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TECHNICIAN          

february

21 2013

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Roll Pack? Not without a struggle

C

Privette expressed frustration with the lack of accessibility in certain areas of campus, specifically dorms. “It’s unfortunate because people with wheelchairs can see how certain areas are difficult to access so much better than those without wheelchairs,” Privette said. The list of dorms with minimal wheelchair accessibility is more extensive than you would expect: Bragaw, Lee, Sullivan, Owen, Tucker, Gold, Syme, Welch, Turlington,

Alexander and Wood Hall all limit wheelchair users. A student who prefers to remain unnamed has expressed anger with the lack of handicap accommodations available at her dorm. “I have a close family member who has wanted to visit my dorm room at Bragaw for the longest time, but she can’t because it’s on the second floor,” she said. The student says she feels guilty for living in a dorm where there are only stairs, but she leaves the majority of the blame with University Housing for neglecting to have a wheelchair ramp or elevator. Susan Grant, Director of University Housing, explains that although funds to make housing renovations

Victoria Vesc Staff Writer

have been located, the staff has not fit the cost of elevators for Bragaw Hall into the budget. According to Grant, future renovation is projected to take place 10 years out. Lee and Sullivan Hall have elevators, but to students in wheelchairs, ascending to higher floors is not the problem. An elevator provides access to each f loor, but the elevator exit leads to two flights of stairs, which are the only paths to reach the dorm rooms. Students in wheelchairs cannot safely navigate these flights of stairs without assistance. �Pete Fraccaroli, University Housing Facilities Manager, admits when

ROLL continued page 2

BITE continued page 3

STORY BY SEAN LANGSTON JR. | PHOTO BY RYAN PARRY

.J. Leslie may have been able to lift Will Privette into the air two weeks ago after he stormed the court in his wheelchair, but Leslie’s busy schedule won’t allow him to do it every day.

The Bite: A show for students, by students The Bite, contrary to popular thought, is not a restaurant, but instead the newest student comedy show to be aired on Wolf TV. Created by and for the students, The Bite is the brainchild of Sean Smith, a senior in international studies and the host of the show. The program format is similar to Comedy Central’s The Colbert Report and The Daily Show. The show was born out of necessity, according to Smith. “Sometimes this campus takes things far too seriously, and we lacked an unrestricted critical voice, thus, a TV broadcast was born to comment on society and entertain students,” Smith said. Though primarily created for NCSU students, the show wants to appeal to anyone who appreciates satire and witty humor. Smith’s dry sense of humor is a fresh alternative to other satirical news shows, and The Bite’s comedic style is made apparent during the first scene of the pilot episode. Smith is waiting in an elevator with a 88.1 WKNC D.J. while he describes The Bite. Despite explaining the show’s premise, the D.J. still thinks the show is about cooking and exits the elevator, apparently disinterested in the

DISABLED STUDENTS HAVE TROUBLE GETTING AROUND, STUDYING AND FUNCTIONING ON CAMPUS

Senior in communication Privette and other students with disabilities requiring mobility equipment are neglected in some areas of campus when they need to travel above the ground floor. University Housing admits that wheelchair accessibility around campus is not optimal. “I remember visiting a friend in Owen Hall, but my friend’s room wasn’t on the first floor, so I had to be toted up the stairs by a few people,” Privette said.

thursday

Banks C. Talley II retires, ending his 60-year tenure Staff Report Banks C. Talley, whom the Talley Student Center is named after, retired two weeks ago from his position as the Vice Chancellor Emeritus. Talley has been with N.C. State for 60 years and came to the University in 1951 as assistant dean of students. �Talley helped found the Division of Student Affairs and led the organization as dean and vice chancellor from 1969 to 1983. Under Talley’s the leadership, Student Affairs expanded to include Greek Life, Student Government, Student Media, University Housing, Student Health Services, University Recreation and other departments. Talley also worked as former Gov. Jim Hunt’s executive secretary in the late 1970s, and later as executive director of the N.C. Symphony and executive vice president of the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Talley retired from his administrative role with the University in 1983. However, he was the director of special projects for ARTS N.C. State until his final retirement.

Editor’s Note: Banks Talley’s son, Banks Talley III, wrote a memoir in homage to his father’s career. Talley III said he grew up at N.C. State, and after helping his father pack up his belongings, it only seemed appropriate to let Talley III write about this chapter in his father’s career, but also his milestone in Talley III’s life as well.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF BANKS C. TALLEY II

(Left) Banks C. Talley II and his son Banks C. Talley III pose for a portrait with Talley III’s daughter, Rebecca Talley. (Right) Banks “Grandpa” Talley, the father of Bank C. Talley II, poses in his North Carolina A&M jersey in front of Patterson Hall.

M

THE END OF AN ERA: BANKS C. TALLEY III WRITES A MEMOIR OF GROWING UP AS “DR. TALLEY’S” SON

y dad is retiring from N.C. State again, this time for good. Everyone at State called him, “Dr. Talley” or “Dean Talley” but he has always been just “Dad” to me. You’ve probably seen him on campus, the elderly gentleman in a coat, red scarf and tweed cap with a walking stick. When I was a child, he used to hold my hand as we walked on campus. Sometimes, I have to help him walk now. He has not, however, lost an ounce of his enthusiasm or love

for the school where he spent most of his career, most recently helping fundraise for Arts N.C. State. I hear the excitement in his voice when he says, “We’ve raised $5 million for the Gregg Museum. We need 2 million more and we’ re going to get it!” I believe him. He started his career at State in 1951 as the assistant dean of students. He was just 24 years old and barely out of college himself, having graduated in 1950 UNC-Chapel Hill after his U.S. Army service in the Philippines during World War II. Since he’s been at NCSU so long,

most people assume Dad was always a member of the Wolfpack. Bill Friday completed his undergraduate degree at NCSU and spent his entire career in Chapel Hill. My father did the exact opposite. Friday is the one who first told my dad about the job at NCSU. When he arrived on campus, his first boss was Dean Edward Cloyd, and John Harrelson was the Chancellor. Harry Truman was the President of the United States and Kerr Scott was the Governor of North Carolina. At that time, there were only 50 female students at State.

