Issuu on Google+

TECHNICIAN          

exam issue 2013

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Cuts uncertain, NCSU prepares for worst Ravi Chittilla & Mark Herring

faculty salaries. Republican House Speaker Thom Tillis said if he was chancellor of a UNC System school, he would find When Gov. Pat McCrory proposed other sources of revenue to gain inhis 2013-15� budget in March, his dependence from state government. recommended $140 million cut to Democrats in the N.C. House the UNC System sparked a debate said the cuts are a threat to the about the role of government in state’s economy and warn the state public education. is falling short of Though Chancellor its constitutional Randy Woodson obligation to keep said he won’t make education “as free a final judgment of as practicable.” the budget until it The N.C. Senate passes the House, budget will cross N.C. State is alover to the House ready preparing to of Representatives cut library services. May 16, and DemAt t he heig ht ocratic representaof the recession, tives said they fear Sarah Timberlake, graduate Nor t h Ca rolina UNC System cuts student in communication law ma kers cut could be deeper more than $400 than those promillion from the UNC System due posed by McCrory. to reduced government revenue. In “[The cuts are] really even more 2011, the state legislature demand- than what they seem to be,” said ed that N.C. State cut its budget by Rep. Rick Glazier (D-Cumberland), 15 percent. Since then, University who serves on the Appropriations administrators have scaled back programs, cut faculty positions, inCUTS continued page 2 creased class sizes and nearly frozen

spring

Staff Writer & Correspondent

Student group uses the power of protest Jake Moser News Editor

“Our administration is at the mercy of the legislature ... it is up to us to make a move ”

CHRIS RUPERT/TECHNICIAN

Tom Ross, president of the UNC System, which manages the public universities in North Carolina, speaks in the Walnut Room of the Talley Student Center April 2, 2013. Ross spoke about Gov. Pat McCrory’s then recently proposed budget cuts.

A single person doesn’t have the ability change his or her government, but as history shows, there is power in numbers. In 2011, Egyptian citizens overthrew their corrupt dictator after 30 years in office through the power of protest, starting a wave of demonstrations, civil wars and revolutions that flooded the Arab world. In 1963, more than 200,000 protesters marched on Washington D.C. demanding civil and economic rights for African-Americans, leading to the signing of the Civil Rights Act. While the words of Martin

UNION continued page 4

Tuition increases hurt students throughout U.S.

TUITION continued page 2

Race to the Top sparks more debate Sara Awad Staff Writer

A grand jury indicted 35 staff members from Atlanta Public Schools March 29, including former national superintendent of the year Beverly Hall, according to �CNN. The staff members are charged with racketeering, theft by taking and making false statements.

The scandal occurred after the state examined mysterious increases in test scores, which were allegedly due to cheating. James Martin, chemistry professor and Board of Education member, said he thinks scandals like these are due to programs like Race to the Top. Funded by the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Race to the Top asks states to

compete for funding by improving scholastic achievement and creating plans for reform. President Barack Obama approved the program. Making education a race increases the chance schools will try to use shortcuts to show improvement, Martin said. “Anything in education if you tell

RACE continued page 4

insidetechnician viewpoint features classifieds sports Service with a smile: The Charles Lark story See page 5.

Mediocrity kills the Pack See page 12.

8 5 11 12

$16,000 $14,000 $12,000

GRAPH BY EMILY PRINS

Out of state

$18,000

$10,000 $8,000

In state

$6,000 $4,000 $2,000

2010-11 2012-13

2007-08

2004-05

2001-02

1998-99

1995-96

1992-93

1989-90

$0

1986-87

hang out with my friends.” Tsekai English, a senior in mathematics from Cambridge, Mass. is also being pressured by tuition hikes to graduate quickly. “Graduating on time is always in the back of my mind because out-ofstate tuition is so much more money and because it’s increasing more,” English said. “It really motivates me to finish my degree as fast as I can. I definitely still enjoy N.C. State, but I’m always thinking, ‘Is my financial aid going to be enough? How many loans am I going to have to take out?’” The University blames a decrease in state aid over the past few years for its rising tuition, and with Gov. McCrory in office, many speculate the situation won’t get any better. Only two states in the U.S. have granted more funding to higher education in the past five years —

1983-84

The cost of going to college has more than doubled over the past 30 years nationwide, but has the quality of higher education followed suit? A major reason for this price increase is soaring national tuition rates which, on average, rose 4.8 percent this school year and 8.4 percent the year before, according to the College Board. This is not just a national problem. College students around the world have protested rising college fees from Montreal, to Chile, to England. While N.C. State ranked sixth in USA Today and the Princeton Review’s list of best value public colleges in 2013, the University is no exception when it comes to tuition hikes. In 2012, the UNC Board of Governors approved a 9.8 percent tuition

increase for in-state students at N.C. State, and Gov. Pat McCrory suggested a 12.3 percent increase for out-of-state students this past March, which was largely shot down by lawmakers on both aisles. Rising tuition is especially a concern for out-of-state students like Sara Kerr, a senior in science education from Bedford, Va. Kerr, who plans to remain in the state as a teacher after graduation, was born in North Carolina but is not a resident of the state. She said N.C. State makes her feel at home. Despite Kerr’s connection to the state, rising tuition has added stress to her college experience. “[Increasing tuition costs] made me rush through college so I can get out in a shorter time,” Kerr said. “I haven’t made as good of grades as I had hoped because I was trying to take 19 credit hours, and working to make sure I can pay for everything has also affected how much I can

1980-81

News Editor

1977-78

Jake Moser

Change in tuition 1977-2013 (does dot adjust for inflation)

Representatives and Senators of North Carolina, Enough is enough. Our University is dying. No, it is being killed — by budget cuts taking place within a systemic attack on public services. But we, the students, faculty and staff of the UNC System, will not put up with this any longer. Sen. Tom Apodaca, if you had graduated from N.C. State when you got your bachelor’s degree, your tuition would have been six percent of what we pay today, and even adjusting for inflation, 18 percent of that. Cuts have kept faculty and staff pay nearly stagnant for years, as class sizes and contingent faculty have swelled in number. You recently decided to eliminate North Carolina’s estate tax, which will help only 140 families in the state, while costing it more than $60 million every year. Point being, there is enough money — it’s just a matter of how you choose to use it. Right now, you’re using it to the harm of the many; the many being us, whose futures depend on the UNC System. We demand you stop your assault on education. If you defund our universities, we will defend them. Sincerely, ____________________ SIGN AND DELIVER THIS LETTER TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ON YOUR OWN, OR DROP IT BY STUDENT MEDIA’S OFFICE AT 307 A WITHERSPOON STUDENT CENTER, AND THE TECHNICIAN WILL DELIVER IT ON YOUR BEHALF.

Contact us at

866-857-3619


News

PAGE 2 • SPRING EXAM ISSUE 2013

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Sam DeGrave at editor@ technicianonline.com

CUTS

continued from page 1

Subcommittee on Education. “I’m hearing rumors that the Senate budget will be less than the governor’s budget. That’s a rumor we don’t know. Those cuts are significant, but they are deeply serious in the context of the last three years of cuts. The cuts we’re talking about are not really $140 million in the grand scheme — it’s really two-thirds of a billion dollars of cuts that are now accumulating on an annual basis.” The defense for highquality and affordable education has attracted voices from both sides of the aisle, and some Republicans have taken issue with the magnitude of the cuts proposed by McCrory. Republican Sen. Tamara Barringer (Wa ke), who serves on the Education/ Higher-Ed Committee, said she grew up in a poor household and attributes her socioeconomic transformation to the state’s education system. “I would not be where I am without UNC-Chapel Hill, where I was educated both at the law school and business school,” said Barringer, now a UNC-CH professor of accounting and legal studies. “I had a great number of relatives attend N.C. State and the other member institutions. … I really do believe I am an American success story. My first home had no indoor plumbing, and today I am a state senator. It was because of affordable education.” Barringer is not alone in the Republican supermajority of

TUITION

continued from page 1

Wyoming and North Dakota — and North Carolina has cut average spending per student in the UNC System by $1,710 since 2008, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Despite lower funding, the UNC System has churned out 17

TECHNICIAN

the North Carolina Gen- taken on new forms of argueral Assembly. At Educa- mentation, and Glazier said tion Day, an April 3 event he fears Republican attacks that brought chancellors on education are neither conand lobbyists from every structive nor in good taste. UNC System institu“This is not a new fight, but tion together, Sen. Jeff it has taken on far more sinTarte (R-Mecklenburg) ister and exponentially imlaunched a staunch defense portant overtones because so for the university system, much more is at stake,” Glacalling it “unequivocally our zier said. “It’s one thing when greatest asset we have in the the critics of public education state.” are criticizing it to improve “How can you be against it, which we’ve always had, education? Education is which is good. When you fundamental for everyone,” have critics who are seeking Tarte said. “It’s above politics. to undermine public educaIt’s not a party issue. It’s a tion, they have a very differ‘let’s educate our kids’ issue.’” ent mission. However, despite marginal “When the funding deciRepublican outcry against sions have eliminated all the budget cuts to higher educa- extras and now we’re talktion, paring about t y leadhow ers st i l l much of call these the base cuts miwe’re gonor. Sen. ing to Tom Apcut, those odaca, a are very Republidifferent can busidiscusnessman sions. We from a re facWestern ing rea l Rep. Rick Glazier N.C ., is questions among those who support about the commitment of the the cuts. state to the continued glob“Let me tell you the good ally competitive existence of news: We’re not looking at the university system.” severe cuts,” Apodaca said Apodaca and his counterduring Education Day. “I parts are calling for more efdon’t know if we have any ficiency, and as Tillis put it, bad news. … The cuts are UNC-System schools need to going to be minor compared strive for efficiency. to what they were in the past. “I would not say univer[Overall] we like to see busi- sity-system schools are too ness principles in place and dependent. We’re talking we like to see efficiency.” about moving the needle — Apodaca sits on the Senate in regard to state funding — a Education/Higher-Ed Com- single-digit percentage point mittee and serves as co-chair [roughly 5 percent],” Tillis of the Education/Higher-Ed said. “I don’t think we’re talkAppropriations Committee, ing much more than that.” the same committee which Many Republicans say will decide the severity of there is still fat to cut in adthe cuts to the UNC System. ministrative overhead costs, GOP senators Apodaca, but UNC System President Dan Soucek and Jerry Till- Tom Ross argues the system man, all co-chairs of the Edu- cannot withstand more cuts cation/Higher-Ed Appropria- without compromising qualtions Committee, refused to ity of education. comment for this article. According to Ross, the The education debate has UNC system is currently pro-

ducing 17 percent more degrees while costing the state 17 percent less per degree. “I believe those degrees have every bit of the exac t s a me qu a l it y t hat they had five years ago, if not stronger,” said Ross. The UNC System has been streamlining operations and cutting costs for the past decade, but the John Locke Foundation, a conservative think tank, stands by McCrory’s budget. The foundation recommends for more cuts than McCrory’s budget overall, but its higher-education budget is identical to McCrory’s. “We did cut kindergarten through 12 and Community College appropriations in our budget,” said Sarah Curry, the John Locke Foundation’s director of Fiscal Policy Studies. “We didn’t touch universities because of increasing tuition. But in K through 12, there are a few things we think we can go without, like trying to cut administrations or administrative waste. They can use black and white copies as opposed to color copies.” But the ramifications of budget cuts to the university system may be more than changing color copies to black and white. Sarah Timberlake, a graduate student in communication and member of the University Library Committee, said N.C. State Libraries is preparing for the cuts and is considering cutting student services and journal subscriptions. “We’re preparing for a 3- to 5-percent budget cut across the University both in academic in non-academic sectors,” Timberlake said. “What this means for the library is a $570,000 to more than $930,000 cut from the current operating budget.” Timberlake said that N.C. State Libraries is ranked second-to-last in academic journal subscriptions for a library system of its size.

