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HOW SOCIAL MEDIA CAN MAKE OR BREAK YOUR JOB SEARCH

         

TECHNICIAN

wednesday More than ever, social media is crucial to getting hired. october

2 % OF RECRUITERS LOOK AT SOCIAL PROFILES. 2013

86

Which social media channels are they using most?

78%

technicianonline.com

% 93 87 %

55%

% 66 55 %

% 54 47 45 Raleigh, North Carolina %

%

Government shutdown hits NCSU Jason Katz Deputy News Editor

T he U.S. gover nment ceased all non-critical federally-funded operations Tuesday for the first time since 1995, and the effects can be felt throughout the nation and in North Carolina, including at N.C. State. Government officials said the shutdown could affect about 6,000 state government workers who receive funding from the federal government, according to The News & Observer. Terri L. Lomax, the vice chancellor for Research, Innovation and Economic Development at N.C. State, said the shutdown affects employees funded by the government

and could impact research at the University. “There are immediate effects for anyone who is a federal employee, which we have some on staff at N.C. State,” Lomax said. “They are furloughed now already.” The United States Department of Agriculture, which has an office on Centennial Campus, is a federal agency that has been impacted by the shutdown. The USDA’s website is down, which said, “due to the lapse in federal government funding, this website is not available,” on the homepage. According to Lomax, some of the University’s research projects might be in jeopardy if the government remains inactive for a long period of

Democrats run ads criticizing cuts to N.C. public education Jacqueline Lee Correspondent

The North Carolina Democratic Party posted advertisements in newspapers across the state last week criticizing Republican lawmakers for their cuts to public education. According to Micah Beasley, a spokesman for the North Carolina Democratic Party, the party bought the ads because Republicans in the General Assembly passed a budget that cut about half a billion dollars to public schools and universities. “We wanted to lay out plainly the negative effects of Gov. [Pat] McCrory and Republican legislators turning their backs on public education in our state,” Beasley said. “From increased classroom sizes, to aging textbooks and dwindling supplies, these cuts are felt profoundly from pre-K all the way up to our public universities. Voters need to know this and they need to understand it.” The advertisement’s message criticizes the Republicans in Raleigh for prohibiting pay increases for teachers, causing overcrowding

in classrooms with budget cuts, cutting textbooks and supplies, getting rid of bonus pay for teachers with a master’s degree and eliminating the annual sales tax holiday. The ad also opposed a proposed voucher plan to take money away from public schools to benefit private schools, according to Beasley. However, North Carolina Republican Party Chairman Claude Pope criticized the advertisement. Gov. McCrory inherited former Gov. Bev Perdue’s budget problems, Pope said. “The attack ad is ironic, given the fact that it was Democratic Gov. Bev Perdue’s disastrous mismanagement of the state budget that led to decreasing teacher pay in comparison to other states,” Pope said. “Although Gov. McCrory was handed a budget mess, he and the General Assembly have worked diligently to clean it up, and in the process they have kept education funding steady while giving parents more

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time. Lomax said research grants that started in the last fiscal year would not be immediately affected and will proceed normally for now. But research can’t continue indefinitely because eventually they won’t be getting reimbursed by the federal government. “We won’t be getting any new grants [if the shutdown continues],” Lomax said. “We won’t be able to submit any proposals for new grants, and we also won’t be able to do changes for renewals on current grants as long as the government is shutdown.” Lomax said that there are some deadlines coming in the near future that are casting doubt about what is going

Employers don't just use social media to screen candidates. They're also using these sites to identify and recruit new hires. Deleting your profiles is no longer an option. Persona can help turn your social media into a professional asset.

2010 2011 2012

2010 2011 2012

2010 2011 2012

to happen with current and government shutdown, the state budget.’’ Source: http://web.jobvite.com/rs/jobvite/images/Jobvite_2012_Social_Recruiting_Survey.pdf future grants. ability of schools and the dePresident Barack Obama “It’s a wait and see situa- partment to work on complex issued a statement Tuesday tion, but it’s certainly a level student or borrower issues to all government employees of stress for our researchers would be a problem.” and urged Congress to rethat they don’t need,” Lomax open the federal government. said. According to The News & “I want you to know that However, the University Observer, Gov. Pat McCrory I will keep working to get and students shouldn’t haveFacebook was in meetings % all day Tues- Congress to reopen the Govto worry about financial aid, day, awaiting instruction ernment, restart vital services LinkedIn at least for now. from the federal % government that the American people According to Inside Higher about what critical programs depend on and allow pubFriends/ contacts presidentTwitter Ed, Justin Draeger, will still be%funded through- lic servants who have been of the National Association out the shutdown. sent home to return work,” of Student Financial Aid “We have to make sure Obama said in the statement. Administrators, said institu- the functions that are critiLomax said that there has Source: http://blog.jobvite.com/2012/01/infographic-the-social-job-seeker/ Source: http://blog.jobvite.com/2012/01/infographic-the-social-job-seeker/ tions administering financial cal remain open,” McCrory been no indication of how aid should not be affected told The News & Observer. long this shutdown will last. much. “But at the same time we are “If you’re watching CNN, “If we have a brief govern- not spending money that the or whatever [news program], ment shutdown, I’d say the state does not have that the your guess is as good as ours,” concern is pretty minimal,” federal government has re- Lomax said. Draeger told Inside Higher sponsibility for because this Ed. “If we get into a prolonged could have an impact on our

JOB SEEKERS USE MULTIPLE SOCIAL NETWORKS TO EARN VALUABLE REFERRALS.

88 71 63

WHAT DO STUDENTS FEAR?

42

In fact, 36 MILLION AMERICANS were hired via a referral on social media.

WHO DO THEY FRIEND?

84

%

%

of Millennials include at least one employee in their Facebook networks

of students fear that information they posted on social networks might

Students and employers disagree on % damage what’s appropriate for social30media of people are likely to friend their boss.

their job prospects

Source: http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/03/29/facebook.job-seekers/index.html

Marty DeFrancesco Staff Writer College students and job recruiters have different opinions on what constitutes an appropriate Facebook post, according to a recent study. Persona, Inc., a Seattlebased social media utility focused on protecting users’ professional reputations in social media, conducted a survey sampling 500 college juniors and seniors. The study indicated 57 percent of college students do not think they have inappropriate material on their Facebook pages. However, according to a previous CNN poll, 69 percent of employers have rejected applicants based on their social media activity. John Wolfe, a senior in criminology, is among that 57 percent. “I know I don’t have any inappropriate pictures, but I do know some kids who are on the borderline,” Wolfe said. According to Persona Founder and CEO Lee Sherman, those on that “border-

Problem is, they don’t safeguard content from their colleagues.

Source: http://www.womenpoweringbusiness.com/should-you-friend-your-colleagues/ http://mediacenter.avg.com/en/news/one-quarter-of-18-25-year-olds-are- facebookfriends-with-the-boss.html

THE MOST DAMAGING CONTENT

recruiters & hiring managers see on social networks

78 % 66 % 61 % 47 %

Illegal Drug Use Adult Content (Sexual nature) Profanity Alcohol Consumption Source: http://web.jobvite.com/rs/jobvite/images/Jobvite_2012_Social_Recruiting_Survey.pdf

GRAPHIC COURTESY OF PERSONA, INC.

According to a study by Persona, Inc., 69 percent of employers have rejected job applicants due to their social media activity.

line” need to be proactive in preserving their professional reputation. In a press release last month, Sherman offered advice to college students preparing to enter the job market, saying that “Facebook never forgets,” and asking students to check their past social media histories. “[Students] must be aware that recruiters will ... go back in time to earlier posts. No one, not even the most care-

Students and faculty combat addiction

ful candidate, wants recruiters to see photos or posts of them from their teenage years. Monitor content now, and go back in time to delete content from the early days,” Sherman said according to the Persona website. However, Sherman also advised students to take advantage of the opportunity social media provides in the employment process. “Employers hire people they like and want to spend

time with,” Sherman said. “[Job-seekers] should use Facebook to get an advantage before the interview” and to “showcase personal experiences”. Some students, like Christian Solorzano (as well as 58 percent of those surveyed), choose to keep their Facebook set to “private” as their only line of defense against the threat of recruiters find-

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insidetechnician

Sarah Ray Correspondent

In the midst of government plans to cut funding for addiction clinics, the Student Health Center is working with students to try and help others on campus manage substance abuse. The Health Promotion Office and the Counseling Center, located within the Student Health Center, to provide treatment and counseling for students addicted to drugs or alcohol. Chris Campau, a nondegree-seeking student who dealt with drug and alcohol

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Salsabor celebration brings Latino culture to campus See page 5.