My father has been associated with N.C. State for 62 years, including 46 years working on campus. He left the University a few times, to work with the North Carolina Symphony, the National Trust for Historic Preservation and Gov. Jim Hunt. Dad says he always knew Hunt, the only NCSU student body president to wear a coat and tie to class, would be governor someday. When he called last week to ask if I would help him move from the small corner office in the building

TALLEY continued page 3

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PAGE 2 • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

TECHNICIAN

THROUGH BRETT’S LENS

POLICE BLOTTER

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Mark Herring at editor@ technicianonline.com

Monday 1:38 A.M. | SUSPICIOUS PERSON D.H. Hill Library Report of subject walking with two bicycles. Officers searched area but did not locate subject.

WEATHER WISE

8:49 A.M. | TRAFFIC VIOLATION Varsity Drive Student was cited for speeding.

Today:

9:04 A.M. | TRAFFIC VIOLATION Varsity Drive Employee was cited for speeding and seatbelt violation.

53/35

1:19 P.M. | FIRE ALARM Toxicology Building FP responded to alarm caused by Freon alarm filter failure.

Sunny.

Tomorrow:

41 40

4:11 P.M. | LARCENY D.H. Hill Library Student reported theft of unattended laptop and bookbag. Property was later found.

‘Now do the Harlem Shake’

Showers.

PHOTO BY BRETT MORRIS

Saturday:

S

tudents massed in the Brickyard show some school spirit as they respond to the Wolfpack chant Wednesday afternoon. The crowd gathered in front of the Atrium as Michael Ramos led a short Improv at NC State performance of the Harlem shake. After the dancing ended, Ramos encouraged everyone looking on to stick it to UNC and join him with the chant. GO WOLFPACK!

53 40 Showers.

SOURCE: WWW.WEATHER.COM

CAMPUS CALENDAR February 2013

ON THE WEB See exclusive audio/photo slideshows. Answer the online poll. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline.com. Check it out!

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Thursday FIDELITY INVESTMENTS SPEAKERS SERIES PRESENTS BRIAN HAMILTON EB II Room 1231 6 to 7 p.m.

MOVIE: THE PRINCESS AND THE FROG Witherspoon Student Cinema 7 to 9 p.m.

UNIVERSITY THEATRE PRESENTS AN INSPECTOR CALLS Thompson Hall, 7:30 p.m.

UNIVERSITY THEATRE PRESENTS AN INSPECTOR CALLS Thompson Hall, 7:30 p.m.

MOVIE: FLIGHT Witherspoon Student Cinema 9 to 11 p.m.

MOVIE: FLIGHT Witherspoon Student Cinema 9 to 11 p.m.

FREE MOVIE: MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL Witherspoon Student Cinema 12 to 2 a.m.

Friday DANCE MARATHON NC STATE Carmichael Gym 7 p.m. to 8 a.m.

Saturday NC STATE POLICE TORCH RUN 5K & POLAR PLUNGE Lake Raleigh 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

MOVIE: FLIGHT Witherspoon Student Cinema 7 to 9 p.m.

GAMEWATCH: NCSU V. UNC Witherspoon Student Cinema 4 p.m.

ROLL

continued from page 1

Sullivan and Lee were first built wheelchair accessibility was not in mind. Grant says stories like these have prompted her staff to look at wheelchair accessibility much closer,

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but confesses that planning will be long term. “We plan to make changes to Lee and Sullivan Hall in the next 10 to 12 years, and our University construction will make sure everything is ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) appropriate, but right now, it’s a quandary,” Grant said.

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5:26 P.M. | DRUG VIOLATION Syme Hall Units responded to alarm. Report of possible drug violation. Officer did not locate source of odor. 9:28 P.M. | LARCENY D.H. Hill Library Student reported unsecured cell phone stolen. 11:20 P.M. | FIRE ALARM Engineering Building II Units responded to alarm. Electronics responded and reset system. Tuesday 12:16 A.M. | DRUG VIOLATION Sullivan Drive Two students were cited for simple possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia after being stopped at checking station. Students were referred to the university. Wednesday 2:33 AM | LARCENY Dabney Hall Student reported bicycle stolen.

Privette spent his first year at N.C. State living in University Towers and said the living circumstances offered there attracted him. “UT was the perfect place for someone in a wheelchair, honestly,” Privette said. He now resides in an offcampus apartment complex where necessary accommodations are provided with ease. Privette’s frustration also encompasses what he calls “the lack of handicap parking offered” on campus. He recalls many instances where he was tardy and even missed classes because he was forced to park far away from his lecture halls. “It frustrates me a lot because I don’t want special treatment, but they don’t need to make it any harder,” Privette said.


News

TECHNICIAN

BITE

PAGE 3 •THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013

episodes will be aired before spring break, according to Smith. If you want to know more about The Bite or possibly become a member of the crew, you

continued from page 1

show. The Bite also includes short video segments. For example, “Dorm Delights” satirizes college students themselves and discusses ways college students can eat good on a budget. Smith spent a great deal of time assembling his dedicated crew, and he welcomes new faces. He also empha-

TALLEY

continued from page 1

that carries his name, I wasn’t sure how to respond. I know it’s time for him to retire, but I have mixed emotions about him leaving State. After all, I grew up on this campus, thanks to him. As a young boy, I was thrilled whenever Dad asked me to accompany him to the office. I would jump in his 1956 Thunderbird convertible to go to work with him at Holladay Hall on a Saturday. While Dad worked, I shuffled paperweights and played with a penguin snow globe, a gift from a former student. I loved using the dumbwaiter in his office, a relic of years past when Holladay Hall included a cafeteria, to send objects to the building’s basement. My father never seemed to mind. I think he was just glad to have his son around. So many of my NCSU memories with Dad involve sporting events. My earliest memory from Carter-Findley Stadium, as it was known then, is sitting on the wooden bleachers to watch State defeat Penn State. A young Lou Holtz was the head coach then, and my dad called him “Hotshot.” My father had to attend games for work and always managed to get extra tickets so I could take a friend. While I thought it was cool to sit in the Chancellor’s Box with free Cokes and packs of Nabs crackers, it was too exclusive for me. I longed to be in the raucous Wolves Den, the once grassy hill now covered in concrete at the Mur-

can email Sean at thebitencsu@ gmail.com. “Hopefully this can become

“The Bite” is a student-run show on WolfTV and YouTube that features funny moments of N.C. State life.

sizes the importance of new talent because the show is created by students.