“To function as a library you have to have research. … We can’t cut that too much, so our committee is talking about cutting overnight hours in the Hunt and D.H. Hill libraries,” Timberlake said. “They just can’t afford to have them operating 24-hours/five-days-aweek right now.” Timberlake said Vice Provost and Director of Libraries Susan Nutter has her hands tied in sticking up to the General Assembly. According to Timberlake, Nutter wants to see students fight against proposed cuts. “Susan Nutter told me opposition has to come from the students,” Timberlake said. “We as students must approach this issue with urgency. Our administration is at the mercy of the legislature. We as students must react. This movement must come from the students; while the faculty and staff want to do everything to help, it is up to us to make a move.” In 2001, which was the last time NCSU Libraries proposed cutting hours, 500 students participated in a sit-in at the D.H. Hill Library and then marched at midnight to the chancellor’s residence to demand that the library stay open all night. That same spring, more than 5,000 students marched to the state capitol to protest a $125 million cut to the UNC System. As a result of student protests and public outcry, NCSU Libraries did not cut any hours, and the state legislature declined to pass what would have been a significant cut to the UNC System.

percent more degrees, according to system president, Tom Ross. The trend in North Carolina is to cut state funding, jack up tuition and force university system chancellors to look for funding elsewhere, usually in corporate partnerships, alumni donations and public grants. However, some of N.C. State’s efforts to increase tu-

This justification for more buildings instead of more faculty represents a trend in higher education, which suggests the quality of education isn’t increasing with the rising price tag. Instead, according to a Forbes article in August 2012, universities across the country are spending this extra tuition money on state-of-theart gyms and dining facilities, among other similar projects. N.C. State is following that model, and over the past two years, the University has renovated the Atrium food court and Carmichael gym. Another problem posed by the rising cost of college is whether or not students with financial aid will be able to afford it. The Center For College Affordability and Productivity released a study in 2011 saying that, while financial aid has increased over the years, universities tend to artificially inf late tuition when more aid is available, thus “capturing” that aid for other purposes. The CCAP study broke this concept down into an easily understandable analogy: If a good or service costs $100, and the government gives consumers a $50 subsidy, then the price of the product is cut in half, and people who previously couldn’t afford it now can. However, this idea of making the good more affordable only works if the seller doesn’t increase the price because of the subsidy. If the seller changes the price

to $150, the product doesn’t become more affordable. It only equates to more money for the seller. The study concludes that the affordability of college has been compromised by rising costs, and financial a id ha sn’t been able to keep up. According to Krista Domnick, director of the N.C. State Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid, the University actually reserved a quarter of its increased tuition revenue for students who need financial aid. “N.C. State ... has set aside a portion of the campus initiated  tuition  increases  for the purposes of financial aid. For example, 25 percent of the increase for 2013-14 has been set aside to provide need-based financial assistance to students,” Domnick said. “While the additional funding does help to offset the additional need students incur due to higher tuition rates, it does not completely compensate for it.” As N.C. State follows the national trend of increasing education costs, the state’s university system remains a “good deal.” Only Alaska and Wyoming provide more state-government funding per university student than North Carolina does. But as the cost to attend college

“This is not a new fight, but it has taken on far more sinister and exponentially important overtones.”

ition and cost of attending the University aren’t due to a lack of aid, but rather, to fund construction projects around campus. In 2009, the Board of Trustees approved a 6.5 percent tuition hike and student fee increase, and leaders of the board claimed financing the Talley Student Center renovations was a major reason, according to a News14 article.

Representatives and Senators of North Carolina, Enough is enough. Our University is dying. No, it is being killed — by budget cuts taking place within a systemic attack on public services. But we, the students, faculty and staff of the UNC System, will not put up with this any longer. Sen. Tom Apodaca, if you had graduated from N.C. State when you got your bachelor’s degree, your tuition would have been six percent of what we pay today, and even adjusting for inflation, 18 percent of that. Cuts have kept faculty and staff pay nearly stagnant for years, as class sizes and contingent faculty have swelled in number. You recently decided to eliminate North Carolina’s estate tax, which will help only 140 families in the state, while costing it more than $60 million every year. Point being, there is enough money — it’s just a matter of how you choose to use it. Right now, you’re using it to the harm of the many; the many being us, whose futures depend on the UNC System. We demand you stop your assault on education. If you defund our universities, we will defend them. Sincerely, ____________________ SIGN AND DELIVER THIS LETTER TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ON YOUR OWN, OR DROP IT BY STUDENT MEDIA’S OFFICE AT 307 A WITHERSPOON STUDENT CENTER, AND THE TECHNICIAN WILL DELIVER IT ON YOUR BEHALF.

Partnership campuses: helping or hurting? Taylor O’Quinn Staff Writer

Amidst government cuts to education, N.C. State has found a way to stay competitive and find funding. As universities across the nation, such as Clemson University, Michigan State University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, seek private grants and partnerships to help offset drastic reductions in income, N.C. State is no exception. Currently, 65 partners either rent office spaces or are headquartered on Centennial Campus, according to Leah Burton, director of partnership development on Centennial Campus. “The whole idea of Centennial is to create a place where faculty and students can collaborate with the government and corporations together,” Burton said. STUDENTS AND PARTNERSHIPS

The question is of ten asked: Are students only seeking a job through the partners on Centennial, or is academia also important to industry? Student Body President, Andy Walsh, said he hopes there’s a little bit of both. “It’s important that the values of our degrees are taken seriously,” Walsh said. CEO of Research Triangle Park, Bob Geolas, said he believes students are getting an education while also making an investment in a talent or skill that helps them in their future endeavors.

PARTNER continued page 3

increases, the socioeconomic gap widens, too. A study by Harvard University in 1995 suggests that increases in tuition in the 1980s and 1990s “saw the greatest widening of the gaps in enrollment between h ig h- a nd low-income youth.” Access to a college education goes hand-inha nd w it h economic success and social mobility in the U.S. North Carolina politicians attribute the state’s transformation from a textile and agricultural economy into a modern, high-tech economy to the state’s university system. While state funding for higher education has suffered since the Great Recession, the question of whether to continue austerity persists. According to a Pew Research Center poll in 2011, 57 percent of Americans say the higher education system in the country “fails to provide good value for the money students and their families spend,” and four-in-ten college presidents agree with that statement. The question now is if North Carolinians, educators and policy makers agree as well.

“ ... As the cost to attend college increases, the socioeconomic gap widens, too.”


News

TECHNICIAN

PARTNER continued from page 2

Geolas said. Partnership campuses help the University remain prominent in research and job creation, despite governmental cuts to education, Chancellor Randy Woodson said. �

The goal of land-grant universities such as N.C. State is to help students find a job while gaining the experience CURRENT PARTNERS necessary for their future Eastman Chemical, based career goals, according to in Kingsport, Tenn., held Geolas. their grand opening on Fri“Students are very smart day to celebrate their partnerand very capable and they ing with Centennial. can protect themselves very Eastman Chemical dewell,” Geolas velops varisaid. ous types of Almost polymer and all partner sustainable companies products, on Centenaccording to nial hire stuGary Luce, dent interns, Eastman provide coChemical’s ops or spontechnology sor projects liaison. in hopes to Jim RogGene Pinder, director of turn t hese ers, CEO marketing for Centennial opportuniof Eastman Campus ties into full Chemical, time emsaid he and ployment, Burton said. his team went through a rigRebecca Borttoff, chief orous process to select N.C. people officer for Bandwith, State as their partner from one of the partners located the top research schools on Centennial, said students across the country. who participate in co-ops, Virginia Tech, the Univerinternships, special projects sity of Minnesota and the and other Bandwidth student University of Illinois were programs are most likely to among the other top conbe hired. tenders competing with N.C. Borttoff also said students State, Luce said. are more likely to be hired Luce said Eastman Chemiif they have demonstrated cal ultimately decided to imagination, ingenuity and partner with N.C. State for the ability to learn quickly three reasons—the people, and contribute. the science and the use of “The reason why centen- innovative problem-solving nial started was because of skills. the need for ongoing research “Our decision had so very with faculty and students,” much to do with what the

“The industry has discovered over time that there’s a lot of brainpower on campuses.”

PAGE 3 • SPRING EXAM ISSUE 2013

people at N.C. State were like to work with,” Rogers said. Rogers sa id E a st ma n Chemical’s $10 million decision to partner with N.C. State should benefit both parties. Eastman Chemical will soon be offering internships and co-ops in exchange for student and faculty research and input for their company.

THE FUTURE OF CENTENNIAL What’s next for Centennial— is the university slowly privatizing and exploiting students? With a lot less funding coming from the state government, N.C. State is trying to keep costs low by looking for support from the private sector. “We’re not privatizing, but maximizing in way of public dollars,” Burton said. Chancellor Woodson said he has absolutely no plans to privatize the University. Woodson said he views partnership campuses as an opportunity to move companies and the economy forward through the University during the grand opening of the University’s new partnership with Eastman Chemical on April 18. “The industry has discovered over time that there’s a lot of brainpower on campuses,” Gene Pinder, director of marketing for Centennial Campus, said. Pinder said N.C. State has only “scratched the surface” of working closely with RTP and summed up the idea of a partnership campus: “It’s all about how we can all help each other.” �

CHRIS RUPERT/TECHNICIAN

The number of partners on Centennial Campus has grown in recent years. Currently, partners include Red Hat (above), Eastman Chemical Company and WebAssign.

Representatives and Senators of North Carolina, Enough is enough. Our University is dying. No, it is being killed — by budget cuts taking place within a systemic attack on public services. But we, the students, faculty and staff of the UNC System, will not put up with this any longer. Sen. Tom Apodaca, if you had graduated from N.C. State when you got your bachelor’s degree, your tuition would have been six percent of what we pay today, and even adjusting for inflation, 18 percent of that. Cuts have kept faculty and staff pay nearly stagnant for years, as class sizes and contingent faculty have swelled in number. You recently decided to eliminate North Carolina’s estate tax, which will help only 140 families in the state, while costing it more than $60 million every year. Point being, there is enough money — it’s just a matter of how you choose to use it. Right now, you’re using it to the harm of the many; the many being us, whose futures depend on the UNC System. We demand you stop your assault on education. If you defund our universities, we will defend them. Sincerely, ____________________ SIGN AND DELIVER THIS LETTER TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ON YOUR OWN, OR DROP IT BY STUDENT MEDIA’S OFFICE AT 307 A WITHERSPOON STUDENT CENTER, AND THE TECHNICIAN WILL DELIVER IT ON YOUR BEHALF.

work hard, play hard

free snacks

opportunity to grow I am beating my goals

happy hour

working with smart people people listen to my ideas

What do I love most about my job the ping pong table at Citrix ShareFile?