VICTORIA CROCKER/TECHNICIAN

Assistant Director of Health Promotion, Chris Austin, is helping students deal with substance abuse problems. Austin also attempts to reduce drug and alcohol issues among the student body by teaching harm reduction.

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PAGE 2 • WEDNESDAY, OCT. 2, 2013

TECHNICIAN POLICE BLOTTER

CORRECTIONS & THROUGH ALEX’S LENS CLARIFICATIONS

7:30 P.M. | HIT & RUN Bragaw Lot Student reported seeing another student strike a vehicle and then leave the scene. Driver was located and cited for failing to stop at the scene of accident. 1:03 AM | DRUG VIOLATION Metcalf Hall  Report of possible drug violation. Officers did not locate source of odor.   12:07  AM | HIT & RUN Harris Lot  Student reported vehicle had been struck while parked in lot.   3:03  AM | TRAFFIC VIOLATION Dan Allen Drive  Non-student was cited for stop sign violation.   10:15-11:30AM Larceny Warren Carroll Drive Student reported bicycle stolen from vehicle bike rack.

In the staff editorial that ran Tuesday, we said that Gov. Pat McCrory has been in office for a year and a half. McCrory has only been governor for 10 months. Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Sam DeGrave at editor@ technicianonline.com

WEATHER WISE Today:

85/62 Sunny

Tomorrow:

Pedal to the metal

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PHOTO BY ALEX CAO

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John Paton, junior in textile technology, and Spencer Vaughn, chemical engineering graduate, do a nose to nose burnout on the top floor of West Deck on Wednesday, Sept. 25. Paton and Vaughn are a part of the Wolfpack Motorcycle Association which meets on top of the West Deck weekly.

Friday

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CAMPUS CALENDAR

Today CAMPUS SUSTAINABILITY DAY: ALTERNATIVE VEHICLE SHOWCASE 11 a.m. - 2 p.m., Brickyard

October 2013

SOURCE: WWW.WEATHER.COM

VIEWMORE

TECHNICIANONLINE.COM Visit our website to read more content.

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JAMES H. SPEED, JR.: WELLS FARGO EXECUTIVE SERIES 4:30-5:30 p.m., Nelson Hall

STOPPARD 7:30 p.m., Titmus Theatre

STOPPARD 7:30 p.m., Titmus Theatre

Tomorrow WHAT’S NEW IN MOODLE 2 12-1 p.m., D.H. Hill Library

CYBER SECURITY AWARENESS MONTH: HOW TO TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR DIGITAL LIFE 12-1 p.m., witherspoon student center

MAJOR EXPLORATION SERIES 3-5:45 p.m., Witherspoon Student Center

TEACHING TO RETAIN AND RECRUIT NEO-DIVERSITY WITH DR. RUPERT NACOSTE 5:30-7 p.m., Caldwell Lounge

RESPONSIBILITY, MORAL AND OTHERWISE 4:30 p.m., Withers Hall

UNIVERSITY THEATRE PRESENTS ARCADIA BY TOM

UNIVERSITY THEATRE PRESENTS ARCADIA BY TOM

3:23 AM | FIRE ALARM Motor Pool Facility Units responded to alarm caused by water flow alarm in dry riser system. 3:45AM | BREAKING & ENTERING-ATTEMPTED Plaza Hall Report that someone had attempted to break inot electrical room of construction area. 9:44 AM | BREAKING & ENTERING Bragaw Hall Three students reported unknown person had entered room while they were sleeping. Residents asked subject to leave. Subject left without incident. 12:43 PM | TRAFFIC ACCIDENT Coliseum Deck Student vehicle struck vehicle belonging to non-student.

Recession forces grads away from jobs in their fields Jason Katz Deputy News Writer

Graduating college may not guarantee a career as it once seemed to, but there are still things students can do to help their chances. On Saturday, the Los Angeles Times reported college graduates are often-times not using their degrees, but are instead working in restaurants, bars or retail for a living. “The main reason is a pretty simple one,” Richard Vedder, an economist at Ohio University told the Los Angeles Times. “The number of college graduates has grown vastly faster than the number

THERAPY

continued from page 1

addiction, said he can benefit greatly from on-campus resources at the Student Health Center. Campau said he attended Western Carolina in 2001 and dropped out due to his substance abuse. Campau applied to N.C. State last summer, but he was denied full status because of his grades at Western Carolina. He said he is hoping to join the social work program next semester and remains in contact with the Student Health Center. After being denied from the program and struggling to overcome the stigma created from his addiction, Campau heard of a collegiate recovery program that schools such as Texas Tech and the University of Michigan use to support those in long-term recovery who are attempting to further their education. According to the University of Michigan’s website, the Collegiate Recovery Program provides a supportive

of jobs that require high-level education skills.” According to the Los Angeles Times, Vedder said the number of college graduates working in fields that do not require degrees has grown exponentially. He said 25 percent of retail sales clerks now have college degrees. Additionally, the percent of taxi drivers that have degrees has multiplied, from 1 percent in 1970 to 15 percent now. Monique Alyshia graduated from N.C. State last year with a psychology degree. After graduation, she attended several job interviews but was unable to find a job that met her preferences that utilized her degree.

She is now in graduate school and working in a restaurant. “I decided to just quit applying and go back to school,” Alyshia said. Woody Catoe, associate director for student career services at the Career Development Center, said that finding a job in recent years has become more difficult for students. He said the center works to try and help students obtain jobs. “The best summary I can give you is we do everything and any thing related to career and career development,” Catoe said. Catoe said that there were several things that students

could do to insure a better career path. “Two things I would do, first is to start [preparing] early,” Catoe said. “The second thing, and this is huge, is the hands-on experience that help students begin to gain skills that are marketable.” Catoe said that the center is helpful for students in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, where careers are often less defined than other colleges on campus. Getting students into internships and co-ops can help students get a career goal set, as well as gain professional connections. “You can almost think of internships as being an ex-

tended interview,” Catoe said. Alyshia said the Career Development Center is a great resource for students. She used ePACK, a university-wide job and internship posting system, while at N.C. State and was able to get most of her interviews through the site. “Start the process early, utilize the career center,” Alyshia said. “They have good resources—make sure your resume is good and that will help you a lot, and definitely use ePACK,” Alyshia said. Catoe said that one of the keys to helping students is talking and really listening to them. This way the counselors can better understand

what the direction the students want to go—helping them choose things such as classes, minors and internship possibilities, among others. “It’s really a place where they can come to discover more about what their interests are and we do a lot with students who are maybe struggling a little bit about career direction,” Catoe said. Alyshia said she is now attending North Carolina Central University to obtain her master’s degree in the Counselor Education Program, with a concentration in clinical mental health counseling.

community where students in recovery can achieve academic success while enjoying a genuine college experience, free from alcohol and other drugs. After contacting and visiting the major universities that have such a program, Campau decided to start one himself at N.C. State. “I did this because of the student that comes behind me, the one that has the same problem I did,” Campau said. “I don’t want them to have to go through the things I did. I don’t want them to be discouraged.” According to Campua, after overcoming his addiction, he then attended community college and changed his academic record. He received an associate of arts from South Western Community College as well as a two-year degree in human services technology/ substance abuse from Wake Technical Community College. He graduated with a 3.7 GPA. “While at Western Carolina, I personally battled with drug and alcohol problems that led me to fail out of school,” Campau said. “After struggling and dealing with

all kinds of terrible conse- dents aware about alcohol quences surrounding my use and other drug issues on addiction, I finally entered campus, which is why we do long term recovery in May things like Alcohol EDU,” of 2006.” Austin said. “We do more The Stacie Mathewson harm reduction for those Foundation promised to choosing to use, so that they give $10,000 to 100 universi- look to use in more, lower ties that have a Collegiate Re- risk ways.” covery Program. The group Students sanctioned by the will apply for the grant in Office of Student Conduct are January, even though they sent first to the Health Prohave already been guaran- motion Office to undergo teed the funding, according the AlcoholBASICS program. to Campau. This includes a class educatAssistant ing the Di rec tor of students Health Proabout the motion, Chris facts surAustin, works rounding with students alcohol in order to consumpprevent alcot ion a nd hol and drug one to two abuse at N.C follow-up St ate. Wit h sessions in programs which the Monica Osburn, Counseling such as Alcoseverity center director holEDU and of the stuAlcoholBASICS, the school dent’s addiction problem is is able to educate students screened. about the practicalities of “With students that we do alcohol use as well as screen find out they’re having more students who have received a issues, then we send them sanction from Student Con- over to counseling, where duct for addiction problems we have people that specialthat may be developing. ize in substance abuse,” Aus“My role is to make stu- tin said. Students can also be

sent off campus to be looked at by a community intervention and treatment program. The next step for students receiving treatment through N.C. State is to meet with the Counseling Center, led by Director, Monica Osburn. Unless a student poses a threat to themselves or others, the center is completely confidential. “We have a pretty comprehensive support program, whether students are coming from a referral from Student Conduct or whether they’re coming on their own,” Osburn said. “We have several clinicians who have a lot of experience in substance use and abuse.” After the initial assessment of the student’s addiction issue, the center then refers the student to an appropriate path to recovery. “We’ll make a variety of recommendations, which can include groups on campus that we run in the counseling center related to substance abuse and treatment,” Osburn said. “It might be individual counseling. There are also AA meetings offered on campus, but sometimes we have to recommend offcampus resources as well.”

