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TECHNICIAN          

Stude n contr ts weigh ol wit in on h Pac gun k Poll

2nd best place to work Sara Awad Staff Writer

Imagine going to work where you get to meet Robert Downey Jr. and Gwyneth Paltrow, managers value you and you feel like you are on a college campus. For people working at SAS, a software company started in Cary by N.C. State faculty member Anthony James Barr and SAS CEO and N.C. State alum Jim Goodnight, this is reality. Senior in business administration Virginia Webb said she chose to intern at SAS because she heard it was “the biggest information technology company in the world.” Her statement comes as Fortune Magazine ranked SAS as the second best place to work in the U.S. for 2012. Google currently holds the top spot, but SAS held the number one spot in 2010 and 2011. Employee satisfaction hailed from a number of factors that included the people, amenities and

SAS continued page 2

A recently conducted poll shows Democrats, 73 percent students do not want to ban semi- of who support it. automatic weapons nationwide. Although most stuAccording to the Pack Poll, a dents oppose a nationwide semi-annual representative survey gun ban, most were not in of N.C. State undergraduates, 57 favor of having guns around percent of N.C. on ca mpus. State students Twenty-nine oppose a napercent of stutionwide semidents strongly automatic gun oppose the idea ban. of having a conThis is relacea led carr y tively consispolicy on camtent with the pus while only 17 data found by percent strongly the Gallup Poll, support it. which showed Partisanship Alex Dowcett, a junior in that 51 percent again had a sigenvironmental engineering of Americans nificant impact are not in favor on opinions in of a semi-automatic gun ban. Sta- this poll. Eighty-three percent of tistically, men are more likely to op- Democrats oppose concealed carry pose the ban while women are more on campus, a greater percentage likely to support it. Republicans than the 63 percent of Republicans oppose the ban more often than who oppose such a policy.

“Having increased access to guns ... [when] the most minor incidents can become volatile especially scares me.”

asketball is like a presidential election: you can win all the individual statistics — i.e., the popular vote — and still come up short.

See page 5.

gun ban

29%

of students strongly opposed the idea of having a concealed carry policy on campus

17%

of students strongly support a concealed carry policy on campus

83%

of Democrats oppose concealed carry

63&

of Republicans oppose concealed carry

Out of the timeout, Miami guard Shane Larkin pushed up a contested lay-up that hit rim and missed, but Johnson was there for the put-back with only .8 seconds left on the clock. Johnson’s basket put Miami up by one point. Freshman guard Rodney Purvis’ three-quarter court desperation shot hit rim but bounced out as the buzzer sounded to end the game. Head coach Mark Gottfried emphasized how proud he was of his team’s resilience in a loss that’s hard to swallow. “That’s a heartbreaker,” Gottfried said. “I thought we played extremely hard and never quit. I’m disappointed, but at the same time, I’m proud of our effort. ” With Brown sidelined by an ankle injury sustained in last Tuesday’s game against Virginia, Gottfried’s

Wolfpack Women defeat Demon Decons See page 8.

COURTESY OF CATAWBA COUNTY SHERRIF’S DEPARTMENT

Politics were not the only factor that appeared to have an impact on students’ opinions. Other factors that may have played a role in shaping opinions included students’ upbringing. Students whose parents own a gun are twice as likely to support concealed carry on campus as students whose parents do not. The Pack Poll gathered these statistics from an online survey conducted Jan. 28-29, in which about 26,000 students were emailed questions about their opinions on

gun laws. Of the 26,000 who were contacted, 891, or 34 percent, responded. According to Jake LaRoe, a researcher at the Pack Poll, this is a high response rate compared to the 9 percent response rate normally seen in industry polls, which can likely be attributed to the brevity of the survey and the exclusiveness of the network of survey recipients.

GUNS continued page 2

AP credits may become a thing of the past Jessica Hatcher Staff Writer

job was sure to be a challenge. Operating a limited seven-man rotation, Gottfried elected to start junior center Jordan Vandenberg in place of junior forward C.J. Leslie. The decision was likely made to rest Leslie for the end of the game. Vandenberg, who made his first career start as a member of the Wolfpack, played only seven total minutes and registered one block and a steal. Purvis started the game at point guard, flanked by �freshman forward T.J. Warren and senior guard Scott Wood. As the game played out, Purvis shifted to wing, and Lewis assumed point guard duties. The game was defined by spurts by both teams. Coming out with tenacious defense and physical frontcourt play, the Hurricanes found an early rhythm, jumping out to an 11-7 lead at the first media timeout.

