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TECHNICIAN

thursday october

24 2013

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Talley marks new era for student centers Dan Martin Correspondent

University Student Centers at N.C. State opened the first part of the newly renovated Talley Student Union Wednesday. Jason’s Deli, Los Lobos Grill, Red Sky Pizza, Tuffy’s Diner and the Talley Market are new dining venues located in phase I section of the student union. Talley staff handed out koozies, t-shirts and brochures to the mass of students that rushed the building. Lines of students streamed out the door and students who arrived early were among the first to lounge on new furniture while they ate food from five new dining venues. “It’s exciting to be a part of the new face of N.C. State.” said Bethaney Lewis, a senior studying nutrition science. “It feels great to be part of the legacy.” The chancellor walked through the crowded lines of people, greeting smiling students who were devouring their N.C. Statemade ice cream. “It’s very modern and pleasing to the eye” Alex Edmiston, a junior in business, said. “The windows made it look very spacious.” This renovation is the first part of the first phase of a $120 million, four-year project. Once fully complete, the 283,000 square foot building will be five stories high, with seven food venues and a 50,000-gallon cistern for rain collection.

JOSEPH PHILLIPS/TECHNICIAN

Hundreds of students waited in a line that went “out the door” of the newly reopened Tally Student Union. Phase I of Tally’s renovation opened Wednesday after numerous setbacks and delays.

TALLEY continued page 3

Planned teacher walkout garners opposition Madeline Safrit Correspondent

While teachers across North Carolina prepare for a Nov. 4 walkout in response to poor working conditions and pay, other educator groups are opposing the walkout strategy altogether. The walkout was originally assembled online to challenge recent bills that eliminated pay raises, tenure and created reductions in educational funding. Because North Carolina is a rightto-work state, the law prohibits public employee strikes.

North Carolina teachers participating in the walkout are prompted to take a sick or personal day to raise awareness for these issues. However, many educators have vocalized their opposition to the walkout and possible alternative strategies. The Wake County chapter of the North Carolina Educators Association, Iredell-Statesville Schools and the Charlotte-based Classroom Teachers Association have all opposed the walkout and are instead encouraging teachers to take part in a walk-in. The statewide walk-in invites

community members to visit and volunteer at local schools Nov. 4 to learn more about the work with which teachers are involved. With so many protests against the walkout, some teachers feel as though they do not have much support. Albert Zay, who has taught for 15 years, is employed at Brunswick High School Early College in Bolivia, N.C. His wife is also a teacher in Bolivia. In planning to participate in the Nov. 4, walkout, he is one of many who must accept the lack of support from NCAE.

“As a member of NCAE…I do understand that they cannot endorse it. That’s fine with me,” Zay said. Zay, like other participants in the walkout, said he struggles to understand NCAE’s rationale for protesting against the walkout. “Who are they going to protest, if not the teachers?” Zay said. “Is the protest slated for after school hours so that we can teach and then go protest? I appreciate their efforts but they have been fruitless and fallen on deaf ears.” Michael Maher, N.C. State’s Assistant Dean for Professional Education, said that while some teachers

have valid reasons for walking out, others face negative feedback from the general public. “If I were a teacher, I would likely not be walking out because I would want the public to support me,” Maher said. “And I think that this does the opposite by walking out. [Teachers participating in the walkout] are going to erode some of the public support for teachers.” Maher said that by walking out, some teachers are sending the wrong message. “They want to show that they

WALKOUT continued page 3

Women continue to be underrepresented in STEM

NCSU professors give MOOCs a chance, refuse to join dissenting groups

Rachel Coffman

Correspondent

Number of STEM graduates in 2012-2013

Correspondent

More men than women graduate from N.C. State with degrees in STEM fields. According to University Planning and Analysis data, that imbalance has held steady for years. In the 2012-2013 school year, 147 women and 259 men graduated with degrees from the College of Sciences, and 408 women and 1,751 men graduated from the College of Engineering. A recent article published in The New York Times fo und physicists, chemists and biologists at six major universities more likely to favor a male scientist over a woman with the same qualifications when reviewing job applications. According to Jamila Simpson, assistant dean for Diversity and Student Services, both male and female students at N.C. State have an unconscious bias against women majoring in science. Simpson, who gives presentations about diversity to undergrad students, said that students don’t typically think of women when it comes to

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science. “I asked N.C. State students in a College of Sciences class to think of ten scientists, and we wrote their list on the board,” Simpson said. “Afterward, I pointed out that every single scientist they listed was a white male.” Simpson said that although students later recalled women scientists to name as well, the initial reaction was certainly telling. Simpson also tells her students about the Draw-a-Scientist Test, an experiment in which children told to sketch

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a scientist reveal unconscious bias. “Students describing a scientist often include characteristics as white, male, old, nerdy and wears glasses,” Simpson said. Simpson said that these stereotypes aren’t malicious in nature. “It’s not intentional,” Simpson said. “It’s due to conditioning.” According to Vicki Martin, assistant dean for Academic Affairs in the College of Sciences, N.C. State needs to eliminate this bias and in-

crease the number of women majoring in science. “People turn on T.V.’s and constantly hear about the need for engineers and scientists in the workforce,” Martin said. “We need to make women a part of this workforce.” Jo-Ann Cohen, associate dean of academic affairs in the College of Sciences, said that women majoring in science can be deterred from doing so by a lack of other female scientists as role models.

WOMEN continued page 3

Rachel Coffman Not everyone is a fan of Massive Open Online Courses, it seems. Even though the availability of free MOOCS is expanding nationwide, 65 faculty, student, teacher and union associations have formed a coalition against them. The group argues that MOOCs are profit-driven and not in the best interest of the students. Dave Frye, associate director of the Friday Institute at N.C. State, said that despite the formation of anti-MOOC groups, N.C. State is not formally involved in any type of coalition against MOOCs. N.C. State’s College of Education offers two MOOCs through the Friday Institute. Frye said the College of Education can use MOOCs to promote its research on effective teaching methods and the use of technology in the classroom. “Our belief is that there has been a lot of talk about MOOCs, both positive and negative, but it isn’t always informed by research,” Frye said. “We want to inform the broader conversation with

STUDENT SPECIAL

research findings from our MOOCs for educators.” One major complaint from anti-MOOC groups is that large MOOC providers, including Coursera, Udacity and EdX, typically receive large profits from the universities that partner with them. According to a report by the Campaign for the Future of Higher Education. EdX received $60 million from collaborations with MIT and Harvard alone. Frye said the Friday Institute chose not to partner with a MOOCs provider to allow better control over design of their courses and make changes based on research findings. According to Frye, the Friday Institute’s MOOCs are not profit-driven, thanks to support from companies interested in N.C. State’s research, including the National Science Foundation and the Oak Foundation. Frye said, aside from the time commitment from researchers, there are few costs associated with developing the Friday Institute’s MOOCs. “Our MOOCs are part of the research we’re doing. They are a tool to get the Col-

NC State

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MOOCS continued page 2

Cameron Village

STUDENT S


PAGE 2 • THURSDAY, OCT. 24, 2013

CORRECTIONS & THROUGH SAM’S LENS CLARIFICATIONS

News

TECHNICIAN POLICE BLOTTER

In the article titled “Open,” which ran Wednesday, we referred to Talley Student Union as Tally.

Oct. 22 1:52 A.M. | TRAFFIC VIOLATION Dan Allen Dr/Sullivan Dr Non-student was cited for stop sign violation. 10:08 A.M. | WARRANT SERVICE Public Safety Center Student was arrested for Secret Peeping and issued referral. 9:45 A.M. | MEDICAL ASSIST Research III Units responded and transported employee in need of medical assistance. 9:52 A.M. | MEDICAL ASSIST Public Safety Center FP assisted student in need of medical assistance. Transport was not required.

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Sam DeGrave at technician-editor@ ncsu.edu

WEATHER WISE Today:

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Cooking for a cause

Tomorrow:

PHOTO BY SAM FELDSTEIN

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t the Sigma Kappa Rock-a-Thon, Brandi Johnson, a junior in chemistry, Paige Patton, also a junior in chemistry, Brooke Sanders, a junior in fashion and textile management, and Jenna Pennock, a sophomore in engineering, helped to sell cookies, cupcakes and other sweets to raise money for to help find a cure for Alzheimer’s. The dog, Lola, proved a useful as a way to attract customers.