The counseling center places an emphasis on the needs of the student seeking help. “It’s the balance of prevention and intervention, but many times it’s really about making that connection with the student,” Osburn said. “With addiction, there’s so much fear. There’s so much unknown for the students, and it’s a scary process. To not feel alone in that process is really one of the biggest ways to get students help,” Osburn said.

“With addiction, there’s so much fear. There’s so much unknown for the students...”

tonight!

Arcadia

Wed-Sat, Oct 2-5 at 7:30pm Sun, Oct 6 at 2pm • Titmus Theatre Arcadia takes us back and forth between the 19th and 20th centuries, ranging over the nature of truth and time, the difference between the Classical and the Romantic temperament, and the disruptive influence of sex on our orbits in life. “Tom Stoppard's richest, most ravishing comedy to date.” – NY Times $5 NCSU students

919-515-1100 ncsu.edu/arts


News

TECHNICIAN N.C. State seeks orientation leaders for next summer Staff Report

The Office of New Student Orientation is seeking applications for Orientation Leader positions in the summer. Selected students will represent N.C. State during the 2014 summer orientation programs by informing incoming students and their families about the academic and social opportunities at N.C. State. The office encourages anyone who is interested in gaining leadership and professional experience and wants an opportunity to meet and work with administrators, faculty and staff members, and students to apply. Orientation leaders will also facilitate group meetings, aid students in understanding academic require-

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schooling choices for their children.” According to Steven Greene, a political science professor at N.C. State, it’s unusual to have attack ads when there is not an election, but the Democratic Party is trying to keep voters interested in the education debate in the meantime. “Obviously [the Democrat’s] hope is that this is one way to keep people thinking about the issue. I think there is concern that this issue is just going to drop too far off the radar and might not be a useful strategy,” Greene said. “Maybe this is in face a waste of money for them by doing it now, but presumably they think it is in their interest, otherwise they wouldn’t be doing it.” Beasley said the ads were also posted in key legislative districts to begin laying the foundation to take seats back in the General Assembly for 2014. “Investment in quality public education has been a cornerstone of public policy in North Carolina under Democratic leadership,” Beasley said. “We’re

ments and serve as academic and social counselors. Applicants must be fulltime undergraduate students during the upcoming spring and fall semesters. Applicants also must have a minimum 2.5 GPA, be in good standing with the University, demonstrate leadership ability and have what the office deems strong communication and organizational skills. Anyone interested in applying should submit an online application by going to www.ncsu.edu/orientation/ recruitment. Applications are due by Oct. 16. For any questions regarding the orientation leader program, contact Heather Johnson at orientation@ncsu.edu.

Professor to lead graduate school lecture Staff Report

Rupert Nacoste, professor of Social Psychology and 2013 recipient of the Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching, will head the CHASS fall diversity lecture on Tuesday from 5:30-7:00 p.m. Nacoste’s presentation will emphasize graduate education and how to encourage undergraduate students to matriculate into the graduate school at N.C. State. Specifically, Nacoste will highligh the importance of “neo-diverse” students. Na-

coste will outline teaching techniques that inf luence the University’s retention of neo-diverse students who are already attending N.C. State. He will also describe teaching techniques that activate the non-cognitive factors that will bring those students into these graduate education programs to become the professors of the future. The event will take place in the Caldwell Lounge in Caldwell Hall and is free and open to the public.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 2, 2013 • PAGE 3

known for that legacy and we’re going to continue to fight to protect public education against Republican short-sightedness,” Beasley also said North Carolina ranks 46th in the nation for teacher pay. According to The News & Observer, North Carolina was rated 25th in the nation for teacher pay in 2008. “N.C. GOP leadership in North Carolina has ignored the needs of our teachers by not offering raises for them as well as [enacting] recent budget cuts statewide,” said N.C. State College Democrats President, Anne Marie Fristoe. “I think North Carolina can see very plainly the priorities of the N.C. GOP leadership, and teachers and education are not one of them.” The ads were initially in The Mountaineer, The Mountain Times, The Daily Reflector, Burlington TimesNews, The Sanford Herald, The Eden News, Reidsville Review, Madison Messenger, The Daily Advance, The Sun Journal, The Winston-Salem Chronicle, The Carolinian (Raleigh) and The Wilmington Journal. Beasley said the North Carolina Democratic Party is looking into buying more ads in the aforementioned publications because of the optimistic response they received.

GRAPHIC COURTESY OF THE NORTH CAROLINA DEMOCRATIC PARTY

The Democratic party of North Carolina released this ad in publications across the state to criticize cuts to education.

Volunteers wanted for fall harvest Staff Report

GCF Farm volunteers sought Goodwill Industries of Eastern North Carolina, which runs the Goodwill Community Foundation Farm adjacent to its corpo-

HOW SOCIAL MEDIA CAN MAKE OR BREAK YOUR JOB SEARCH More than ever, social media is crucial to getting hired.

rate headquarters on Chin Page Road in Durham, NC., is looking for volunteers for the summer and fall harvest season, according to the CSLEPS website. GCF grows fruits and vegetables on the farm that are donated to the food banks of

Central and Eastern North Carolina. Last year, GCF donated more than 22,000 pounds of fresh produce. It has already exceeded that number this year and is well on the way to more than doubling that amount this year. GCF can arrange for spe-

cial work days for N.C. State groups and organizations. For more information, call GCF Farm Volunteer Coordinator Becky Lytle at (919) 281-9192 or write her at blytle@goodwillenc.org

LOOK AT SOCIAL PROFILES. FACEBOOK social media channels are they using most? 86% OFWhichRECRUITERS

in Job Applicants’ Social to analyze applicants’ FaceMedia Postings,” shows that book profiles, and the two continued from page 1 despite the high tendency for were compared. % % % recruiters to assess applicants The researchers found that % % % 45% Facebook behaviors 55% this me- certain 78%through Facebook, ing reputation-harming ma- dium actually may not be do not necessarily indicate Employers don't just social media to terial online.use the best indicator of a good a poor employee, and vicescreen candidates. also using “Honestly, They're ifthese[recruiters] worker. versa. Many extraverts were sites to identify and recruit are so upset by activities, The study, published this seen around alcohol simply new my hires. Deleting your profiles is no longer an option. maybe we wouldn’t work too2010summer, by because of their 2011 2012was authored 2010 2011 2012nature. Some 2010 2011 2012 Persona can help your social well together turn anyway,” said Will Stoughton, Ph.D. stu- extremely conscientious peomedia into a Solorzano, a professional juniorasset. in busi- dent at N.C. State, and co- ple were seen in suggestive ness administration. “Maybe authored by N.C. State psy- situations, but many recruitthat helps align like-thinkers chology Professor Lori Foster ers failed to adequately assign to companies they are most Thompson and associate pro- the correct traits to applicants compatible with. I hope my fessor Adam Meade. for the jobs they were trying coworkers for the next 40 The main focus of the re- to fill. years have fun the same way search was the employers’ “The kid who has the ocFacebook % I do.” side of the applicant screen- casional beer pong picture But while Persona’s website ing processes. could be a harder worker LinkedIn % says 86 percent of all recruitBy testing recruiters on than the straight edge kid. Friends/ Twittertraits of ideal employees, ers look at socialcontacts profiles the It’s impossible to tell. Being % when reviewing applicants, the study took an x-ray of social is never a bad thing,” an N.C. State study, “Big Five the perfect candidate. Then, Wolfe said. Personality Traits Reflected the recruiters were allowed

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Source: http://web.jobvite.com/rs/jobvite/images/Jobvite_2012_Social_Recruiting_Survey.pdf

JOB SEEKERS USE MULTIPLE SOCIAL NETWORKS TO EARN VALUABLE REFERRALS.