MIAMI continued page 8

inside technician High cotton ties redefine style

2013

SOURCE: PACK POLL

STORY BY WILL RAYNOR | PHOTO BY JOHN JOYNER

No. 19 N.C. State outrebounded, outshot and was more efficient in every imaginable category than No. 14 Miami Saturday. The only statistic it was bested in happens to be the only one that matters — �the final score. State lost against Miami, 79-78, Saturday afternoon in PNC Arena. State played the game without junior starting point guard Lorenzo Brown. Miami forward Reggie Johnson converted a last-second tipin as the Hurricanes handed State its first home loss of the season. With 47 seconds left and the score 78-77 in the Wolfpack’s favor, Miami gained possession after freshman guard Tyler Lewis missed a jumper in the lane. After the Hurricanes got the rebound, they immediately called timeout with 10.9 seconds remaining.

4

BY THE NUMBERS NCSU student oppose a 57% ofnationwide semi-automatic

STORY BY TIM GORSKI | GRAPHIC BY TREY FERGUSON

Pack Loses at PNC

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Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

SAS named

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More than 2,400 incoming freshmen received course credit from Advanced Placement classes this fall, according to registration and records. However, many institutions are modifying their policies considering AP classes. Dartmouth College recently announced it will no longer accept AP credits towards graduation, effective 2018. Hakan Tell is a classics professor and chairman of Darthmouth College’s Committee on Instruction. “The concern that we have is that increasingly, AP has been seen as equivalent to a collegelevel course, and it really isn’t, in our [the college’s] opinion,” Tell said in an interview with NPR. Jim Martin, professor of chemistry and a representative for the Wake County Board of Education, agrees. Martin explained that colleges are straying away from providing AP credit because AP courses are becoming centered around test preparation more than the actual learning process. “I see that a significant amount of AP is teaching people to pass the AP test,” Martin said. Kristin Stroud, a sophomore majoring in fashion and textile brand management, affirms this notion. “I do not feel like I gained the same quality of education [in AP classes] because we simply aim towards passing a test rather than learning true fundamentals and material,” Stroud said. Preparing for standardized exams encourages students to focus solely on recognition based learning, Martin said, adding that this is problematic because it is not practical in real-life situations. “The way I teach reflects the way my life is as a chemist. When I’m working, I don’t get answers

to choose between,” Martin said. Martin said he finds students in his higher level chemistry courses who have received credit for a prerequisite through AP credits perform at a much lower rate compared to those who took the prerequisite courses at the University. “People who have been trained with the standardized form of learning get a culture shock,” Martin said. Martin said high schools should require more intensive and challenging classes that teach fundamental skills such as critical thinking, independent learning and problem solving rather than merely passing a test. Stroud said she feels like she gets more of an education from her courses now. “I think AP classes had more ‘busy-work’ and were far more time-consuming than my classes now. I feel like my classes now provide me an ample amount of time to study and actually learn the material rather than simply memorize it for a test,” Stroud said. According to Martin, AP classes can be helpful for students. “However, there’s a difference between a class being helpful and being substituted for college credit,” Martin said. Another problem with AP classes is that they discourage students from taking other enriching classes. “I see this as a member of the Board of Education; there are a lot of students who take AP courses because of the impact they have on a weighted GPA,” Martin said. Martin asserts this discourages students from taking other courses that broaden their experience. “I always encourage students to take as many drama classes as they can; you might not need to perform a drama in career, but you need the communication and presentation skills that a drama class might teach you,” Martin said. Martin said he does not think

CREDIT continued page 3


Page 2

PAGE 2 • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013

TECHNICIAN CAMPUS CALENDAR

THROUGH CADIE’S LENS

POLICE BLOTTER

February 2013

Thursday 11:38 A.M. | SUSPICIOUS INCIDENT Holladay Hall Employee reported suspicious incident. Investigation ongoing. 1:28 P.M. | HIT & RUN Lee Hall Employee reported parked vehicle had been struck by unknown vehicle.

WEATHER WISE

50/37 Mostly Cloudy

Tomorrow: Today:

60 37

Partly Cloudy

Wednesday:

60 35 Sunny SOURCE: WWW.WEATHER.COM

Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copy edit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday through Thursday 09:00 AM to midnight and Friday, 09:00 AM to 04:00 PM, or e-mail Editor-in-Chief Mark Herring at editor@ technicianonline.com

ON THE WEB See exclusive audio/photo slideshows. Answer the online poll. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline.com. Check it out!

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Wednesday ENGINEERING CAREER FAIR McKimmon Center, 9:30 a.m to 4 p.m.

Broken gate on Dan Allen Dr. PHOTO BY CADIE WOOTEN

AUDITIONS FOR THE HEIDI CHRONICLES Thompson Hall - Titmus Theatre, 7 p.m.

T

he Dan Allen Gate has already been broken. Friday afternoon, Feb. 1, 2013, a motorist pushed through the Dan Allen traffic gate on the way to Western Blvd., temporarily taking the gate out of commision. Buses and facilities operations vehicles had to inch by in order to pass through before the gate was eventually removed and then repaired.