I believe in what I do I get to talk all day

learning about sales

great benefits global company, local spirit

Citrix ShareFile is one of the fastest-growing companies in the Triangle, and we are looking for smart and enthusiastic people to join our teams in sales, marketing, engineering and more. What will you love about working at Citrix ShareFile? Find out at www.sharefile.com/lovemyjob.


News

PAGE 4 • SPRING EXAM ISSUE 2013

UNION

TECHNICIAN

continued from page 1

Luther King Jr., Mahatma Ghandi and other visionaries have been relegated to the history books, the spirit of activism and protest is alive, even in North Carolina. However, activists in the state aren’t revolutionaries trying to stage a coup or overhaul the political system — they are students fighting back against cuts to public education. The North Carolina Student Power Union was created by UNC System students in the summer of 2012 to organize students, promote their interests, and “take the power back from the administrators and the corporate interests that they represent,” according to the group’s website. The NCPSU has no formal leadership, but instead focuses on the collective voice of students working together. Hannah Allison, a graduate student in social work at N.C. State and NCSPU member, says the union’s goals revolve around student representation at a state level. “The important thing for us is forming a powerful voice for students and creating an organization that is student led and student run,” Allison said. “It’s really important for students to have representation is decisions are made about their future.” While the NCSPU is less than a year old, the group was formerly known as the North Carolina Defend Education Coalition, which defined student activism for years in the state. The NCDEC was founded in 2010 by college students after budget cuts and tuition hikes, among other measures, were enacted by the North Carolina General Assembly and the Board of Governors. The group organized several actions throughout the next two years, advocating equal access to public education for undocumented students, and protesting cuts to education as well as far right efforts to re-segregate Wake County schools. Despite using peaceful methods to enact change, the

RACE

continued from page 1

me it’s a race where you are going to get it done quickly, I’m going to look you in your face and tell you, ‘No, we’re not,’ or ‘It’s not

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRITTANY PETERSON

Chilean students form a circle around a group of prominent university leaders to protect them from possible police retaliation. College students in Chile have been protesting for affordable education during the past yearfor.

NCDEC wasn’t simply a collection of picketing students, casually protesting the state government. Numerous members were arrested during a civil disobedience action in 2011, setting a tone of dedicated advocacy. Perhaps the coalition’s defining moment came at the UNC Board of Governor’s meeting at Chapel Hill in February 2012, where the board voted to remove a tuition cap set in 2006. Outside the meeting, the NCDEC along with 200 students from across the state, as well as other unions, demanded representation. “The constitution of North Carolina says that all political power is supposed to be used for the good of the whole, not the whims of a few,” William Baker, president of the NCNAACP said at the protest. “When you cut budgets in the General Assembly that make education less and less something that everyone can afford...you are not governing for the good of the whole, you are undermining the constitution and we are going to challenge you on that.” When the meeting started students were denied access to the BOG room and protested in the lobby. “Those seats are our seats,” and “shame on you,” students chanted. Andrew Payne, former N.C. State student body president, was among them. Pay ne, who graduated from the University with a degree in watershed hydrology in 2001 and a degree in political science in 2003, was a member of the BOG at the

time and reserved a seat at the meeting. Payne was initially inside observing the conference but left to use the restroom. When he returned, he was barred from entering. “I tried to get back to my seat and next thing you know, I was getting arrested,” Payne said. Payne can’t recall what he was charged with, but it was “something along the lines of trespassing.” The charges were ultimately dropped. “It’s odd getting arrested for trespassing at an event where you reserved a seat,” Payne said. Eventually, the protesters forced their way into the meeting room and took it over, criticizing the tuition increase. They continued with their own meeting as BOG members exited. While the BOG still voted to increase tuition (more than $7,500 over four years for N.C. State and UNC Chapel Hill and hikes across the board for UNC System schools) the group says it was successful, “illustrating what an education that was run by and for the people would look like,” according to the NCSPU website. The coalition changed their name to the NCSPU in the summer of 2012 to ref lect their new goal: To build unions of workers and students in order to give the suppressed a voice. The decision to join forces with other activist groups is the reason the power union is effective compared to other student organizations, like Student Government, according to sophomore economics

going to be good education,’” Martin said. “You don’t race to education. Education is a slow, painfully slow process.” Kenneth Bernstein, Daily Kos education contributor and a Washington Post Agnes Meyer Outstanding Teacher, said he’s not happy with RTT

either. “People with no experience in education are driving policy and they cannot understand what teaching and learning are,” Bernstein said. Educators can’t reach an agreement on how RTT will affect education or how stu-

Representatives and Senators of North Carolina, Enough is enough. Our University is dying. No, it is being killed — by budget cuts taking place within a systemic attack on public services. But we, the students, faculty and staff of the UNC System, will not put up with this any longer. Sen. Tom Apodaca, if you had graduated from N.C. State when you got your bachelor’s degree, your tuition would have been six percent of what we pay today, and even adjusting for inflation, 18 percent of that. Cuts have kept faculty and staff pay nearly stagnant for years, as class sizes and contingent faculty have swelled in number. You recently decided to eliminate North Carolina’s estate tax, which will help only 140 families in the state, while costing it more than $60 million every year. Point being, there is enough money — it’s just a matter of how you choose to use it. Right now, you’re using it to the harm of the many; the many being us, whose futures depend on the UNC System. We demand you stop your assault on education. If you defund our universities, we will defend them. Sincerely, ____________________ SIGN AND DELIVER THIS LETTER TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ON YOUR OWN, OR DROP IT BY STUDENT MEDIA’S OFFICE AT 307 A WITHERSPOON STUDENT CENTER, AND THE TECHNICIAN WILL DELIVER IT ON YOUR BEHALF.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BRITTANY PETERSON

Young Chilean citizens destroy a local telephone company store. They were cleared out minutes later by police special forces using tear gas. While the majority of protesters were peaceful, a group of a few hundred people caused damage to both property and the image of the movement.

major at UNC Charlotte, Tyler Copeland. “Student Government is important, but the Student Power Union works with other organizations, like the NC-NAACP, workers unions and other student organizations directly, and we’re actually involved in activism,” Copeland said. Payne, a former member of SG himself, agrees, although he “[hasn’t] really followed SG that much” since graduating. “It seems like to me the student power union people care about the issue and are willing to do something about it, SG would rather be a part of a social club,” Payne said. “It’s pretty sad because I haven’t heard them doing anything about the issue, especially when you pay student fees for the organization to represent you and they don’t do anything about you. It seems to be a theme of governments in general.” Recently, the NCSPU has focused on Gov. Pat McCrory’s proposed budget, which recommends a $138 million cut to the UNC System. They are also The group is also a critic of McCrory’s Budget Director, Art Pope, and Republicansuggested legislature, like the Senate bill 666, which would force students to vote in their hometown. Otherwise, their parents will forego $2,500 in tax benefits, effectively cutting

out the student vote. The power union’s efforts to combat the budget and other proposed measures will culminate in an organized rally on Wednesday, May 1, also known as May Day or International Workers’ Day. Unions across the world use this day to celebrate the international labor movement, where workers fought for better conditions from their employers and government. The NCPSU and other activists will meet at the N.C. State Bell Tower, march to the Civitas Institute (a conservative think tank in downtown Raleigh) for a mini-rally and join with other protesters at Moore Square before finally arriving at the North Carolina General Assembly. Dhruv Pathak, a freshman history major at UNC Greensboro, is looking forward to protesting the state government’s stance on higher education at the May Day rally. “A lot of people feel like they’ve been oppressed for a long time, and they can finally get together and share their beliefs,” Pathak said. “It’s empowering to feel like your voice is actually being heard.” The group may be against heavy odds in their attempt to limit cuts to education, but they have succeeded in unlikely situations before, according to Molly McDonough, a freshman in women’s and gender studies

at N.C. State and member of the NCPSU. “This year there was a general public outcry against the idea of closing certain campuses (as recommended by Republican lawmakers),” McDonough said. “The NCSPU played a big part in getting them to back off from that idea.” This success, and the fact that students are organizing for a cause has garnered appreciation from N.C. State faculty, like Barbara Zelter, a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Social Work. According to Zelter, the Student Power Union is prominent not only as a student group, but as an activist movement in general. “The NCSPU is one of the most impressive student-led organizations I have seen since the sixties,” Zelter said. “These student leaders are serious, sacrificial and smart. They are doing some of the best organizing in the state against the current regressive legislature, pushing back against its anti-public education initiatives in particular.” The NCSPU have proved that students have a voice and can make a change, and although downtown Raleigh is a far cry from Tiananmen Square, the NCSPU is working to ensure that voice will always be heard.

dents will fare by the time they reach college. “Everything comes down to how it is implemented because policies don’t teach,” said Natasha Ushomirsky, K-12 Senior Policy and Data Analyst for Education Trust. RTT must remain in compliance with No Child Left Behind, the most recent reauthorization of the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The 2001 act established national standardized testing and higher teacher credentials. Supporters of the act expected 100 percent of students to reach proficiency in the areas of reading and math by 2014, but that goal will not likely be met. Eight y-t wo percent of schools would fail under those standards, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan told CNN in 2011. Bernstein said that “NCLB was based on a false premise” and that Race to the Top is NCLB “on steroids,” worsening the problem. Ushomirsky said schools under NCLB failed to meet standards if they missed one criterion for adequate yearly progress. As a result, the government treated the lowest performing schools just the same as it would treat schools failing by a narrow margin. “There was no differentiation,” Ushomirsky said.

Many also criticize No Child Left Behind for its emphasis on standardized tests. Virginia, for example, lowered the number of correct responses needed for students to pass their middle school history examination, giving off an appearance of improvement, Bernstein said. The exam, though, was not included in the adequate yearly progress calculation. Other tactics to defy the system include not adding students—held back students or those who intended to acquire a GED after dropping out of high school—to the overall dropout rate, Bernstein said. This contributed to the “Texas Miracle,” which formed the basis for NCLB after scores on Texas state tests rose, while dropouts decreased, according to CBS. Scores rose because they were preventing certain students from taking the tests, Bernstein said. “There needs to be [assessment] in education, but with the NCLB you needed to put a number to everything and so hence you get your standardized tests,” Martin said. The focus on standardized tests created recognitionbased learners rather than critical thinkers, Martin said. “In principal, we want NCLB absolutely in that we want to pay attention to the learning of all children, but

narrowly defined basicsbased education is not the way to improve learning,” Martin said. “The two-fold curse of NCLB was the mythology of the standardization – assign a number to everything and that tells you quality – and then secondly that you could do all this with existing resources, neither of which were true.” NCLB was still a “big step forward” for students, according to Ushomirsky. The law required the nation to pay attention to outcomes and emphasized education for all groups of students for the first time. The act also made more data available for comparisons with other parts of the world. The problem is NCLB sets different standards for each of the 50 states, Ushomirsky said. “Now the conversation is shifting with the Common Core State Standards,” Ushomirsky said. CCSS, developed by the National Governor’s Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers, asks states to adopt the same standards across the nation. Forty-five states have followed suit. If implemented correctly, these standards could improve the rigor of school curriculums and increase college readiness.