88 71 63

Source: http://blog.jobvite.com/2012/01/infographic-the-social-job-seeker/

WHAT DO STUDENTS FEAR?

42

In fact, 36 MILLION AMERICANS were hired via a referral on social media.

damage their job prospects Source: http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/03/29/facebook.job-seekers/index.html

84

Profanity Alcohol Consumption Source: http://web.jobvite.com/rs/jobvite/images/Jobvite_2012_Social_Recruiting_Survey.pdf

Which social media channels are they using most?

87 % 93

% 66 55 55

2010 2011 2012

2010 2011 2012

%

78% Employers don't just use social media to screen candidates. They're also using these sites to identify and recruit new hires. Deleting your profiles is no longer an option. Persona can help turn your social media into a professional asset.

%

%

% 54 47 45

%

%

2010 2011 2012

Source: http://web.jobvite.com/rs/jobvite/images/Jobvite_2012_Social_Recruiting_Survey.pdf

JOB SEEKERS USE MULTIPLE SOCIAL NETWORKS TO EARN VALUABLE REFERRALS. Facebook

%

of Millennials include at least one employee in their Facebook networks

of people are likely % 30 to friend their boss.

LinkedIn Friends/ contacts

Twitter

88% 71% 63%

Source: http://blog.jobvite.com/2012/01/infographic-the-social-job-seeker/

In fact, 36 MILLION AMERICANS were hired via a referral on social media. Source: http://blog.jobvite.com/2012/01/infographic-the-social-job-seeker/

Problem is, they don’t safeguard content from their colleagues.

Source: http://www.womenpoweringbusiness.com/should-you-friend-your-colleagues/ http://mediacenter.avg.com/en/news/one-quarter-of-18-25-year-olds-are- facebookfriends-with-the-boss.html

THE MOST DAMAGING CONTENT

Adult Content (Sexual nature)

86% OF RECRUITERS LOOK AT SOCIAL PROFILES.

WHO DO THEY FRIEND?

WHAT DO STUDENTS FEAR?

OF PERSONA, INC. WHO DOGRAPHIC THEYCOURTESY FRIEND?

Social media has become a powerful asset for employers, who use it to hire new employees as well as reject applicants. 86 percent of employers look at social media according to Jobvite.

42 78Technician was there. 30 damage 66 61 You can be too. 47

84%

%

recruiters & hiring managers see on social networks Illegal Drug Use

More than ever, social media is crucial to getting hired.

Source: http://blog.jobvite.com/2012/01/infographic-the-social-job-seeker/

%

of students fear that information they posted on social networks might

HOW SOCIAL MEDIA CAN MAKE OR BREAK YOUR JOB SEARCH

% % % %

of Millennials include at least one employee in their Facebook networks

of students fear that information they posted on social networks might

are likely % ofto people friend their boss.

their job prospects

Source: http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/03/29/facebook.job-seekers/index.html

Problem is, they don’t safeguard content from their colleagues.

Source: http://www.womenpoweringbusiness.com/should-you-friend-your-colleagues/ http://mediacenter.avg.com/en/news/one-quarter-of-18-25-year-olds-are- facebookfriends-with-the-boss.html

THE MOST DAMAGING CONTENT

recruiters & hiring managers see on social networks The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information. Illegal Drug Use % Adult Content (Sexual nature) Profanity Alcohol Consumption Source: http://web.jobvite.com/rs/jobvite/images/Jobvite_2012_Social_Recruiting_Survey.pdf

78 66 % 61 % 47 %


Viewpoint

PAGE 4 • WEDNESDAY, OCT. 2, 2013

TECHNICIAN

Bring the voter ID law to justice

N

orth Carolina became the first state to pass a restrictive voter ID law since the United States Supreme Court’s d e c i s ion t o Tim Gorski strike down a Deputy key provision Viewpoint Editor of the Voting Rights Act this summer. This decision has led the Department of Justice to file a lawsuit against North Carolina Monday on the grounds that this law targets minorities unfairly and disproportionately. In a press conference on Monday morning, Attorney General Eric Holder said, “The Justice Department expects to show that the clear and intended effects of [the voter ID law] would contract the electorate, a nd re su lt in unequal access to the participation in the political process on account of race.” Although this claim is highly difficult to prove in a court of law and will likely take years to sort out, it is abundantly evident to an unbiased observer and can be discerned within seconds that this was precisely the intent of this Republican-backed legislation. “The state legislature took extremely aggressive steps to curtail the voting rights of African-Americans,” Holder also said. The law contains four main objectives: requiring a North Carolina-issued ID to vote, cutting back the early voting period, eliminating same-day registration for early voters and stopping the counting of provisional ballots that are cast in the correct county but in the incorrect precinct. The timing of this law is more than a coincidence; although North Carolina voted Republican in the last presidential election, AfricanAmerican voter turnout has increased considerably in the 2008 and 2012 elections. Moreover, according to North Carolina voting records, more than 70 percent of ballots cast by African-Americans were early ballots. However, despite the statistical observation that African-Americans, who frequently vote Democratic, are

more likely to be targeted by the effects of House Bill 589, Republicans dismiss this correlation as coincidental. They assert the aims of the voter ID legislation are common sense and that because the law applies to all voters equally, it is unreasonable to claim that it targets specific groups. At face value this assertion seems perfectly reasonable. After all, if voter fraud is a serious concern, why should it matter what race people are? Shouldn’t everyone have to prove, using accepted methods of identification, that they are who they say they are in order to vote? If they didn’t, wouldn’t voter fraud be an epidemic? As it turns out, voter fraud is not a serious concern. According to t he North Carolina Board of Elections, of about seven million vote s c a s t in the 2012 presidential election, only 121 or 0.00174 percent were referred to the district attorney’s office for allegedly committing voter fraud. Clearly, these 121 alleged cases of voter fraud aren’t worth turning away the 318,643 registered North Carolina voters who do not have any form of identification. It is important to note that 58 percent of the aforementioned voters are registered Democrats, according to the North Carolina Secretary of State. And how could voter fraud feasibly become a serious issue? What person is going to try to take politics into their own hands by running around to different voting sites pretending to be other people to try and influence a national election? There are many factors that influence people to not vote. Some people may feel fundamentally disconnected from the political process, or have logistical issues about getting to a polling place such as finding transportation or getting time off work. This legislation is just one more burden that dissuades Democrats from getting to the polling booth and Republicans are fully aware of that.

“This legislation is just one more burden that dissuades democrats from getting to the polling booth ... ”

Sam Jones, freshman in English

Expats: Not proud to be Americans

T

he decision to leave your own country to work in another does not come without a long list of reasons. But for many, the main reason is probably the same as it is for many expatriates—taxes in the home countries a re eit her Ziyi too high or Mai Staff Columnist there are too many regulations, resulting in a harsh business environment. The United States was, and still is, one of the most popular countries for emigrants. In last week’s “The Saturday Essay,” published in The Wall Street Journal, Michael Barone questioned whether or not another surge of immigration will tear apart the U.S. Barone, resident fellow of American Enterprise Institute, pointed out that the U.S. is strong because it has the ability to assimilate new immigrants into the mainstream society and integrate different ethnic groups, providing them with a peaceful environment to live, work and worship. Immigrants usually do not divide the U.S. — they typically unite it. People don’t divide a country. But the provisions of the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act, which will go into effect July 1, 2014, will

likely tear Americans apart by deteriorating relationships with foreign countries and invading citizens’ private information. FATCA requires financial institutions around the world to report all the assets and incomes of any U.S. citizens with $50,000 to the Internal Revenue Service. If the institutions fail to comply, the IRS will withhold 30 percent of dividends and interest payments. The U.S. has long been known for its uniqueness as a country that practices tax policy based on citizenship rat her t ha n residency. Even Americans who haven’t lived on American soil in a long time and are not enjoying any public services or taking up public resources still have to file U.S. taxes every year. Eritrea, a country located in Northeast Africa, also practices this tax policy. Susan Rice, former U.S. ambassador to the U.N., condemned Eritrea for this practice, calling it “the extortion of a ‘diaspora tax’ from people of Eritrean descent living overseas.” It seems Rice didn’t re-

“Even Americans who haven’t lived on American soil in a long time ... still have to file U.S. taxes every year.”