SAS

continued from page 1

the flexibility. According to SAS’s website, the core of these factors goes back to Goodnight’s philosophy, which refers to the company’s employees as “creative capital.” “It’s my job to maintain a work environment that keeps those people coming back every morning,” Goodnight said in an article on Harvard Business Review featured on SAS’s website. According to a WRAL Tech Wire article, Goodnight’s innovation resulted in a 3.3 percent employee turnover rate and record profits. Webb said the best part of her internship was the people, who still visit her at the restaurant where she currently works. Former N.C. State and UNC-Asheville student Jordan Dorsett, who graduated from Greensboro College in 2009, worked at SAS for two years, first as a summer camp counselor and then as a recreation and program coordinator. He said SAS is a “tight-knit community.” “People hang out with each other in a laid-back atmosphere,” Dorsett

GUNS

continued from page 1

GET INVOLVED IN TECHNICIAN

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AUDITIONS FOR THE HEIDI CHRONICLES Thompson Hall - Titmus Theatre, 7 p.m.

3:16 P.M. | FIRE ALARM EB III FP reponded to alarm caused by error in sensor system.

Friday 3:34 A.M. | B&E - BUILDING Bragaw Hall Student reported unsecured room had been entered and items and money taken.

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Tuesday BEYOND THE CONCEPT: TECHNOLOGIES AND INCLASS ACTIVITIES FOR FLIPPING THE CLASS D.H. Hill East Wing, 12 to 1 p.m.

2:44 P.M. | ASSAULT Carmichael Gym Staff reported student had struck another student requiring medical attention. Subject was arrested and referred to the university.

7:34 P.M. | CONCERNED BEHAVIOR Public Safety Center Officers initiated concerned behavior investigation regarding student. Contact was made with on-call counselor and student was issued welfare referral. 8:34 P.M. | HIT & RUN Morrill Drive Student reported cehicle had been struck by vehicle that left the scene. Officers identified student as owner of vehicle. Investigation ongoing.

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Monday AUDITION ORIENTATION FOR THE HEIDI CHRONICLES, A PLAY WITH UNIVERSITY THEATRE Thompson Hall, 6 p.m.

8:04 A.M. | SUSPICIOUS INCIDENT Reynolds Coliseum Employee reported suspicious subject in laundry facility.

4:38 P.M. | ASSIST PERSON University Plaza Officers attempted to conduct welfare check on student but were unable to locate. Counseling Center staff reported student had been located.

Su

The recent gun control policy debate prompted the questions on the Pack Poll and is the topic of legislation in the North Carolina Senate. According to The News and Observer, a bill was introduced Thursday, Jan. 31, which will allow teachers to possess guns on campus if passed. Alex Dowcett, a junior in environmental engineering and Democrat who participated in the survey, said he does not want to see a concealed carry policy on campus. “A large part of me says that there is no reason why a technologically advanced society should allow an object that has the one and only use of taking another person’s

said. Junior in statistics and computer science Bethany Vohlers has worked at the company for three years. “My father and brother work there, so it feels like one big family,” Vohlers said. “I get my hair done out there, go to the gym and see people I’ve known since I was little.” Even Student Body President Andy Walsh works at SAS, following in the footsteps of his mother and father who also work for the company. “Getting to work in such a positive SAS environment – where one is given the tools to be intellectually challenged and stimulated – has had an impact on how I perform my duties at N.C. State,” Walsh said in a blog by SAS communications specialist Shannon Heath. SAS also offers many amenities to employees. “It’s almost like a big college campus,” Dorsett said. According to Dorsett, SAS employees have a card similar to the Wolfpack One card, which they can swipe to deduct the money they use on SAS’s services from their paychecks. “Where I see SAS most emulating a college setting is through the technology found on both campuses,” Walsh said in Heath’s blog.

Webb said she also enjoyed seeing famous movie starts when Iron Man III filming took place in her building. “I got to meet Robert Downey Jr. and Gwyneth Paltrow,” Webb said. According to Dorsett, SAS operates under flexible conditions as well; some employees come in early to go to the gym and then return to their office. Dorsett said he only worked Tuesdays through Fridays, equating to a 35hour workweek. “You work 35 hours, but you get paid like you are working 40,” Dorsett said. Dorsett said the only reason he left his job at SAS was because he preferred collegiate athletics rather than recreation and fitness. Dorsett now works as a marketing assistant for the University’s athletic department. “However, for analytics and computer science, SAS is the best place to be,” Dorsett said. SAS was unable to give Technician statistics regarding the number of N.C. State students employed by the company in time for publication. According to Webb, many N.C. State students working at SAS have family or friend connections. Dorsett said SAS vice president of human resources Jenn Mann was a family friend.

life,” Dowcett said. “Having lotte said. “The students increased access to guns in a I have spoken to are not day and age where the most convinced that this gun minor incidents can become ban won’t affect their abilvolatile especially scares me. ity to hunt, and I believe For example, a scuff le at a we are a student body that State tailgate in 2004 ended remains educated with with two people dead and at current events and from least one State student going what I gathered, want our to jail for life. Everyone in- government to place more volved there time and lost somemoney on thing dear mental b e c au s e a health edgun got inucation, volved.” diagnoSome stus e s a nd dent leaders research, were not surnot gun prised about control.” the results Pilotte of the poll. is the Ross Pilotte, junior in fisheries and Ross Pilotte, president wildlife sciences a junior in of the fisheries and Univerwildlife sciences, opposed a sity’s chapter of Students nation-wide ban on semi- for Concealed Carry on automatic weapons. Campus, an organiza“We’re a huge agricultural tion that advocates for a school, a huge wildlife school. concealed carry policy on A lot of us are hunters,” Pi- campus.