“We are always looking for new students to join our staff, that is the real point of this

project anyhow,” Smith said. The first episode is already online and can be viewed on

The Bite’s YouTube Channel at http://www.youtube. com/thebitencsu. Two more

phy Center end of the field. It cost five bucks to sit on the hill. It was so steep that several times I found myself pressed against the fence after rolling all the way down it. The Den was an interesting mix of kids and college students, the students were always willing to carry us kids back up the hill or catch the small plastic footballs we tossed around. When State won an ACC Championship in football in 1979 it was so exciting. My father wouldn’t let me sit in the Den when we played East Carolina University. I didn’t understand why until 1987. Walking past Reynolds Coliseum now, you would never guess that it was once the loudest and most exciting place in Raleigh (with all due respect to our wonderful Lady Wolfpack). My father always tells me that I missed the glory days of N.C. State basketball — the Dixie Classic era. However, I did get to see David Thompson and the Cardiac Pack of 1983 play at Reynolds. My father and I always had the same seats, left of center court and three rows behind the green (now red) metal railing. It’s hard to imagine now, but even the seats were painted green until after our NCAA victory in Albuquerque. Along with David Thompson’s brilliance on that court, I remember most the night he fell on the court in 1974. We were playing the University of Pittsburgh. He jumped so high that his knees were at fellow Wolfpacker Phil Spence’s shoulders. The thud when his head hit the hardwoods was sickening, louder

than the constant squeak of rubber soled shoes. The entire Coliseum went silent. They took David to Rex Hospital on Wade Avenue, the same hospital where I’d been born about six years earlier. When he returned with his head wrapped in gauze, the house erupted in cheers — from the hometown crowd and the opposition a li ke. It would not get that loud again until the winter of 1983. As an early Christmas present i n 1982, my father gave me season basketball tickets so we could attend all the home games together. I was 14 years old and wanted to spend quality time with my father. We had no idea what was in store for the Pack. I remember a few monumental events from that season. 1. Terry Gannon’s four consecutive free throws against UNC-Chapel Hill after Dean Smith got called for a double technical foul. In the same game, Sidney Lowe passed between his own legs to Thurl Bailey for a gamewinning dunk over Sam Perkins. 2. Dereck Whittenburg breaking a bone in his foot and young guard named Ernie Meyers stepping up to help the team regroup. 3. Beating Wake Forest 130-89 in the final regular season game, the noise meter staying in the red for the entire second half. 4. Our miraculous run to the National Cham-

pionship, where we defeated Houston’s “Phi Slamma Jamma,” starring Hakeem Olajuwon and Clyde Drexler. My dad, never one to miss history, took my little sister and me to the Brickyard for the post-game celebration. The trees creaked loudly under the weight of students hanging from their branches. A jun ked car blazed brightly as t he crowd sang the NCSU Fight Song. (The previous week, you could pay a dollar to hit it with a sledgehammer and help bash Houston.). My other memory from 1983 is somewhat sillier but still resonates. That year, Van Halen played a concert at Reynolds. My parents wouldn’t let me attend, but my dad drove me over to campus so I could listen from outside the Coliseum. Only good fathers, who hate rock

n’ roll but love their children, would do that. Despite many happy memories, I was reluctant to come to NCSU as an undergraduate. It seemed too close to home and too familiar. I was frequently irritated when a professor would single me out during roll call and say, “I expect great things from you in my class.” While it may sound like adolescent whining now, I wanted to be my own person, freed from the expectations that came with being “Dr. Talley’s son.” But I had a wonderful time at State. I loved being an English major, working late nights doing “paste up” at Technician in the precomputer era, serving on the Student Media Authority and as an editor of the Windhover literary magazine. I also enjoyed getting a second undergraduate degree and later a master’s at the College of Design. In 2001, when I completed my graduate degree, Dad handed me a small leather scrapbook. Two photos inside dated 1912 stood out. In one, my Grandfather Talley stands

“As a young boy, I was thrilled whenever Dad asked me to accompany him to the office.”

something that will remain at NCSU for years to come, and provide an editorial outlet for students who just want to have some fun,” Smith said.

in front of Patterson Hall wearing a football uniform. In the other, he sits in front of the now demolished Fourth Dorm. I was confused. My grandfather attended veterinary school at Ohio State. Had he also attended NCSU? That day, I learned that my grandfather had attended North Carolina A&M, a former name of the University, before World War I. I was the third generation in my family proud to be associated with N.C. State. As my dad and I moved the last of his packed boxes into the hall, I turned and looked back at the small office, my dad’s campus home for the last decade. It was time to go. “Don’t you want to keep your name plate?” I asked. “Just leave it,” he replied. It was only then that I realized my mad wasn’t wearing a tie anymore. He looked relaxed and happy, ready to go home. I wrapped the penguin snow globe in some newspaper and carefully tucked it in my jacket pocket as he locked the door behind him.


Viewpoint

PAGE 4 • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013

TECHNICIAN

Bad things, too, must come to an end

T

echnician reported Tuesday that Facilities will demolish Riddick Stadium Field House over spring break, beginning March 2. Our response to the news: about time. However, some other students don’t feel the same way and created a “Save the Field House” Facebook page with a link asking students, alumni, faculty, staff and fans to sign the Petition to Save the Riddick Stadium Field House. But the destruction is long overdue — the 2007 Master Plan for the University called for the Field House to be torn down. The creators of the Facebook page believe the building is “key to N.C. State’s past.” But let us remember that the Field House was part of Riddick Stadium, which hosted Wolfpack football from 1907 until the completion of Carter-Finley Stadium in 1966. Though the fans may have felt sentimental about Riddick, it is said that the football players were first to volunteer to tear down the small, rarely used stadium.