{

{ LETTER TO THE EDITOR {

“I think it’s an evil game that the government is playing with the American people right now. It’s a movie we’ve seen before, and we’re sick of it.”

“The government shutdown means that my family doesn’t have any income right now. My father has to go in and work for free and a lot of my family is in the same boat.” Richard Fenimore senior, English

“I think that it’s appropriate. I think that they’re going to open it back up but it’s what they needed to do.” Gabriel Murphy sophomore, polymer and color chemistry

senior, political science

Editor-in-Chief Sam DeGrave

News Editor Jake Moser

technician-editor@ncsu.edu

technician-news@ncsu.edu

Managing Editor

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695

technician-managingeditor@ ncsu.edu 515.2411 515.2411 515.5133 technicianonline.com

}

BY VICTORIA CROCKER

Kyle Tervo

Editorial Advertising Fax Online

IN YOUR WORDS

bye to their U.S. passports or keeping their hard-earned money from going to the bank, in order to prove they owe nothing to the IRS. For many foreign financial institutions, FATCA is absolutely a hot potato that puts them in a position of predicament. Given the threat of withholding 30 percent of their dividends and interest payments, foreign financial institutions will be less likely to have incentives servicing American clients. FATCA might also be in conf lict with financial laws in countries such as Swaziland where banks have obligation to keep their clients’ financial states confidential. American financial intuitions are not happy about the regulation that the Treasury Department imposed based on FATCA. Banks in the U.S. are required to share data with other countries about foreign investors who have accounts in the U.S. These series of complications are expected to trigger a tremendous amount of lawsuits once it is in effect. Does this law really serve its purpose to close loopholes and give a boost to the IRS’ book value? It’s hard to say. Does it do any good to Americans? Not at all—neither for expatriates nor for Americans at home.

How do you feel about the government shutdown?

In response to “North Carolina’s declining popularity”

With regard to your article on “North Carolina’s declining popularity,” I would direct you to some actual facts. First, no matter how you cut it the education budget went up this year. Mad that teachers aren’t paid enough? The assembly only sets base pay, counties are supposed to tack on extra funds to make teacher’s pay competitive. Second, taxes are cut and North Carolina is ranked 4th most favorable to business in the NATION, according to CNBC. Third, racial equality? The Racial Justice Act was inherently unequal. Prohibiting the death penalty for a particular race and not all is the definition of racism. As for voting, according to a recent poll by Elon University, showing an ID to vote was supported by 75 percent of North Carolinians! We’re offering free IDs to people at the DMV and supporting other government issued IDs. What’s the issue? Early voting hours will remain the exact same. Instead of more days they’re just going to be open later. Next time please refrain from conjecture and focus on facts or don’t write about it at all. If you’re struggling to find facts, feel free to email me. I’ll be glad to help you add a basis to an argument other than this Public Policy Poll that found out people who aren’t even in our state don’t like us.

alize her beloved country was doing the same thing. If taxing based on citizenship is unreasonable, then FATCA is far from sane. The U.S. government has attempted to close the loopholes in its tax system and recover an estimated $100 billion per year in unpaid taxes of Americans’ assets overseas. But this law has led to outrage and backlash from American expatriates and foreign financial institutions. Since Congress passed the act in 2010, many American expatriates have considered giving up their U.S. citizensh ip. I n 2012, 189 expatriates renounced their U.S. citizenship. This number surged to 1,131 in the second quarter of 2013, according to BBC. This number is still small compared to the fact that there are six million Americans abroad, but the growth rate is rapid. From a citizen’s perspective, the notorious FATCA will be cutting off the affections and pride that many American expats have toward their country, forcing them either to think about saying good-

Features Editor Will E. Brooks technician-features@ncsu.edu

Sports Editor technician-sports@ncsu.edu

Viewpoint Editor Megan Ellisor technician-viewpoint@ ncsu.edu

“What the hell is a government shutdown?”

Chris Jones sophomore, political science

Josh Brand freshman, mechanical engineering

Design Editor Emily Prins

Multimedia Editor Russ Smith

technician-design@ncsu.edu

technician-webmaster@ ncsu.edu

Photo Editor Greg Wilson

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Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2011 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Bienvenidos

TECHNICIAN

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 2, 2013 • PAGE 5

Salsabor celebración trae cultura latina al campus Nury Castro Corresponsal

Kenneth Smith-Lopez Traductor

Buena comida y actuaciones talentosas fueron lo más resaltante de Salsabor, evento ocurrido el 27 de Septiembre en Witherspoon Student Center en el campus. Mi Familia, la organización Latina más grande de la Universidad, presentó su evento anual y cultural como forma de celebrar el mes de la Herencia Hispana. El evento duró dos horas, desde las seis de la tarde hasta las ocho con comida de “La Cocina de Mami Nora”, un restaurante peruano reconocido que se ubica en Old Wake Forest Rd. Siempre un favorito, Mami Nora sirvió pollo a las brasas, y complementos tradicionales como plátano, arroz y frijoles, así como dulces como tres leches y flan. Mientras la comida fue una de las atracciones para los estudiantes, Salsabor permitió aprender un poco más de la cultura Hispana. La diversidad de las actuaciones y las presentaciones dieron una oportunidad perfecta para

CORTESÍA DE YOLANDA MUÑOZ/TECHNICIAN

Sube Ritmo, uno de los aspectos más destacados del evento Salsabor, es el único equipo de baile latino en el campus.

otros de poder aprender del rol de los latinos en los Estados Unidos. Cristal Vivanco, presidente de Mi Familia, inició el evento con una intrigante pieza educacional. La semana de la Herencia Hispana fue introducida por el presidente Lyndon Johnson, luego Ronald Reagan lo extendió a un mes, el cual transcurre desde el 15 de Septiembre hasta el 15 de Octubre. Vivanco empezó con la frase “En orden de saber a dónde vamos, es

necesario saber de dónde provenimos”. Para muchos latinos éste no es solo un mes para celebrar quienes somos, sino también para conmemorar y recordar de dónde venimos y recordar los sacrificios de quienes vinieron antes de nosotros. Junto a la explicación de la cultura, también hubo tiempo dedicado a conectar a los estudiantes con los recursos que el campus les ofrece. Ms. Mary Medina, asistente de posgrado en la Oficina de

Asuntos Multiculturales así como estudiante de PhD, presentó lo que hacen en su oficina de manera de apoyar de manera regular a la población Latina en N.C. State. Muchos de los eventos del mes de la Herencia Hispana fueron patrocinados por ésta oficina. Durante la presentación también hubo lectura de poemas por varios estudiantes, así como maneras de cómo los Latinos pueden ayudar y educar acerca de su cultura a otros. Para muchos de estos

participantes, Salsabor es un show que les permite incluirse en la comunidad. Como el primer evento que realizan en el Otoño, Salsabor se ha convertido en una tradición y en el evento ideal para los estudiantes para que puedan ser expuestos a la herencia hispana en N.C. State. Sube Ritmo, el único grupo de baile latino de N.C. State, realizó una presentación al final, dando un sabor de la cultura latina. Bailaron bachata y salsa, dos de los bailes

más típicos en Latino América. Jackie García, estudiante de último año en Fashion y Textiles, ha formado parte del equipo por cuatro años, y para ella el baile latino es “una manera de…contar una historia. A veces la canción cuenta una historia y a veces intentas contar la historia de la cultura”. Al final del evento, Sube Ritmo ofreció clases de baile a los asistentes a Salsabor, enseñando los pasos básicos y movimientos sencillos de principiante. Cuando se le preguntó a Vivanco acerca de lo que pensó del evento, dijo que se encontraba emocionada al haber resultado mejor de lo que esperaba. “Estaba sorprendida de que todas las entradas se vendieran, y que hubiese suficiente comida y espacio para que todos disfrutaran Salsabor”. Carlos Vega, estudiante de cuarto año de Ingeniería Civil, asistió a Salsabor por segundo año consecutivo. “Me gustó la idea que estaban fomentando, de que este programa es para cualquiera, no solo latinos, cualquiera puede venir y aprender de la herencia latina”.