“We’re a huge agricultural school, a huge wildlife school. A lot of us are hunters.”

Thursday LEGAL ISSUES IMPACTING ONLINE INSTRUCTION PART 1: FERPA AND ACCESSIBILITY D.H. Hill Assembly Room, 12 to 1:30 p.m.

SAS ON-SITE AMENTITIES

• • • • • • • • • • • •

STUDENT SHORT FILM SHOWCASE D.H. Hill Auditorium, 7 p.m. to 12 a.m.

recreational areas daycare medical care book exchange hair salon car detailing dry cleaning massage therapy nail salon racquet stringing skin care services UPS - personal shipping

WRECK IT RALPH Witherspoon Student Cinema, 7 to 8:30 p.m.

SOURCE: SAS

According to Webb, managers also associate with a lot of the University’s organizations, like Alpha Kappa Psi, with whom Webb is a member. Webb and Vohlers said they would love to work at SAS as full-time employees after graduation. According to Webb, 60 percent of SAS interns get rehired. “I didn’t just do busy work during my internship and they treated me like a real employee,” Vohlers said. “I learned a lot of how software products get from point A to point B,” Webb said. “I actually got to be in the business world and see how it works.”

{

GAMEWATCH: NC STATE VS. DUKE - FREE Witherspoon Student Cinema, 8:45 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Friday WRECK IT RALPH Witherspoon Student Cinema, 7 to 8:30 p.m. SINISTER Witherspoon Student Cinema, 9:30 to 11:30 p.m. WRECK IT RALPH Witherspoon Student Cinema, 11:59 p.m. Saturday VITA TAX INCOME TAX ASSISTANCE Nelson Hall labs - basement level, All Day KRISPY KREME CHALLENGE Bell Tower, 8:30 to 10:30a.m. FOSS FAIR 2013 EB II Rooms 2216, 3211, & 3300, 9 a.m. COLLEGE OF TEXTILES OPEN HOUSE College of Textiles Convocation Center, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. WRECK IT RALPH Witherspoon Student Cinema 7 ro 8:30 p.m.

IN YOUR WORDS

}

Who do you want to speak at Commencement? BY KELSEY BEAL

“Paulina Yarborough” Vijayalakshmu Kasi junior, accounting

“Zach Galifianakis” Alex Pomeroy sophomore, chemical engineering

“Stephen Colbert”

“Bo Burnham”

Emma Thorpe freshman, mathematics

Megan Lomonaco freshman, nuclear engineering


News

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 3 • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013

Student run company empowers orphans Tim Gorski

sold by RESQD, 25 percent of the profits are sent to its executive partner Loving Orphans Global, an organization which maintains orphanages in impoverished areas in Uganda, Indonesia, Haiti and Burma, among many others. The remaining 75 percent of the profit is reinvested in the company so it will be able to sustain operating and supply costs. The company is currently in its research and development phase and has just produced its first shirt, with help in part by a child named Jefry. Jefry lives in an orphanage in Bali, a province in the country of Indonesia. The shirt features

Staff writer

A small group of N.C State students has started a for-profit company that is empowering orphans everywhere. Founded by Owen Jordan, a junior majoring in environmental science, and Tasso von Windheim, a junior majoring in materials science and engineering, RESQD is a for-profit company that is using drawings from orphans as graphics on apparel which will help to help feed, educate and care for the areas in which these tiny artists live. For every item of clothing

Jefry’s drawing of a house raising campaign. next to a mountain and a long Jordan said RESQD has windy road. RESQD is also a goal of $4,500, which it in the process of unveiling intends to meet by Tuesit s second day, March shirt, “prin5. This cess Kenti,” amount will designed be used to by another cover shipchild named pi ng s up Kenti, an orplies, licensphan from i ng c o s t s , the same 90 “Jef r y ” tribe as Jefry and “Kenti” Matthew Konar, in Bali. shirts, webfounder of groundworkk I n order site creation for RESQD and mainto be able to produce the tenance fees, among others shirts at an adequate rate, things. the company needs to sucJordan said it took him five cessfully complete its fund- years to find a way he could

“Owen and Tasso are such go getters, their business model is impressive...”

provide help to other people. One year ago he found his calling when he met two employees of Loving Orphan Global while on a trip in California. The puzzle came together at a Student Network meeting for the N.C. State Entrepreneurship Initiative when he met Von Windheim, co-founder and president of operations, as well as Kristen Bloch, who now serves as their president of media. They were both sold by the idea and hit the ground running. RESQD received its largest donation in December through a local micro-funding initiative called ground-

workk. Founded by �Matthew Konar, an alum of both the N.C. State Colleges of Engineering (1997) and Design (2001), groundworkk invites the community to provide its time and charity to new startups. Through groundworkk, RESQD was able to raise a grand total of $315. “Owen and Tasso are such go getters, their business model is impressive, their commitment to giving 25 percent of their proceeds is incredible,” Konar said. “Everything these guys are doing and the distance they’ve come in the short time they’ve been at it has been incredible.”