Features

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 5 • SPRING EXAM ISSUE 2013

Service with a smile: The Charles Lark story Will E. Brooks

52-year-old black man. “First, [Meadows] came up to me and said ‘You’re a When Charles Lark trav- n***** and I’m going to kill eled to downtown Raleigh to you,’” Lark said. “I said, ‘Well grab a meal at a soup kitchen then shoot me.’ So he looked last June, he was attacked by at me and he whipped out the a racist wielding a metal rod. pipe. Despite his string of misMeadows severed half of fortune, Lark, who works as Lark’s left ear, put a lash in a cook for University Dining, his head and fractured his has been able to maintain a elbow. After fighting off his positive attitude, gaining him attacker, Lark said he ran affans from both students and ter Meadows, who then began staff who appreciate his cook- to shout for help. ing and love of life. Lark said Meadows’ girlfriend, a black woman, apKICKED WHILE HE WAS DOWN proached him to help after When students leave for the the attack. An EMS vehicle summer, many University took Lark to a hospital, where Dining workers are forced to he got stitches for his ear inlook for work elsewhere. It is jury. Police arrested Meadows a matter of economy — with- that day. He was later convictout students the school can’t ed for assault and sentenced afford workers. Last summer, to three years in prison. Lark happened to be one of Without a job, a home or those workers. health insurance, an injured Without a job, Lark trav- Lark had difficulty finding elled room-to-room. He anyone to listen to his story. stayed with friends most “Nobody was able to say nights, but when he needed ‘Hey, how are you? Here’s food, the aca helpi ng complished hand,’” Lark cook had to said. look to charLark said ity. he went to As he was WRAL and leaving a ABC 11 to soup kitchen tell his story near Moore following S qu a re on the attack. Drew Connor, sophomore in June 7, a man B ot h s t apsychology shouted at t ions told him from the him the city park. story, if picked up, would take The shouting man was 10 days to process. Neither reJonathan Wayne Meadows, ported on the attack. a homeless 26-year-old white “If it happened on camman. He approached Lark, a pus then it would have Features Editor

“If everybody was like Charles Lark we would all live in a much better world ... ”

JOHN JOYNER/TECHNICIAN

Charles Lark speaks with a student in Clark Dining Hall Thursday, April 25, 2013.

been breaking news, but it happened downtown and a homeless guy hit me, and I was — not homeless, but semi-homeless — I was transient, so I guess that kind of annulled it.”

PAYING IT FORWARD Lark said his father would oftentimes tell him to not get involved in anything unless he could help another human being by doing it. Lark found a way to help by returning to University Dining as a cook. More than anything, Lark said he likes the idea that he can make a difference in a person’s day. “I always greet [guests] with a nice ‘How do you do?’

and I smile, say, ‘Have a great day,’” Lark said. “I know it’s helping patrons, other people, other human beings.” Taylor Cook, a sophomore in biomedical engineering, said she goes to Clark Dining Hall about three times a week for breakfast. Cook said she heads to the omelet station, where Lark works, during every visit for food and a conversation. “I always get [an omelet], and they are always the best because Charles Lark makes them,” Cook said Cook created a Facebook fan page for Lark in March. She said the idea came to her on the way back from Clark one day after being encour-

aged by Lark’s kind words and his omelet. “He’s just so likeable, he’s just the kind of guy I could sit and talk to for hours,” Cook said. Cook isn’t the only person who enjoys talking with Lark. Thirty-five other users liked the Facebook page to declare two things: that Charles Lark will make the best omelet you have ever eaten and that he will also make your day. Cook said although she speaks with Lark several times a week, she wasn’t aware of the assault. “We’ve had so many conversations and he just doesn’t seem like the kind of guy who would complain about any-

thing,” Cook said. Lark said the page flattered him when he first heard about it. “I think it’s great,” Lark said. “Honestly, I’m in a state of shock, I don’t know how else to say it.” Drew Connor, a sophomore in psychology, said he typically goes to Clark three times a day. He said Lark’s company isn’t the only thing that keeps him in the food line. “I’ll come in and ask for an omelet with extra cheese and he’ll do Ricotta cheese, he’ll explain how this is better than the other way.” Connor said. “He talks about places

LARK continued page 7

Friday’s legacy grounded in education Alden Early Staff Writer

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE FRIDAY INSTITUTE

William C. Friday speaks at his retirement reception. Friday retired in 1986.

Student wars off vultures Young Lee Correspondent

When residents of Shelby, N.C. woke up last fall to something strange in their neighborhood, they didn’t call the Ghostbusters. They sought help from the N.C. State Cleveland County Cooperative Extension. Hundreds of vultures descended upon a roughly two-block area of the small city in western North Carolina and terrified residents. The vultures were ready to make Shelby their new home for the colder months as part of their annual migration. Unable to shoot the federally protected turkey vultures and black vultures, which made up most of the vulture nuisance, residents looked for other options to try to ward

off the large flying pests. Kristen Duren, senior in the extension education program, stepped in to help rid the town of avian annoyances. “My internship [with the cooperative extension department] started Jan. 11 and during the second week or so we got a phone call from a resident saying she had vultures hanging out in her backyard,” Duren said. “When she called, there were about 200 of them… and she was like, ‘I don’t know what else to do and I don’t think this is safe. How do we get them to leave this area?’” Greg Traywick, the director of the West District Cleveland extension program, brought up She l by ’s

vulture problem during a weekly progress meeting within the department. He asked if anyone had worked with vultures in the past. “I said I volunteered when I was little, at the [Carolina] Raptor Center and I know a couple things but not a whole lot,” Duren said. “And he goes, ‘Good you’re in charge of things.’” With Traywick’s help, Duren found ways to chase the unwelcome

VULTURE continued page 10

When education leaders in North Carolina are faced with a problem, they often ask themselves, “What would Bill Friday do?” William C. Friday, 92, died Oct. 12, 2012 at his home in Chapel Hill. Friday retired as president of the UNC System in 1986. He attempted to establish a common bond among the public schools, colleges and universities in the state. Perhaps the best way Friday could think to begin his journey was to bind together the two most influential universi-

ties in the system: N.C. State and UNC Chapel Hill. Friday had strong ties with N.C. State and graduated from State College in 1941 with a degree in textiles manufacturing. He later earned a law degree from UNC-CH before serving as assistant dean of students at UNC-CH from 1948 until 1951. Friday was officially sworn in as the UNC System president during a ceremony at Reynolds Coliseum in 1957. “It is with you, the people of North Carolina, that I have entered into solemn compact today. It is to you I have pledged my mind, my heart,

my hands and my strength,” Friday said. As UNC System president, Friday worked to expand the system from three members to its current total of 17 constituent institutions. The three charter members were UNC-CH, N.C. State College and the Woman’s College of North Carolina, which is now UNC Greensboro. Before Friday’s tenure as president, state universities were more often combatants than companions. Friday united schools across the state and helped

FRIDAY continued page 7

Representatives and Senators of North Carolina, Enough is enough. Our University is dying. No, it is being killed — by budget cuts taking place within a systemic attack on public services. But we, the students, faculty and staff of the UNC System, will not put up with this any longer. Sen. Tom Apodaca, if you had graduated from N.C. State when you got your bachelor’s degree, your tuition would have been six percent of what we pay today, and even adjusting for inflation, 18 percent of that. Cuts have kept faculty and staff pay nearly stagnant for years, as class sizes and contingent faculty have swelled in number. You recently decided to eliminate North Carolina’s estate tax, which will help only 140 families in the state, while costing it more than $60 million every year. Point being, there is enough money — it’s just a matter of how you choose to use it. Right now, you’re using it to the harm of the many; the many being us, whose futures depend on the UNC System. We demand you stop your assault on education. If you defund our universities, we will defend them.

NATALIE CLAUNCH/TECHNICIAN

Sincerely, ____________________

SIGN AND DELIVER THIS LETTER TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ON YOUR OWN, OR DROP IT BY STUDENT MEDIA’S OFFICE AT 307 A WITHERSPOON STUDENT CENTER, AND THE TECHNICIAN WILL DELIVER IT ON YOUR BEHALF.


TECHNICIAN

Cinco de Mayo Large.pdf 1 4/19/2013 4:40:57 PM

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

News

PAGE 3 • FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 2012


Features

TECHNICIAN

FRIDAY

continued from page 5

establish one of the premier public education networks in the United States. C.D. Spangler, Friday’s successor as UNC System president, said Friday will be remembered as “the most significant education leader in North Carolina of the 20th Century.” Former Gov. Bev Perdue spoke at Friday’s memorial service in 2012. “He simply believed in education,” Perdue said. “He

believed that for all of us, not some of us, education was the silver bullet that could change our lives. During Dr. Friday’s tenure, the percentage of North Carolinians with at least a bachelor’s degree tripled, because he worked on making that happen.” Perdue said Friday’s leadership carried on after his retirement as UNC System president. When faced with a $3.1 billion bond referendum in 2000, she said Friday told her to “do it for North Carolina and do it for our future.” Friday not only transformed the university sys-

tem, but also his leadership contributed in the development of Research Triangle Park, revolutionizing the economy of the state, shifting it from a largely agricultural economy to a center for technology and innovation. Former Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Tom Stafford said that Friday’s influence on the state is unmatched by any other North Carolinian. “There’s nobody else who has impacted N.C. State over that period of time than anybody else in North Carolina,” Stafford said. “He overcame many obstacles in education in North Carolina, and

though he didn’t do it alone, he was able to rally everyone around progress.” In a 2003 interview with N.C. State Magazine, Friday reflected on his years as UNC president, and added his rendition of a famous Winston Churchill line. “Did I reach out as far as I could? Did I serve as many people as I could? Did I give back as much as I could, and did I do this with conviction?” Friday said. “If you can say those things, answer those things, then you’ll have made a difference in this world. I think that’s why we’re all here.”

PAGE 7 • SPRING EXAM ISSUE 2013

LARK

continued from page 5

he’s cooked before and he’ll tell interesting stories.” In 1989, he walked from his hometown in Brooklyn to Washington D.C. to join tens of thousands of people in the Housing Now! march to protest the shortage of affordable housing. In addition to cafeterias in D.C., Lark said he has also cooked in cafeterias of Daily News, in New

York, N.Y., the N.C. General Assembly and Meredith College. Charles said he wants to continue cooking in Raleigh, but as summer approaches, Lark said he is uncertain where the next few months will bring him. However, many students hope Lark won’t go too far. “If everybody was like Charles Lark we would all live in a much better world,” Connor said. “A world with friendly people and good omelets.”