Salsabor celebration brings Latino culture to campus Nury Castro Correspondent

Good food and talented performers highlighted Salsabor, held on Sept. 27 in the Witherspoon Student Center. Mi Familia, the largest Latin organization on campus, presented its annual cultural event to celebrate Hispanic Heritage month last Friday night. The two hour event featured food catered from La Cocina de Mami Nora, a wellknown Peruvian restaurant located on Old Wake Forest Road. A culinary favorite, Mami Nora’s served grilled chicken, traditional sides

such as plantains, rice and beans, as well as delicious deserts such as tres leches cake and flan. While the food was a major draw for some students, others attended Salsabor simply to learn more about Hispanic culture. A diverse range of performances and presentations provided the perfect opportunity for others to learn about the role that Latinos play in the United States. Cristal Vivanco, the president of Mi Familia, started the event with an intriguing educational piece: President Lyndon Johnson first introduced Hispanic Heritage Week in 1968 and in 1988

CORTESÍA DE YOLANDA MUÑOZ /TECHNICIAN

Salsabor, un evento cultural en el campus mostrando la cultura latina, atrajo a una gran multitud de gente.

President Ronald Reagan extended the week to a month. Hispanic Heritage Month runs from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. “In order to know where we are going, we must know where we come from,” Vivanco said. For many Latinos, the month is a time to celebrate their culture, but also a month to remember where they come from and what those that came before them had in mind when sacrificing as much as they did. Time at Salsabor was dedicated to connecting students with resources available on campus along with speaking about cultural awareness. Mary Medina, graduate assistant at the Multicultural Student Affairs office, as well as a Ph.D. candidate, presented on behalf of MSA about what the office does on a regular basis to support the Latino population at N.C. State. Many campus events for Hispanic Heritage Month were almost entirely sponsored by MSA. Various students read poems and performed skits that ref lected how Latinos can easily educate others about their culture. For many of these speakers and performers, Salsabor was a showcase

CORTESÍA DE YOLANDA MUÑOZ/TECHNICIAN

Liliana Galván (izquierda) y Emerald Muniz, miembros de Sube Ritmo, realizaron una baila de salsa con sus parejas.

that allowed them to involve the community. As the first cultural event that Mi Familia holds every fall, Salsabor has become a tradition and the ideal event for students in the community to become exposed to Hispanic heritage on N.C. State’s campus. Sube Ritmo, N.C. State’s only Latin dance team, performed at the end, giving the crowd a little taste of the Latin culture. They performed bachata and salsa dances, two of the most popular dance styles in Latin America. Jackie Garcia, a senior in Fashion

and Textile Management, has been with the team for four years. Garcia said dancing is “a way to … tell a story. Sometimes the song tells the story and sometimes you try to tell a story about the culture.” Immediately following the event, Sube Ritmo held a dance workshop for guests of Salsabor to participate in, teaching the basic steps and some of the easier beginner moves. Vivanco said the event’s turnout was larger than expected.

“I was completely surprised that they sold out, yet glad that there was enough food along with space for everyone to fully enjoy Salsabor,” Vivanco said. Carlos Vega, a fourth year student in Civil Engineering, attended Salsabor for his second year. Overall, Vega said he liked the event’s message. “I liked what they were trying to convey, which is that this program is for everyone, not just Latinos, that anyone can come learn about Latino heritage.”

SACNAS día del Demo muestra oportunidades de investigación para estudiantes WANTED:

Student Speaker for 2013 Fall Graduation Exercises

Applications available at:

http://www.ncsu.edu/registrar/graduation

Application Deadline:

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Return applications to: Registration and Records 1008 Harris Hall

Miguel Sanchez Editor de Bienvenidos

En la primera de lo que pueden ser muchas series de eventos, el departamento de ingeniería eléctrica abrió sus laboratorios al público el pasado jueves. Como parte de los “días de demo”, la Sociedad de Avances de Chicanos/Hispanos y Nativos Americanos en las Ciencias (SACNAS), abrieron sus puertas a estudiantes para que pudieran observar las investigaciones en ingeniería eléctrica. Un público mediano asis-

tió al Demo Day, evento en el que el Dr. Lobaton plantea continuar en el futuro. Dr. Edgar Lobaton, Profesor Asistente en el Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica y de Computación [ECE, por sus siglas en inglés], abrió el evento compartiendo sus investigaciones con los asistentes. Lobaton centra sus investigaciones sobre sistemas de cámaras con detectores de mov i miento — si mi lares a los cuales que tal vez son usadas por diseñadores de videojuegos para imitar movimientos humanos—y

robóticos que son diseñados a imitar los movimientos de insectos como abejas, para las cuales tienen sentido de vista que es bastante limitado. Los participantes tuvieron la oportunidad de aprender sobre una plataforma robótica económica que fue diseñada por el grupo de Lobaton, que se llaman “WolfBots.” WolfBots permiten a los investigadores aplicar varios diseños experimentales y que prueben varios algoritmos con un solo robot. Comparada con otras plataformas robóticas en el mercado ahora, WolfBots son mucho

más barato, costando acerca de $500 para construir. WolfBots se pueden usar en cartografiar topológico, o delinear los contornos de áreas donde los humanos no pueden alcanzar, probablemente en áreas afectadas por desastres. Miembros de SACNASNCSU presentarán su plataforma robótica WolfBots en la Conferencia Nacional 40 Anual de SACNAS-NCSU en San Antonio, TX luego esta semana, desde el 3 de oct hasta el 6 de oct.

SACNAS continuado página 6


Features

PAGE 6 • WEDNESDAY, OCT. 2, 2013

SACNAS

continuado de página 5

Daniel Benevides, un estudiante en su último año en ingeniería eléctrica y de computación, espera el presentar de sus investigaciones de WolfBots en la conferencia, junto con dos otros estu-

diantes en el departamento de ECE. Los WolfBots son fáciles de programar, que los hace una plataforma atractiva para otros investigadores. “Operan de sistema operativo Linux y programación Python, lo cual les permite ser integradas fácilmente en cualquier tipo de investiga-

ciones,” dijo O’Hara. Estudiantes también pudieron probar la cámara con detectores de movimiento, completa con el traje negro y sensores blancos que se han aparecido en varios anuncios para los videojuegos de deportes. Veronica Galindo, estudiante de último año en ingeni-

ería eléctrica y de la computadora, probó el equipaje de los detectores de movimiento. “De verdad, me probé el traje; fue un poquito chistoso. Pero están utilizando los detectores de movimiento para imitar el movimiento humano, y para traducir este movimiento a algoritmos que los robóticos pueden usar,”

TECHNICIAN dijo Galindo. Considerando que era la primera vez que SACNAS ha tenido un evento como este tipo, Galindo salió impresionada. “Deseo que otros profesores harían esto, que permitirían que sean los estudiantes en lo más puntero de investigaciones, para ver lo que hacen día

a día…la gente tal vez se hará más emocionada sobre ir al posgrado, especialmente si quieren ser en la frontera más innovadora de los campos de ingeniería.”

SACNAS Demo Day shows potential research opportunities to students Miguel Sanchez Bienvenidos Editor

In the first of what may become a series of outreach events to undergraduate students, the Electrical Engineering department opened its labs to the public last Thursday. As part of what will be called demo days, the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics & Native Americans in Science, or SACNAS, hosted an open house for students to take an inside look at the type of ongoing research in electrical engineering.