NCSU AP CREDIT HOURS AWARDED BY CLASS

KATHERINE HOKE/TECHNICIAN

Kate VanVorst, a senior in parks, recreation and tourism management, raffles off a PBR hat at Double Barrel Benefit on Saturday Feb. 2 2013. The two night concert raised money for N.C. State’s radio station WKNC.

KATHERINE HOKE/TECHNICIAN

Spider Bags headline the second night of Double Barrel Benefit on Saturday Feb. 2. This was the tenth anniversary of the benefit concert which raises money for N.C. State’s radio station WKNC.

WKNC boosts budget with Double Barrel Will E. Brooks

Hopscotch 2013. “We recorded the EP really fast, so we want to take our time on this,” Logan said. Jenny Besetzt, a five-piece band from Greensboro, performed shoegaze-inspired rock defined by ambient guitar and synthesizer beneath guttural vocals Friday along with an indie-pop performance by aptly named Lollipops. Members of WKNC gave praise to the bands for their performa nces, ma ny of which gave thanks back. Jason Kutchma of JKutchma and the Five Fifths gave his account of what the station means to him. Kutchma, who blended folk, rock and pop in his headlining performance Friday night, began with a speech. Kutchma said after agonizing attempts distributing his music, he heard himself first on WKNC; it was a moment Kutchma said he wouldn’t forget. “It was so nice that someone out there cared about [my music],” Kutchma said. “I feel like it legitimized me.”

Deputy News Editor

Bands did not have to travel far to show off local talent at WKNC’s Double Barrel Benefit 10 at the Pour House Friday and Saturday nights. The lineup highlighted by Spider Bags and Lilac Shadows of Carrboro, and Oulipo of Raleigh, meshed with folk and indie-rock outfits to produce a homogenous festival. Lilac Shadows’ performance Friday night energized the predominately student crowd, with an energetic presence despite a keyboard malfunction pre-performance. Double Barrel marked Lilac Shadows’ first performance in nearly half a year, and band member Sam Logan said on stage, “It feels good.” “[Double Barrel] was the most fun I’ve had in a long time,” Logan said. Logan felt Lilac Shadows’ most recent EP was quick, if not rushed, and he wanted to take his time writing and recording for a new album that is slated for release near

Kutchma, who sounded something of a southern Bruce Springsteen, said his influences have varied from John Lennon, early Bob Dylan and Springsteen, but that he attempts to keep to a style his own. Against the indie-rock mantra of the weekend, Oulipo, composed partially of N.C. State students, performed eclectic music saturated with synthesizer, voice modulation and technical drumming. Timmy Matthews, guitarist for Oulipo and junior in communications, said the performance may not have been the band’s largest in size, but may have been their most important performance to date. Matthews said he thought the band’s first performance at the Pour House was successful and enjoyable. “I was very impressed with it,” Matthews said. “I thought the crowd was very responsive.” Matthews said the band plans to release a new track in two weeks and is currently

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working on an album for summer release. Headlining the night, Spider Bags, a three-piece group out of Carrboro, made noise with psychstyle punk and alarming stage presence. Nick Murphy, senior in chemical engineering, said he enjoyed the performance for its music and raucous attitude. Murphy said he liked the exciting stage presence given by Spider Bags’ bassist and guitarist. “The singer laid down and played a solo, I just thought that was really punk,” Murphy said. “I liked how the bassist got on the speakers, I thought that really amped people up.” The tenth Double Barrel Benefit brought several flavors of local indie-rock together, proving the music surrounding the Triangle is still a force to be reckoned with.