Partly cloudy

Saturday:

CAMPUS CALENDAR

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EXHIBIITION: 5TH ANNUAL PINHOLE PHOTOGRAPHY CHALLENGE The Craft Center, All day

Monday EXHIBITION: TRIANGLE ART QUILTERS All day

NCSU CENTER STAGE PRESENTS THE ADVENTURES OF ALVIN SPUTNIK: DEEP SEA EXPLORER Thompson Hall, 8 p.m.

EXHIBITION: 5TH ANNUAL PINHOLE CAMERA PHOTOGRAPHY CHALLENGE All day

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GET INVOLVED IN TECHNICIAN Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copy edit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon Monday to Thursday 9 a.m. to midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or e-mail Editorin-Chief Sam DeGrave at technician-editor@ncsu.edu

ON THE WEB See exclusive audio/photo slideshows. Answer the online poll. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline.com. Check it out!

MOOCS

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lege of Education’s research in the hands of teachers and school leaders to ultimately inform education policy and practice,” Frye said. Frye said that last spring, N.C. State’s Friday Institute launched two MOOCs to help K-12 educators bring

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Today EXHIBIITION: TRIANGLE ART QUILTERS The Craft Center, All day PLACES AND SPACES: MAPPING SCIENCE Hunt Library, All day EXHIBIITION: 5TH ANNUAL PINHOLE PHOTOGRAPHY CHALLENGE The Craft Center, All day

Saturday EXHIBIITION: TRIANGLE ART QUILTERS The Craft Center, All day EXHIBIITION: 5TH ANNUAL PINHOLE PHOTOGRAPHY CHALLENGE The Craft Center, All day PLACES AND SPACES: MAPPING SCIENCE Hunt Library, All day Sunday EXHIBITION: TRIANGLE ART QUILTERS All day

ETHCIS AND ANIMALS Withers Hall, 4:30 p.m.

EXHIBITION: 5TH ANNUAL PINHOLE CAMERA PHOTOGRAPHY CHALLENGE All day

Friday EXHIBITION: TRIANGLE ART QUILTERS The Craft Center, All day

HOMECOMING 2013 All day

Tuesday EXHIBITION: TRIANGLE ART QUILTERS All day EXHIBITION: 5TH ANNUAL PINHOLE CAMERA PHOTOGRAPHY CHALLENGE All day STELLAR STUDENT SERIES FEATURES RYAN O’DONNELL D.H. Hill Library, 3 to 4 p.m. RED AND WHITE FOOD AND BEVERAGE FESTIVAL Dorothy and Roy Park Alumni Center, 6 to 9 p.m.

PLACES AND SPACES: MAPPING SCIENCE Hunt Library, All day

CONSIDERATIONS FOR MOVING YOUR COURSE TO THE WEB Online, noon to 1 p.m.

digital learning to the classroom. After more than 2,500 educators from 70 different countries participated in the course, the Institute chose to offer the courses again this fall. Frye said that while seeking to spread educational research, the Friday Institute is investigating MOOC research at the same time. “Part of our motivation is to conduct lending-edge on

research on the best way to design and deliver MOOCs for educators,” Frye said. “We want to find out what makes a MOOC useful for educators and what doesn’t, and we want to create a better model for MOOCs to share with others.” MOOC-eds at the Friday Institute are noncredit courses where educators can decide whether to participate in discussion boards. Poten-

tial benefits of MOOCs for students are difficult to determine, according to Michael Maher, assistant dean for professional education at N.C. State. “MOOCs tend to have very low completion rates, so for the majority of students these would not be a valid alternative to traditional courses. For some highly motivated students they could be quite valuable,” Maher said.

WALKOUT

continued from page 1

care about kids,” Maher said. “That’s the nature of their work. By walking out, it almost gives the impression

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tonight!

Nightly concerts in Dorton Arena Buy tickets online

Oct. 23: Dailey and Vincent

GLOBAL ISSUES SEMINAR 2302A Withers Hall, 7 to 8:30 p.m.

NCSU CENTER STAGE PRESENTS THE ADVENTURES OF ALVIN SPUTNIK: DEEP SEA EXPLORER Hunt Library, 2 p.m.

OCTOBER 17-27 Oct. 17: Sister Hazel

LIVING LEGENDS - “SOCIAL JUSTICE: THE MOVEMENT THEN AND NOW” WITH THE REVEREND DR. C. T. VIVIAN Witherspoon, 6 to 7:30 p.m.

Oct. 18: Building 429 with Francesca Battistelli

Oct. 19: Joe Nichols

Oct. 24: Who’s Bad

Oct. 25: MercyMe

Oct. 20: Oct. 21 & 22: Florida Georgia Line Scotty McCreery

The Adventures of Alvin Sputnik: Deep Sea Explorer Thursday-Sunday, October 24-27 TONIGHT at 8pm • Titmus Theatre

Oct. 26: Randy Houser

ncstatefair.org

Oct. 27: Eli Young Band

Produced by Perth Theatre of Australia, this enchanting puppet spectacle tells a touching and uplifting story about love, loss and heroism in a postapocalyptic world. YouTube trailer: go.ncsu.edu/alvin $5 NCSU students

919-515-1100 ncsu.edu/arts

PMC LECTURE SERIES: DR. MARK EVAN BONDS, UNCCHAPEL HILL DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC Thompson Hall, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday Chili challenge cook off Case dining hall, 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. CYBER SECURITY AWARENESS MONTH: 10 SPOOKY ATTACKS TARGETING YOU 126 Whitherspoon, noon to 1 p.m. USING THE IT ACESSIBILITY QUICK GUIDE TO MEET NCSU COURSE REGULATIONS D.H. Hill East Wing, noon to 1 p.m. UNIVERSITY BUDGET ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING Chancellor’s Conference room Holladay Hall, 2:30 to 4 p.m. HOWLOWEEN SWEETS, TREATS AND CHOCOLATE EATS Clark and Fountain dining halls, 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. NC STATE BLACK ALUMNI SOCIETY HOMECOMING 2013 Thaiphoon Bistro Lounge, 9 p.m.

10:04 P.M. | LARCENY DH Hill Library Student reported prescription medication and headphones taken from unattended bookbag. 10:47 P.M. | TRAFFIC VIOLATION Centennial Pkwy/Blair Dr Student was cited for Careless and Reckless Driving. 11:29 P.M. | TRAFFIC VIOLATION Cates Ave/Dan Allen Dr Student was cited for speeding. 2:20 P.M. | WELFARE CHECK Off Campus NCSU PD conducted welfare check regarding student. Oncall counselor was contacted. Concerned Behavior report completed and welfare referral issued. 5:13 P.M. | SUSPICIOUS PERSON West Deck Report of suspicious subject looking into vehicles. Officers located non-student. All file checks were negative. 6:41 P.M. | TRAFFIC VIOLATION Dan Allen Drive Student was cited for vehicle inspection. 6:53 P.M. | SAFETY PROGRAM Park Shops Officer conducted DWI Education program for fraternity. 6:53 P.M. | SAFETY PROGRAM Main Campus Dr/Varsity Dr Student was cited for stop sign violation. 8:15 P.M. | TRAFFIC VIOLATION Main Campus Dr/Varsity Dr Student was cited for stop sign violation.

Science mapping exhibit on display in Hunt until Sunday Staff Report

NCSU Libraries is currently featuring “Places & Spaces: Mapping Science” in the iPearl Immersion Theater in James B. Hunt Jr. Library in collaboration with Indiana University until Oct. 27. Now in its ninth year, the Places & Spaces exhibit has traced

that they are walking out on the kids.” Conversely, instead of standing behind the walkout, opposing educator groups continue to encourage an educational walk-in. Iredell-Statesville School Superintendent Brady Johnson, who spoke with The Charlotte Observer earlier this week, agrees that there is a way to support teachers without such drastic measures as a walkout. “We certainly respect what those other teachers are trying to do and the message they’re trying to convey,” Johnson said. “But there’s a better way to do it. Why should our teachers have to stand alone and fight for better working conditions and additional resources for their students? We should all stand united behind our schools and our teachers.”

the evolution of science maps, featuring examples of knowledge domain mapping, novel location-based cartographies, data visualizations and science-inspired art works. The exhibit is a 10-year effort. Each year, 10 new maps are added resulting in 100 maps total in 2014.

