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TECHNICIAN          

friday october

22 2010

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

of Fall Color Explosion to raise awareness Hordes zombies to take over Raleigh

The Fall Color Explosion is planning to beautify campus by planting flowers to increase breast cancer awareness and honor Kay Yow.

volunteers,” Morris said. According to Morris, the first Color Explosion was held in 1993 and has been held every October. “The relationship between Fall Color Explosion and Breast Cancer is somewhat open to individual interpretation. We tie Fall Color Explosion to breast Nithya Kote cancer normally because the month of Staff Writer the planting occurs in October, which Students will have a chance to in- is Breast Cancer Awareness Month,” crease breast cancer awareness Satur- Morris said. Britney Keene, a sophomore in soday, as well as beautify the campus. Fall Color Explosion, an event cial work, said the beautiful season and planned by the Student Government cause work well together. “Fall is a season of community service pretty colors-the colcommission and the orful flowers makes University grounds the surroundings crew, prompts stuso beautiful. If the dent volunteers to University can come plant flowers around together to support campus in order to breast cancer awareraise awareness for ness by planting breast cancer. flowers, it means a According to Erin lot,” Keene said. Morris, co-chair of Willysha Jenkins, a senior in Mor r i s s a id a the Department of animal science, Breast Cancer Vigil Community Outwill be held on Oct. reach, the Fall Color Explosion is meant to honor coach Kay 25 at Wolf Plaza. “The following Monday after the Yow and all other victims of breast canplanting is done, Student Government cer. “This event is meant to honor our is planning on doing a Breast Cancer beloved coach Kay Yow. We want to re- Vigil,” Morris said. “This ceremony member the amazing woman that she will honor both victims and survivors was, and to pay respect to her memory. of breast cancer. We wanted to give In addition to that, this event is meant students and faculty the opportunity to encourage both students and faculty to pay tribute to loved ones who have who have been affected by breast can- had breast cancer. In addition to that, we also wanted to pay tribute to our cer,” Morris said. Morris, a junior in political science, beloved Coach Yow.” According to Morris, the University’s said Student Government is very exgrounds management crew provided cited about the event. “We have a wide variety of student the plants for the event. “It is the wonderful NCSU grounds organizations participating [in the event].” “We are expecting about 100 plus EXPLOSION continued page 3

People all over Raleigh are being encouraged to look, talk and act like zombies in the 2010 “Zombie Walk.” Brooke Wallig Staff Writer

“It is good to have a campus full of flowers and greenery; it has a relaxing effect.”

MARISA AKERS/TECHNICIAN FILE PHOTO

Family members Susan Yow, Debbie Yow and Ronnie Yow, along with Jeffery Johnson, a senior in business administration, and Jim Barnhill, sculptor of the memorial, unveil the memorial for Kay Yow beside Reynold’s Coliseum, Aug. 24.

TEDxNCSU to ignite imaginations Organizers hope that event speakers will be thought provoking.

Reyes said. “‘X’ stands for an independent, community organized TED event. It is licensed by TED, but it is organized locally by the community. So, there have been over a thousand TEDx events around the world.” Allison Saito Last year Reyes attended a TED Staff Writer event in India and he said the UniN.C. State will become the first versity seemed like a natural place university in North Carolina to host for a pro-progressive thought event a TEDx event when the University like TEDx. Reyes was a main factor in getting TEDx to campus. presents TEDxNCSU Saturday. “When I was in India, I was sitTED, Technology Entertainment Design, has licensed the University to ting there thinking ‘Why can’t we host this independent event. Francis do this at N.C. State?’ The Univerde los Reyes, an associate professor sity has students who we want to of civil, construction and environ- inspire,” Reyes said. “It is a space mental engineering, said the event where we should be able to exchange presents the best thinkers and ideas ideas. It is a natural place for a thing like TED, and so I to change the world. thought we should “TED is a nado TEDxNCSU.” tional, internationReyes sa id t he a l l y phe nome n a event changes how actually. What it is listeners think and actually is is a confeel about world ference put on by a changes. nonprofit organiza“[It’s like] your tion that features m i nd has been the best thoughts in Francis de los Reyes, an blown away. Your the world. They put associate professor of civil, up these two confer- construction and environmental emotions have been pulled in many difences,” Reyes said. engineering ferent directions,” “Twice each year Reyes said. “You get they have a gathering of the best doers, thinkers, and a really great talk that changes how ideas to present ideas that change the you think, how you feel, and inspires you.” world.” He predicts TEDxNCSU will be a “TED is not about main stream, it is about ideas. Some of them might similar experience. “It is going to be a barrage of inbe something we don’t hear every day, but it is making an impact,” Reyes formation, different messages, {and] ideas in four hours,” De los Reyes said. The event will be held Saturday said. “It is quite intense.” Speakers at TEDxNCSU will infrom 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 a.m. in the Talley Student Center Ballroom. Ap- clude Marshall Brain, N.C. State proximately 200 people purchased alumnus and founder of HowStufftickets. The event is sold out. Accord- Works.com, and Dick Gordon, host ing to de los Reyes, Union Activities of the public radio show This Story. “[Brain] has been on Oprah. He’s Board is planning on hosting another TEDxNCSU event in the spring. That been on things like National Geoevent may accommodate up to 800 graphic series,” Reyes said. “He is a attendees. thinker, he thinks about a wide range “TEDx is an off shoot of TED,” of topics, and he is going to talk about

“The University has students who we want to inspire.”

the meaning of life.” “[Gordon] is going to talk about stories that he thinks are inspirational or will change how you think about the world,” Reyes said. Members of the University community will also speak. Speakers were chosen to fit into the event theme, “What Really Matters.” Mike Giancola, director of CSPELS and one of the event’s speakers, said he thinks it’s a great thing that the University is trying to bring to campus. Giancola said he was invited to speak by an event organizer and that he plans to speak on hunger and poverty at Saturday’s conference. “Anytime you’re given an opportunity to talk about something you’re passionate about it’s a great opportunity,” Giancola said. Reyes said the organization looked at a variety of speakers and searched for those who would bring new perspectives to the debate. “We either came up with names first, or we thought about issues that we wanted covered and then we looked at different people who would bring a new perspective to those issues” Reyes said. “Obviously, we wanted an N.C. State slant, so we started with the university of N.C. State.” All talks will be less than 18 minutes, and Grains of Time, an N.C. State acapella group, will also perform. “[This weekend] it is just the morning, but we figured that we would start to get the ball rolling,” Reyes said. “The hope is that we can do this every year.”

Grad Fa ir Class Rings

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QUESTIONS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT SUCCESS TASK FORCE The chancellor has begun work on the University’s Strategic Plan. The plan is divided up between nine task forces, one of which is Undergraduate Student Success. The Technician will be asking students their opinion about undergraduate student success each day leading up to the Strategic Town Hall Meeting on Tuesday, Oct. 26.

WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES TO N.C. STATE UNDERGRADUATES’

Halloween will arrive early this Saturday, as zombies participating in the 2010 Raleigh Zombie Walk will flood the city streets. In the fourth annual Raleigh Zombie Walk, participants are expected to dress and act the parts of zombies, zombie hunters, or hapless and helpless victims while lurching around a fixed path in downtown Raleigh at 7 p.m. According to Rich Livingston, event organizer and self-proclaimed “Shaun of the Dead,” the event is meant to be both a tribute to the classic idea of the zombie and an event for all ages. “We really want to keep with the classic images of zombies as set by film director George Romero,” said Livingston. “But this is also an event for everyone, regardless of age, and we want people to act accordingly.” The event, which first started in 2007, began as a collaboration among multiple people who shared an interest in classic horror and the undead. “It was just a group of people interested in horror and the undead who saw that Raleigh was missing out on something that every major city should have,” said Livingston. “Walking hordes of the undead.” Livingston said there are two sets of rules for this zombie walk, the main

ZOMBIES continued page 3

SUCCESS? WHAT SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES ARE RELEVANT TO THESE CHALLENGES? WHAT DOES THE UNIVERSITY NEED TO DO TO TO IMPROVE IN THESE AREAS? To submit your responses to the Technician, email: letters@ technicianonline.com. To submit your input to the Undergraduate Success Task Force, visit: http://info.ncsu.edu/strategicplanning/task-forces/undergraduatestudent-success/. To voice your opinion in front of the University, attend the Chancellor’s Forum on Oct. 26, at 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m., in Stewart Theater.

Installing: Chancellor Randy Woodson Overall progress: 44%

Estimated time remaining: 4 days Destination location: S:/buildings/HolladayHall/offices/chancellor/Woodson

CHANCELLOR’S INSTALLATION WEEK EVENTS: WEDNESDAY The Chancellor’s Ice Cream Dream: When: noon – 12:45 p.m. Where: The Brickyard, by D.H. Hill Library What: Meet the chancellor and sample the University’s newest ice cream flavor, which will be Woodson’s own signature ice cream. Celebrating Faculty Research and Scholarship Event: When: 4:30 p.m. – 7 p.m. Where: Auditorium, D.H. Hill Library What: This event will highlight the collective achievements and scholarship of N.C. State’s faculty. SOURCE: CHANCELLOR’S OFFICE

insidetechnician

Pack ready for Dig Pink

Women’s volleyball to play two over weekend, including annual Dig Pink match. See page 8.

viewpoint fine arts classifieds sports

r i a F d a r G

NC State Bookstores Nov. 16-18 10am - 4pm

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Graduation Announcements

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Page 2

PAGE 2 • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

TECHNICIAN CAMPUS CALENDAR

THROUGH ALEXANDER’S LENS

October 2010

On page 3, the “donut man” graphic for “T-shirt contest gives students the power” was contributed by John Yanik, co-chair of the Krispy Kreme Challenge. Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Amanda Wilkins at editor@ technicianonline.com

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Today N.C. STATE FAIR

WEATHER WISE

MOTIVATIONAL TEACHING STRATEGIES End Day

Today:

SOUTHERN ROOTS OF MIDCENTURY MODERN Gregg Museum of Art and Design Noon to 8 p.m. JANE COMFORT & COMPANY IN “FAITH HEALING” Stewart Theatre 8:00 p.m.

69/40 Sunny and clear.

Saturday:

75 51 Sunny with fog in the evening.

Sunday:

78 58

Pie that sista PHOTO BY ALEXANDER NITT

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tudents get a chance to throw pies at Pi Beta Phi sisters during the second annual Pie a Pi Phi event on the Brickyard on Thursday. Samantha Marshall, a sophomore in sport management, takes a shot at Erin Furr, a sophomore in First Year College. Each person has to donate $2 per pie thrown. “I like participating in the event because it’s fun and at the same time it supports a good cause,” Furr said. The event raised money for Pi Phi’s philanthropic organization, First Book, an organization that promotes literacy for under-privileged children.

IN THE KNOW

Mostly cloudy and patchy fog.

SOURCE: WWW.WEATHER.COM

ON THE WEB See exclusive audio/photo slideshows. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline.com. Check it out!

MOVIE: MUNNA BHAI MEETS GANDHI 7 p.m. to 9:25 p.m. Witherspoon Cinema

Fossil Fair featured at Museum of Natural Sciences, Nov. 6 Fossil Fair on Saturday, November 6, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.The state’s largest free event dedicated to fossils and paleontology returns to the Museum for the

first time in three years, and features dozens of displays, activities and presentations about fossils from North Carolina and around the world. Talk with curator of paleontology Vince Schneider and see some of the 230-million-year-old reptiles he has been discovering in nearby Chatham County. SOURCE: JONATHAN PISHNEY

Jane Comfort & Company Presents Faith Healing On Friday at 8 p.m. in Stewart Theatre, Jane Comfort & Company will perform Faith Healing. Based on Tennessee Williams’ The Glass Menagerie, the show is a blend of dance and theatre, lip-synched film scenes and delicate duets. It also has mature themes. There will be a pre-show discussion with Jane Comfort at 7 p.m. Tickets will be available online until noon on Friday. Prices are: $5 for NCSU students, $19-$23 for faculty/staff, and $24-$28 for the general public.

N.C. State Fair breaks attendance records October 14, 15, 17, 19 all broke attendance records since the fair has started taking attendance in 1986. Thursday, the attendance was 47,677, up from the previous record of 37,932. Friday’s attendance was 77,485, up from 60,369. Sunday’s attendance was 112,130, up from 105,885 and Tuesday’s attendance was 81,553 up from 71,537. SOURCE: N.C. STATE FAIR

SOURCE: CAMPUS CALENDAR

MOVIE: SALT 10 p.m. to 11:40 p.m. Witherspoon Cinema MOVIE: HAPPY GILMORE Witherspoon Cinema 11:59 p.m. Saturday N.C. STATE FAIR TEDXNCSU 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Talley Student Center Ballroom FALL COLOR EXPLOSION 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Starts at Belltower RALEIGH ZOMBIE WALK 2010 7 p.m. to 12 a.m. Begins at Moore Square THE GRAINS OF TIME FALL CONCERT 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Stewert Theater at Talley Student Center Sunday N.C. STATE FAIR Last Day BREAKING INTO JOURNALISM 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. WRAL-TV, Studio A, 2619 Western Boulevard, Raleigh, NC WOLFPACK QUIDDITCH VS. DUKE QUIDDITCH 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Duke University, West Campus Turf Field

Technician was there. You can be too. Faith Healing Fri, Oct 22 at 8pm Stewart Theatre

Based on Tennessee Williams' play The Glass Menagerie, Faith Healing is a blend of dance and theatre, lip-synched film scenes and delicate duets. Mature themes. Pre-show discussion with choreographer Jane Comfort, 7pm.

Grains of Time C

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Sat, Oct 23 at 8pm Stewart Theatre

NC State's favorite male a cappella vocal group is back with their fall concert. $5 NCSU students

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919-515-1100 ncsu.edu/arts

The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information.

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News

TECHNICIAN

Entrepreneurship lecture series continues Monday at McKimmon One of the most successful graduates of the University comes back to speak about entrepreneurship.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010• PAGE 3

CELEBRATE WHAT’S GREAT

Lehrer’s lecture will be held Monday at 4 p.m. Before his lecture begins, the Office of Technology Transfer will host a showcase of entrepreneurial companies launched at the University. This event will Elise Heglar be held at 3 p.m. The events Staff Writer are being held at McKimmon Students will have an op- Center. “We are hoping that students portunity to hear about successful entrepreneurship this can gain some awareness by semester from one of the best. going to this event. We want As part of installation week, to promote success on our honoring new Chancellor campus,” Parker said. After leavRandolph ing the comWoodson, a pany Morse/ lecture series Diesel in on entrepre1979, Lehrer neurship is founded his bei ng held current comMonday. Peter Lehrer, Stephanie Parker, assistant to the pany, Lehrerchancellor for communications McGovern co-founder w it h Gene of L eh rerMcGovern, McGovern, who had will be the keynote speaker. Woodson worked with him at his prewill be introducing Lehrer vious company, according to an ncsu.edu report. Lehrerbefore his speech. “There are a lot of events McGovern are now considered going on during installation one of the top three builders week, and this is one of them. in America’s $100 billion conThe Chancellor will be in- struction industry, the report troducing Mr. Lehrer before said. During his speech, Lehrer he speaks and give everyone some background informa- will be discussing the docution,” said Stephanie Parker, mentary “Dream Builders,” assistant to the chancellor for which is about his entrepreneurial career in construction. communications.