Representatives and Senators of North Carolina,

the way you want to live.

Enough is enough. Our University is dying. No, it is being killed — by budget cuts taking place within a systemic attack on public services. But we, the students, faculty and staff of the UNC System, will not put up with this any longer. Sen. Tom Apodaca, if you had graduated from N.C. State when you got your bachelor’s degree, your tuition would have been six percent of what we pay today, and even adjusting for inflation, 18 percent of that. Cuts have kept faculty and staff pay nearly stagnant for years, as class sizes and contingent faculty have swelled in number. You recently decided to eliminate North Carolina’s estate tax, which will help only 140 families in the state, while costing it more than $60 million every year. Point being, there is enough money — it’s just a matter of how you choose to use it. Right now, you’re using it to the harm of the many; the many being us, whose futures depend on the UNC System. We demand you stop your assault on education. If you defund our universities, we will defend them.

Is Now

Sincerely, ____________________

SIGN AND DELIVER THIS LETTER TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ON YOUR OWN, OR DROP IT BY STUDENT MEDIA’S OFFICE AT 307 A WITHERSPOON STUDENT CENTER, AND THE TECHNICIAN WILL DELIVER IT ON YOUR BEHALF.

Premier

Cottage-Style

Living

• Large, Private Bedrooms • Largest Pool in Raleigh with Tanning Ledge and Grilling Stations

rAtes

$

As Low as

550

• 9,500 sq. ft. Clubhouse • Cardio Space and Strength Center • Ask about our Spring Specials!

sign up for your meal plan today!

• Visit website for full list of amenities!

919.755.7877

universityhouse.com

go.ncsu.edu/mealplans

®


Editorial

PAGE 8 • EXAM ISSUE SPRING 2013

TECHNICIAN

The unsigned editorials are the opinions of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and are the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

A call to action for May Day

M

ay Day is the real Guy Fawkes Day. Hollywood may have attached the images of the Guy Fawkes mask and the Fifth of November to revolutionary ferment, but if any day actually stands for such a sentiment, it’s May 1, International Workers’ Day, commonly known as May Day. May Day commemorates the Haymarket Affair of 1886 in Chicago during which police opened fire on a public assembly during a general strike for the eight-hour workday after an unidentified person threw a bomb at them. In the internationally-publicized trials that followed, eight anarchists were convicted of conspiracy, among whom seven were sentenced to death, despite overwhelming evidence that none of them could have thrown the bomb. This led to worldwide outrage from workers’ movements and promoted the Haymarket anarchists to the status of martyrs. Soon, around the world, May Day became an occasion for demonstrations and strikes. To counter its popularity, the United States government made May 1 “Americanization Day” in 1921, and even today, May 1 is a minor legal holiday (though not a federal holiday) here under the name of “Loyalty Day.” Thus, though May Day has its roots in the U.S., unlike

more than 80 other nations in the world, it is not an official national holiday. From the days of some of the largest May Day marches during the Great Depression, May Day had waned in significance by the start of this century. However, in 2006, in what may have been the largest day of protest in U.S. history, massive migrant marches on May 1 reignited the tradition. By May Day 2012, riding on the wave of the Occupy Movement, International Workers’ Day had been restored as a focal point in the struggle for the liberty and well-being of the common person. After a May Day march in Durham last year, May Day Triangle NC is organizing a demonstration in Raleigh this year. Leaving at 4 p.m. from Moore Square, the march will go through downtown, voicing demands for the rights of workers, women, the GLBTQ community and immigrants, reaching the N.C. Legislature for a rally, teach-ins and music. However, students are leading the way in celebrating May Day. The North Carolina Student Power Union has organized a march for education from the Bell Tower which will join the general march in Moore Square. Technician stands in solidarity with this effort to defend our education. With a brutal budget cut of about $140 million to the UNC Sys-

NCSU Eval (and forecast)

tem proposed by Gov. Pat McCrory, students need to get angry. One day we may not have the luxury of a sheltered university environment, and so, out of basic self-interest, we should demand that our education not be slashed and privatized to atrophy. Moreover, this fight is connected to many others that May Day agitates for, because of their common economic base. If we take action to defend education, we’re continuing the ethos that won us the eight-hourworking day, other employee benefits and our social safety net. And fighting for any such social institution, in the end, is to the benefit of all other public services, such as education. Standing on the gallows, in the final moments of his life, Haymarket anarchist August Spies shouted out, “There will come a day when our silence will speak louder than the voices you throttle today.” We students, though, are still in a position of power. Our voices have not been throttled, and there is no reason that we should be silent. Thus, we call on students to converge at the Bell Tower at 2 p.m. on May 1, and — for the love of ourselves, for the love of learning, for the love of the world — speak out loud and clear.

T

houg h Technician’s editorial board won’t say it wants to see Chancellor Randy Woodson in tights, it does want him to be the hero in these economically precarious times. Amid the proposed budget cuts, tuition increases, and stagnant funding, N.C. State’s administrators have been vocal about the challenges ahead and how they have — and will — handle them.

A LOOK BACK Ad m i nist rators have been busy bracing their departments for the worst. As reported in the News & Observer, the College of Natural Resources has identified a potential buyer — who is yet to be named — for its 80,000-acre Hoffmann Forest. The forest is valued between $120-150 million. The revenue from the sale would be reinvested in stocks. Regardless of whether this is a financially, educationally and environmentally sound decision, it shows desperation. It’s not likely CNR would sell such a massive asset and resource if administrators weren’t worried about future funding. Last September, t he University struck a deal with Eastman Chemical Company. The company agreed to give $10 million

in research funding in what is being called an “intellectual property agreement.” The chemical company will have greater control of intellectual property rights from research completed in the Eastman Innovation Center on Centennial Campus, according to the Triangle Business Journal, and the benefit to students will be access to new technology and industry validation. As another example, the Poole College of Management’s BB&T Program for the Study of Free Markets and Institutions is not only a mouthful, but a means for indoctrinating students too. Its goal, according to the PCoM website, is to “... resolve the disconnection between the perception of capitalism as an immoral economic system and the higher economic standard of living it produces.” Economics 305, a course supported by the program, purports to help students understand how economic freedom and political freedom are connected. On the other end of the spectrum, PCoM has yet to announce a course called “A closer look at Marxian economics.” Finally, the Board of Trustees approved a $330 tuition increase effective fall 2013. In the coming five years, the increase is expected to grow to $1,168.

PREDICTIONS Technician sees imminent program and faculty cuts. We can expect to see more partnerships between the University (and its departments) and businesses. But hopefully, administrators will keep student interests in mind while signing contracts. But not all is doom and gloom. An administrative task force responsible for a strategic plan for 2011-2020 proposed that N.C. State hire more leading scholars and increase the number of tenuretrack faculty. It is important that the University hires scholars in all departments, not just for engineering. Lastly, we expect that the political ingredients in administrative decision-making bubble up and boil over, especially in the short-term. The new state government drew the eyes and ire of students and has, likely to its own chagrin, revived activism. But because students are becoming more politically aware and vocal, the UNC System will likely do more lobbying in the coming year to preserve federal and state funding and keep down costs. The next year will be an uphill battle. On second thought, textiles students — get to work on tights and a cape with an embossed “R” for “Randy.”

One year later, we wait for Amendment One to be repealed

I

t has been nearly a year since North Carolinians passed Amendment One, illegalizing not only same-sex marriage, but also prohibiting same-sex domestic partnerships and civil unions. But the amendment did not pass due to a lack of effort. “The GLBT-Community Alliance as a student organization hosted numerous events on their own and in collaboration with other groups to educate individuals and to help register people to vote” Justine Hollingshead, director of the N.C. State GLBT

Center, said. A Pack Poll released in July found 68 percent of students who planned on voting were opposed to Amendment One. Unfortunately, Wake County was one of only eight counties to vote against the amendment, thus it passed with 61 percent of the vote. While our gay marriage legislation is not receiving the national attention that the Defense of Marriage Act and Proposition 8 are, we recognize Amendment One as just as much of a constitutional issue. In fact, our Amendment One bears extraordinary

resemblance to California’s Proposition 8. Both define marriage as a union solely between a man and a woman in their respective states. California’s legislation overturned a previous law that said same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marry. Our legislation, on the other hand, only reinforced antigay marriage sentiments, as marriage in North Carolina was already defined as between a man and a woman. Because of this, Amendment One was a slap in the face to gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered North Carolinians and their supporters.

Representatives and Senators of North Carolina, Enough is enough. Our University is dying. No, it is being killed — by budget cuts taking place within a systemic attack on public services. But we, the students, faculty and staff of the UNC System, will not put up with this any longer. Sen. Tom Apodaca, if you had graduated from N.C. State when you got your bachelor’s degree, your tuition would have been six percent of what we pay today, and even adjusting for inflation, 18 percent of that. Cuts have kept faculty and staff pay nearly stagnant for years, as class sizes and contingent faculty have swelled in number.

I

We demand you stop your assault on education. If you defund our universities, we will defend them. Sincerely, ____________________ SIGN AND DELIVER THIS LETTER TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ON YOUR OWN, OR DROP IT BY STUDENT MEDIA’S OFFICE AT 307 A WITHERSPOON STUDENT CENTER, AND THE TECHNICIAN WILL DELIVER IT ON YOUR BEHALF.

Editorial Advertising Fax Online

ndeed, enough is enough. And no, I am not talking about the redundancy of the letters to the North Carolina General Assembly, which you probably have noticed are on every page of this Sam issue. DeGrave Don’t Editor-in-Chief worry, I will not patronize you by using this letter from the editor as a soapbox for the importance

Editor-in-Chief Sam DeGrave

News Editor Jake Moser

editor@technicianonline.com

news@technicianonline.com

Managing Editor

Features Editor Will E. Brooks

Viewpoint Editor Ishan Raval

Photo Editor Greg Wilson

features@technicianonline.com

viewpoint@technicianonline.com

photo@technicianonline.com

managingeditor@technician online.com

Fayetteville Street. This year’s festival takes place May 4 and will include live music and speakers who share their stories and advocate for change. While the GLBT Center shows support with its traditional festival, several North Carolina churches have shown their support by breaking tradition. Pullen Memorial Baptist Church on Hillsborough Street and Green Street United Methodist Church in WinstonSalem are advocating for gay marriage by refusing to wed heterosexual couples. By making these surprising decisions, these forward-thinking churches are paving the way for others. While increasing citizen support is important in the movement toward marriage equality, government backing is also essential. Rep. Deborah Ross (D-Wake), who worked against Amendment

Sports Editor sports@technicianonline.com

of higher education. If you are taking the time to read Technician, I’d wager you probably care about education and are at least somewhat familiar with the Gov. Pat McCrory’s proposed $140 million budget cut to the UNC System. That being said, what I will do is ask you to take a minute, if you have not done so already, and read the letter directly to the left. It was not an easy decision to run these letters on every page. However, if the GA’s proposed budget cut is passed, it will

Design Editor Emily Prins

Multimedia Editor Russ Smith

design@technicianonline.com

webmaster@technicianonline.com

Advertising Manager Sarah Buddo advertising@sma.ncsu.edu

515.2411 515.2029 515.5133 technicianonline.com

One, said, “I hope that it will be repealed, but given the makeup of the General Assembly, I am not optimistic.” Other members of the General Assembly are more hopeful, including Rep. Darren Jackson (D-Wake). “I do believe it will one day be repealed, but it will take a big change of representation in Raleigh to start the process to repeal,” said Jackson, who also spoke and voted against Amendment One. Technician appreciates the efforts made by everyone, from citizens to government officials, in support of gay marriage. In concurrence with Jackson’s comments, we hope we will be there when Amendment One is finally repealed.