One alternative strategy is the Wear Red for Education campaign, which encourages parents, students and teachers to wear red in honor of teachers everywhere. “I’ve been wearing red. My wife’s principal has reminded his entire staff to do it every week,” Zay said. A lso, NCAE President Rodney Ellis has also proposed that schools utilize American Education Week, starting Nov. 18, to educate North Carolina communities about the issues surrounding the teaching profession. Mike Ladidadi, a Wilmington real estate agent, launched the idea for the walkout through an event page that he created on Facebook. As of press time, 627 people had registered on the page.


News

TECHNICIAN

THURSDAY, OCT. 24, 2013 • PAGE 3

JOSEPH PHILLIPS /TECHNICIAN

Staff hands out free prizes to students in line waiting for Talley’s grand opening. After the long build up, Phase I of Talley finally opened on Wednesday.

JOSEPH PHILLIPS/TECHNICIAN

Employees from Jason’s Deli put the finishing touches together minutes before Talley’s grand opening. After the long build up, the first part of Phase I of Talley finally opened Wednesday. Students gathered together with N.C. State staff to enjoy the occation.

TALLEY

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In its final form, Talley Student Union will include a room for multicultural student affairs, a women’s center, a GLBT center, a CSLEPS

WOMEN

continued from page 1

“Women deciding to go into science often struggle finding role models in their fields,” Cohen said. “We want to provide them with a supportive environment so that they take greater risks. They need to see people like themselves in these disciplines at N.C. State.” Martin said that the upper ranks of female professors with tenure are generally low compared to the number of women who complete graduate school. However, in the College of Sciences, all of the associate deans and assistant deans are women with the exception of one.

room and a room for Greek life. In addition to the meeting rooms for various organizations the new building will include a 12,000 square feet ballroom and will be the new location for the N.C. State bookstore. In a Campus Enterprises

press release Tim Hogan, director of University Student centers said that Talley Student Union will be a hub for students and their college experiences. According to Hogan, Talley Student Union exists to reinvigorate the idea of College Unions at N.C. State. Hogan

Cohen co-formed t he Women in Science and Engineering village at N.C. State in 2003. Katherine TitusBecker, the current WISE director, said that the goal of the WISE village is to increase the retention rates of women science majors. “The historical perception is that women don’t go into the science and engineering fields,” Titus-Becker said. “Our program exists as an enrichment program for these underrepresented students. WISE gives women in these fields a place where they can live and study with others in a supportive community.” Spencer Williams, a freshman in first-year engineering, said the WISE community offers many benefits that make

the program a valuable asset to young women majoring in STEM fields. “A lot of women drop out of engineering without a support group like WISE because it’s such a male dominated field,” Williams said. “It’s a little intimidating to go to the career fair and see so many men and so few women with the same major, but I like to think of it as a challenge.” WISE attends a number of recruiting events to encourage women to come to N.C. State and to major in science and engineering fields. It also works with K-12 outreach programs to encourage young interest in the science fields.

said that as the phased project opens each additional service, venue, space and department will bring the vision of reinvigoration to life. In the press release, Wesley Lo, a senior in business administration and president of the Student Centers Board of Directors, said that the new

JOSEPH PHILLIPS/TECHNICIAN

Excited about Tally’s grand opening, Tara Dockerya, a senior communication media, orders Howling Cow ice cream. After the long build up, Phase I of Talley finally opened Wednesday. Students gathered together with N.C. State staff to enjoy the momentous occation.

student union helps to make N.C. State a place of learning, collaboration and service life. According to Lo, the new

The Adventures of Alvin Sputnick: Deep Sea Explorer to show in Titmus Theatre through the weekend Staff Report

Today The Adventures of Alvin Sputnick: Deep Sea Explorer, a one-man show combined with puppetry and animation, will open in Titmus Theatre. The show tells the story of a post-apocalyptic world where the oceans have risen and humans have

run out of places to live. The survivors reside on farms on top of skyscrapers, but they are running out of options. Alvin Sputnik, however, accepts a death-defying mission to seek a new place to live – on the bottom of the very thing threatening the human race, the sea itself. It was the winner of the best

New form of peer-review process poses potential flaws for researchers Mona Bazzaz Correspondent

Some online journals have abandoned the tradition of publishing articles reviewed anonymously by the writer’s peers, known as peer-review. Instead, the journals use an “open review” process, in which the author knows the reviewer. Proponents say this leads to more amicable reviews because reviewers can no longer hide behind anonymity. But opponents argue the new approach could lead to too much politeness. The reviewer could be afraid of hurting the author’s feelings, and edit the article less critically.This could diminish the quality of published work. For example, John Bohannon, a Harvard University biologist and writer, submitted an article full of intentional errors to 304 openaccess journals, reports Science magazine. Even though Bohannon used a fake name and said he taught at a fake university, more than half of the journals accepted his article for publication. “Any reviewer with more than a high-school knowledge of chemistry and the ability to understand a basic data plot should have spotted the paper’s shortcomings immediately,” Bohannon wrote in Science. “Its experiments are so hopelessly flawed that the results are meaningless.” Inside Higher Ed reported that many of the

online publications that accepted Bohannon’s bogus article used an open-review process that allows readers to review articles. Opponents of that method claim it can destroy the credibility of published work. If the public can review an article, then anyone can comment with no guarantee that their argument is valid. According to Cynthia Istook, associate department head of the College of Textiles at N.C. State, the open online reviews could add credence to the article or work to negate it. However, she said she steers clear of articles that have not undergone rigorous blind review. “I need to have that kind of informed endorsement that what I am reading is based on sound scientific process by people who are authorities in the field and who have nothing to gain by the endorsement,” Istook said. Assistant communication professor Kami Kosenko stated that this new review process both intrigues and troubles her. “On one hand, I would welcome the input of more individuals in the review process. However, I also worry that having too much feedback would impede or lengthen this process, which is already cumbersome enough,” Kosenko said. Kosenko said that given the quality of comments posted in other online venues, she imagines that the feedback authors receive would be more destructive than constructive.

The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www. ncsu.edu/sma for more information.

student union is a building that students will certainly enjoy.

solo show at the New York International Fringe Festival. The show was created and will be performed by Tim Watts. It will be running Today at 8 p.m., Friday at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m., Saturday at 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. Student tickets are $5.

FILM A MOVIE IN A WEEK FOR FREE!

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Viewpoint

PAGE 4 • THURSDAY, OCT. 24, 2013

TECHNICIAN

Give it 10 years

O

n Oct. 22, Gallop Poll reported, for the first time in our country’s history, that a strong majority of Americans are now in favor of marijuana legalization. Within 12 months, support for marijuana legalization has increased 10 percent to a now clear majority of 58 percent. While the political process in the United States is notoriously sluggish and unresponsive to voter preferences, I am more Tim Gorski than willing to wager all Deputy the money I will ever earn Viewpoint Editor that marijuana will be legal under United States federal law within the next 10 years. You are probably thinking right now, “this

Tim Gorski is off his rocker.” But if you give serious consideration to the facts surrounding the drug’s illegality it is abundantly clear that marijuana prohibition is exceedingly unsustainable for reasons that are effortlessly discernible. For one, the old arguments supporting prohibition have no merit. The gateway drug theory can be applied to alcohol or tobacco as easily as it can to marijuana. Also, studies have shown that there is no evidence that prohibition decreases drug use, marijuana use is less harmful than fast food consumption and in the United States, it is easier for children to acquire than legal drugs such as alcohol or tobacco. So, given that spending billions of dollars locking hundreds of thousands of Americans in a cell every year for using a harmless drug that our president has admitted to using is

both patently imbecile and recklessly inequitable, why has it taken so long for our political system to end this injustice? It seems that there is simply a lack of political will power to bring about any change to the laws that currently stand. That is, people tend to see marijuana legalization as a fringe issue, one that is secondary to the more important things than politicians have to conquer such as the deficit or health care. Although, there are other issues which are important for the government to deal with, marijuana legalization should not be taken lightly, its perpetuation has devastating ramifications. Recent studies have shown that the federal and state governments lose more than $31.1 billion every year in taxes from marijuana sales. In addition, governments pay $10.7 billion in direct law enforcement costs for a

whopping total of $42 billion dollars in annual due entirely to marijuana prohibition. Not to mention the millions of lives ruined with unnecessary bouts with the legal system. Also, when industry takes the task of marijuana production out of the hands of the criminals who are currently responsible for it, the marijuana industry will explode leaving thousands of new jobs in its wake in industries ranging from medicine to textiles. The increase in public support for legalization, coupled with the success of the marijuana industry in Colorado and Washington and the lack of legal action on the part of the federal government will give states no choice but to lead the country in legalizing marijuana themselves. Shortly thereafter, federal legalization will be the only viable option.