“Entrepreneurship is what N.C. State is all about. A lot of our graduates have done something like that and a lot of students want to do something like it,” Parker said. Lehrer was chosen as a speaker because of his great success as well as his personal relationship with the University. He graduated from the University in 1963 with honors in civil engineering. His success is something the chancellor is hoping students will be able to benefit from hearing about. “It’s a great way to celebrate a successful alumni while encouraging students to excel,” Parker said. Lehrer is known for his work on large construction projects. His company has worked on several big projects, including the restoration of the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, Euroland Disney, and the restoration of Grand Central Station in New York City. “I always had tremendous belief in myself, but even more in the people I work with [and] in my company’s ability to deliver,” said Lehrer in a July 28, 2005 New York Sun report.

ZOMBIES

Traditional Indian music played at Tally center event

“Entrepreneurship is what N.C. State is all about.”

continued from page 1

set being the technical rules of the event set in place to keep up the charade. “Each set of characters has its own purpose. You’ve obviously got your zombies, which shamble after the humans. You’ve got the zombie killers who try to take out the zombies,” said Livingston. “And then you’ve got the marked survivors, which are basically the equivalent of zombie fastfood.” The other set of rules involves legal and courtesy issues, which Livingston said are important to follow so there can be future zombie walks. “We want to be sure that people, of course, stay out of traffic and keep their blood off of buildings and sidewalks,” said Livingston. “We also want to be sure they only attack those humans designated as ‘victims.’ Despite their innate desires to consume human flesh, we can’t have them randomly attacking innocent bystanders.” Larry Graham, a freshman in political science, will be attending the zombie walk as a member of the undead. “I think it’ll be a lot of fun. I can’t wait to get out and eat some brains,” said Graham. “What would be really awesome is if N.C. State organized a campus-wide game of zombie.”

According to Graham, the game “zombie” has similar rules as the Raleigh Zombie Walk. A certain number of students are selected to be zombies, who then lurch about while searching for survivors to infect. In order to infect the human survivors, zombies have to grab them with both hands and hold on for at least three seconds. If they are caught, they are required to turn into zombies and go after the remaining survivors. The last survivor is the winner. The only method of protection is to attack the zombies on the head with a shortened pool noodle. The survivors in the zombie walk will not have this advantage, and must turn into zombies once bitten. According to Livingston, at least 300 zombies joined forces in previous zombie walks, and he said he hopes there will be more this year. “We’re going to have photographers and videographers out helping to spread the word about the night’s events,” said Livingston. “Zombies are entitled to the same rights as humans. All we are asking for is the same civil rights for the undead.”

JORDAN MOORE/TECHNICIAN

Aldridge Forrester, a sophomore in business, takes a bite out of a corn on the cob at the N.C. State Fair Sunday. Forrester said the corn wasnt as interesting as the Krispy Kreme Burger he had just finished, however. “[The corn] was pretty good though,” Forrester said.

Carnatic, Rock and Jazz to be some of the genres of music played at the event. Pranay Deshpande Staff Writer

A fusion of Western and Indian music will be played in the Talley Student Center ballroom Sunday at 5 p.m. MAITRI Indian graduate student association will sponsor the event which will promote talent. Aditya Ravi, a graduate student in mechanical engineering and president of the MAITRI, said “Carnatic to Rock and Blues to Jazz will be played at the event.” According to Ravi, the event began with several enthusiastic students who wanted a music

EXPLOSION continued from page 1

crew who is responsible for getting all the materials associated with the event. The grounds crew does this in an effort to reach out to students and get them actively involved on campus. Once the flowers are planted, the grounds crew takes care of them,” Morris said. Morris said there would be different varieties of f lower-

Technician was there. You can be too.

program with the intention to promote their newly formed band “!NJAYN.” Ravi said ticket costs factored into the event, but students are excited to see the 12-member band. “Since the costs were high, students were a little hesitant, but they certainly wanted to do this show,” Ravi said. Sriram Menon, a graduate student in mechanical engineering and a band member, said the event plans to mix Jazz and traditional Indian music. “It will be a good mix of Western and Indian music and there will also be some fusion stuff,” Menon said. “Our own compositions are an attempt to fuse some Jazz music with Indian music, both of which we find extremely challenging to create, as well as to play.”

A lot of preparation went into the program and according to Menon, the group practiced for over a month, picking up songs that they wanted to play. Saranathy Pakkam, a graduate student in mechanical engineering and band member, said plenty of rehearsal went into preparing for the event. “We had a lot of rehearsals, some of which went on for four to five hours. A lot of coordination between conflicting schedules of band members was required,” Pakkam said. Ravi said the event will also have free refreshments and an area to relax and enjoy the performance. “Since it’s an evening where one can relax and chill out with friends and listen to good music, I think the response should be good, and hey, we have free

pizza as well,” said Ravi. According to Ravi there were not many formalities or permissions involved with organizing such event. “We contacted the Talley Student Center to reserve the Ballroom, and automatically we have the clearance to play music or host any other approved event as per their regulations,” Ravi said. According to Ravi, MAITRI wanted to do something bigger but there are time and money constraints attached to every event. “This committee will step down and a new committee will be elected in December. This will be a foundation for such events and we only hope that the new committee will work on it and make it even bigger,” Ravi said.

ing plants planted during the event. “This year we are planting two types of Pansy, Delta Strawberry Shortcake and Delta Wine and Cheese,” Morris said. “We also have Snapdragon ‘LaBella Mix’, Swiss Chard ‘Bright Lights’ and Ornamental Cabbage ‘Color up White.’” Morris said the flowers would be planted all over campus, but mostly in prominent places such as around the Bell Tower, the Chancellor’s Residence, Holladay Hall, Winston Hall

and Wolf Plaza. “Due to budget cuts we have had to decrease the number of flowers and beds almost every year but we still try to plant the most prominent places on campus,” Morris said. Willysha Jenkins, a senior in animal science, said she thinks all the greenery and f lowers around campus has a very relaxing effect. “Planting flowers is a very good idea, especially as it increases the greenery around campus. It is good to have a cam-

pus full of flowers and greenery; it has a relaxing effect,” Jenkins said. “It is wonderful for the University to acknowledge the importance of breast cancer. It can help women to be informed at a young age, and they can be more vigilant about it.” Morris said Student Government would like more student volunteers to participate in the event. “We want as many students as possible to show up for the event, Morris said.

By 2016, the Nonprofit sector will need over 80,000 new leaders per year. Are you ready to step up to the plate?

Minor In NONPROFIT STUDIES The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information.

Learn more at http://nonprofit.chass.ncsu.edu/minor


Viewpoint

PAGE 4 • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010

TECHNICIAN

{OUR VIEW}

TED talks further the challenge T

THE FACTS:

TEDxNCSU will take place in Talley Ballroom on Saturday, starting at 8:30 a.m. Speakers will include Mike Giancola, Marshall Brain, Dick Gordon, Saul Flores, Blair Kelly, Claudia Kimbrough, Marian McCord, and Santiago Piedrafita.