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Edgar Lobaton, an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, opened Demo Day by sharing his research with attendees. Lobaton’s main areas of research are about motion sensor camera systems—such as what video game designers might use to mimic human movements—and robotics designed to imitate the movements of insects such as honeybees, for which the sense of sight is quite limited. Participants were given the opportunity to learn about an affordable platform robot designed by N.C. State depart-

BIENVENIDOS CALENDAR Tomorrow NC Latin Film Festival: Neighbouring Sounds 7 P.M. to 9 P.M. Nelson Mandela Auditorium, GEC. UNC-Chapel Hill Neighbouring Sounds | O Som ao Redor, Kleber Mendoça Filho (Brazil. 2012) Life in a middle-class neighborhood in present

ment, the WolfBots. WolfBots allow researchers to apply different experimental designs and test various algorithms with a single robot. Compared to other platform robots on the market today, WolfBots are much cheaper, costing about $500 to build. WolfBots would be used in topological mapping, or mapping out the contours of areas where humans may be unable to reach, likely in disaster-stricken areas. Members from SACNASNCSU will present their WolfBots robotics platform at the 40th Annual SACNAS National Conference in San

Antonio, Texas later this week, from Oct. 3 to Oct.6. Daniel Benavides, a senior in electrical and computer engineering, is looking forward to presenting the research at the conference, along with two other students in the ECE department. WolfBots are easy to program, which makes them an attractive platform for other researchers. “They run on a Linux operating system and Python programming, which allows them to be easily integrated into any type of research,” said David O’Hara, a senior in ECE working with Bena-

vides. Students also were able to try out the motion sensor camera, complete with the black suit and white orb sensors that may seem familiar from videogame commercials for common sports games. Veronica Galindo, senior in electrical and computer engineering, tested the motion sensor equipment. “Yeah, I actually tried the suit on; it was kind of funny. But they’re using the motion detectors in order to mimic human movement, and to translate human movement into algorithms for the robots

day Recife, Brazil, takes an unexpected turn after the arrival of an independent private security firm. The presence of these men brings a sense of safety and a good deal of anxiety to a culture which runs on fear. Meanwhile, Bia, married and mother of two, must find a way to deal with the constant barking and howling of her neighbor’s dog. A slice of ‘Braziliana’, a reflection on history, violence and noise. Introduced by Gustavo Furtado. Romance, Duke

(The State of) Hispanic Student Perspectives 12 P.M. to 1 P.M. DH Hill Library Assembly Room (2nd Floor East Wing) A discussion with current undergraduates sharing their perspectives of the NC State Hispanic student experience. Topics will include Bilingual Education, Cultural Competence, Demographic Trends, Community Engagement, and University Resources. Hosted by DH Hill Library.

Friday

Mi Familia General Body

Meeting 6:30 P.M. Mann Hall 304 Mi Familia will be holding elections for executive board positions at Wednesday’s meeting. Friday-Sunday International Festival Friday 4:30 P.M. to 10 P.M. Saturday 10 A.M. to 10 P.M. Sunday 11 A.M. to 7 P.M. Raleigh Convention Center, 500 South Salisbury St. Raleigh “Discover the World... In Raleigh!” The yearly International Festival in downtown Raleigh features

to use,” said Galindo. For it being SACNAS’ first time hosting an event of this type, Galindo left impressed. “I wish that more professors would do this, that they would allow students to be on the cutting edge of research, to see what they do on a daily basis…people might get more excited about going to grad school, especially if they want to be on the more innovative front of the engineering fields.”

authentic ethnic dances from over 30 different cultures, Cultural Exhibits, Delicious food, as well as Demonstrations and a Marketplace to by crafts from across the glob. Entrance is $6 on Friday, and $8 on Saturday and Sunday. Next Tuesday Women of Excellence 7 P.M. to 8:30 P.M. Park Shops Guest speakers Rachel Campos Duffy and Nina Roque will share what it takes to be a successful Hispanic Woman.

IPREO taps into Triangle’s talent Kaitlin Montgomery Staff Writer

Ipreo, a company that provides market intelligence, data and technology solutions for investment corporations, recently added Raleigh to its lineup of offices stretching from New York to Hong Kong. With about 800 employees globally, O’Hara Macken, executive vice president and managing director at Ipreo, said the company realized it was scattered in pockets around the world and it was time for a change. “We went through this journey of trying to identify where the right place for us to open an office was,” Macken said. “We ended up in North Carolina because of the educational system down here.” The Triangle’s wealth of educated citizens, coupled with its upand-coming reputation, sold the location to Ipreo, according to Macken. “Whether you talk about t he university system, the

community college system or even what feeds into that there’s a very strong education system here,” Macken said. “You have this great mix of excellent talent while educating people and they want to be here.” Ipreo executives said they chose downtown Raleigh instead of Research Triangle Park, or any other business park in the Triangle, because of its atmosphere. “[Ipreo came] out of other urban environments and we know we like it,” Macken said. “Downtown Raleigh felt good and we just liked it.” Macken said the Trian-

gle’s three major research According to Macken, schools—N.C. State, UNC Ipreo has had great success Chapel Hill and Duke—were with hiring graduates from an important N.C. State. part of Ipreo’s “State is a move and talprimary foent selection. cus for us,” “We’ve been Macken all across said. “Dean t he board,” Weiss from Macken said. t he busi“We’ve hired ness school folks on the and Dean technology Martin-Ves i d e , f o l k s O’Hara Macken, executive vice ga from the with business engineerpresident, Ipreo experience ing school who want to have both be on the business side, peo- been very helpful in, not only ple on the analytical side.” us understanding the market

“There really is a great culture here, not just within our company, but within Raleigh.”

down here and getting down here, but then working closely with the university.” Ipreo committed to bringing 250 jobs to Raleigh by the end of 2016, Macken said. “Roughly, right now, we’re at about 115 [jobs],” Macken said. “Our goal internally is to be up to 150 by the end of the first quarter next year and working towards that 250 by the end of 2016.” Ipreo is stimulating downtown Raleigh with more than just jobs though. The company sponsored Hopscotch, the CED Tech Venture Conference and will take AT&T’s sponsor spot at

Raleigh’s Winterfest, changing the title to “Ipreo Raleigh Winterfest.” “We committed to the first six months or so doing things that get the Ipreo name out there while we’re also doing all the groundwork with the universities,” Macken said. “We’re also, going into 2014, really looking at our employees and saying, ‘Okay, where do you want to get involved in the community and how can we support you in doing that?’” According to Macken, in the end, the culture that brought Ipreo to Raleigh goes farther than the Triangle. “There really is a great culture here, not just within our company, but within Raleigh – it goes broader,” Macken said. “The entrepreneurial environment that exists and the support for entrepreneurs up through big companies like Ipreo or Red Hat, whatever the case may be, is phenomenal. We selected this because it hit our hypothesis really well and it’s really playing out.”


Sports

TECHNICIAN

HOCKEY

continued from page 8

York. According to sophomore forward Garrett Sunda, the University doesn’t require the squad to have a coach, since it’s a student run club, but said Gazzillo’s contributions are essential to the team’s success. “He handles a lot for us and we’re really thankful for all he does,” Sunda said. “We do need him to be on the bench for us.” “He does a great job of running practice, coming up with drills and keeping us focused.” The team practices four times during the week, twice at Raleigh Center Ice, and two off-ice sessions on campus. According to Kamaris, earning a spot on the team is competitive, but the team does carry healthy scratches throughout the year. “We have a huge roster, but we don’t necessarily play everybody,” Kamaris said. “To play on the team, you have

to be constantly pretty good. You probably have to be one of the better players on your [previous] club team.” Although the team participates in the ACCHL, against non-NCAA teams, the players said they have the tools to be highly competitive this year, possibly enough to earn a spot at regionals, or nationals. “I think if we play our best game against the good teams, like Liberty, Delaware, Navy and Georgetown … if we win those four games, the other ones we should definitely win,” Kamaris said. “If we went on a good run, we could go undefeated.” State will play in 28 more games this season and participate in four tournaments: the UNCC, Liberty, Stephen Russel and ACC tournament. The Pack will be back in action on Saturday, at home, against rival UNC in its first ACCHL conference match up. Puck drop is scheduled for 9:30 p.m at Raleigh Center Ice.

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 2, 2013 • PAGE 7

MEN’S TENNIS

Pack sends three to ITA championships Luke Nadkarni Staff Writer

Three members of the N.C. State men’s tennis team are participating in the Intercollegiate Tennis Association All-American Championship at the Michael D. Case Tennis Center in Tulsa, Okla. this week. ITA All-American Championship is different than the spring’s regular season play. The competition has an emphasis on singles tournament play as opposed to team competition. The ITA All-American Championship is viewed as the most prestigious event of the fall season. Top finishers in each draw advance to the USTA/ITA National Collegiate Indoor Championships in Flushing, N.Y. from Nov. 7-10. In fall tournaments, it is possible that players from the same team will face off against each other. The Wolfpack has players in both the singles and doubles qualify-

ing draws. Eight singles qualifiers will progress to the main draw, and eight doubles teams will qualify for that bracket as well. Singles and doubles main have not been released. On Monday, State junior Austin Powell, ranked No. 95 in the nation, won his first match in the qualifying draw. Powell, who led the Wolfpack in the 2013 spring season with 21 singles victories, bounced back from a tough first set to upset Ohio State’s Chris Diaz, ranked No. 69 in the country by a score of 2-6, 6-4 and 6-3. Freshman Nick Horton, the Pack’s other singles representative, was not so fortunate, falling to No. 95 Daniil Proscura of Alabama 6-4, 6-0. Horton, a native of Sydney, Australia, is the No. 6 freshman in the ITA rankings. “Nick is an outstanding freshman who will really help us,” assistant coach Mat Cloer said. On Tuesday, Powell took on David Holiner of Texas