{

IN YOUR WORDS

BY CHRIS RUPERT

“No problem with that. I wouldn’t really care a lot, it’s kind of creepy” Alison Fowler freshman, marine biology

“Not really, I think it’s sort of become an eyesore. I could see how it could be a problem for people walking out of the tunnel.” Rashaad Hamilton sophomore, political science

“I guess, it’s been there a while, tradition and all it’s an essential part of campus..” Scott Hunter senior, marketing

“No I don’t, it’s kind of a safety issue, kind of a creepy place. If it wasn’t there you would have a better view of the surrounding area.” Matthew Jackson graduate student, economics

The petition’s creators propose, “Let’s fix it up! Let’s make it into a usable space! Let’s not wait for those above us to make the right decisions!” But the building’s location at the end of a parking lot, adjacent to the railroad tracks, makes it too inconvenient to be worthy of renovation. Furthermore, the Field House is an eyesore beyond repair. The Field House has not served much of a purpose in recent years. Kevin MacNaughton, associate vice chancellor for Facilities, was quoted in Tuesday’s Field House article saying that the building was used most recently to house construction contractors working on SAS Hall and the Yarborough Energy Plant. The petitioners dramatically conclude their description, “And foremost importantly, let us not allow the doomsday to come on March 2.” The destruction of a building does not war-

N

ot ever yone needs a college degree. This is a tough pill for most of us to swallow, due to the educational pat h we have chosen, but the truth of the Trey matter is Ferguson our sociManaging Editor ety needs a diverse group of individuals in every aspect to properly run. During the election, Pat McCrory was criticized for not putting enough emphasis on education — his major issue was job creation, after all. His first signed piece of legislation aims to kill these two birds with one stone. By placing more focus on career and technical education, North Carolina will be able to aid those with the means to go into higher education as well as those who choose a different path. It’s hard for many of us to imagine the idea of being pushed into the workforce directly after high school. However this is a very real concern for many of our state’s high scho�ol graduates. These vocational programs give students who are unable to pursue a college education (or who choose not to) an opportunity to learn a skill, have a career, provide for their families, contribute to their community and become productive citizens. They provide students with skills, skills that our society needs to function. For example, Allied Health programs train high school students to become CNAs by the time they graduate. With North Carolina’s increasing retirement population, these jobs are needed to take care of our elderly. North Carolina is currently in its sixth year

with more than 80 percent of high school students graduating in four years. A contributing factor to this major accomplishment is the fact that these programs engage students in their academic coursework that would otherwise be apathetic toward their education. These students leave high school with the hope of a career, a skill that they can fall back on. It is both naïve and unfair to think that the only path to success is the one many of us have taken. In some cases, these students will be making more than the average first-year college graduate. Many critics argue Gov. McCrory’s first piece of legislation takes away from society’s value on higher education and places too much emphasis on trade jobs. I have news for them; our society could not function without these jobs. A college degree is not required to be successful in life. They must also look at the impact these classes have on college preparation. Students who hope to go to a four-year university go through these programs and discover what field they want to pursue in their higher education. I guarantee nearly every agricultural major here at N.C. State took an agricultural class in high school. State funding that goes to universities only directly benefits those of us who attend a university. However, funding that goes to public schools will benefit all North Carolinians. It’s easy to shrug off these programs as devaluing education, but they’re actually helping to fuel it.

“... funding that goes to public shools will benefit all North Carolinians”

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695 Editorial Advertising Fax Online

rant a comparison to doomsday. In fact, while facilities workers are tearing down the Field House, Technician advocates the demolishment of most of West Campus along with several other buildings scattered throughout N.C. State ­— or at least drastic renovations. Lee and Sullivan halls are in the running for most unoriginal designs. And although they both have elevators, they are considered only partially handicapped accessible because the elevators stop halfway between floors, forcing residents to climb up or down a few steps. Poe and Harrelson halls are two of the least aesthetically pleasing buildings on campus, and our editorial board will be the first to admit that they make this ugly campus even uglier. They are also brick-free, making them a campus anomaly. If you must make an ugly building, at least make it brick so it blends into the background and the foreground and

the ground. In addition to being hard on the eyes, Harrelson is a nuisance. The stairs are steep, the circular shape makes it hard to navigate and the elevator ­—if you can find it — feels shaky. After two reports declared Harrelson unfit for renovation, the North Carolina State Board of Trustees approved its demolition by 2015. We also wouldn’t miss outdated and uneasyon-the-eyes Bostian, Dabney or Cox halls. You can’t swing a wrecking ball on main campus without hitting a building we’d like to tear down. We know all good things must come to an end, but what about bad things? Well, petitions like these only ensure the permanence of “bad things” like the Field House, which exhibits cracks in its foundation in which you can stick your hand. Though the petition is respectable for making students’ voices heard, Technician upholds the necessity of the demolition.

The college path is not the only one

}

Do you have a problem with tearing down the field house?

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

515.2411 515.2029 515.5133 technicianonline.com

Send your thoughts to viewpoint@technicianonline.com

Matthew Clark, senior in arts application

Looking through James Bond (and through everything else)

T

he new James Bond mov ie , S k y fa l l , came to Campus Cinema last weekend. In it, there was a scene in which M, the head of the British foreign intelligence agency MI6, has to defend her handling of a security i s sue . B e cause of the Ishan Raval high-handed t houg h Deputy Viewpoint Editor seemingly ineffectual way in which she has dealt with the matter, the government has held a public inquiry. There, backed by a dramatic musical score, she justifies her approach to tackling the problem in a little monologue, saying: “I’m frightened because our enemies are no longer known to us. They do not exist on a map, they are not nations, they are individuals. Look around you. Who [sic] do you fear? Can you see a face, a uniform, a flag? No. Our world is not more transparent now, it is more opaque. It is the shadows. That’s where we must do battle.” Then she goes on to recite some lines by Tennyson about heroism, strength of will and moving earth and heaven, while the shots revert between her and James Bond saving the world. The scene nearly crumbles under the weight of its own overdone, melodramatic earnestness, but the job is done. The movie has done its task in creating public opinion about government secrecy and the expanding sway of intelligence agencies. Skyfall will forever affect the way we view

judicially unapproved drone strikes, the hacktivist group Anonymous, Wikileaks and whether someone blowing up your car should be the proper tipping point for going berserk trying to kill them. All works of art have the effect of shaping cultural values, and when viewed without a critical eye, art can become propaganda. But cultural values are also shaped in much more subtle ways than by M telling us that intelligence agencies need less oversight and governments need less transparency. Subliminal messaging exists everywhere. Either in an institution existing in society or a line we hear in a movie, all social artifacts bring with their own presence certain underlying messages that construct reality. They scatter into the mass mind conceptions about what people are like and how people are supposed to behave. And as we regard these social artifacts as givens, these messages become regarded as truth. But when we look through the subliminal messages and ideology contained in the things around us, our minds, at least, are emancipated. We equip ourselves to not unconsciously accept values that are harmful and to oppose endeavors that enforce or preserve wrongs. An example is the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA). This bill was introduced last year to allow certain companies exemptions from privacy law, through which they can collect threatening information about people, such as private communication data. Fur-