OUR OPINION:

This is a great opportunity for inspiring leaders of the University to share and promote their ideas and bring prestige to N.C. State. The talks should become a tradition at the University to truly show we are an innovative force with valuable ideas.

he chancellor’s new slogan is “Locally responsive, globally engaged,” and the University embodies this idea through its extension program within the state and its outreach to many countries across the world. Now, with the help of the TEDxNCSU talks, the University will be able to show that it is made up of people who also think the same way. The topic of Saturday’s talks is “What Really Matters,” which will show that N.C. State has ideas that “really matter.” It may seem like another lectures series, but it is something much more. The TEDxNCSU event will help students and

ideas that can also make a difference. N.C. State has ideas worth spreading. From CALS to dents and faculty to change the CHASS, Engineering to Deworld, and now it can challenge sign, each college has a phithe world to do the same. This losophy to share with the stuwill further validate N.C. State dents, who will go on to share as a think tank and promote it with the world. The speakit as an innovative, forward- ers for the TEDxNCSU talks thinking environment. embody these various corners Also, holding the first TED of the University and will actalks to be held at a university curately present the ideas N.C. in N.C. brings prestige to the State has to change the world. University. Schools like Duke University and UNC-CH may have great graduation guest speakers, however N.C. State can prove that it has homegrown inspirational talent with

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

faculty see here are people with inspiring ideas in their own backyard. There will be people speaking who spread their ideas every day and who are available to inspire others, all students need to do is take advantage of having their resources. Francis de los Reye was good to bring the talks to campus. Speakers will not only be speaking to attendants, but to the University and others who tune in to listen. The University constantly challenges stu-

Setting the campus climate

D

iversit y ha s been a recent buzzword on campus. Groups, leaders, rally’s and even Technician’s editorials have been throwing the word around. Most students are tired of hearing it, but N.C. State encompasses a diverse body of students, faculty and staff. There is no way around it. The University released a survey Wednesday to the student body to test the campus climate regarding diversity. Students can tell the administration how they feel about diversity and acceptance, how they view other’s opinions and can express exactly what they want to in an open-ended response box at the end. This shows the University is interested in hearing what students think about diversity, and students should not take this for granted. If you get it, take the time to fill it out. It is important students respond to this survey, whet her or not they think diversity is important. If you think diversity is great, say so. If you don‚Äôt think diversity is a good thing, say so. Whatever the response, if people have this kind of opinion, the University should be aware of it. Being lazy is not an excuse for not taking the survey. It is 20 minutes to share an opinion that will shape the way the University moves forwards with its plans. The chancellor has already started work on the University‚Äôs Strategic Plan, and the results of this survey will factor into the plans, whatever the results. The University certainly put considerable thought into this project. One of the most interesting parts of the survey is about what the students‚Äô perception of others’ feelings are towards diversity, including the faculties‚Äô attitude. The students‚Äô perceptions are just as important as their personal feelings. The survey also asks about how welcome students feel in different scenarios. While general feelings are important to consider, students are also affected by interactions. The University is wise

to consider these instances as well. The University really wanted to hear what the students have to say, so students should tell them. How many times do students complain the University doesn’t care? Well, this is their time to really express their thoughts, instead of continuing to let the University go with a blind, general feeling that students all like diversity. Students can confirm or deny this perception and allow the University to move forward based on the true feeling of students. The University should also think about extending this survey to faculty. If they ask students about their opinions towards professors, professors should also be able to tell the University about what they have seen. T he a dministration will also be able to gauge how diverse the faculty, who are the ones teaching and interacting with students daily, think the campus is or should be. Ultimately, people are people and all people have opinions. There are groups on campus who do not feel we, as a community, should be welcoming to other groups different from themselves. Then there are groups who think the campus should be welcome to all walks of life. Both of these ideas are the opinions of the different sides, however everyone needs to consider what it means to be on a University campus and who else is in the population that makes it up. At the end of the day, the greater majority has to be inclusive, no matter the opinion for or against diversity.

Mark Lawhorn, Editor-in-Chief Emeritus

“This shows the University is interested in hearing what students think,”

Send Amanda Wilkins your thoughts on the campus survey to letters@technicianonline.com.

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515.2411 515.2029 515.5133 technicianonline.com

“Make sure you lead with your core values and don’t deviate from them.” Adam Cloninger Senior, International Studies

“Christianity.” Wesley McNeely, Freshman, Civil Engineering

}

“Find a healthy passion.”

Joseph Binkley Sophomore, Engineering Undeclared

Bryce Davis, Senior, Physics

“A good idea worth sharing is one that strives for the greater good.”

“Be greatful for the little things we have that the rest of the world does not have.”

Sarah Loren Moles, Junior, Human Biology

Stephen West, Freshman, Aerospace Engineering

Editor-in-Chief Amanda Wilkins

News Editor Nathan Hardin

Sports Editor Tyler Everett

Photo Editor Sarah Tudor

news@technicianonline.com

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Managing Editor Biko Tushinde

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Viewpoint Editor

Advertising Manager Andrea Mason advertising@sma.ncsu.edu

Features Editor Laura Wilkinson features@technicianonline.com

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What is an idea worth sharing?

“Love.”

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IN YOUR WORDS

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2008 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features FINE ARTS

TECHNICIAN

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010 • PAGE 5

Grains of Time talk musical process and auditions N.C. State’s oldest a cappella group give insights into their musical process and what auditions are like. Elizabeth Ayscue Correspondent

The Grains of Time that will take the stage Saturday sounds a lot different than the one that began its 40-year run performing traditional a cappella songs. The group, while still performing classics such as “Swing Low Sweet Chariot,” has added to its repertoire contemporary pop favorites like the Backstreet Boys song, “The Call.”   The Grains, the University’s premier allmale a cappella group, have been around since 1968. The group gained its popularity for performing a cappella versions of traditional songs. Matthew Tucker, a junior in human biology and biochemistry, said the group has progressed over the years. Tucker, the musical director for the Grains, explained that in order to attract a more diverse crowd, the group has begun playing pop songs to make their performances more contemporary. These songs are intermixed with the traditional a cappella songs that are a staple of their concerts. “There can only be so many songs on the radio that a group of guys can sing,” Tucker said. As far as converting a song to a cappella

format, Tucker said it is just a matter of listening to the song and determining the chord structure, then applying it to voices. He also said that a few of the members play musical instruments, which is helpful when writing the parts. Ryan Riddle, a senior in mechanical engineering and the group’s public relations director, said this is especially true when considering the percussion of the song. Riddle beatboxes to provide the percussion during the performances. In order to prepare, he listens to a song to determine the different drums used and mimics the sound. “I played drums for a long time. It makes it easier,” Riddle said. After the group decides on a song, they hold auditions for solos and assign parts based on voices. This year, the Grains have two new members, Scott McWhirter, a freshman in aerospace engineering, and Luke Miller, a freshman in chemical engineering. McWhirter said he decided to try out after seeing some a cappella videos on YouTube. “It was really nerve-wracking for me,” McWhirter said. “But the guys made it really relaxed.” Miller said he did not have a chance to audition before the callback date, but the guys allowed him to perform anyway. “They were really cool about letting everyone have a chance,” Miller said. The Grains hold their auditions biannually, at the beginning of the fall and

spring semesters. Tucker said they usually get more people who audition in fall than in the spring. When choosing a new member, the group looks at not just the quality of his audition, but also at his musical background and whether or not they think he will make a good addition to the group. Tucker also said they try to recruit about two or three guys to make up for the ones they lose when they graduate. Every four years or so, the group loses about five members, according to Tucker. For those who are too afraid to try out, Miller wants them to know that it is possible to do a performing arts activity like the Grains and still have time for schoolwork. “You can do just as much in school and still do this, if you know how to balance your life,” Miller said. Through the use of more contemporary music, the Grains are hoping to widen their fan base to beyond a cappella fans and have more of a presence on campus. “We’re trying to appeal more to the student body,” Riddle said. and still do this, if you know how to balance your life,” Miller said. Through the use of more contemporary music, the Grains are hoping to widen their fan-base to beyond a cappella fans and have more of a presence on campus. “We’re trying to appeal more to the student body,” Riddle said.