Remembering Talley’s murky history

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he new Talley has opened. Four restaurants and Talley Market began operations at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, officially opening phase I of the Talley Student Union.  Phase I-A Ishan Raval of the new Guest Columnist Talley isn’t yet quite finished, as it should be this semester—the gaming area isn’t there yet—and phase I as a whole is scheduled to be finished early next semester. Phase II, which was originally going to be finished by in late 2014, is now slated to open in early 2015.  Regardless of such minor hitches, good for us. The old Talley Student Center was a crummy old slab that made students warm to D.H. Hill Library. A lot, if not most of us, will likely find the new Talley an improvement, though given its appearance, some of us may find it another “attempt to marry a battering ram and the Dorton Arena.” So on this occasion, let’s review if the decision to have a new student center is appropriate. The events leading up to this decision, which took place in 2009 before most of us were enrolled at the University, might raise questions about the nature of democracy at our University. In Oct. 2009, Student Government held a non-binding referendum in which students were asked, whether they saw “a need for increased funding in the Atrium Food Court and Talley Student Center,” and whether they approved of such funding as a result of a hike in student

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IN YOUR WORDS

}

“I have been to multiple dinners with clubs and professors involved.” Christian Grundman senior, mechanical engineering and policital science

fees. While 56.6 percent of students voted there was a need for such funding, only 38.4 percent voted for an increase in student fees. Still, Student Senate approved a graduated fee of $83, not to exceed $290 at any point, for the coming year. The fee for Talley was subsequently passed by University administrators. In a nutshell, here’s what happened: We were asked whether we wanted to fund Talley’s renovation. We said we didn’t. Yet, our money was taken. Yes, the referendum was non-binding—the University did not act absolutely dishonestly by charging us for Talley. Yes, the old Talley was a wreck, and there is a good case for why we needed a new Student Center. But it is necessary to address the manner in which democracy is exercised at our University.  First, when the amount of money taken from students was of such a large quantity, at a truly democratic institution, such a referendum would not have been nonbinding. Second, when there was so much student money involved in the equation, a truly democratic University would have tried harder to convince the students that a new Student Center was necessary. For the matter, the University did try, but the Rally 4 Talley campaign, in which Campus Enterprises spent more than $10,000, didn’t do its job. In fact, this kind of misleading marketing approach is called “astroturfing,” and is prohibited by the code of ethics of the Public Relations Society of America. Third, in a truly democratic university, Student Govern-

Do you interact with professors outside of class?

“I would talk to them in club meetings and while walking around campus.” Jordan Wright senior, design studies

BY ERIC ENGSTROM

“I am a freshman, so I only have had the opportunity during field trips outside of the classroom.” Sarah Morgan freshman, architecture

Editor-in-Chief Sam DeGrave

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ment would have stood with the students. But SG chose not to speak on behalf of the students, instead choosing to do the administration’s bidding. Even today, SG lacks the audacity to speak about the inattention to students’ voice that took place in 2009. Both Wesley Lo, a student and President of University Student Centers Board of Directors, and Student Body President Alex Parker, don’t consider themselves authorities to comment regarding the referendum, since they weren’t there at that time. If that’s the case, they also shouldn’t be able to say anything about the Civil War. I asked Parker more than once, whether he thought that the new Talley represented a legitimate use of money and he repeatedly answered, “I’m just happy it’s open.” Now, Student Government probably didn’t have much power in this anyway. After all, technically, it only recommends fee increases to the Fee Review Committee, and given how much the University had already invested into the idea of a new student center, the administration may well have still increased fees. This, of course, would have spoken even more clearly to how little students are in charge of their education. So let’s not hold SG’s meekness against it when we reap the benefits of what we didn’t want taken from us. It’s the Administration, and in particular, Campus Enterprises, that led the charge for a new Talley. So, whether they were right in doing so or not, let’s just remember: This isn’t our State, this is the administration’s State.

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Features Editor Will E. Brooks technician-features@ncsu.edu

Davis Leonard, senior in science education

Not like most girls

A

t some point or another, we’ve likely come across someone who identifies as female and maintains she is “not like most girls.” We see parodies of this well-worn sentiment on the Internet and in our real lives. Guys joke, “I’m not like Nicky Vaught most girls— Deputy Features I’m a boy.” Editor Twitter has seen several thousands of the unoriginal, “‘I’m not like most girls’ –Most girls” or some variation of that joke. Though we joke about it, some women still assert themselves as unlike the rest for a host of unspecified reasons. But I’d like to know what’s wrong with other girls? I’m a heterosexual male, so I’m into women. Are most girls harboring a secret I need to know about before embarking on a relationship with one? Is there something about them I don’t realize is a problem? What’s wrong with them? When we search “not like most girls” on Twitter, we learn that most girls love pumpkin spice lattes, cute texts and MTV. They are unoriginal, irrational and impatient. Well, I like pumpkin spice lattes. I enjoy cute texts. Though MTV has lost some

credibility in the past decade, I don’t think it appeals exclusively to females—nor do I see an interest in it as problematic. Few people in the world are truly original. No human is fully rational and only monks are remarkably patient. But most girls are also boy crazy. In one of my classes the other day, someone asked something along the lines of, “Why are girls so obsessed with love and finding a partner?” For a while, and still today by some sects, women were thought as pursuing higher education solely to f i nd a husband—the MRS degree, people joke. Women, according to this line of thinking, are free to get an education in whichever field they deem interesting, but once they find a man, they settle down into a domestic lifestyle and let the man be the breadwinner. If a woman wants to do this, that’s fine. It’s the expectation that all women should that isn’t. The idea is that women, more than men, buy into the Hollywood ideology of romance. Ostensibly, they spend the early parts of their lives waiting for the perfect man to rescue them after some sort of love at first sight

type of ordeal. We refer to this theory of romance as “Eros love.” About 34 percent of people in the United States conceptualize romantic love in this way. But the shock comes when we learn that men, not women, are the ones who are more often obsessed with the idea of a man rescuing a woman. A woman asserting herself as unlike the rest implies that most girls are of a single type of femininity—a type that is pretty much untrue or more applicable to hu m a n nature than to womanhood. This type of thinking is extremely harmful. It perpetuates the notion that women are static, single-dimensional characters in a world of men. When a well-rounded woman comes along, which is pretty often, men take her as more of a concept than a person, something to be tamed or something to bang, rather than someone to be respected and treated as an equal. It does an enormous disservice for a woman to assume other women are unlike her. It perpetuates stereotypes about females and has heterosexual men setting their standards unreasonably high for their romantic endeavors.