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thermore, broad immunities were offered for sharing this information with the government, thus helping it keep an eye on its citizens and curtailing loosely-defined cyberthreats. CISPA was opposed last year for being a gross attack on civil liberties and Internet freedom by organizations such as the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Mozilla and the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Under pressure from such groups and the public, it was defeated in Senate. But last week, it was reintroduced in the House of Representatives. I’m not claiming that the sponsors of the bill thought, “Well, after that Bond movie that came out last year, people won’t mind CISPA this time.” I write only to call for vigilance. Ideas about what is good for the world and what is right are always being generated and discreetly embedded into society. Various cultural artifacts are responsible for this. Some, like Skyfall, are works of art which contain ideas and communicate them. Others, simply by being what they are and existing as socially-validated entities, communicate the ideas that lie behind them and go along with them ­— for example, the assumptions and ideas about society that lie behind commercial art existing at all. We live in an ocean of subliminal cultural messages, and if we are not vigilant, many of these can and definitely do lead to problems that suave secret agents won’t be able to cure. So, let us be critical of culture, lest the sky fall.

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2011 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


F

TECHNICIAN

TH E

K A E R B SHake FIFT

H

PAGE 5 • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY21, 2013

THE

From top song in the nation to YouTube Hall of Fame, the Harlem Shake by Bauuer has thoroughly infected our attention span.

W

e all know Internet trends are incredibly infectious. It goes without saying that we view, share and discuss an insane amount of YouTube videos. We’re suckers for a catchy dance reminiscent of the Macarena with an added Asian flair. Give us something to quote, and we got time for ‘dat. In the age of Internet, it’s just about impossible not to get completely lost in the beautiful and hilarious world of cyberspace. Surfing the web comes second nature; we flit from site to site, meme to meme, video to video. While, seemingly, there may be no danger in trolling for the occasional YouTube of the week sensation, there are some dangerous consequences that do occasionally arise. The most common is constant imitation. CI for short. Those experiencing CI are easy to spot. They can be spotted attempting bizarre

THE FIFTH:

PLAY

continued from page 6

environmental sciences, was especially compelling. Even though each of the characters had done something clearly immoral, the actors playing them made their reasoning completely under-

feats, like chugging a gallon of milk or planking on the roof of Harrelson Hall in the middle of the day. Occasionally, it can be hard to distinguish CI and general hazing, but with practice one can spot the differences. Those suffering from CI spend equal amounts of time perusing YouTube for bizarre things to stave off boredom and attempting to emulate the most absurd ones. Be on the lookout for this specimen: odds are someone is going to serve as ambulance before its’ all over. Another side effect to infectious Internet is inappropriate mimic (IM). Pause for a moment. Take a deep breath and use all of your powers of imagination to envision your weird economics professor throwing it down Gangnam Style. Consider the possible side effects of your English professor using grumpy cat on

an assignment sheet. Suddenly, the things you once found hilarious, feel so wrong. Your humor has been violated in the worst way. The inside jokes you once shared with dorm buddies are being made a mockery of with education. It’s blasphemy. It’s equivalent to moms on Facebook; to our internship companies requesting to follow us on Twitter. It is the abomination of silly Internet joy, and it must be stopped. IM hits us at our most vulnerable moments and leaves us empty, longing to be filled with the next fad of the online universe. Despite the side effects that can come of the wrong type of people being exposed to the beauty of wasting time on the Internet, we all know it’s a sickness that can’t be cured. We swear off, afraid of horror, only until the next boring lecture or tedious work shift begins.

named for the the number of views this plague should have stopped at.

standable. I could picture myself in their situations and see how my own willpower would fail as well. Moreover, their guilt regarding their actions and sympathetic quirks were portrayed as powerfully as their faults. Each character received the opportunity to tell his or her side of the story, and each one

told it powerfully. For instance, the secrets of Eric Birling, played by Philipp Lindemann, a sophomore in political science, do not come out until near the end of the play, but when he broke down and confessed, he confessed wholeheartedly. He tossed back drinks, and his mannerism switched

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between fury toward his accusers and dejected despair at his deeds. An Inspector Calls was engaging and energetic, and none of the characters fell f lat. While it may start out slow, I think it was mainly because of the script’s effort to set the stage down to the exact year and the political climate. The direction

was well done and the action filled up the whole stage. The production crew outdid themselves. All that, and a twist ending, make for a stand-out performance from University Theatre.

Technician was there. You can be too.


Features ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

PAGE 6 •THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013

COMMENTARY

TECHNICIAN

‘Good’ lives up to its name

Will E. Brooks Deputy News Editor

Nearly every outsider has asked him or herself how seemingly ordinary, intelligent men could have come to commit genocide in 20th century Germany. It is a question that has led to debate among historians, students and even playwrights such as C.P. Taylor. Burning Coal Theatre’s production of Good follows Halder, a professor of literature during the rise of Nazism in Germany who finds himself conforming to a new system that provides the only way to advance. Halder, played by Steven Roten, is depicted as a virtuous citizen during the rise of Hitler. Halder, convinced the only way to climb the academic ladder is within the Nazi party, reluctantly joins and eventually becomes swept away by Nazi glory. He compartmentalizes many of his values in accordance with the state, and eventually finds himself aligning with the Nazi party, morally unchanged. Playgoers find themselves

attached to Halder and ultimately question what it means to be a good citizen. Roten gave an outstanding performance as Halder, making onlookers feel as conflicted as his character. It is difficult, especially in intimate productions like Burning Coal’s, with a seating area of some 85 seats wrapped U-shaped around a floor-level stage, to watch Roten and think Nazi. He executes the desired effect of Halder, that some good men became intoxicated with Nazism, often not at first by choice. Halder is the friend of a Jewish colleague, Maurice, played by Rob Jenkins, who also serves as his subconscious narrative. The Jewish character unsurprisingly preaches sentiments similar to the mainstream today, that Nazism and anti-semitism were radical and unsympathetic at the very least and sadistic at their core. Jenkins’ acting, like most of the Burning Coal crew, is on point. At times, the script is meaningfully unclear whether Maurice has become a figment of Halder’s