Classifieds

and won a tight match 6-3, 6-7(1), 7-5. Powell served for the match in the second set but Holiner fought back. “Austin was battling himself mentally,” Cloer said. “He was a little bit tight and wasn’t as aggressive as he could be. It’s hard to bounce back when you can see the finish line and don’t get there.” After falling down a break in the third set, Powell got the last laugh as he came back to win. He will meet Chris Heillar of University of AlabamaBirmingham in the third round on Wednesday. “He’s a warrior,” Cloer said. “You always know what you’ll get with Austin Powell.” Horton is also competing in the doubles qualifying draw, which began on Tuesday, alongside senior Sean Weber. Horton and Weber, seeded 12th, received a first round bye and triumphed in their second round match by beating Louisville’s Alex Gornet and Albert Wagner by a score of 8-3. They will next

face Tulsa’s Japie De Klerk and Matt Kirby in the third round of qualifying. “[Sean and Nick] are doing real good things in doubles,” Cloer said. “They were really sharp today. I’m very proud of them.” Weber led the team in doubles victories in the spring season with 19 along with the now-graduated Dave Thomson. He is gunning for his second doubles title of the fall season. On Sept. 21, he partnered with junior Robbie Mudge to win the black draw of the University of Virginia’s Ranked +1 Invitational in Charlottesville, Va. Weber and Mudge also advanced to the finals of the black bracket in the Duke Fab Four Invitational on Sept. 14 in Cary. Main draw play begins on Thursday, and the tournament runs through Oct. 6. The next event for State will be the ITA Carolina Regionals, which run from Oct. 1721 at the Cary Tennis Park.

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Sports PAGE 8 • WEDNESDAY, OCT. 2, 2013

COUNTDOWN

• Three of days until football takes on Wake Forest in Winston-Salem

INSIDE

• Page 6: IPREO taps into Triangle’s talent

TECHNICIAN

Men’s basketball holds first practice N.C. State’s march to a third consecutive trip to the NCAA Tournament began Tuesday afternoon, as the Wolfpack men’s basketball team held its first practice of the 2013-14 season. The Wolfpack started practice a little earlier than usual this year, as a new rule in college basketball holds that college programs can start practicing 42 days before their first game. The N.C. State coaching staff has titled the first set of practices before the university’s fall break a “mini-camp.” SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Rashard Smith earns ACC specialist honor Senior wide receiver Rashard Smith has been named the ACC Specialist of the Week for his efforts against Central Michigan. Smith returned a punt 87 yards for a touchdown in the second quarter of the Wolfpack’s 4814 win over visiting CMU. That return tied as the third-longest in school history and was the second for a score in his career. Smith also rushed for 41 yards on five carries and had three catches for another 39 yards to tally 167 all-purpose yards for the game. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

JOHN JOYNER/TECHNICIAN

Senior midfielder Alex Martinez drives down the pitch during soccer match against Boston College at Dail Soccer Field Sept. 27, 2013. The Wolfpack fell to the Eagles 2-1.

MEN’S SOCCER

Wolfpack earns draw against Bulldogs Zack Tanner Correspondent

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Today MEN’S TENNIS @ ITA ALLAMERICAN CHAMPIONSHIPS Tulsa, Okla., all day WOMEN’S TENNIS @ ITA ALLAMERICAN CHAMPIONSHIPS Pacific Palisades, Calif., 2 TBA Tomorrow WOMEN’S SOCCER VS. MARYLAND College Park, Md., 7 p.m. MEN’S TENNIS @ ITA ALLAMERICAN CHAMPIONSHIPS Tulsa, Okla., all day WOMEN’S TENNIS @ ITA ALLAMERICAN CHAMPIONSHIPS Pacific Palisades, Calif., 2 TBA Friday MEN’S SOCCER VS. SYRACUSE Syracuse, N.Y., 7 p.m. WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL VS. BOSTON COLLEGE Chestnut Hill, Mass., 7 p.m. SWIMMING AND DIVING @ ALL NORTH CAROLINA INVITATIONAL Greensboro, N.C., all day MEN’S TENNIS @ ITA ALLAMERICAN CHAMPIONSHIPS Tulsa, Okla., all day Saturday FOOTBALL VS. WAKE FOREST Winston-Salem, N.C., 3:30 p.m.

QUOTE OF THE DAY “If we went on a good run, we could go undefeated.” Nick Kamaris, Junior goaltender

N.C. State rallied from behind to finish its match against Gardner-Webb in a 1-1 draw on Tuesday night in Boiling Springs, N.C. The Running Bulldogs (4-4-1, 1-1-0 Big South) are undefeated at home this season, and kept that streak alive against the Wolfpack (4-2-2, 1-2-1 ACC). The draw gives Gardner-Webb’s all-time record against ACC schools to 1-21-1, with its only win coming against Clemson in

2009. State is now 6-0-1 alltime against the Bulldogs. Gardner Webb struck first in the 75th minute on a header from junior forward Denzel Clark that was knocked past sophomore Wolfpack goalkeeper Alex McCauley. Ten minutes later, State’s freshman midfielder Michael Bajza responded by ripping a shot from just outside the box for his first goal of the season. He was set up off a corner kick from senior midfielder Alex Martinez, tacking on his fourth assist of the year. “I’m excited about getting

my first college goal, but the team matters more overall than anyone individually,” Bajza said. “You really learn about who your team is [in these kinds of situations].” The first half was uneventful from an offensive standpoint, with only three shots on goal from State and two from the Bulldogs. “It was the kind of game where we started off slow, and we paid for it in the end,” Bajza said. In a drastic change from the first half, the second was packed with offense and missed chances on both sides.

The first six minutes of the second period saw four shots from the Bulldogs and six from the Pack. “In the end, you have to take responsibility for your own success, and tonight we didn’t do that,” head coach Kelly Findley said. Despite the goal scored by Clark, goalkeeper McCauley held his own, totaling seven saves and making key plays down the stretch. State was inefficient on offense Tuesday night, scoring once on 33 shots, 14 of which were on goal.

“I wasn’t happy with our finishing,” Findley said. A factor in the Pack’s struggles was freshman Bulldog goalkeeper Matthew Swan, who snagged 13 saves and was named player of the game. The Pack will continue its road trip this Friday against ACC newcomer Syracuse. “I did think we did a good job of fighting back so I was pleased with that part, but we shouldn’t have put ourselves in that situation,” Findley said. “We need to be hungrier earlier.”

Club sports spotlight: Club hockey looks to reclaim title Jonathan Stout Senior Staff Writer

After falling to Georgetown in the 2012-2013 Atlantic Coast Collegiate Hockey League championship game, N.C. State club hockey is looking to reclaim a title after a two-year drought. Thus far, the team is a perfect 3-0 with wins against George Mason, Clemson and Wake Forest. The team plays in the American Collegiate Hockey Association, under a Division-II ranking in the ACCHL conference. State, UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke, Elon, Georgetown, Navy, George Washington and Wake Forest compile the members of the ACCHL. “I think we’re just as good as some D-I clubs,” junior goaltender Nick Kamaris. “If we had the budget to get the ice time and training facilities, we’d be a lot better. But I think we’re pretty good for where we are.” “It’s exciting and fast pace hockey—it’s not what you’d expect in the South. It’s definitely not as popular as it is up north, but we definitely have a good team.” According to sophomore defenseman Andrew Cooke, a lot of players from last season are on the team. “We’re just improving after last year,” Cooke said. “We have pretty much the

COURTESY OF N.C. STATE CLUB HOCKEY

Above: Senior forward Mike Reisland faces off against a UNC-Wilmington opponent at Raleigh Center Ice. Below: Sophomore forward Billy Manuella skates down the ice in pursuit of the puck. N.C. State club hockey is 3-0 this season, with the rival UNC-Chapel Hil Tar Heels up next Saturday at 9:30 p.m.

same team. We know how to play together now, we’re just working on the little things.” “We want to win the ACC championship, that’s our team goal, especially after last year.” The team is led by head coach Mike Gazzillo, who has been with the team since the 2010 season. Previously to coaching the Pack, Gazzillo served as an assistant coach at UNC-Chapel Hill and coached in many different levels while residing in New

HOCKEY continued page 7

Technician – October 2, 2013  

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