“ ... men take her as more of a concept than a person ... ”

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Features

TECHNICIAN

THURSDAY, OCT. 24, 2013 • PAGE 5

Fair-food fans find vegetarian options Nikki Stoudt Deputy Features Editor

It’s a truth universally acknowledged that North Carolina State Fair-time in Raleigh is easily one of the best times. Fair food, fair rides and fair games fill the dreams of students and citizens alike, and when the bright midway lights finally reach their usual blinding capacity, we’re ready

for them. Lately, the bacon craze has left me dizzy — not just as a vegetarian, but as a human. And there is no time like a trip to the fair to broaden one’s bacon palate. Baconcovered cinnamon rolls, bacon chocolate chip cookies and good old-fashioned, deep fried bacon litter the fairgrounds just waiting for the next poor pork-happy

victim. Lucky for the meat shy, there are many meatless alternatives to the everyday turkey leg. The first thing I did when my friends — who go to that light blue school down the road — and I eventually made out of the parking lot, past the ticket gate and into the fray was seek the first vegetarian-friendly confection I could find. At the top

of the list? Oreos. That’s right, these delicious chocolate and crème cookies are vegetarian friendly — sorry, vegans, Oreos have come in cross contact with milk during the manufacturing process. Lucky for me, fair food vendors have made deep fried Oreos a staple and often experiment with the traditional batter — this year I saw Oreos deep fried in a red velvet batter, but wasn’t brave enough to try them; maybe next year. Topped with powdered sugar, the Oreos come out of the fryer dangerously hot, so it’s probably a good idea to search for the next sinful food to try while they cool a few hundred degrees. It didn’t take long for the next veg-friendly morsel to come into view. I decided to chance salmonella and

food poisoning with deep fried Pillsbury cookie dough — a decision that ranks in my top 10 all year. The cookie dough hadn’t really baked all the way through, which kept the doughy consistency, but the chocolate had melted and was oozing out of the sides. Posted on a wooden skewer, the cookie dough was the perfect to-go snack. My friends decided it was time for a savory treat, so we set out in search of the famed deep fried vegetable stand. The booth looks like any other but their menu is where the diversity lies. We opted for deep fried pickles, a Southern favorite, and deep fried macaroni and cheese, a new discovery. Normally I would stay away from macaroni and cheese because it violates the “Don’t

fix what is not broken” rule, but I have never been gladder to step out of my culinary shell. The outside of the triangular pocket was a perfect golden brown that crunched a little when you bit into it, and the inside was solid, corner-to-corner-to-corner mac and cheese. Fried pickles are a classic — never a disappointment and perfect as always. Dow ntow n Ra leig h is known for its diverse culinary atmosphere and constantly budding entertainment scene, but it’s time to move the party toward the fairgrounds. Regardless of your dietary restrictions or preferences, don’t be fooled by the N.C. State Fair’s historically carnivorous reputation — there’s food for all at North Carolina’s Homecoming.

NIKKI STOUDT/TECHNICIAN

This year’s fair included fried cookie dough on a stick. The heat did not bake the cookie dough but it did melt the chocolate chips.

NIKKI STOUDT/TECHNICIAN

A fair-food favorite is fried oreos. They come in the traditional or red-velvet dough .

NIKKI STOUDT/TECHNICIAN

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Features

PAGE 6 • THURSDAY, OCT. 24, 2013

TECHNICIAN

WOLVES IN SHARP CLOTHING

Black is always the new black Megan Stitt Correspondent

Tulsi Patel, a senior in chemistry, models Megan Stitt’s recommendations, such as wearing leather with lace (right) and using a different knit black sweater to add texture (left). She also adds black shoes to both outfits.

“Mint is the new black,” I heard someone say this summer. It was one of my friends as she paraded around in her mint-colored ballet flats. And yes, they were cute flats. Yes, the color was vibrant, fun and trending for both summer and spring, but that changes nothing. Black is and always will be the new black. To further validate my point, last week’s Wolves in Sharp Clothing article focused on a specific black article of clothing, the little black dress. Made famous by Coco Chanel, everyone should own at least one as it makes any evening instantly classier. In this article, however, I want to talk about other dark cloth classics such as leather, outerwear, sweaters and accessories. Leather is not only for the bikers; it’s for everyone, adding a punch to his or her everyday style. Recently there have been new developments in the world of leather besides the famed vests and jackets — which I might add are always in style — such as skirts, skinny pants and dresses made of leather. In styling leather you should be careful not to overdo it. Leather can be worn with other blacks but probably shouldn’t be worn with other leather. Too much of it and you’ll look constrained in movement and people might ask where your motorcycle is. There’s nothing wrong with mixing leather with sweet elements such as lace or flowing fabrics — these things balance out the look. Winter is on its way, so it’ll soon be time to bring out all our trench coats, parkas, pea

coats and the like. Though there are various versions of these styles in browns, greys or greens, black is definitely the best option here. It’s more elegant and probably matches with more, including your snow boots if we see a flake or two. Plus, let’s not forget that the color absorbs the suns rays for extra warmth. Sweaters are also a nice option for black. If you want to mix it up, try a different knit or possibly borrow one of your dad’s big old sweaters from “back in the day” and throw it on over some leggings. The finishing touch to an outfit is its accessories and I invite you to try everything from black shoes to scarves to jewelry. Besides, your favorite pair of sunglasses is probably already half black, why not go full tilt? Scarves add both another layer of warmth and flair to any outfit, plus playing this particular card in black gives you the opportunity to wear a patterned shirt. I’ve focused mainly on fall and winter styles, but black is important in the spring and summer too. Whether it be a tank, cardigan or a show-stopping maxi dress, black can be worn in all seasons. In fact, many designers’ Spring 2014 collections in the Mercedes-Benz Fashion week in New York featured black, including Vera Wang, Rebecca Minkoff and BCBG Max Arzia. Black is the epitome of elegance when paired with simplicity and good shape. And let’s also not forget that black is slimming. It’s forever on trend. All in all, even if society judges it’s too much, just remember Michael Kors himself often is dressed head to toe in it — you can never have too much black.

PHOTOS BY BRETT MORRIS/TECHNICIAN

Wolfram speaks and showcases ‘North Cackalacky’ dialects Kaitlin Montgomery Staff Writer

Boomer, sigogglin’ and y’all are just a few of the many words that scream that the speaker is from North Carolina. Walt Wolfram, a professor of linguistics, has the ability to pinpoint where most North Carolinians were born and raised simply by how they utter a few words or phrases. It’s all thanks to his several decades-worth of work studying different dialects found in North Carolina. “When I started out I wanted to be a missionary and do good for the world,” Wolfram said. “I had an aptitude for languages and was interested and loved doing academic study. I didn’t want to make academic study a sort of end in its own right. There’s so much misunderstanding of language differences — what they mean, and so that’s been sort of a passion of mine.” Wolfram said that his start with linguistics was a modest one. “I just got a videographer and started doing documentaries,” Wolfram said. “I was always doing documentaries.” The first of Wolfram’s three current film projects is called “Core.Sounders” and centers on the dying North Carolin-

ian fishing industry and the languages that accompany it. It premiered March 14 at the North Carolina Museum of History. Wolfram is also working on a project documenting the revitalization of the Cherokee language. It is slated to be finished by the end of the year. “It’s really cool because people are excited about American Indian languages that are dying and what we can do to save them,” Wolfram said. The newest film project Wolfram is working on is titled “Talking Black in America” and is funded by a $300,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. “We’ll be spending three years going to Africa and the Middle Passage in the Caribbean’s,” Wolfram said. “We’ll be traveling all around the country to document AfricaMerica speech in urban areas ranging from, sort of, the President to most modest laborer.” On top of the various film projects Wolfram is working on, he also has a book in the works that will be available next spring. Titled Talking Tar Heel: Voice of North Carolina, the interactive Eversion of the publication will include quick response codes that allow the reader to view videos and listen to the audio

of 125 different interactive media pieces. “What’s exciting about that is language is kind of meant to be heard and seen,” Wolfram said. “It’s hard to talk about how people say things but this way they’ll have immediate access to it, which for us is really cool.” Wolfram recently put his work into action at the North Carolina State Fair. Wolfram, with 40 graduate students from his class manning the booth, ran the North Carolina Life and Language Project as way to showcase the many unique dialects found across North Carolina. “There’s interactive stuff,” Wolfram said. “There’s a touch screen monitor, and we have a sort of looped video of different scenes from different places in North Carolina. We give out pins, we sell t-shirts, we have DVDs, and we have banners celebrating different varieties. The banners celebrate the Lumbee language, AfricaMerica, Outer Banks English, languages of the cities with the dialect of Charlotte and Raleigh and so forth.” According to Wolfram, there’s a science to figuring out where someone might be from with his or her dialect. “We can’t tell exactly [where you’re from] so we use examples,” Wolfram said.

