by Nick Dardanes of Minnesota in a close 4-2 decision. This loss placed him in the wrestleback bracket, but Little prevailed with three straight wins. Afterwards, Little ended up facing Borislav Novachkov of Cal Poly, ending up in the seventh place match where he was also defeated by Michael Nevinger of Cornell University. NC State has been able to produce an All-American three of the last four years. Darius Little finishes his career with a record of 10258 (37-13 senior year), which places him third in the Wolfpack record book behind Sylvester Terkay and Darrion Caldwell. “The experience was amazing. Actually being grouped with the best wrestlers in the country is quite a feat in itself, but to be mentioned in the discussion is phenomenal,” Little said. “Hard work and perseverance pays off in the long run. My teammates also did a great job wrestling and supporting me throughout the tourney, especially Quinton,” stated Little. Little plans to continue to wrestle post-graduation in which he hopes to get a chance to compete for in the Olympics. Afterwards, he would like to teach and coach on the high school level. The other participants were Quinton Godley, Colton Palmer, Colton Fought, and Matthew Nereim.

GRADUATION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 ates 86 percent of its African American male basketball players, while Duke University has a 100 percent graduation rate for both African American males and White male basketball players. Atlantic Coast Conference partner Florida State is not doing as well. Only 67 percent of their athletes graduate, and out of that percentage only 57 percent of African American basketball players graduate. In the coming years, the NCAA will be penalizing teams which are not pushing their student athletes in the classroom. The cutoff will increase from the standard APR of 925 to 930, which is equal to a 50 percent graduation rate. The APR, developed in 2004, is a fouryear average of academic performance that rewards student-athletes for remaining eligible as well as continuing education at the same school. Teams that don’t meet that cutoff will not be eligible to compete in the postseason the following year. If the new rule were to have taken effect this year, thirteen teams (Colorado State, Florida State, Syracuse, St. Louis, Indiana, Colorado, Mississippi Valley State, New Mexico State, Norfolk State, Ohio, St. Bonaventure, Connecticut, and Southern Mississippi) would be ineligible to compete. Lapchick emphasized that, “We need to raise the bar and move toward 60 percent being the acceptable standard for the APR. The NCAA has started to do that by raising the APR minimum score to 930 in the future.” Lapchick noted, “Race remains a continuing academic issue. By itself, the 28 percentage point gap between graduation rates for white and African-American student-athletes demonstrates that. However, it must be emphasized that African-American male basketball student-athletes graduate at a much higher rate than African-American males who are not student-athletes.” Lapchick stated, “Presently, too many of our predominantly white campuses are not fully welcoming places for students of color, whether or not they are athletes. There are lessons that our campuses could learn from athletics. We have to find new ways to narrow this gap. The blame does not rest alone with our institutions of higher education. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan’s emphasis on improving urban high schools is an important start as many of our African-American student-athletes graduate from those underfunded and underequipped schools. ”

Nubian Message March 21st  

Nubian Message - 16th Issue

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