AP COURSE

AP SCORE

NCSU COURSE

CREDIT AWARDED

US History

3, 4

HI 252

3 hours

US History

5

HI 251 & HI 252

6 hours

Biology

4, 5

BIO 181/181L & BIO 183/183L

8 hours

Chemistry

3

CH 101/102

4 hours

Chemistry

4, 5

CH 101/102 & CH 201/202

8 hours

English Language & Composition

4

Eligible to submitt portfolio

4 hours if awarded credit

English Language & Composition

5

ENG 101

4 hours

Environmental Science

3

MEA 100

3 hours

Environmental Science

4, 5

ES 100 or MEA 100

3/4 hours

European History

3, 4

HI 205

3 hours

European History

5

HI 208 & HI 209

6 hours

US Government

3, 4, 5

PS 201

3 hours

Calculus AB

3

MA 141 upon passing MA 241

3 hours

Calculus AB*

4, 5

MA 141 or MA 131 4/3 hours

Calculus BC

2

MA 141 upon passing MA 241

Calculus BC

3

MA 141, MA 241 4/8 hours up on p assing MA 242

Calculus BC

4, 5

MA 141/ 241 OR MA 131/231

8 hours

Physics B

3, 4, 5

PY 205 upon passing PY 208 OR PY 211/212

4/8 hours

Physics C: Mechanics

3, 4, 5

PY 205

4 hours

Physics C: Electricity & Magnetism

3, 4, 5

PY 208

4 hours

Psychology

3, 4, 5

PSY 200

3 hours

Statistics

3, 4, 5

ST 301 upon passing ST 302, or ST 311 (nonstatistics majors)

3 hours

4 hours

SOURCE: OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS

CREDIT

continued from page 1

the University will stop taking credit altogether, but he expects it will take more care as to whether or not the credit will stand in place of a prerequisite. “At this time, we have no plans to change our policies regarding thresholds for ex-

emption from English 101 or eligibility for portfolio submission based on scores on the AP Language and Composition test or our thresholds for other exams,” Bridget Kozlow, associate director of undergraduate student support in the First-Year Writing Program, said.


Features LIFE & STYLE

PAGE 4 • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013

TECHNICIAN

Crossing oceans for a cause Emma Cathell

too.” The third option, Drifting Angels Orphanage, is what While studying abroad, caught her eye. students get to travel some“I really wanted to live at where different, see other cul- the orphanage and play with tures and meet new people. the kids,” Wilson said. “I Sometimes these trips even ended up doing a lot of Engchange their lives. lish and math teaching while For Genelle Wilson, a se- I was there.” nior in international studies The transition from an with an African concentra- American to an African lifetion, a study abroad expe- style was drastic. rience in Africa did this “It was very difficult at first two-fold — for her and the for me,” Wilson said. “I’d say orphaned children she cared the first week and a half were for during her time there. so hard because the condiWilson had always been tions are very poor. The chilattracted to the often over- dren sleep on concrete floors looked continent. Accord- and they have very thin straw ing to Wilson, the wildlife, mats where they sleep.” animals and people made Besides the children’s sleepher decision easy when it ing arrangements, Wilson came time to choose a study was also exposed to how the abroad location. The Ghana, 35 children in the orphanTogo and Benin summer pro- age lived. There are many gram seemed like the perfect instances where they only fit for her. What she did not eat once a day. Furthermore, know, though, was what she the living conditions are not was going to do after the pro- very clean. Similar to other gram ended. Africans, those who live at “My mom told me, ‘Well, the orphanage shower with it’s only for a month. Don’t only a bucket. Whenever a go home. Stay in Africa for a child wets their mat or gets second month because you sick on their mat, the most can’t get a job for only half a the volunteers can do is hose summer anyways,’” Wilson it off. said. “It was very overwhelming Summer 2010 was sound- to accept the conditions they ing better and better to Wil- were living in and to not be son, especially after she fig- constantly upset by it, but it ured out what she was going was so easy to fall in love with to do after her trip. them immediately,” Wilson “I looked said. “That on G oog le was the best a nd fou nd part of it. an organizaI immedition ca l led ately fell in Vo l t a A i d love with 35 that looked kids, and I trustworthy,” am so grateWilson said. ful for that. “You could They were volunteer at the part a hospital if that made you had medit all worthical training, while.” y ou c ou l d Wilson volunteer at a also noted Genelle Wilson, senior in school if you how differinternational studies had teaching ent the chilexperience, dren at the or you could volunteer at orphanage were than how she an orphanage and live there expected them to be. Staff Writer

“These kids completely changed my worldview and helped me realize what I was passionate about.”

JOANNAH IRVIN/TECHNICIAN

Gennelle Wilson, a senior in international studies, studied abroad in Ghana in the summer and worked with a local orphanage. She returned the next summer with approximately $3,000 in donations for the orphanage. “The hardest part for me was to see the poverty”, Wilson said “I thought I knew poverty and then lived with 30 kids for two months”.