ARCHIVES/TECHNICIAN

Walt Wolfram, professor of linguistics, is working on several projects in order to increase awareness of the “language landscape of North Carolina,” including three documentaries, a book and a booth at the State fair.

“We can use pronunciation of a certain word. So, for example, everyone in North Carolina would say time drawing out the letter ‘I’. Only people in the Coastal plains and in the mountains would say white rice adding an ‘A’ sound between the ‘W’ and the ‘H’ and then again between the ‘R’ and the ‘I’. There are pronunciation things and then there are also vocabulary items that are regional in nature.” Wolfram explained that while a few various things might cause a change in dia-

lect, such as gender, there’s always one question that clearly displays where someone comes from. “There is one question, though, that we can always use to figure out where you’re from,” Wolfram said. “Pronounce the name of where you’re from. It’s a joke, but lots of locals have some weird ways of pronouncing places.” Wolfram said that there’s one main mission of the project: Turning away from the negative stereotypes tacked onto Southern speech and embracing the dialects as

cultural heritage. “We want people in North Carolina who love their state and love their heritage and love things North Carolinian, we want them to include the language diversity and the language landscape of North Carolina,” Wolfram said. “People are growing up ashamed because they’ve been sold on the socialization. They’ve been indoctrinated into the idea that Southern speech is bad speech. We want them to see that’s it a part of their heritage and embrace it.”


Sports

TECHNICIAN

VOLLEYBALL

continued from page 8

ARCHIVE/TECHNICIAN

Redshirt senior forward Lakeesa Daniel shoots coverage during the eighth annual Hoops 4 Hope basketball game.

BBALL

continued from page 8

guard Ashley Eli and senior guard Breezy Williams. “We have five seniors essentially,” Moore said. “We have strong veterans, but we have to change their culture a little bit. They have to believe, and they have to feel like they can compete at this level, so it is a

work in progress.” State will host a scrimmage match against WinstonSalem State on Nov. 3 at 2 p.m. The Pack will open its regular season in Reynolds Coliseum on Nov. 8 against St. Bonaventure at 6 p.m. “We want to just get out there and work hard,” Brown said. “We are taking everything day-by-day and gameby-game.”

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percentage and total blocks. Merriwether said she recalls N.C. State’s recordbreaking season in 2012, in which State’s volleyball team made its first postseason appearance since 1987 and won its first set in an NCAA tournament match. “My fondest memory [of last season] was just how shocking of a season we had,” Merriwether said. “We were rated 12th in our conference [in the preseason] and finished fourth. Going to the NCAA tournament was one of our goals, so that was huge for us.” As the 2013 season progresses, Merriwether’s game has only improved. Through 20 games, she ranks second on the team in kills, kill percentage and total points. She also leads the team in blocks with 80, and her 1.27 blocks per set average is good for third best in the Atlantic Coast Conference and 44th in the nation. “It’s definitely a lot about vision, something that I didn’t have as a freshman,” Merriwether said. “When you come from high school and club to college, the game is so

much faster. It’s all about seeing what’s happening before it happens.” Merriwether said that the team was pleased with their progress so far and has high hopes for the remainder of the season. She said that she sees the team building on last year’s success and making a push for the NCAA tournament at the end of November. “Our goal is to be in the top five in our conference,” Merriwether said. “Winning really big games shows us how much potential we have, and it really motivates us to keep working hard.” Merriwether said she has become extremely close with all of her teammates, especially junior hitter Dariyan Hopper. Merriwether and Hopper have accounted for 36 percent of the Pack’s point total this season. Not only is Merriwether a star on the court, she has also been successful in the classroom. Merriwether, human biology major, sports a gradepoint average of over 3.8. As a junior, she was named to the All-ACC Academic Team and selected as a captain on the Capital One Academic AllDistrict Team. After graduating this year, Merriwether said she plans to attend chiropractic school.

Classifieds

THURSDAY, OCT. 24, 2013 • PAGE 7

RYAN PARRY/TECHNICIAN

Senior middle blocker Brie Merriwether spikes the ball against Appalachian State University September. Merriwether had 10 kills in the Wolfpack’s 3-0 win over the Mountaineers during the first game of the Courtyard Midtown Classic at Reynolds Coliseum.

In her free time, Merriwether said she enjoys baking and occasionally sneaks cookies onto the bus for away games. She said she has also

picked up knitting and scrapbooking for a while. “I just have a really artistic side to me,” Merriwether said.

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31 Innocents 32 Foil kin 35 Deli slicing request 39 Old salt 41 More than suspected 42 Colony residents 43 Sat (down) ungracefully 44 Hang out in the hammock

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49 USAF E-6’s 50 Question before “Yeah, you!” 52 ’Vette roof option 53 Pear remnant 54 “Yay, me!” 55 Neck and neck 56 Hole on the green 57 Static jolt 58 Skater Midori 59 Swig


Sports

COUNTDOWN

• Two days until football takes on Florida State in Tallahassee

• Page 5: A story about vegetarian-friendly fair food.

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 8 • THURSDAY, OCT. 24, 2013

#PACKTWEETS

INSIDE

VOLLEYBALL

Q&A Thursday: B.J. Anya is ready to play Jonathan Stout

BeeJay Anya @BAnya_Allday

Senior Staff Writer

Fab 4 just being honest tonight for real we ain’t holding nothing back no more

CAT @catbarber1994 Got soo much on my mind right now I hate being lied to wish I could start over and pick the right choice.. HONEST!!

Ryan Mathews @RMath13

ELIZABETH DAVIS/TECHNICIAN

Senior middle blocker Brie Merriwether spikes the ball over the net Sept. 6. The Wolfpack defeated Appalachian State 3-0 at Raynold’s Coliseum.

All the hair is coming off tomorrow morning. #timeforachange

Merriwether leading the way in final season

Mark Gottfried @Mark_Gottfried This Saturday have @PackMensBball serve you breakfast then watch us scrimmage during our annual #TipOffBreakfast

Zack Tanner

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Friday WOMEN’S TENNIS AT TENNESSEE INVITATIONAL Knowxville, TN, all day WOMEN’S GOLF AT LANDFALL TRADITION Wilmington, N.C., all day RIFLE AT KENTUCKY Lexington, KY., all day SWIMMING AND DIVING VS. GEORGIA TECH Tallahassee, FL., 3 p.m. SWIMMING AND DIVING AT FLORIDA STATE Tallahassee, FL., 3 p.m. MEN’S SOCCER VS. VIRGINIA TECH Raleigh, N.C., 7 p.m. WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL VS. PITTSBURGH Raleigh, N.C., 7 p.m. Saturday MEN’S GOLF AT BRIDGESTONE INTERCOLLEGIATE Greensboro, N.C., all day WOMEN’S TENNIS AT TENNESSEE INVITATIONAL Knowxville, TN., all day WOMEN’S GOLF AT LANDFALL TRADITION Wilmington, N.C., all day RIFLE VS. MEMPHIS Lexington, KY., all day FOOTBALL AT FLORIDA STATE Tallahasse, FL., 3:30 p.m. WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL VS. MARYLAND Raleigh, N.C., 5 p.m.