Do us all a favor: Cut it out

You recently decided to eliminate North Carolina’s estate tax, which will help only 140 families in the state, while costing it more than $60 million every year. Point being, there is enough money — it’s just a matter of how you choose to use it. Right now, you’re using it to the harm of the many; the many being us, whose futures depend on the UNC System.

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695

The amendment not only violates our civil rights, but it promotes discrimination. There is no statewide law protecting GLBT North Carolinians from being evicted from their homes or fired from their jobs. Additionally, prohibiting same-sex marriage also prohibits same-sex couples from filing their taxes jointly. Though Amendment One is no longer up for debate, it is important that we continue discuss it rather than simply accept it. One way marriage equality advocates continually raise awareness is through periodical events. The GLBT Center of Raleigh hosts forums, luncheons, book clubs and support groups for the various members of the GLBT community. These events are held mostly in private, but every year the center hosts Out! Raleigh, a free, public festival on

impact the entirety of Technician’s readership. For that reason, I have one last favor to ask of you. Please sign and then cut or neatly rip that letter out of the paper and bring it by the Student Media office, which is located on the third floor of Witherspoon Student Center. From here, Technician will send every letter it receives to the legislators out to “defund” our futures.

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2011 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Op-Ed

TECHNICIAN

Other opinions from our staff & readers

PAGE 9 • EXAM ISSUE SPRING 2013

Sadlack’s: Hillsborough’s mortal hero

I

didn’t even make it to the door of Sadlack’s Heroes before I knew I was out of place. I’d never eaten at the tiny red restaurant before, but last week I joi ned a friend to investigate the more t ha n 30-year-old Joseph HillsborHavey Staff Columnist ough Street icon. We parked somewhat illegally in the back — the parking lot behind Sadlack’s almost never has open spots — and walked confidently toward the door, phones in hand and dressed in preppy colors. We couldn’t have stood out more. As we walked through the outdoor seating section toward the entrance, I felt

the stares of several darkly clad regulars. These people had beards, and they looked rough. I quickened my pace, checked to make sure my friend hadn’t been hit by a stray dart, and went inside. Immediately, I was hit with a strong feeling that this place had a soul. “So this is Sadlack’s,” I thought as I looked around at the eclectic haven for anything anti-mainstream. All the men had long hair, and the air smelled strongly of Pabst Blue Ribbon. I found out that if I’d walked in at this time last year, I would have been met with a large banner appealing to people to go out and vote against Amendment One. Indeed, the enterprise has an essence that cannot be captured by one label or flavor. Rather, it’s a unique

amalgamation of different cultural colors and spirits that somehow fits naturally into its niche on Hillsborough Street, in North Carolina, rather than jutting out. Our bartender stood silently staring into space when he wasn’t fixing someone’s drink. I’ve heard about the restaurant’s reputation plenty of times, but it appeared as if alcohol — not marijuana — was the only substance intoxicating the people around us. Everyone was smiling, and quickly my friend and I forgot we stood out. We ordered a basket of sweet potato fries, and after drowning them in the accompanying apple butter, inhaled them in rapid succession. I quickly concluded that Sadlack’s will never go out of business because of its food. The next day I returned

The future of Hillsborough Street

change are her customers. She guided me through the punk phase of the ‘80s, the grunge phase of the ‘90s and on to hipsters today. She said that the ‘90s were her favorite years, because no one was afraid to be different. Everyone is the same now, she said, rolling her eyes. “All the girls especially — they’ve all got such long hair.” When I asked her what was one thing she wanted to communicate to the N.C. State body as a whole, I thought she’d respond along the same lines as David, expressing her frustrations with the lack of student customers. Instead, she answered with this: “Never be afraid to take a chance.” “People live in so much fear these days,” Rose said. “Even I feel like I didn’t take enough chances.”

This is coming from a woman who bought a restaurant without even a day’s experience as a waitress. After leaving her job as a toxicology lab technician for DOW chemical, Rose moved to Raleigh with her husband. One year of boredom later, she bought Sadlack’s. Now, 29 years later, Rose has to leave her street corner by Dec. 31 of this year to make way for a new hotel. She doesn’t know what will happen to the restaurant — several offers in downtown Raleigh have fallen through. She’s losing hope that Sadlack’s will continue to exist after this year. I encourage you to visit this restaurant before it leaves Hillsborough Street. It will certainly be an unforgettable experience.

Representatives and Senators of North Carolina,

However, it is our viewpoint that a price tag cannot be put on culture, and that is what many of these businesses bring to us, more so than maybe anything in our vicinity. We lament this impending ousting and scarring of Hillsborough Street’s classic, distinct flavor and local economy from the N.C. State community, and possibly even Raleigh. So for the future, we urge the University to be extremely wary of selling off what makes our community special and rich in a way money cannot measure. Apart from the two columns on this page, do check out a third one about Buddha’s Belly on www.TechnicianOnline.com.

MAP COURTESY OF WIKIMAPIA.ORG

An eight-story luxury hotel is going to replace the businesses on the block of Hillsborough Street between Enterprise Street and Maiden Lane. These include Bell Tower Mart, the restaurant Sadlack’s Heroes, art supply store Buddha’s Belly and Raleigh’s only independent record store, Schoolkids Records. N.C. State sold the plot to real estate groups Bell View Partners and The Bernstein Companies in 2011 without any advance notice about the sale to the businesses housed in them, and now, they have until the end of the year to clear out. We understand that the money acquired through the sale of the university is crucial in these dire economic times.

and talked with David , one of the bartenders there. I was surprised to find that N.C. State students don’t often make their way down to the restaurant. Though the next-youngest customer had at least 15 years on me, the place felt like a college bar. Nevertheless, David said design majors are about the only college students who come to Sadlack’s — and even those aren’t that common. Af ter speaking brief ly with David, I got to meet the owner, a tiny, energetic woman named Rose. The first thing I wanted to find out was how she’d seen the restaurant change over the years, but according to her, it hasn’t. “Every day’s the same for me,” she said with a slight Midwestern accent. However, what she has seen

Enough is enough. Our University is dying. No, it is being killed — by budget cuts taking place within a systemic attack on public services. But we, the students, faculty and staff of the UNC System, will not put up with this any longer. Sen. Tom Apodaca, if you had graduated from N.C. State when you got your bachelor’s degree, your tuition would have been six percent of what we pay today, and even adjusting for inflation, 18 percent of that. Cuts have kept faculty and staff pay nearly stagnant for years, as class sizes and contingent faculty have swelled in number. You recently decided to eliminate North Carolina’s estate tax, which will help only 140 families in the state, while costing it more than $60 million every year. Point being, there is enough money — it’s just a matter of how you choose to use it. Right now, you’re using it to the harm of the many; the many being us, whose futures depend on the UNC System. We demand you stop your assault on education. If you defund our universities, we will defend them. Sincerely, ____________________ SIGN AND DELIVER THIS LETTER TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ON YOUR OWN, OR DROP IT BY STUDENT MEDIA’S OFFICE AT 307 A WITHERSPOON STUDENT CENTER, AND THE TECHNICIAN WILL DELIVER IT ON YOUR BEHALF.

I

f you were walking down Hillsborough Street on April 20, you may have noticed a few things. Sure, you may have noticed the leftovers on the pavement from a long, prior Lauren night of Noriega Staff Columnist partying. However, if you made it far enough to see the Bell Tower, you probably would have been shocked to see a hoard of people surrounding Raleigh’s music refuge, Schoolkids Records. There are three words to explain this: Record Store Day. Record Store Day is an in-

Schoolkids still breaking Records ternational tradition that just celebrated its six-year anniversary. It serves as a way to celebrate music with fans, artists and independently owned record stores. Record stores all over the country host in-store concerts and typically have the best deals of the year. If you’re a music lover, it is something that you cannot bear to miss. The current owner and manager of the store, Stephen Judge, revealed that this year was no different. In fact 2012 was Schoolkids’ most profitable year to date , with sales 40 percent higher than last year. Fans were so eager about the day that there was a line of them waiting for the store to open at 6 a.m.

The most impressive fans of the day were the two guys who camped outside of the store roughing a thunderstorm for the incredibly rare Dave Matthews Band box set, which Schoolkids was fortunate enough to have two of. However, next year’s Record Store Day will quite different from the last few because Schoolkids has been looking for a new location. During the past two years, Schoolkids has known their location will change due to a new hotel that will grace the Bell Tower’s line of vision . Schoolkids does not know exactly where its future headquarters will be, but the desire to stay connected with the University is obvi-

ous because of the company’s history. After speaking with Judge, an alumnus, I was quickly reassured the future of Schoolkids is anything but bleak. In fact, it seems as though the timing of this move may actually work in favor of the store because of the ambitious hopes of expansion. In the years to come, Judge hopes Schoolkids not only will still be the music lover’s sanctuary, but also a livemusic venue with a bar. Not only would you still be able to thumb through your favorite vinyls, but you could also listen to a great live band while sipping on a refreshing beverage. Judge has been looking for other Hill-

sborough Street locations as well as venues in downtown Raleigh. Schoolkids brings a very organic feel to the street. While Hillsborough Street is getting increasingly cluttered with franchises , Schoolkids, based in Raleigh, is keeping our spending local. When you enter the store, you are suddenly confronted with posters of all of the local shows you have the opportunity to attend. You flip through the record stacks and find albums by bands that would not be sold at Target. You talk to the employees and find out they were once or still are N.C. State students. Schoolkids Records has been a staple of N.C. State for

Gov. Pat McCrory and Sen. Tom Apodaca see clients at Budget Cuts hair salon.

Derrick Freeland, junior in social work

almost 40 years now. It houses multiple different locations along Hillsborough Street. It has always had a strong tie to the University and perhaps an even stronger tie to the student population. I know from personal experience whenever a new CD is released or I have the urge to add a new record to my collection, I don’t have to look much further than Schoolkids. It has already become a local hangout for music enthusiasts. Hopefully that will never change, no matter where it is located.