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE RIGHT IMAGE PHOTOGRAPHY

The cast of Burning Coal Theatre Company’s production of Good perform a number from the play.

imagination. Jenkins does a particularly excellent job of developing his character from an outspoken Jew to a hopeless fantasy of Halder’s. Good does not feel like a musical, but rather a play with music, as Roten and actor Matthew Hager — who plays two small roles, but appears throughout the play in a band — provided the most notable singing performanc-

es. Both actors displayed their unwavering, powerful voices that resonated perfectly with the Nazi ideal of perfection. Halder’s love interest also seemed to represent a similar theme of perfection. As a married man, Halder must cope with being in love with a young German named Anne, played by Jessica Heironimus. Anne embodies the ideals of Nazi Germany, and the “if

you want it, take it” attitude of the time. Where the production excelled in acting and singing talent, it lacked some in stage organization. Several settings were presented at one time upon the f loor-level stage, and beyond lighting changes were often completely imagined, and thus, ambiguous. Confusing setting and context of dialogue failed to

make a definitive timeline in an otherwise historical play. Burning Coal’s intimate production of Good poses historical and moral questions that are more likely to be pondered than answered in a definitive way. The high-quality performance — both musical and dramatic — serves as just one interpretation of a complicated history.

COMMENTARY

Atmosphere and mood build up for a successful showing Katie Sanders Deputy Features Editor

�University Theatre’s production of An Inspector Calls, by J.B. Priestley, seized the mood of the mystery thriller and articulated it perfectly. The lace tablecloth, the yellowing globe and the highbacked chairs around the table all added to the haunting, musky atmosphere of the rich dining room set. Behind the window lightning flashed, thunder crashed and rain could be heard beating against the roof. I felt like I had accidentally walked into an Agatha Christie mystery novel or at least a well-played game of Clue. An Inspector Calls is set in Britain in 1912 and chronicles the secrets of the members of the well-off Birling family who, each in their own way, is somehow connected to the suicide of a young girl. Two

years ago, the girl had worked for the Birling family, and Inspector Goole isn’t convinced that their relationship ended when her employment did. When the Inspector arrives unexpectedly at Sheila Birling’s engagement party and begins asking uncomfortable questions, he starts to uncover the layers of deception and misdeeds. University Theatre’s production shone when it came to the details. The set, lighting and costumes were a ll stunning and fit with the sophisticated detective theme wonderfully. The light of the room seems to come from old-fashion paraffin lamps and a f lickering fireplace — the stage was kept dim enough to be sinister, but bright enough that you could follow the action onstage. T he ma le per for mers sipped their port wine in elegant coats complete with

“University Theatre’s production shone when it came to the details.”

tails, while the female cast members wore refined laced and sequined dresses. Even though I was initially star-struck by the beautiful setup, the gentleman sitting next to me called its value into question when he started a conversation during intermission. He had been going to detective theatre for years and loved the mystery, he said, but found that most stories focused on a small cast of rich, dastardly, aloof and unrelatable folk. At the beginning of the play I had to agree. Meandering around the stage in their British accents and shiny dresses, the plot seemed to have plenty to offer, but I doubted that the characters did. However, the actors quickly changed my mind. In the first of the three acts, the action seemed a bit clunky at times. Even though the dialogue was clever, there seemed to be actions implied by the script that never happened, as if the cast hadn’t played the script quite to its full potential. Moreover, many of the actors spoke in haste, and while this was probably required by the

length of the play, it was a bit intimidating. A s t he y wa r med up, though, all of the actors became more into their characters. Their personalities filled

up the whole stage, even during moments when there was relatively little action. The relationship between Sheila Birling, played by Rhonda Lemon, a senior in mechani-

cal engineering, and her fiancé Gerald Croft, played by Ryan Fleming, a junior in

PLAY continued page 5

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Sports

TECHNICIAN

SALVATION continued from page 8

N.C State is probably oversensitive to mockery it receives from Chapel Hill, but State has bore the brunt of academic-related putdowns from Carolina for many years. When the men’s basketball team was placed on probation in 1990, it basically was a death penalty to the proud program. But it was largely a self-administered punishment. At that point, the basketball programs in Raleigh and Chapel Hill were essentially equal. N.C. State had actually won the last national championship between the two schools. Both teams had an ACC regular season and ACC Tournament title in the previous three seasons. For many years, N.C. State made mistakes. As bad as things had gotten at the end of Jim Valvano’s tenure as head coach and athletic director, the perception of N.C. State athletes among the community and the nation was even worse. Changes were needed and State was

willing to make them, even forsaking future athletic glory to do so. It has been frustrating for Wolfpack Nation to see its basketball team stuck in the mud over the last 23 years, while the Tar Heel basketball program has been to great heights. The solace for people who love State must then come with the juxtaposition of State’s self-administered punishment versus North Carolina’s lack of scruples and self-awareness. If glory on the basketball court is worth devaluing the education received from a university and belittling a rival is more important than acknowledging the unfair practices that gave the school an unfair advantage, then Carolina has made its bed. And it is a bed that N.C. State itself chose not to lay in 23 years ago. When N.C. State travels to Chapel Hill Saturday, there will likely be many stats used to relate the recent success of the Tar Heels over the Wolfpack. However, the gulf between the two schools in basketball since 1990 is not a failure for State – it’s their salvation.