QUOTE OF THE DAY “Winning really big games shows us how much potential we have.” Brie Merriwether, senior middle blocker

Coming off a historic year, the N.C. State volleyball team is on pace to have its best season in history. Leading the charge is senior middle blocker Brie Merriwether, who serves as a captain of the team. Merriwether is entering her fourth and final year with the Wolfpack. She was the star of Oviedo High School’s volleyball squad in Orlando, Fla., where she was named a Florida Athletic Coaches As-

sociation All-Star. really know what you want in “I remember [head coach a college.” Bryan Bunn] came to one Since joining the program, of our tournaments in Or- Merriwether has made a lando and asked me come huge impact on the team. visit [N.C. State],” Merri- In her first year, she led all wether said. “When I came I freshmen on the team in sets really loved the school, and played, with 81, and started the community-type feel was 27 matches. really attractive to me.” As a sophomore and junior, Merriwether said the atmo- Merriwether started at midsphere at N.C. State helped re- dle blocker for the Pack in all duce the stress of the recruit- but two games. In those two ing process. years, she ranked in the top “The recruiting process five on the team in kills, kill as a whole was so stressful,” Merriweather said. “As a senior in high school, you don’t VOLLEYBALL continued page 7

Freshman forward B.J. Anya is among the new faces on this year’s men’s basketball squad. The 6-foot-9-inch Gaithersburg, Md., native and DeMatha Catholic High School graduate, is preparing on-and-off the court to help the Pack succeed in his first year with the program. Anya scored tallied three points and three rebounds in 14 minutes during the team’s scrimmage at Primetime with the Pack last Saturday, starting for the red team. Technician: What do you think about N.C. State from an off-the-court perspective? Anya: “It’s a great school; it’s in a great city and people here are very nice, and down to earth. I’ve made a lot of friends already, people who are not athletes. This is a good place to call home.” Q: What are some activities you like to do around campus when you’re not on the court? A: “Just hang out with friends and have fun. If you know me, I’m a fun-loving guy. I like going out with my boys and doing what college kids do.” Q: What do you think you and the rest of the freshman can contribute to the team this season?

A: “I think we can contribute a lot because there is a lot of opportunity for us to play. We have to come in to practice and go hard, and go hard during games so we can contribute to our team.” Q: You’ve said you think you can come in and start right away. What do you bring to the team that will allow you to find time on the court? A: “I have a low-post presence. I can score on the block, alter and block shots and I can rebound the ball. It’s those three things my team needs and they need to have faith in me that I can come into the game and do it.” Q: How do you feel about playing a few games in Reynolds Coliseum this season? A: “Reynolds is a historical coliseum because it has so much history and tradition. It’s not as big as PNC [Arena], but the atmosphere in there is going to be crazy because it’s a small gym and it’s going to be packed.” Q: Is there a game you have circled on your calendar this season? A: “No, we’re going to take one game a step at a time. The only game I’m worried about right now is UNC-Pembroke. That’s the first game and then we’ll move on from there.”

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Wolfpack tips off season with new leadership Daniel Wilson Staff Writer

N.C. State’s women’s basketball held an open scrimmage Wednesday night at Reynolds Coliseum, officially kicking off the 2013-14 season. The Wolfpack, entering its first season under new head coach Wes Moore, began the event with players showcasing their skills in position drills as well as smaller, halfcourt scrimmages that led up to the full-court scrimmage. “We cannot afford to miss out on any opportunity to work and get better,” Moore said. “This was the first time they had been out in front of people, and we didn’t always handle it really well. We’re going have a lot to talk about from this.” The team was split into two squads: a red team and a black team. The red team claimed victory in the first 16-minute half, 38-20. The black team put up a stronger defensive showing in the 12-minute second half but was unable to secure the win falling, 1410, to the red squad. The red team’s players consisted of three of the four returning starters: redshirt junior guard Len’Nique Brown, senior forward Kody Burke and senior center Markeisha Gatling. Burke led the team last season with 13.3 points per game and 7.2 rebounds per game. Brown led the team

ARCHIVE/TECHNICIAN

Sophomore guard Krystal Barrett looks for a path to the basket during the women’s basketball game against Clemson in Reynolds Coliseum Feb. 10. The Wolfpack Women defeated the Tigers 79-45.

with 3.8 assists per game while tacking on 7.2 points per game. Senior guard Myisha Goodwin-Coleman also suited up for the red team after starting 22 of the Pack’s 34 games last season and averaged 8.8 points per game. Freshman guard Miah Spencer rounded out the red team’s roster. The Decatur, Ga. native averaged 18.7 points per game in her senior season en route to helping lead Columbia High School

to a second consecutive 3-A title. “[Spencer] looks like she’ll be a great player for us,” Moore said. “She doesn’t seem to get caught up in the moment and has a good head on her shoulders.” The black squad was compiled of freshman guard Ashley Williams, freshman forward Jennifer Mathurin, sophomore guards Dominique Wilson and Kaley Moser, and senior forward Julianna Prim.

“We have a lot of new bodies, but we also have six upperclassmen,” Brown said. “It’s a fresh start, but we have been working hard. It’s exciting to see what we have.” Williams averaged 21.2 points per game as a senior at Green Hope High School in Cary, leading her team to a 16-0 conference record. Mathurin, a Montreal, Quebec native, averaged 15.5 points per game for Champlain College St. Lambert High School and helped lead

the Quebec Provincial team to a bronze-medal finish in the Canadian National Championships in 2010. Wilson transferred from Arkansas after averaging 6.6 points per game for the Razorbacks. Junior guard Krystal Barrett, the Pack’s other returning starter, played on both the red and black teams along with redshirt senior forward Lakeesa Daniel, sophomore

BBALL continued page 7


“Come over the hill, Caroline�

Technician homecomingPpreview

2013


2 • Homecoming Preview

App offers new experience for old tradition Jason Katz Deputy News Editor

There is a new way to get connected to what’s happening with N.C. State’s homecoming festivities this year. The N.C. State Alumni Association Student Ambassador Program developed a new app meant to make participating in homecoming easier and more intuitive. It’s free and currently available for iPhone and Android smartphones. Nicklaus Hynson, vice president of AASAP and a senior in accounting, said connecting and staying current with all the events of homecoming is one of the new software’s greatest features. “On the app, you can connect with your Twitter or Facebook accounts so you can get up-to-date right away,” Hynson said. The app has seven links on its homepage

that allow easy access to the homecoming schedule, news related to homecoming events and information about campus partners, parking and athletics. Included in the app is a map that allows users to click on locations around N.C. State and view what events will be held in each location and when take place. Starting Sunday, the calendar will be filled with homecoming events for both students and the businesses surrounding the University. For example, Paint the Town Red, an event in which students and participating businesses paint their windows to promote N.C. State, is on Monday at 6 p.m. With the new app, students can easily find which businesses chose to participate in Homecoming. “Any restaurants or businesses that are in Paint the Town Red—you can pinpoint

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them on the map,” said Homecoming Director Kathryn Howie, a senior in business administration. Information on the app is current and can be updated easily and quickly, according to Howie. “It’s just a nice resource to have, not only for the people attending, but it’s nice for us too,” Howie said. Designing the new app wasn’t an easy undertaking, Hynson said. According to Hynson, this year’s app has a completely new design and layout compared to its predecessor. “It was kind of complicated,” Collier said. Hyson said that last year, the AASAP used a different mobile software program that was far less effective than the new app introduced this year. “Last year, it was an app within an app,” Hynson said. “The layout really wasn’t professional.” Howie, Collier and Hynson each said they were very impressed with the upgrade, but said that even with a new partner and more control, there were still a lot of difficult decisions to be made. “We started working on it in June,” Howie said. Hynson said that a lot of the work stemmed from getting the design perfect for the new product, even concerning the placement of the block “S” on the background screen. He said that he feels that the product has really come out well. “We really like the look and the feel of the layout,” Hynson said. Hynson said this year the ASSAP partnered with Aloompa, a mobile app developer from Nashville, Tenn. “We really like the look and the feel of the layout,” Hynson said. Homecoming events begin Sunday and run through next Saturday.

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4 • Homecoming Preview

Leader of the Pack Candidates What is your year and  major? Could you describe the extracurricular activities with which you’re involved? What are they/how are you involved with them, etc.

1

Junior. Business Administration & International Studies

Senior in electrical and computer engineering

2

Member of the Entrepreneurship Garage, Caldwell Fellow, Hamilton Scholar, Member of the Honors Program, Member of Catholic Campus Ministries, Director of the N.C. State World Record Food Drive

Student Vice President, Member of College of Engineering Ambassadors, Recording secretary for Eta Kappa Nu, honors engineering society

How do you think you’ve made an impact at N.C. State?

3

Why do you think are you the best candidate?

4

What’s one tradition at N.C. State that you haven’t done yet, but want to do before you graduate?