“These children in Ghana just gravitate toward you and immediately love you,” Wilson said. “They’re so sweet and gentle and just want to get to know who you are.” The number one cause of death in Ghana is malaria. In fact, children in Ghana get malaria like the common cold in America. “Sometimes, it would be three of four days before the child would go to the hospital because the people who ran the orphanage didn’t have the money and wanted to wait some time to be sure,” Wilson said. “So a kid would

have a 103-degree fever for three days.” It was hard for Wilson to see that happen to the children, and she ended up advocating for a child who was sick to go to the doctor right away and paid for their visit. “A week into my experience, I felt like I wasn’t giving the children enough in comparison to how much they were changing my life,” Wilson said. That was the mindset that inspired Wilson to do something for the children. She created a project called “A Bed For An Angel,” which

raises money to give all the children mosquito nets and bunk beds. She started the project the following September, and by sending out emails to her family and friends, letters to churches and talking with people at N.C. State, she had raised enough money four months later. In January 2011, Wilson made $3,000 for her project. In the summer of 2011, she returned to Ghana again. “My goal kind of changed when I got back to Ghana [and spoke with Volta Aid],” Wilson said. “I realized they needed health insurance first

and foremost, so that there would never be an excuse for them to go to the hospital when they got sick. And secondly, that they needed multivitamins every day.” Childhood is the most important time for people to get the nutrients they need. These orphans were not getting enough because of their eating habits, and these vitamins help with that. “It was so important that I went back [to Ghana] with an open mind,” Wilson said. “I told people that I was roughly going to buy just mosquito nets and bunk beds, but the real purchase that meant so much was the health insurance and the multivitamins. That’s what I’m most proud about because bunk beds can break and malaria nets can rip, but the health insurance is guaranteeing their future more.” All of her purchases were made in Ghana to help the local economy. With the remainder of the money, Wilson created a fund for future volunteers to add to so that the children can continue to get more. “I think the children were very grateful,” Wilson said. “I think the older children knew what was going on, but I never said, ‘This is from Nellie. You’re welcome.’ It was just giving it to them that mattered and getting to see how happy they were when they got [it all].” According to Wilson, her time in Africa is not one that will ever be forgotten. She said her experiences modified the way she lives her life and completely turned her world upside-down. “I think that when you see poverty like I did, there’s no turning back or forgetting it,” Wilson said. “These kids completely changed my worldview and helped me realize what I was passionate about, which is helping people. And now, when I see struggle is when I realize how beautiful life is.

GLBT center conducts follow-up survey Taylor Quinn Staff Writer

Ten years ago, when the GLBT Center was just getting ready to open its doors at N.C. State, a survey was conducted among the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community gauging the climate of equality within the University. Now the center is conducting the survey again to see how things have changed and if the full equality of treatment is in sight. Justine Hollingshead, director of the GLBT Center, wanted to conduct this sur-

vey to discover “how to make changes and meet the need of the community,” and added “research and assessment is a need.” This survey is unique to N.C. State but takes elements from national surveys as well as from the survey taken in 2003 that was used in Vice

Provost Lisa Zapata’s dissertation. She is one of the associates responsible for the health and counseling centers who did research gauging climates of the GLBT community. Zapata helped with the planning and analysis of this survey to make sure it would maximize the information they received. The GLBT Center’s administration felt as though it was time to conduct another survey to compare the results to see how, or if, the University has grown as a more inclusive community. “[The survey] is open to

all students, faculty and staff with a graduate student to who are in the GLBT commu- get them credit,” Hollingsnity,” Hollingshead said. head said. “Experience is Aside rare for our from gainfield because ing knowlwe are not in edge about the science the climate or STEM of the GLBT fields.” community, When Hollingst he sur vey head and the Justine Hollingshead, director comes to a of N.C. State GLBT center GLBT Cenclose, Holter are worklingshead ing with a graduate student said she would like to use the in the survey process and are results to gain more knowlgiving them an opportunity edge about the issues that to get class credit. impact the community and “Being able to partner hopes to find ways to address

“I’m hoping to ... see that the climate has improved.”

the issues as the center’s director. “I really don’t have a preconceived notion,” Hollingshead said. “But I’m hoping to be able to compare the results on the other survey and hope to see that the climate has improved.” This survey is taking place through Feb. 14 and can be found on the GLBT Center’s website. The survey takes approximately twenty minutes to complete and should be answered as honestly as possible.

Technician was there. You can be too. The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information.


Features LIFE & STYLE

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 5 • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013

Amina’s Cafe combines student staples Nicky Vaught Deputy News Editor

To those who have ever craved Mediterranean cuisine and frozen treats at the same time, Hillsborough Street may finally have the place for you. Abbes Khelfa opened Amina’s Cafe, 2508 Hillsborough St., at the beginning of the year and runs the cafe independently, �primarily to sell frozen yogurt. On one side of the cafe, Khelfa sells Mediterranean dishes, such as panini, gyro and kabobs; on the other, frozen yogurt and ice cream. According to Khelfa, frozen yogurt and Mediterranean food pair well and both harbor certain health benefits, so he decided to sell them together. With students and faculty as his most frequent customers, Khelfa focuses mostly on selling to students as he has the most experience selling to them. Prior to relocating to the Raleigh area, Khelfa and a partner owned and operated Angora, a frozen yogurt shop near Boston College and Boston University. After its initial success, Khelfa and his partner expanded, turning Angora into a three-store chain.

JOANNAH IRVIN/TECHNICIAN

Stacks of toppings line the walls of Amina’s Cafe, a frozen yogurt and mediterranean cafe, on Tuesday. Options available for mixing include Oreo’s, York Peppermint Patties and N.Y. style cheesecake.