COMMENTARY

Blind Guardian sails to the edge of time

PICK

OF THE WEEK

CAITLIN CONWAY/TECHNICIAN

Justin Gray, a senior in construction engineering, performs “Part of the List” by Ne-Yo at the Grainsof Time concert on Saturday, Dec. 5, 2009. Gray was a soloist in multiple numbers including “I Ain’t Got You” by Alicia Keys and “What I Got” by Sublime.

Q&A Chris Wolstenholme with

Muse bassist shares insight

T

echnician was given the opportunity to chat with Chris Wolstenholme, the bassist and back-up vocalist for the English band Muse. To kick off their fall North American tour, the alternative rockers will play at the RBC Center Tuesday night, their first appearance in the capital city since they played with U2 at Carter-Finley Stadium in 2009.

At the Edge of Time Blind Guardian No Remorse

Jonathan Newman WKNC DJ

How does one define epic? I believe, in my humble opinion, that if you were to look up the word epic in the dictionary you would see a picture of Blind Guardian’s latest magnum opus, At The Edge of Time. This album is pure magic. From the opening strings and orchestra, to the closing guitar riff, this album is absolutely f lawless. All of the songs on the album are based off of fantasy stories, and it really shines through in the lyrics. The opening song, “Sacred Worlds,” was originally in the video game Sacred 2, where you had to find the band’s instruments in a quest. They extended the song with a full orchestra intro and outro, adding more depth and character to the song. This song immediately sets the tone for the whole album and gives you an idea for what you have in store. The next song on the album that really shines is “Tanelorn (Into The Void),” based off the series of books Eternal Champion. The song is fast, having more speed metal akin to their earlier work. The guitars drive you forward, leading you to a catchy chorus you can’t help

Laura Wilkinson Features Editor

COURTESY OF NO REMORSE RECORDS

but sing along to. One of my personal favorites, “Curse My Name,” is based off of John Milton’s novel, The Tenure of Kings and Magistrate, where a king is killed for not fulfilling his duties. It is an epic ballad where you will sing along to every word, and even raise your fist in the air, screaming the chorus at the top of your lungs. It is one of the best tracks on the album and quite possibly the best out of their entire 20 year discography, ranking second only to “The Bard’s Song (In The Forest),” a crowd favorite. The last song to make mention of is “Wheel of Time,” based off of the Wheel of Time fantasy series written by Robert Jordan. This song is very much akin to the band’s last epic song, “And Then There Was

Silence.” It is bombastic with its huge chorus where the lead vocalist, Hansi Kursch, vocals are layered upon each other. It is a fantastic way to close an album, and one that will force you to play the CD again, and again. All of the songs on here are beautiful and composed perfectly. The orchestra added to the songs contribute depth that one rarely finds in CD’s these days. I recommend this album for anyone who loves power metal, prog metal or even just music in general. It is a fantastic album and one I think that will be very hard to top. I will be listening to this album until I reach the edge of time.

NCSU Center Stage presents Jane Comfort and Company

Faith Healing a dance/theatre work based on

The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams with

Mark Dendy as Amanda

Friday, October 22 8pm Stewart Theatre 919-515-1100 ncsu.edu/arts $5 NCSU students $19-$23 faculty/staff 7pm pre-show talk with Jane Comfort

mature themes Faith Healing is a National Performance Network (NPN) Re-Creation Fund Project sponsored by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts in partnership with the Florida Dance Association, NCSU Center Stage and NPN. This project has been made possible by the National Endowment for the Arts as part of American Masterpieces: Three Centuries of Artistic Genius. For more information: www.npnweb.org. Permission to utilize THE GLASS MENAGERIE material by arrangement with The University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee. Photo: Arthur Elgort.

Technician: How did Muse get started? Wolstenholme: I think when we got to about 15 years old, a lot of people were getting to the age where they were coming up to finishing school and thinking about careers and what they wanted to do, and a lot of people lost interest [in being part of a band]. I guess me and Matt [lead vocals] and Dom [drummer] were a few of the last people that wanted to carry on making music and being in a band and feel like we were a part of something. It was just by coincidence really. Matt and Dom’s band fell apart and my band was on the verge of falling apart and Matt and Dom started to some stuff on their own and they asked me to play with them. I was a drummer at the time and they wanted someone to play bass and do back-up vocals so they asked me if I go. I had never picked up a bass in my life at that point. I had a few rehearsals with them and it kind of went from there and that was in 1994. It took a long time to get going though. The first five years were really tough. I think particularly the part of the country we lived in there was no real music scene going on at that point. It wasn’t like London or Manchester that have these big huge music scenes going on, we were in a rural part of the country and there were very few places to play. We spent more time rehearsing than we did gigging. Once we got signed to Maverick and different labels in different countries it was all about touring. We just hit the road and never looked back. I think it’s been a good way to break the band. For us, it was always about going out and playing live. I think we’re in a really good position now because the record sales industry is in such a bad place now. We’re in a good position because we know we can go out and play live pretty much anywhere in the world.

Technician: What inspires your music? Wolstenholme: I think the one thing we’ve always tried to do with our music is keep it varied. I think music tours are like an education. We’ve always been keen to explore many different areas of music and many different approaches to making music. There are some influences – particularly in recent albums – that are not necessarily music that we listen to that much. They’re definitely approaches to music we find appealing. I think on the last couple of albums there have been some electronic influences. I don’t listen to an awful lot of electronic music but I’m definitely interested in the way electronic music is produced because it’s very, very different to the way guitar music is produced. For us, guitar music has always been what we are and I think what this band always will be. I feel that between the three of us, there is only so much you can do with guitars. If you really want to expand your repertoire you need to be influenced by other things. Matt’s been very heavily influenced by a lot of classical music, so the classical music combined with the rock element combined with certain electronic influences has created this whole new sound that we’ve made. Technician: What’s your favorite part of touring? Wolstenholme: Obviously the show. Every day, you wake up and the one thing you look forward to is getting onstage. That’s what it’s all about. Aside from the show, it’s an opportunity to experience the world. There are many places that we’ve been to with the band that are places I wouldn’t have thought in a million years of going to. It’s great to experience as much of the world as you can; I think it makes you more open-minded as a person, experiencing the different cultures and different people. Obviously the travel is very difficult sometimes – you spend a lot of time jet-lagged, you spend a lot of time hanging around in

airports, cars, vans and tour buses. But that’s something that just becomes a way of life. Initially it’s very exciting because you’re travelling around all the time and then after a while it becomes tiring and once you get past that it becomes a way of life. For us, hopping on a plane is like most people jumping on a bus. Technician: Do you have any stories about crazy fans? Wolstenholme: You get stalked a little bit sometimes but it depends where you on. When you go to Asia and Japan and places like that, where a lot of bands from Europe and a lot of bands from America don’t go there that much, I think they get very over-whelmed by the whole situation when a band turns up. It’s funny, you turn up to the airport and there will be hundreds of people there to greet you off the plane. I find it quite hilarious when you fly to New York or when you fly to Heathrow or some major city like that, no one gives a shit. Then you turn up in Indonesia or Tokyo or somewhere like that and there are hundreds of people at the airport wanting to get things signed. When you turn up at a hotel, there’s people hiding behind curtains and walking around the lobby pretending they’re hotel guests and then the next thing you know you’re getting swarmed by about 30 people at once. Places like that, the fans are really interesting because they come from a different culture and they get very excited when bands from Europe and America go over there. I don’t think we’ve had anything too crazy. If that’s the kind of thing that irritates you then you probably shouldn’t be in a band. I think the reason most people are in bands is because they want to be loved and they’re insecure – that’s why you get into a band; you just turn into a show-off.