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KASTANEK continued from page 8

a re not l i m it e d to the basketball court. Kastanek has earned a 4.0 grade point average and is currently ranked No. 1 out of 5,567 psychology majors in the senior class. The NCAA Senior CLASS Award nominee is also a member of the prestigious Phi Beta Kappa society. Her work ethic and determination to reach her goals is what drives her to her many successes. Kastanek has shown her tenacity and dedication, even outside the continental United States. She competed on Team USA in the 2011 Pan American Games and was the team’s captain as the group finished seventh in Guadalajara, Mexico. �Kastanek averaged 5.8 points per game and tied for the team lead in threes with six baskets beyond the arc. “To go down there to represent the nation put a whole different perspective on things,” Kastanek

JOHN JOYNER/TECHNICIAN

Senior guard Marissa Kastanek takes position to defend the basket during the women’s basketball game against Clemson in Reynolds Coliseum Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013. The Wolfpack Women defeated the Tigers 79-45.

said. “Just to experience that has helped make me thirsty to make the Olympic team.” These last five games, followed by ACC and potential NCAA or WNIT tournament games, will be the last in which Kastanek will don her Wolfpack jersey, but with this closing comes the opening of new opportunities in the WNBA or elsewhere. With new challenges to face, State will be close at heart. “This is where I have been

Classifieds

for the past four years,” Kastanek said. “In everything I do, there is going to be something that ties back to State. The biggest thing is keeping what has shaped me in the past four years and knowing that this is who I am now.” In her four years in Raleigh, Kastanek has built a legacy that very few women’s basketball players will ever eclipse moving forward. Her resilience and toughness have helped her become

an archetype of how any college athlete should perform, whether it is on the court or in the classroom. She has proved time and time again that no matter the circumstances, she can meet and overcome any obstacle. Kastanek is the living embodiment of what it takes to be the leader of the Pack.

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FOR RELEASE MARCH 2, 2013

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 1

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Keep informed with the new & improved technicianonline.com Technician, as of January 7, 2013, has launched a brand new, fully interactive, multimedia website that better caters to you, our readers. The new easy-tonavigate toolbar and feed-friendly interface lets you access what you want faster than ever before. Be on the lookout for all sorts of new content generated to give you the best coverage of N.C. State and surrounding areas.

ACROSS 1 Installment in a modern series 9 Thing to be cracked 15 Loge 16 Purchase provider 17 Olympic winner 18 Hero with a memorable yell 19 Bird that dines on stingers 20 Bug 21 PC debut of 1981 23 Leans 24 Truffles, e.g. 28 Unit in una zona residencial 30 Most suitable for service 31 In danger of snapping 37 “Whatever” 39 1959 Cornelius Ryan best-seller about the Normandy invasion, with “The” 40 Its Nasdaq symbol is CAR 41 Keister 42 Prepare for a game, as Jenga blocks 43 They may generate interest: Abbr. 46 38-Down option 50 “Hysterical” 52 On balance 57 God wed to his sister 58 Rather wicked 59 Say 60 Not barred 61 Good guys? 62 Many characters on “The L Word” DOWN 1 Place of development 2 It has about a 35inch blade 3 Saint who wrote the earliest history of England

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4 Requiem Mass hymn word 5 Sub base? 6 Bye lines? 7 Did a nurse’s job 8 Version’s beginning? 9 One of U.S. banking’s Big Four 10 “It’s hard to tell” 11 Longhaired pet 12 Nut-producing tree 13 Like some change 14 Uses Zipcar, say 22 Milan’s La __ 24 Keep from happening 25 Wreck 26 Light element 27 “Straight Outta Compton” genre 29 She has your back 31 __ Major 32 Modern entertainment 33 Maleficent 34 Vena __ 35 “Fast Food Nation” author Schlosser

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36 Work area 38 Top choice 42 Apparel for the slopes 43 Now, in Nogales 44 Checked out badly? 45 Ring 47 Seven-time French Open winner

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48 Fail to say 49 Simoleons 51 Petitions 53 Answer from the unwilling 54 Medicine Hat’s prov. 55 Homeowner’s burden 56 Some TV screens


Sports

COUNTDOWN

• 2 of days until men’s basketball tips-off against UNCChapel Hill at the Dean Dome

PAGE 8 • THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2013

INSIDE

• Page 7: A continuation of Marissa Kastanek’s illustrious career at N.C. State

TECHNICIAN WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

COMMENTARY

Kastanek: the epitome� of excellence

Choi earns third win, Pack place ninth

Daniel Wilson

N.C. State’s Albin Choi, the No. 18-ranked Amateur in the world, won for the third time in six events this season by firing a collegiate-low 7-under 65 during Tuesday’s final round of the Puerto Rico Classic. The Wolfpack finished ninth after recording the second lowest team score at Rio Mar Country Club. Choi erased a two-shot deficit leading into Tuesday with an eagle at the par-4 12th, his opening hole of the day. The Toronto, Ontario, native then took the lead at the next hole with the first of seven birdies at the par-4 13th. The Wolfpack team shot a 7-under 281 Tuesday, tying Oklahoma for the second-lowest score of the final round, to finish ninth at 11-over 875.

Staff Wrier

even involved people with a much greater rank within the Tar Heel community than Lucas. Outgoing Chancellor Holden Thorp famously needled students at Duke who were camping out for the Carolina game by saying they were in tents while the students in Chapel Hill were busy studying. Thorp presiding over the greatest academic scandal in over 50 years at North Carolina while choosing to chastise the academics of others is haughty indeed. When the head of a university permeates arrogance towards his neighbor rivals, the aura of superiority is only going to f low down to his underlings.

With only five regular season games left, the 2012-13 N.C. State women’s basketball season is coming to a close, and with that comes the close of senior guard Marissa Kastanek’s collegiate career. Since being recruited from Lincoln, Neb., in 2009, her time as part of the Wolfpack has placed herself as one of the most prolific student athletes in school history. “I had dreams of playing in the ACC since I was little,” Kastanek said. “[Head coach Kellie Harper] made it seem like this is the place to be. I came out, and the rest is history.” The 2012 Atlantic Coast Conference’s Scholar Athlete of the Year is currently tied with Sharon Manning for 10th in school history with 1,569 career points and is two three-point baskets away from tying Tammy Gibson, who currently sits in second with 230 career treys. This season, Kastanek is averaging 13 points and four rebounds per game as well as shooting 80.5 percent at the free throw line in her career, the ACC’s 19th best of all time. Despite these statistics and records, Kastanek believes her best accomplishments come f rom her interactions w it h those who support the team. “One of the biggest impacts I am going to have here at State is my connection with the fans,” Kastanek said. “To be that liaison between the team and the fans is one of my greatest accomplishments.” Her success and achievements

SALVATION continued page 7

KASTANEK continued page 7

SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Women’s soccer spring schedule announced

RYAN PARRY/TECHNICIAN

Freshman forward T.J. Warren shoots a jump shot against North Carolina game Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013. Warren had 19 points in the Wolfpack’s 91-83 win at the PNC Arena.