Features

PAGE 10 • SPRING EXAM ISSUE 2013

VULTURE continued from page 5

guests out of the city. “[The vultures] were coming in during the day and [would] sit around for a couple hours chitchatting,” Duren said. “Then they would go off for a while only to come back and roost, which is when they come and sleep for the night.” Duren said the turkey vultures and black vultures, hailing from northern areas such as New York and Canada, typically migrate to southern areas such as Florida. These vultures had cut their trip short upon finding Floridalike weather in Shelby. “Animals, just like people, can be lazy, so they think, ‘Why do I want to f ly an extra 500 miles to go down to Florida when it’s Florida weather here?’” Duren said. Dealing with this problem was not an easy task, Duren said. In addition to the unnerving appearance of the large black creatures, with wings spanning up to about seven feet, many residents expressed concerns of depreciating home values and recounted stories of vultures eating pet food and trash. “All the feces and all the ‘yuck’ they bring increase the chance of spreading E. Coli in the area,” Duren said. “They are eating dead things so they are a hazard. Black vultures are attracted to bright shiny things and they’ll pull and pick at the shiny things. So some residents were left with leaks in their roofs.” Although she said she was only 10 when she first started working at the Carolina Raptor Center, the experience equipped her with knowledge

others didn’t have. For example, although it may be some people’s first instinct to startle the birds, according to Duren, this may be one of the worst ideas for dealing with vultures. “You’re not supposed to scare them because they vomit when they get scared,” Duren said. “That’s one of those things when you’re a kid that just gets glued in your head.” According to Duren, one resident tried to take care of the vultures by himself — by using a flare gun. “[He] waited until ... it was starting to become dusk and all the vultures got into the area and then he fired that flare gun,” Duren said. “Instead of leaving, all the vultures proceeded to vomit on him. It’s just what [vultures] do as part of their biological mechanism. They think, ‘I’m scared. I’m going to vomit and maybe predators will eat that instead of me.’” However, most humans don’t have a taste for vulture puke and find the experience rather disgusting. Furthermore, vulture vomit can damage the paint on cars and houses. After a meeting with some of the residents affected by the vulture problem, Duren created an education brochure and, after conducting a needs assessment, came up with a few solutions. Under her and the extension education program’s direction, residents chopped down dead trees that attracted the birds. She also developed another scare tactic—an effigy that sends the message to vultures that they were not welcome. “[The effigy] is a vulture prop from a movie studio,” Duren said. “We put it headdown and wings out. It looks like a it’s a snared bird.”

Duren said she got the idea from U.S. Department of Agriculture Wildlife Biologists who have done research on vultures. As part of the extension education program’s budget, Duren bought three vulture props and set up a loaner program allowing residents to rent out the effigies for up to two weeks before having to renew them. “We had six residents check them out over the course of my internship and none of them really needed it for any longer than two weeks,” Duren said. “They all brought them back and were like, ‘that worked great. I put it up and never saw [the vultures] again.’” There are no longer any vultures in Shelby according to Duren, but some of the vultures have moved, in smaller groups, to places around the Shelby area. Although Duren remains on call for residents who have questions, she officially ended her relationship with the extension April 6. Duren said she has mixed feelings about the experience, especially the idea of being known as “the vulture lady,” due to national radio and television coverage, but she said she is thankful for the experience. “This was a very unique opportunity that I don’t think many of our seniors get a chance to have,” Duren said. “Being on national television and national radio a few times prepares you on a different level to be an adult and having to talk to people and educate them and tell them about what you’re doing in a professional manner ... I like that I was able to do it. It was a good opportunity.”

- State-of-the Art Fitness Center - ON THE WOLFLINE - Roommate Matching - Full Size Washer & Dryer - All Utilities Included - Largest Bedrooms in Raleigh - Free Internet & Cable in Every Room - Walk-in-Closets in Select Units - Free Tanning - Located Close to NC State, Meredith College & Wake Tech

1X ONLY Mention this ad

TECHNICIAN

NATALIE CLAUNCH/TECHNICIAN

Kristen Duren, a senior in extension education and intern at Cleveland County Cooperative Extension, works to control vulture populations in Shelby, N.C. Turkey Vultures and Black Vultures both took residence in the area and became a nuisance to residents.

Representatives and Senators of North Carolina, Enough is enough. Our University is dying. No, it is being killed — by budget cuts taking place within a systemic attack on public services. But we, the students, faculty and staff of the UNC System, will not put up with this any longer. Sen. Tom Apodaca, if you had graduated from N.C. State when you got your bachelor’s degree, your tuition would have been six percent of what we pay today, and even adjusting for inflation, 18 percent of that. Cuts have kept faculty and staff pay nearly stagnant for years, as class sizes and contingent faculty have swelled in number. You recently decided to eliminate North Carolina’s estate tax, which will help only 140 families in the state, while costing it more than $60 million every year. Point being, there is enough money — it’s just a matter of how you choose to use it. Right now, you’re using it to the harm of the many; the many being us, whose futures depend on the UNC System. We demand you stop your assault on education. If you defund our universities, we will defend them.

Sincerely, ____________________

SIGN AND DELIVER THIS LETTER TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ON YOUR OWN, OR DROP IT BY STUDENT MEDIA’S OFFICE AT 307 A WITHERSPOON STUDENT CENTER, AND THE TECHNICIAN WILL DELIVER IT ON YOUR BEHALF.


Sports

TECHNICIAN

JIMMY V

continued from page 12

nation: “Don’t give up, don’t ever give up.” His last and most memorable speech came just eight weeks before his death, at the inaugural Espy Awards. Valvano said everybody should take time to laugh, to think and to cry. He also said that it is important to know

MEDIOCRE continued from page 12

ers – a la Virginia – and put up a fight against tough competition. O’Brien should have gone at least 9-3, rather than 7-5, and, honestly, he probably would have kept his job. When you lose on last-second punt returns and desperation passes and lose to below average teams, when Director of Athletics Debbie Yow has

where you came from, where you are and where you want to be. He also announced that, with ESPN’s support, he started the Jimmy V Foundation for Cancer Research, an organization that has since raised more than $120 million. “Cancer can take away all my physical abilities,” Valvano said, closing his Espy Award speech. “It cannot touch my mind, it cannot touch my

heart and it cannot touch my soul. And those three things are going to carry on forever.” Though his body has been buried at Oakwood Cemetery for two decades, his spirit, his enthusiasm and his never-give-up mentality has been alive ever since he stepped foot onto N.C. State’s campus.

set a precedent of greatness, coaches won’t survive long at N.C. State. Fans are tired of looking up to the likes of Duke and Carolina, but if a program hasn’t “arrived” there’s no need for posting billboards or running corny introduction videos. Greatness isn’t simply handed out on a silver platter, waiting for someone to grab it. It’s earned. A team can’t win on talent alone: There’s no “I” in team.

Whether it’s baseball, volleyball, cricket, basketball or football, a slogan or mindset that “you’re the best” won’t lead to “top-dog” status. State fans are itching to reclaim titles and reach the Promised Land, but the program isn’t there—yet. It’s time will come, but it’s not “our time.”

POLICY

The Technician will not be held responsible for damages or losses due to fraudulent advertisements. However, we make every effort to prevent false or misleading advertising from appearing in our publication.

DEADLINES

Our business hours are Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Line ads must be placed by noon the previous day.

PAGE 11 • EXAM ISSUE SPRING 2013

Representatives and Senators of North Carolina, Enough is enough. Our University is dying. No, it is being killed — by budget cuts taking place within a systemic attack on public services. But we, the students, faculty and staff of the UNC System, will not put up with this any longer. Sen. Tom Apodaca, if you had graduated from N.C. State when you got your bachelor’s degree, your tuition would have been six percent of what we pay today, and even adjusting for inflation, 18 percent of that. Cuts have kept faculty and staff pay nearly stagnant for years, as class sizes and contingent faculty have swelled in number. You recently decided to eliminate North Carolina’s estate tax, which will help only 140 families in the state, while costing it more than $60 million every year. Point being, there is enough money — it’s just a matter of how you choose to use it. Right now, you’re using it to the harm of the many; the many being us, whose futures depend on the UNC System. We demand you stop your assault on education. If you defund our universities, we will defend them.

Sincerely, ____________________

SIGN AND DELIVER THIS LETTER TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ON YOUR OWN, OR DROP IT BY STUDENT MEDIA’S OFFICE AT 307 A WITHERSPOON STUDENT CENTER, AND THE TECHNICIAN WILL DELIVER IT ON YOUR BEHALF.

Classifieds

RATES

For students, line ads start at $5 for up to 25 words. For non-students, line ads start at $8 for up to 25 words. For detailed rate information, visit ­technicianonline.com/classifieds. All line ads must be prepaid.

To place a classified ad, call 919.515.2411, fax 919.515.5133 or visit technicianonline.com/classifieds

Real estate

Announcements

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Real estate ApArtments For rent

Help Wanted

Summer Availability at College Inn Looking for physically fit, morally strong

Employment Opportunity for Award

COCKTAIL/WAITSTAFF Positions Woody’s

P/T LANDSCAPE HELPER NEEDED NOW

PARK AT THE COLLEGE INN! $25 a month

College Inn has availability for the

leaders who are interested in the Marine

Winning Landscape Contractor:

Sports Tavern & Grill

with small company. 3 miles from

2717 Western Blvd.

summer! Give us a call if you are interested

Corps Officer Programs including

Turftenders, an established full service

campus. Flexible hours (10+/weekly).

Special Offer: 1 week free!

in living here during Summer I and/or

law and aviation opportunities. For

landscaping company in Raleigh, would

HIGH VOLUME Sports Bar in Cary. Some

Starting salary $8.50/hr. Previous

919-832-8383

Summer II. 919-832-8383 or check us

more information contact the officer

like to speak to

experience necessary but not required.

experience preferred. Basic carpentry

Email collegeinn.leasing@tpco.com

out online at www.TheCollegeInnRaleigh.

selection team at (919)856-4170 or www.

you about some exciting opportunities.

Multiple Shifts available immediately. A

skills desirable. Call 779-2596.

www.TheCollegeInnRaleigh.com

com.

facebook.com/MCRSROST

We are looking for highly motivated

NON-Corporate atmosphere. Woody’s

Leave message.

individuals

Sports Tavern & Grill 8322 Chapel Hill

(students or graduates) with positive

Rd. Cary, NC 27513. APPLY IN PERSON

attitudes who would like hands-on

ONLY! 2-5PM. Please NO Phone Calls.

experience in the

NO EMAILS. YOU WILL NOT GET A REPLY.

CHILDCARE NEEDED

landscape maintenance industry

Check us out at www.woodysportstavern.

FUN CAREGIVER NEEDED FOR 15 Y.O.

3718 Marcom St; 1250 sq. ft. 3-BR house

Off Campus Apartments on Greenleaf

alongside proven professionals in both

com

GIRL, 12 & 9 Y.O. BOYS. WILL SUPERVISE

for rent; 2 BA; DW; W/D; patio, near

Street (between Kent and Gorman).

CHORES, DO CARPOOL, AND TAKE ON

Wolfline. $1050. Available June 1, Tel: 919-878-0849.