Launching Pennies 4 Progress has given me the opportunity to help students learn about and work for a business that exists to make a social impact. Since coming to campus, I have led our school in the fight against hunger by working on the Stop Hunger Now Meal Packaging Event, the state-wide university hunger conferences, and in leading our World Record Food Drive.

I am passionate about fighting hunger in N.C. and around the world. Since I am studying business, I wanted to apply what I was learning in the classroom to solve social problems like hunger. Being a leader for me is about humbly serving the community you live in, leading by example, and living each day purposely.

5 About

Leader of the Pack is a Homecoming competition that seeks to elect the N.C. State student who most exemplifies leadership, scholarship and service. The Technician interviewed each candidate about their experience and why they think they should win. Students can vote for candidates at ncsu.votenet.com from noon Oct. 28, till noon Oct. 29. The winner will be recognized at half-time during the homecoming football game Nov. 2.

Painting the free expression tunnel is a tradition I can’t wait to do. I’m so excited to finally leave my mark on that tunnel even if someone paints over it 30 minutes later.

Ryan O’Donnell

My biggest impact, from a college-career wise perspective, would have to be through the appropriations committee in Student Government. Over the past year and a half I’ve really worked hard to make the experience easier for groups and make sure they’ve understood what’s been happening. We actually have started going through the budget beforehand. We used to go through the during the interview and now we go through budgets beforehand and advise the groups on what is wrong with their budgets and help them with the budgets.

All the people in my classes ... know that I can find information for them. Whenever I hear about an event or opportunity that is exciting I send an email to the students so that they know. I’m also try- ing to always help my fellow student senators and my committee members.

I haven’t done the K r i s py K re me Cha llenge because I’m a n awful runner, but I would like to do it before I graduate.

Kelsey Mills


Homecoming Preview • 5

Questions & Answers Junior in biochemistry

Member of Delta Sigma Iota, Rush Chari, PR Chair, Planning South Asian Awareness Week, President of Multicultural Greek Council, Member of pre-health club Teaching assistant for Intro to Biochemistry, University Ambassador, Park Scholar

I think I’ve made my impact through my leadership. I have really emphasized firm leadership. Through my leadership goal and service is the way I’ve impacted N.C. State.

I think I am the best leader of the pack candidate because I have a very diverse portfolio of things I do, ranging from leadership roles, like the MGC, and academic roles, such as being a teaching assistant. I think, as a candidate, I best embody the areas that the leader of the pack committee is looking for.

One tradition that I have not done yet is running the Krispy Kreme Challenge. In my freshman year, I was on the PR committee for it, but I did not run. Sophmore year I was busy. I’ve been thinking about it, and I really want to do it before I graduate.

Charan Mohan

Senior, materials science engineering and mathematics

President of the Quad Area Council for two years, Drum major for N.C. State Marching Band Member of the National Residence Hall Honorary, Member of the Tau Beta Pi, the Engineering Honors Society, Member of the Honors Program

I think I’ve made an impact in inspiring other people to go out and reach their full potential. For example, two people on my executive board last year went to the IRC executive board and six became RAs [resident advisors] and four became Honors Village Fellows ... I’m very proud of that. By influencing those people, by inspiring those people and encouraging those people, I have reached the larger N.C. State community.

I don’t want to simply just be — to have the title — leader of the pack. I really want to use the influence I get with it to help others and give back to the community what I’ve gotten, particularly in leadership. I would really like the community to understand that they can get passionate.

Before I graduate, I really think it would be the class ring, or a ring that gets to sleep in the bell tower. I think that would be awesome.

Katherine Freeman

Junior in human biology

Junior in middle grades language arts and social students education

Works in a research lab on campus in the biology department, Works with Open Door Medical Clinic, where he translates for Spanish-speaking patients , Member of VOLAR, which helps students learn Spanish, Park Scholar, Member of Stop Hunger Now meal packaging committee, Philanthropy Chair and Chaplain of Kappa Alpha Order

Executive Assistant in Student Government, Member of the Service Leadership Team in CSLEPS, Planned “Bee the Change” campaign, Orientation Leader this summer, North Carolina Teaching Fellow, Charter class member of Kappa Alpha Theta

“I like to think I’ve made a positive impact through service work that I’ve done through leading my fraternity as Philanthropy chair, and being a part Stop Hunger Now meal packaging that I served on.”

I believe I have made an impact at N.C. State by being a servant leader. By being a servant leader in the campus organizations I am a part of and in my everyday life I believe I have inspired others to lead and pursue their highest potential and they, in turn, have helped me to pursue mine.

“I think I am the best candidate because I have connections with many different diverse groups on campus. I don’t think I can be confined to one subset of people. I’d like to think that I can represent the University as a whole because of my connection to all the student groups on campus.”

“I have not yet ridden in the Homecoming Parade, but I will be with the group on Friday, Nov. 1. That’s something that I haven’t been able to do yet that I’m really looking forward to.”

Austin Bath

I think you should vote for me because I am committed to the three things that Leader of the Pack awards: leadership, scholarship and service. I can write all day about things that I’ve done, am doing and will do. But in the end, if I am not committed to doing those things for the right reasons and learning and growing as a leader, scholar and servant, than it isn’t worth anything.

I cannot wait to participate in the ring ceremony. I just ordered my class ring last week and I am so excited to have it spend the night in the Memorial Belltower.

Molly Basdeo


6 • Homecoming Preview

Homecoming earns green certification Will E. Brooks Features Editor

Homecoming is one of N.C. State’s oldest traditions, but members of the Homecoming Committee are letting modernity, not old age, define the way business will run on Sunday. Homecoming Week will receive a Wolfpack Green Certification from the N.C. State Sustainability Office for their efforts to make its events more sustainable this year. Emily Collier, co-director of homecoming and junior in parks, recreation and tourism management, said it all started with a little bit of school spirit. Collier said the prospect of receiving Green Certification first came to organizers’ minds when they

began planning the Homecoming Parade, which will feature a most-sustainablefloat competition. “That’s where it all started,” Collier said. “We’re going to have people from the sustainability office judge how sustainable their floats are.” The sustainability competition led Collier to research N.C. State’s sustainability certification. Collier said that is when she made Green Certification her goal. “I was looking at [N.C. State Sustainability’s] form online about how to become certified and the criteria,” Collier said. “I was glancing at it and thought, ‘we fit some of these, we really should look into it.’” Collier said she brought the idea to the committee, and they began planning

sustainably from there forward. “I met with the rest of the committee and we just talked about options of what we could do to become more sustainable,” Collier said. Collier said the most important piece in that certification was the Homecoming smart phone application. “This is the first year we’ve had an app dedicated just to homecoming,” Collier said. “That kind of ties into why we were able to get certified.” Collier said the phone application contains a schedule of the week ’s events—previously passed out via paper flyers—and a link to the Wolfline application. The Homecoming Committee is saving paper and hoping to pro-

ARCHIVE/TECHNICIAN

Floats line up on Varsity Dr. before the Homecoming Parade Nov. 2, 2012.

mote bus-use, which might reduce the amount of a gas used during Homecoming. “We do have events that are at McKimmon and a

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couple events are at Centennial this year,” Collier said. On Halloween, students will “prep Hillsborough Street to host ghouls, ghosts and goblins,” and “scare away debris and trash before a night of frightful festivities,” according to the Homecoming website. In reality, students will be cleaning Hillsborough Street as just another part of its Green Certification Thursday. In addition to the app, Collier said there will be a “Green and Blue Machine” on Sunday’s 5k that dispenses water so students can reuse an refill water bottles. “That eliminates [the use of] plastic bottles,” Collier said. For Wear Red, Get Fed,

an event where students simply wear red to get free food in the Brickyard, Homecoming will be providing healthy vegan and vegetarian options from Zoe’s Kitchen and Moe’s, another step in their Green Certification. Collier said Homecoming will also hold a blood drive and a canned food drive, which both factor into the green specifications. Green-influenced events will be hard to miss at next week’s homecoming, and Collier said she’s proud of this. “We’re always thinking about ways we can improve [Homecoming] because it’s our longest lasting tradition,” Collier said. “We’re just really excited we were able to attain this goal.”


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Technician - October 24, 2013