Features FINE ARTS

PAGE 6 • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010

TECHNICIAN Ariel Mendoza, a third-year student from la Universidad Nacional Agricultura in Hondouras, and Ariel Fugate, a junior in fisheries and wildlife science, talk underneath the ferris wheel. “It’s really cool,” Fugate said about bringing the Hondouran students to the State Fair and exposing them to what she believes to be a good representation of ‘southern culture.’ “I think it’s a really exciting experience for them to be here.”

Sharing a cup of throwing rings with other students, Ruth Orellana tries to ring a glass soda bottle and win a prize. “[I love] the games and the food,” Orellana said about the night at the State Fair. But going to the fair and visiting family were not the only things she looked forward to on her trip to the United States. “I want to get a tattoo here. It’s my dream,” she added. MARISA AKERS/TECHNICIAN

First time at the Fair

MARISA AKERS/TECHNICIAN

HONDURAN STUDENTS EXPERIENCE THE N.C. STATE FAIR FOR THE FIRST TIME DURING A VISIT TO THE U.S.

E

ver since 2000, N.C. State has brought students from Universidad Nacional Agricultura in Honduras to the U.S for two weeks. Students have the opportunity to learn about educational opportunities, such as internships and graduate school in the U.S.. Professors and students from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences brought these students to the N.C. State Fair on Thursday to experience the excitement of fried food, rides and Midway games.

Raynaldo Flores, a junior in agriculture at the University National de Agriculture, chows down on a philly cheese steak sandwhich while attending the fair Thursday. Sitting beside him, Professor John Cabella pointed out and said “Now that’s American food!” Visiting from Honduras, 24 students came down to the N.C. State campus to learn more about the Unversity for a week. The other week is spent with their family around the country, which many haven’t seen for years.

Eduardo Pinto and Edgar Ferrugino use their digital cameras to record the fireworks show at the State Fair. “Everything is very, very exciting and very, very fun,” Pinto said. “[This trip] is educational and a good experience. I like the United States, especially North Carolina.” MARISA AKERS/ TECHNICIAN

DANIELLE NEUJAHR/ TECHNICIAN

Spotted in the Brickyard

T

PHOTO & STORY BY MEGAN FARRELL

echnician’s weekly “Spotted in the Brickyard” highlights a fashionable student found in the Brickyard. From eclectic and vintage to classic and chic, Technician will be sure to bring you fresh looks every week.

Shakedown Street Pub highlights local artists Pub gives opportunities for local hip-hop artists to perform on Sucker Free Sunday. Brendan Jebb Staff Writer

Kris Gower, a junior in business administration, was spotted wearing a smart and stylish outfit. Her combination shirt and vest was found in her roommate’s closest (price unknown) but purchased from Kohl’s. Gower wears a black pencil skirt from Gap ($18 on sale) and red shoes from Nordstrom ($80). Her outfit is topped off with a bold patterned coat, purchased at a vintage store for $40. Gower loves shopping at stores such as Anthropologie, Free People and Target. Gower was dressed up for a sorority event, but she said her usual style is “relaxed and kind of hippie or hobo-chic.” Gower continued to say, “I like wearing things that no one else has. But I’m also a business student, so I try to dress professionally to impress my professors.”

Jillian Zhou, a graduate student in statistics, poses in the Brickyard. Zhou purchased her top at a store in China for $10, her leggings from Abercrombie and Fitch for $30, and her sweater from J Crew for $30. Her outfit is completed with boots by Sperry ($50), Hugo Boss sunglasses, and a Longchamp handbag ($100). Zhou enjoys shopping at Abercrombie and Fitch and Free People, and mixing those pieces with garments she has from China. “My style is casual with an Asian influence,” Zhou said. “I have Korean and Japanese fashion magazines that I look at for inspiration.”

With the Hillsborough Street renovations giving the area a fresh new look and a new surge of people walking the street, Shakedown Street Pub has capitalized on the opportunity to bring in good entertainment and quality food to an increasing flow of customers they have been experiencing lately. “We have been open since Dec. 1 of last year and offer lunches, an open bar and music shows,” Norman Randolph McArthur, the manager of the pub, said. McArthur discussed the goals of Shakedown Street both for the long run and for the present moment. “We expect to satisfy the customers on a consistent basis and create a great overall experience in terms of food and entertainment,” McArthur said. “We would like to bring in superb local music on a consistent basis in the long run while keeping prices low for customers.” The venue can fit roughly 50 people and provides an upclose-and-personal experience for the audience. Furthermore, there is seating around the walls if customers feel the need to sit down during performances. “We plan on booking many talented local artists, and we encourage people of all ages to

come out to shows. It is great to see our customer base grow over recent months,” McArthur said. One event that has generated popularity at Shakedown Street is Sucker Free Sunday. The event features numerous unsigned hip-hop artists, each performing 15-minute sets with backing from renowned deejays. Last Sunday the event featured performers such as Cyrano Sinatra and Drique London. “Sucker Free Sunday at Shakedown Street was a great show. The crowd was feeling the vibe of that boom bap hiphop I was giving them, and I definitely will be back at this venue again,” Sinatra said. “It made me proud to see fans of underground music come out and support unsigned artists. We just want everybody to spread the word. K-Hill and I are dedicated to carrying the underground hip-hop torch for N.C. whenever and wherever!”
 Eric Taylor, a Raleigh resident and music producer, said more people need to come out to support the artists each Sunday. “I’ve been coming out every week and it’s always a great time,” Taylor said. “If more fans would come out it would further add to the environment of the show and give these artists more motivation to keep making good music.”


Sports

TECHNICIAN

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 22, 2010• PAGE 7

Seven named to Phil Steele’s Midseason All-ACC teams

continued from page 8

QUARTERBACK, LINEBACKER AND TIGHT END ON FIRST-TEAM, WITH SPENCER MAKING SECOND TEAM. JARVIS WILLIAMS, AUDIE COLE AND BRANDAN BISHOP ALSO REPRESENTED, AS THIRD TEAMERS.

1ST T E A M

RUSSELL WILSON PASSING YARDS - 2124 ATTEMPTS/COMPLETIONS - 170/294 PASSING TOUCHDOWNS - 18

2ND T E A M 3RD T E A M

GEORGE BRYAN CATCHES - 20 RECEIVING YARDS - 240 RECEIVING TOUCHDOWNS - 2

NATE IRVING TACKLES - 52 TACKLES FOR LOSS - 9 SACKS - 3.5

VBALL

sphere to play in.” Those wondering what specific part of the uniforms will be pink this year will have to wait until Saturday night to find out. “They’re keeping it a surprise,” Cyr said. B ot h Fr id ay ’s ga me against Virginia and Saturday’s Dig Pink match against Virginia Tech will begin at 7:00p.m. in Reynolds Coliseum.