Help Wanted

Homes For rent 3718 Marcom, one house from Wolfline

Email collegeinn.leasing@tpco.com

Off Campus Housing for 4 to 16 people on Greenleaf

Sales Assistant needed for small pest

maintenance and

control company in Brier Creek. $30/day

installation positions. Turftenders offers

Since 1993. Cary’s most established

FUN OUTINGS. $11/HR, 12-16 HRS/WK.

to put out 450 fliers five days a week. $10

the potential for long-term employment

Sports Bar! If you have a fantastic

NEED TO BE AVAIL. MON & WED., 12.30

bonus for sales. For more information, call

and the

appearance, super smile and offer great

- 5.30, TUE 11.30 - 5.30 NEED WEEKS OF

Brenton at (919) 231-3292

opportunity to grow with the company.

customer service skills then WE WANT

JUNE 11, 17, JULY 8, 22, 29, AND WEEK

Email blmarco2@ncsu.edu

Full-time positions are available as well

YOU! Earn twice as much in gratuites per

OF AUG. 5 AND 12 (IF POSSIBLE). GOOD

as summer

shift as any corporate restaurant. We can

DRIVING RECORD AND REFERENCES.

1316 Gorman St; 1600 sq. ft. 3-4-BR

internships. Turftenders currently

train you in as little as 3-4 shifts!

CALL 919-744-9866

house for rent; 3 BA; DW; W/D; patio, on

Four bedroom / four bath units with private garages and laundry coming available in June, July and September.

1316 Gorman on Wolfline

$1,480 / month ($370 per person). Call Drew @(484) 888-2819 or email aweigand@nc.rr.com.

Sammy’s Tap & Grill

employs 6 NCSU alumni with various

We are now hiring bartenders and servers.

backgrounds in the

Apply in person and join the Woody’s

Flexible schedule. Earn Great Money in a

landscaping industry. Contact us to get

team today! Must be able to work

Part Time Childcare

fun environment. Experienced preferred,

started at: info@turftenders.com or visit

weekends! Are you the right fit for us? We

For our kids ages 7,9,11. References and

Near NCSU/Cameron Village.

dryers. Five kitchens. 8 private garage

but not required. 2235 Avent Ferry Road,

www.turftenders.com/contact-us/

won’t stop trying til we find you! A great

excellent driving record required. Also, a

Charming 3BD Ranch, close to campus.

bays plus an ample lot, large yard. $370

Raleigh. www.sammysncsu.com Apply

careers/.

place to work, earn big money and meet

car that accomodates 3 kids in the back

Quiet surroundings in highly desirable

per person. Call Drew: (484) 888-2819.

new people! Woody’s offers a complete

seat.

neighborhood. Available August 1. Call

food menu all day and all ABC permits.

Email trw3@rocketmail.com

Day: 919-833-7142 and Evening: 919-

in person.

Wolfline. $1200 Available June 1, Tel: 919-

Off Campus Housing for 16!

878-0849.

One building. Seventeen bedrooms. 14 full baths / 3 half baths. Five washer/

Email aweigand@nc.rr.com

783-9410. Please visit our website. www.

LEVEL 4

LEVEL 3

jansenproperties.com

Technician was there. You can be too. The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information.

Lookin’ for the answer key? VISIT TECHNICIANONLINE.COM


Sports

COUNTDOWN

• 4 days until baseball takes on Presbyterian College at Doak Field

PAGE 12 • EXAM ISSUE SPRING 2013

N

INSIDE

• Page 11: A continuation of remembering Jim Valvano

TECHNICIAN

Mediocrity kills the Pack

.C. State athletics during the 2012-13 season, overall, were a bust. Basketball was ranked as high as No. 6 and football was highly touted. To put it lightly, they both failed. Players opted to leave school early for the NFL and NBA draft, players transferred, and it Jonathan sent the Wolfpack Stout faithful into a coma. Senior Staff Writer The aura of State being a second-class program is alive and well. N.C. State sh*t is real, not just a Twitter handle. Women’s basketball’s 2012-13 slogan, “Our Time,” was sadly mistimed and made the program look adolescent. If it’s a team’s “time,” the team doesn’t finish with a 17-17 record, 7-11 in its own conference, and its head coach doesn’t get canned at season’s end. Better yet, “our state,” was a complete joke. It’s not “our state” just because the administration thinks its athletic program has “arrived” or its teams look promising on paper. It’s a joke, and the University is now mocked, especially in the ACC. With arguably the most talent — and the “best” chance to win a third national championship — head coach Mark Gottfried failed to hone some of the most talent players in the country. The team didn’t even make it out of the first round of the

TOM O’BRIEN: Record at State: 40-35 2012-2013 record: 7-5 Preseaon rank: No. 25, according to Sports Illustrated

MARK GOTTFRIED: Record at State: 48-24 2012-2013 record: 24-11 Preseaon rank: No. 6, according to USA Today and Assoicated Press Top-25 polls

RYAN PARRY/TECHNICIAN

Greg Moore, a junior in sport management, holds his hands over his face after N.C. State fell to Temple during the second round of the NCAA Tournament at the University of Dayton Friday March 22, 2013.

NCAA Tournament or break the top 25 to finish the year. The team, ranked as high as No. 6, lost to Temple in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. Players, like senior forwards Richard Howell and Scott Wood, deserved a better end to their time with the Wolfpack. Recently transferred guard Rodney Purvis left the team, and all but one starter either graduated or de-

clared for the NBA Draft. One year after a Sweet-16 birth and a season with much promise, Gottfried is forced to start over. And after six seasons and a 45-35 mediocre record, former head football coach Tom O’Brien was fired. Football’s streak against bitter rival North Carolina was snapped this season, in heartbreaking fashion. It was time. Many felt it was

coming, especially after the loss to the Tar Heels and the unfortunate smackdown from Virginia on Homecoming. Once again, a team filled with talent and promise came up short. Like with any sports team, you should take care of the bottom feed-

KELLIE HARPER: Record at State: 70-64 2012-2013 record: 17-17 Preseaon rank: Not ranked

MEDIOCRE continued page 11

PHOTOS BY JOHN JOYNER PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY BRYCE HART

Remembering the legend: Jim Valvano Daniel Wilson Staff Writer

Former men’s basketball coach Jim Valvano died April 28, 1993 after a long battle with cancer. While Sunday marked the 20th anniversary of his death, he will always be remembered by Wolfpack fans for his life and perseverance.

After a five-year stint as the head coach for the Iona Gaels, the New York City native was hired in March of 1980 to take the reins as head of the Wolfpack. Despite having large shoes to fill in the wake of former head coach Norm Sloan, Valvano never lost sight of his ultimate goal: winning the NCAA Championship.

Representatives and Senators of North Carolina, Enough is enough. Our University is dying. No, it is being killed — by budget cuts taking place within a systemic attack on public services. But we, the students, faculty and staff of the UNC System, will not put up with this any longer. Sen. Tom Apodaca, if you had graduated from N.C. State when you got your bachelor’s degree, your tuition would have been six percent of what we pay today, and even adjusting for inflation, 18 percent of that. Cuts have kept faculty and staff pay nearly stagnant for years, as class sizes and contingent faculty have swelled in number. You recently decided to eliminate North Carolina’s estate tax, which will help only 140 families in the state, while costing it more than $60 million every year. Point being, there is enough money — it’s just a matter of how you choose to use it. Right now, you’re using it to the harm of the many; the many being us, whose futures depend on the UNC System. We demand you stop your assault on education. If you defund our universities, we will defend them.

Sincerely, ____________________

YOU CAN MAIL THIS PETITION TO THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY ON YOUR OWN, OR YOU CAN DROP IT BY STUDENT MEDIA’S OFFICE AT 307 A WITHERSPOON STUDENT CENTER, AND TECHNICIAN WILL DELIVER THIS ON YOUR BEHALF.

Valvano envisioned this goal to the point where he would set aside one practice out of the season to cut down the net, a tournament tradition. The Rutgers alum struggled in his first year at the helm, leading the Wolfpack to a 14-13 overall record and a 4-10, seventh place ACC finish. Valvano would reach the postseason in the 1981-82 campaign as a 22-10 record gave State an NCAA bid. However, The Pack was defeated by the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, putting Valvano’s dreams of a championship on hold. Valvano’s team entered the 1982-83 campaign hardly a championship contender, especially since it belonged to the same conference as the reigning national champions, the North Carolina Tar Heels. State entered the 1983 ACC tournament tied for third in the conference with Maryland, but with an 8-6 conference record, it was unlikely the team would receive an NCAA tournament bid. “For us, it was a do-or-die ACC tournament,” former Wolfpack guard Derrick Whittenberg said. “Coach made us aware that if we didn’t win at least two games, it was very possible that we would not make it to the NCAA tournament.” It was at the tournament in Atlanta that the phrase “Cardiac Pack” was born. The philosophy of the mantra

was simple: Survive and Advance. Valvano became a tournament “It’s a simple concept really,” Val- icon, rushing up and down the vano explained in his autobiography court looking for someone to hug. They Gave Me a Lifetime Contract, Finally, he had his championship. and Then They Declared Me Dead. Valvano continued to coach the “Just win the game you play as op- Pack until 1990, when he was asked posed to building toward something to resign due to multiple academicdown the road.” related allegations A f te r e a r n i ng that forced the unic ome b a c k w i n s versity to be placed over Wake Forest, on probation, barUNC and Virginia, ring the team from Va lva no f i na l ly the 1990 NCA A earned the right to tournament. cut down the nets A f ter le av i ng at the ACC tournaState’s basketball ment. program, Valvano “Obv iously we broadcasted for were very happy ESPN and ABC Jim Valvano, former head and excited, but Sports and worked basketball coach we weren’t surclosely with Dick p r i s e d ,” W h i tVitale, earning the tenberg said. “We had talked duo’s nickname, “the Killer Vees.” about being in this situation, Valvano worked in broadcasting and that makes the difference.” until 1992 when the former coach The Wolfpack’s shining moment was diagnosed with metastatic adcame on April 4, 1983 when, af- enocarcinoma, a type of skin cancer. ter surviving close calls against In the weeks leading to his death, Pepperdine, UNLV, Virginia and he delivered two speeches that have Georgia, they defeated the highly defined his fight with cancer. praised “Phi Slamma Jamma” crew The first took place from Houston on a last-second slam at Reynolds Coliseum dunk by Lorenzo Charles to win on Feb. 21, 1993 with the NCAA Championship, 54-52. members of the 1983 “Coach Valvano really set the focus championship team and the tone for us,” Whittenberg celebrating its 10th ansaid. “People are still talking about niversary. that championship 30 years ago.” “We did not think Jim was ever going to step foot in the gym after leaving here on such a sour note,” Whittenberg said. “For him to come back to the arena and still be a part of N.C. State, I thought that was very, very special.” In that address, he spoke the words that would forever ring in the hearts of Wolfpack

“It cannot touch my mind, it cannot touch my heart, and it cannot touch my soul.”

JIMMY V continued page 11

Contact us at

866-857-3619


Technician - Exam Issue Spring 2013