N.C. State women’s soccer head coach Tim Santoro announced Wednesday that the team will pay six matches during its 2013 spring schedule. The Wolfpack will play its first match Saturday, Feb. 23 versus UNCGreensboro at Dail Soccer Field at 2 p.m. 

After its opening match, State will host High Point at home Saturday, March 16 at 2 p.m., followed by two more home matches against UNCWilmington and East Carolina Saturday, March 23 with the round robin starting at noon, from Dail Soccer Field.

N.C. State will wrap up the spring slate versus Wake Forest at 11 a.m. and High Point at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 14 at the BB&T Soccer Complex in WinstonSalem, N.C. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

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Thursday WOMEN’S BASKETBALL V. MIAMI Reynolds Coliseum, 7 p.m. TRACK AT ACC INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS Blacksburg, Va., All Day SWIMMING AND DIVING AT WOMEN’S ACC CHAMPIONSHIPS/ MEN’S DIVING Greensboro, N.C., All Day Friday SOFTBALL AT KENNESAW STATE TOURNAMENT Woodstock, Ga., 10 a.m./3 p.m. BASEBALL V. VILLANOVA Doak Park, 3 p.m. WOMEN’S TENNIS V. WINTHROP J.W. Isenhour Tennis Center, 4 p.m. WOMEN’S GYMNASTICS V. NORTH CAROLINA Chapel Hill, N.C., 7 p.m. RIFLE AT GREAT AMERICAN RIFLE CONFERENCE CHAMPIONSHIPS Oxford, Miss., All Day SWIMMING AND DIVING AT WOMEN’S ACC CHAMPIONSHIPS/ MEN’S DIVING Greensboro, N.C., All Day TRACK AT ACC INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS Blacksburg, Va., All Day Saturday SOFTBALL AT KENNESAW STATE TOURNAMENT Woodstock, Ga., 10 a.m./12:30 p.m. MEN’S TENNIS V. UNC-WILMINGTON J.W. Isenhour Tennis Center, noon BASEBALL V. WAGNER COLLEGE Doak Field, noon

Pack’s time for salvation Rob McLamb Staff Writer

It is remarkable how often people easily hold others to a higher standard that they are willing to adhere to themselves. Over the years, N.C. State has often been the source of ridicule and scorn – with much of it deriving from those affiliated with or who merely choose to support UNC-Chapel Hill. The day after this past Christmas, Tar Heel Monthly publisher Adam Lucas was kind enough to tweet, unsolicited, about how N.C. State being ranked higher than Carolina nationally had only occurred 7.7 percent of the time since basketball head coach Roy Williams took the job.

The tweet from Lucas came days after the Martin Report was released, detailing how UNC-Chapel Hill athletes were taking bogus classes since 1997, six full years before Williams accepted the job – which means Williams’ teams have had an unfair advantage over State during his entire tenure. To be fair, a single tweet on Twitter must consist of no more than 140 characters, but it is stark and telling which facts Tar Heel administrators and supporters, or enablers, typically choose to omit. That was not the first time someone affiliated with the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill has in some fashion made statements or issued tweets belittling others while having delusions of grandeur as to the greatness of their school. It has

WRESTLING

Wrestling drops home finale Nolan Evans and Ty Prentice Deputy Sports Editor and Staff Writer

The N.C. State wrestling team dropped its last home meet of the season against Atlantic Coast Conference rival Duke Wednesday evening. After falling behind early by losing its first four individual matches, the Wolfpack was down but not out as it put up a fight late in the meet to build some momentum going into the ACC Championships. The Pack’s first win in the meet came from freshman Mike Kosoy over Duke junior Brian Self. Kosoy started off quick, getting a takedown during the first period that put N.C. State up 2-1 after a one point escape by Duke. Kosoy escaped for one more point in the second period, Duke escaped a hold and then Kosoy finished off his opponent with the takedown to win his match 5-3. At the intermission, Duke held a 13-2 two advantage over State following a single point deduction from each side for unsportsmanlike conduct. Junior Joe DeAngelo came out of the intermission for the Pack and grabbed a 12-3 major decision over sophomore Tanner Hough at 125. The two teams then exchanged shutout decisions. The first featured Duke’s No. 27 redshirt sophomore Brandon Gambucci taking a 5-0 victory over State freshman Sam Speno. NCSU freshman Tyler Hunt then pulled the Pack back within

RYAN PARRY/TECHNICIAN

Head coach Pat Popolizio watches as freshman Tyler Hunt is held against the mat against Duke Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2013. Hunt wrestled in the 141 weight class in the Wolfpack’s 22-9 loss to the Blue Devils at Reynolds Coliseum.

seven points by pulling out a 6-0 decision at 141. Following the big wins from Hunt and DeAngelo, sophomore Thomas Gantt and junior Matt Nereim each fought valiantly in an attempt to pull the Wolfpack back into the meet, but they came up short. Gantt dropped his match by an 8-4 count to Duke redshirt freshman Marcus Cain and Nereim came up just shy of the victory, losing 11-10 to redshirt sophomore Immanuel KerrBrown. “It was just an overall disappointing performance,” head coach Pat Popolizio said. “It was just a plain lack of effort, an unwillingness to

keep pushing forward and to not finish our matches.” With the ACC Championships just a few weeks away, the team is looking to improve in order to make a statement. “This is a young team,” Popolizio said. “Nobody on it has ever faced adversity like this before. It doesn’t help that there aren’t any seniors to help lift up some of the young spirits to work hard for the up and coming ACC tournament.” As Popolizio stated, the Wolfpack is an extremely young team. With ten true freshmen, three red-shirt freshmen and five sophomores, this team has plenty of time to develop

and grow as these next three to four years progress. “Certain individuals are certainly heading in the right direction,” Popolizio said. “The attitude will be different day to day as this new staff gets to know the team better… This has been a unique year, not just for the wrestlers, but for myself and the staff as well. I look forward to getting to know the team more as we keep looking to progress and improve together.” With the loss, the Pack falls 5-6 (0-5 ACC) on the season and will return to action March 9 at the 2013 ACC Championships in College Park, Md.

Technician - February 21, 2013  

Roll Pack? Not without a struggle

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