VOLLEYBALL TEAM'S ATTACKING STATISTICS: Kills: 934 Errors: 425 Total Attacks: 2547 Attack Percentage: .200 Kills/Set: 12.8 SOURCE: N.C.. STATE ATHLETICS

OWEN SPENCER CATCHES - 34 RECEIVING YARDS - 524 RECEIVING TOUCHDOWNS - 1

JARVIS WILLIAMS CATCHES - 27 RECEIVING YARDS - 421 RECEIVING TOUCHDOWNS - 3

POLICY

The Technician will not be held responsible for damages or losses due to fraudulent advertisements. However, we make every effort to prevent false or misleading advertising from appearing in our publication.

DEADLINES

Our business hours are Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Line ads must be placed by noon the previous day.

BRANDAN BISHOP TACKLES - 27 INTERCEPTIONS - 3

AUDIE COLE TACKLES - 37 TACKLES FOR LOSS - 7.5 SACKS - 4

Classifieds

RATES

For students, line ads start at $5 for up to 25 words. For non-students, line ads start at $8 for up to 25 words. For detailed rate information, visit ­technicianonline.com/classifieds. All line ads must be prepaid.

To place a classified ad, call 919.515.2411, fax 919.515.5133 or visit technicianonline.com/classifieds

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

FT/PT Veterinary kennel/assistant needed for well equipped small animal hospital. 20 miles east of Raleigh. ideal position for motivated applicants with veterinary school aspirations. 1st sem vet school scholarship (in-state tuition) or equivalent year end bonus provided for individual able to work full-time for 1 year. Call 919-553-4601.

Looking for students to work on a few sales campaigns to contact customers, gaining interest in products/ services, securing leads and setting appointments. Part time, 5-20 hours per week. Hourly base pay. Submit resumes to careers@LeaseASalesRep.com or call 919-783-4182.

Seeking mature individual with pleasant personality to show rental houses to NC State students. Fun work. 10-20 hrs/wk. January through August 2011. Excellent salary. Of­fice furnished. Call 833-7142 for more information.

Hab Techs Needed!! Maxim Healthcare needs staff to work w/developmentally disabled clients in Wake Co. Flexible hours in afternoons, evenings and weekends. $9-$10/hr. Need own transportation. 919- 676-3118.

Optical Retail Sales, High-end eyewear. Will train, 15-20 hrs/week, Flex scheduling, Weekends necessary, Knowledge of fashion trends helpful, Come by for application. 20/20 Eyeworks Crabtree Valley Mall. 781- 0904.

Extras needed to stand in the backgrounds for a major film production. Earn up to $200/ day Exp not Req. All looks needed! CAll 877-460-0657

P/T LANDSCAPE HELPER NEEDED NOW with small company. 3 miles from campus. Flexible hours (12+) M-F, occasional Saturdays. Starting salary $8.50/hr. Previous experience and carpentry skills desired but will train right candidate. Call 779-2596. Leave message.

EmploymEnt Help Wanted BARTENDERS ARE IN DEMAND! Earn $20-$35 per hour. 1 or 2 week classes & weekend classes. 100% job placement assistance. Raleigh’s bartending school. Have fun! Make money! Meet people! Ask about our FALL tuition rates and student discount. CALL NOW!! 919-676-0774. www.cocktailmixer.com Experienced Gymnastics Instructors needed for gymnastics school in North Raleigh. Part time positions available with flexible schedules. Call (919) 848-7988

Level: 1

2 3 4

Valet Parking Attendants Needed at Various Upscale Restaurants/Private Parties. Part-time and weekend positions available. Clean cut customer service oriented, clean driving record, able to drive a five-speed. $8-$15/hr including tips. 919-829-8050 x213.

Real estate

ServiceS

Rooms FoR Rent

Spring Break

Female wanted for sublease Jan- July. Female tenant for unfurnished private bed/bath in 4 BD apt. in Campus Crossings on third floor. $500 a month including utilities, cable, wireless broadband, w/d. Bus to and from campus daily. Call 828- 606-7402 or email jlmaurer@ncsu.edu.

BAHAMAS SPRING BREAK $189 5DAYS or $239 7-DAYS. All prices include: Round-trip luxury cruise with food. Accommodations on the island at your choice of thirteen resorts. Appalachia Travel. www.BahamaSun.com 800-867-5018.

Work one on one w/children w/disabilities. part time evenings and/or weekends. we will train. $9-14 p/h. for more info or application go to www.asmallmiracleinc.com.

FOR RELEASE OCTOBER 22, 2010

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

vs. LEVEL 2

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27

Sudoku By The PUZZLE Mepham Group6/26/10 SOLUTION TO FRIDAY’S Level:

1 2 3 4

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit

www.sudoku.org.uk

LEVEL 4

© 2010 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

vs. TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9 Save up to $45 by purchasing online

www.CarolinaHurricanes.com/college

ON SA L E N OW !

ACROSS 1 Bulletin board material 5 __ ed 9 Human-powered Eastern cab 14 Hyalite, e.g. 15 Realize 16 Arcadian 17 Actress Andersson 18 Karachi language 19 Popped up 20 Baroque painter’s study of a snack? 23 1986 movie title trio 24 Rib 25 Muscat money 28 Employees with a lot of keys 33 Go back 36 Surrealist’s portrait of a president? 38 Spanish pronoun 40 Suffix with polymer 41 Org. co-founded by Babe Zaharias 42 Synthetist’s picture of a French author? 47 Afternoon break 48 Radiances 49 Mars candy bar 50 Pol. platformpromoting org. 52 Après-dinner confection 57 Impressionist’s study of a washerwoman? 62 Intense excitement 63 Sheryl Crow’s “__ Wanna Do” 64 When repeated, “I agree” 65 Newmark with an online list 66 Land of 10,000 Lakes: Abbr. 67 Delinquent’s fear 68 Ma’s forte 69 Pre-wedding party 70 Pres. Reagan’s “evil empire” DOWN 1 G.I. Joe foe 2 Subject of Great Britain/China wars

Solution to Thursday’s puzzle

10/22/10

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every

10/22/10

By Clive Probert

3 Religious teacher 4 Filmmaker’s __ light 5 Berlin was its last capital 6 Bathrobe word 7 When repeated twice, “and so on” 8 Mettle 9 Freshwater crustacean 10 First first name in space 11 Popular foam shoe 12 Mascara target 13 Shout of support 21 Gare du __: Paris railway station 22 Aria singer, often 26 Country singer Jackson 27 Symphonic poem pioneer 29 Word in many a rap name 30 “NBA on __” 31 Frat party wear 32 __ pea 33 Noodle tests? 34 Yawn-inducing 35 Sad 37 “Please open a can for me”?

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

Lookin’ for the answer key? VISIT TECHNICIANONLINE.COM

(c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

39 Improve, perhaps 43 Have, as an operation 44 Stevie Wonder’s “__ She Lovely” 45 Representing in drawing 46 Let go 51 Quahogs 53 Type of jacket the Beatles helped make fashionable

10/22/10

54 Windbreak, often 55 Lots 56 Oversight 57 Like mortals? 58 Track 59 First first name on the moon 60 Landed 61 Humerus neighbor 62 Govt. broadband regulator


Sports

COUNTDOWN

• 29 days until the football team takes on North Carolina

Pack ready for Dig PINK

VOLLEYBALL

Women’s volleyball to play two over weekend, including annual Dig Pink match

Irving a Butkus semifinalist Senior linebacker Nate Irving is one of 15 nominees for the 2010 Butkus Award, which annually recognizes the nation’s top linebacker. Among the 15 semifinalists, three were nominees in 2009. Irving has notched 52 tackles, nine in the backfield and has had 3.5 quarterback sacks. His return from an injury that prevented him from playing in 2009 has played a substantial role in the Pack’s defensive turnaround. The list of award finalists will be released Nov. 23, and the winner will be announced Dec. 8. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Swim meet moved to Cary The men’s and women’s swimming teams will battle with Maryland and Davidson Friday and Saturday at the Triangle Aquatic Center in Cary. The teams’ pool at the Willis R. Casey Aquatic Center is unavailable due to ongoing facility upgrades. State will battle Maryland Friday at 2 p.m. and will take on Davidson at 1 p.m. the following day. The facilities the diving teams normally use will be available, and their meets will take place at the same time their counterparts on the swim teams will be competing. Both the men and women got off to 1-0 starts when the women defeated Campbell and the men took down VMI a week ago. The meet will be the Terrapins’ first action of the season. Davidson’s men’s and women’s teams are both 0-2 and looking for their first wins of the season. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

ATHLETIC SCHEDULE

October 2010 M

T

W

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• Page 7: A continuation of the volleyball preview story

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 8 • FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010

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Today WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL Reynolds Coliseum, 7 p.m. WOMEN’S TENNIS @ ITA REGIONAL INDOORS Chapel Hill, N.C., All Day

Brent Kitchen Agromeck Sports Editor

The women’s volleyball team will host Virginia and Virginia Tech this weekend. The team’s annual Dig Pink event in support of breast cancer awareness will be held as part of the Saturday match against Tech. This will be the first time the event has been held following legendary former women’s basketball coach Kay Yow’s passing. “Especially with losing Kay Yow, who is clearly a big inf luence on our school, I think it’s a really good way to have everyone involved in a common goal for raising money for cancer research and things like that,” senior defensive specialist Taylor Pritchard said. “It’s not just the athletes getting together and supporting cancer research, it’s our fans, our coaches and everybody coming together and doing that together.” However, the team must first focus on its Friday opponent - Virginia. “Coach Bunn, one of his big things is taking it game by game and point by point,” Pritchard said. “We’re used to not focusing on the game after the game we haven’t played yet.” State enters the weekend at 12-9 (2-7 ACC) and with five conference matches to play, is three wins away

from its best ACC season since 1999, when it went 5-11 in conference play. “This is an opportunity for us to win two games at home and it is really exciting that we get to have a Dig Pink match this weekend,” redshirt sophomore setter Megan Cyr said. “It’s going to be a really good game.” This year’s Dig Pink will also be new to transfers like Cyr. “I’ve always seen other schools do it,” Cyr said. “I’ve never had the privilege to play for breast cancer awareness before so I’m really excited to get the opportunity to do that, and I’m really excited to see the fan support and play for a cause.” For Elena Frac, a freshman outside hitter from Cary, the event has additional meaning because of Yow’s battle with cancer. “Being from around here, Kay Yow was a big deal,” Frac said. “When she was going through [her battle with cancer] I heard everything that was going on. Dig Pink makes me think about her and [the fact that] we’re raising money for people who are fighting just like she did.” In addition to raising money for breast cancer awareness, Dig Pink gives the players the opportunity to be a little more “girly.” “Dig Pink is a really fun game because for one, as girls, we get to wear pink, which is always fun,” Pritchard said. “It’s just fun. There’s nothing super different about the game or anything. You still have your competition that you want to win but it’s more of a fun atmo-

VBALL continued page 7

ANDY MUSSELMAN/TECHNICIAN

Junior setter Alex Smith set the ball to a teammate during Friday’s game against Maryland in Reynolds Coliseum. The Pack lost 3-2 to the Terrapins.

MEN’S TENNIS

Pack trio prepared to cap fall season at UNC-Wilmington Invitational Men’s tennis team looking to end fall season on a high note.

who will be competing in the Flight B bracket. Although the fall portion of the tennis season is essentially a tune-up for the spring, the Wolfpack would love nothing Tucker Frazier more than to end it with a vicDeputy Sports Editor tory. “We would love to end the The N.C. State men’s tennis team will cap off its fall season on a high note with a portion of the 2010-11 sea- win,” Rollinson said. “We want son as it takes part in the to work on the things we’ve UNCW Invitational over been practicing on so far this season, put good strokes on the the weekend. ball and just The 59thget better.” ranked With only Wolfpack a handful of will be players makjoined by ing the trip host UNC to Wi lmWilmingington, the ton, North Redshirt junior Julian Sullivan te a m w i l l Carolina be traveling Central and Monmouth in the two light, but Sullivan is still optimistic about their chances, as 12-player singles brackets. Redshirt junior Julian long as players keep their poise. “We just have to stay in the Sullivan and freshman Ivan Sanchez Gomez both match mentally,” Sullivan said. received rankings in the “You can’t get upset about the Flight A singles bracket, last shot. You just have to move earning the No.’s 3 and 4 on to the next point because it seeds, respectively. They helps the opponents if they see will be joined by redshirt us get down on ourselves.” The Pack has received healthy sophomore Will Rollinson,

“Our team has definitely worked hard this season.”

Randy Woodson Chancellor

Kelly Hook Student Body President

Tommy Anderson WKNC General Manager

Mark Thomas

Co-host of 620 The Buzz’s “The Insiders”

contributions from a number of places, according to Sullivan. “Our team has definitely worked hard this season and it’s been paying off for us,” Sullivan said. “Everyone has done really well.” Sullivan kicked off the fall schedule in fine fashion for the Pack, winning the purple bracket at the season-opening UVA Invitational. Junior Jaime Pulgar followed that up by collecting three wins at the UVA Plus One tournament and then reached the round of 16 at the ITA Carolinas Regional. Sophomore Dave Thomson one-upped Pulgar at the ITA’s, making it all the way to the semifinals and picking up five wins in a four-day span. Without Thomson, Pulgar and other vital players, the Wolfpack still expects to perform well to finish the fall strong and carry momentum into the spring season. “In this last tournament, we want to do the same thing we’ve been doing,” Sullivan said. “We want to work hard in every match and the results will be in our favor.”

Julius Hodge

Former Wolfpack basketball star

Debra Morgan WRAL TV anchor

AMANDA WILKINS/ARCHIVE TECHNICIAN

Freshman Rafael Paez prepares to return the ball during his singles match at the tennis match Sunday, March 28, 2010. Paez lost after a close third set.

Tyler Everett Sports editor

Tucker Frazier

Deputy sports editor

Sean Klemm

Deputy sports editor

Taylor Barbour

Deputy sports editor

North Carolina vs. Miami

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Georgia Tech vs. Clemson

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Boston College

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Maryland

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Auburn

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LSU

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Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

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Nebraska

Oklahoma State

Nebraska

Nebraska

Nebraska

Nebraska

Nebraska

Maryland vs. Boston College No. 6 LSU vs. No. 4 Auburn No. 13 Wisconsin vs. No. 15 Iowa No. 16 Nebraska vs. No. 14 Oklahoma State No. 8 Alabama vs. Tennessee

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Bama

Alabama

Alabama

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Alabama

Mississippi vs. No. 23 Arkansas

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Georgia vs. Kentucky

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No.1 Oklahoma vs. No. 11 Missouri

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Missouri

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Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Technician - October 22, 2010  

Fall Color explosion to raise awareness

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