“Customers who have spent time in Boston often find out the same man who started Amina’s is the one who started Angora,” Khelfa said. “They get excited.” Khelfa said he hopes Amina’s gains the same kind of popularity. According to Khelfa, people in many states know about Angora. Success in Boston inspired Khelfa to start Amina’s near N.C. State and, as it’s at the center of a fast-paced, rapidly growing city, Khelfa expects to see the same level of opportunity.

Khelfa started Amina’s on his own, leaving his business partner with the three Angora establishments. The man behind Amina’s got into the frozen yogurt business after leaving his business selling ice cream in Algeria. He and his Turkish partner started selling frozen yogurt in 1990. Their shop gained popularity, as it was the only frozen yogurt business in the area. “Nobody sold it, really,” Khelfa said. “I’d seen it around and at the mall, but it’s not the same. [Ours] isn’t

like, you know, the soft serve, it’s different.” Amina’s Cafe joins an impressive lineup of Mediterranean restaurants and frozen yogurt shops on Hillsborough Street. Some students wonder if the cafe will see much success. “There are already so many restaurants like that,” Josh Poole, a junior in mechanical engineering, said. “There’s Jasmin and Freshberry. It’s like Amina’s is a flower seed that got planted after the rest have already grown and it won’t see much light.”

JOANNAH IRVIN/TECHNICIAN

Amina’s Cafe owner, Abbes Khelfa, displays chicken kabobs which is one of the many mediterranean delights on Tuesday. The cafe also serves made to order frozen yogurt combinations. “I am bringing high quality yogurt and fresh mediterranean food,” Khelfa said.

Poole, eating a small bowl of Nutella-f lavored yogurt, said he enjoyed the business for its integration of two popular, healthy food items. “Hopefully people do go to it,” Poole said. “If not a lot

of people, just enough for it to stay in business. It’s a really interesting place and it doesn’t get carried away by its own gimmick.”

High Cotton Ties redefine style Kaitlin Montgomery

O t he r do c tor s of t e n stopped Cameron when he wore the bow ties, but their High Cotton Ties is bring- reactions weren’t as expected. ing a “true southern accent” “They told Cameron he back to Raleigh with the help wasn’t supposed to be wearof one of North Carolina’s ing bow ties,” Hill said. most renowned and historic “There had been a study products — cotton. showing doctors were carJudy Hi l l, ow ner and rying germs from patient founder of High Cotton Ties, to patient on their neckties. was born and bred in Raleigh Cameron explained to them and is no stranger to the tex- that his bow ties were cotton tile talent tucked away in the and washable because that’s capital. the way I had made them.” “I grew up in Raleigh, so by That’s when Hill’s idea took nature I’m a Wolfpack girl,” off. Hill said. “My father was an “When we found out that N.C. State research scientist this had been an issue we refor soil science. I went to N.C. alized that we had stumbled State myself, cleaning bea- upon something,” Hill said. kers in my dad’s lab. It was With people grabbing the ties because I grew up around all out of her hand at Starbucks of the professors at State that when trying to show friends, I was very familiar with the Hill understood that a washtex t i le i nable bowtie dustry.” was someHill’s t h i ng t hat company hadn’t been features 100 seen previpercent ously. homegrown“I had a cotton bow son, James, t ie s a long at C h a p e l with a numHill, he was ber of other t he pre siJudy Hill, owner and founder accessories, dent of his of HIgh Cotton Ties all of which fraternity,” are handmade in North Hill said. “I took at least 100 Carolina. ties and I got eight of the “I’ve always wanted to start boys, sitting them all on this a business that would ben- fraternity bench in the bowefit North Carolina,” Hill ties for a photo shoot. People said. “So when I came back walking by would try to stop to North Carolina five years and buy ties off of the hanger ago after living in Washing- I had with me. By the end of ton, D.C., I started thinking the day we had sold almost about what I could do to ben- all of the ties we had with us. efit my state.” It was a phenomenon; no one Hill attributes the idea for had ever seen a cotton bowtie High Cotton to her oldest before.” son, Cameron, who was in Realizing the product could medical school at the Uni- come solely from the Caroliversity of Virginia when the nas, Hill saw this as her opplans were hatched. portunity to give back to the “He always wore bow ties so state. I figured I’d make him three “From the start we’ve had for Christmas,” Hill said. “I an unwavering mission to had made my own pattern be a true southern company, and when I went to go get making all of our products fabric they didn’t have any here,” Hill said. “It was our silk so I got cotton instead.” mission from the start to emStaff Writer

“We’ve made a commitment ... to my hometown of Raleigh; we’re investing here.”

ploy our neighbors as much as possible.” Alex Peden, a 2012 graduate of N.C. State’s College of Art and Design and a recent hire of High Cotton, explained their passion for employing their neighbors. “One of their main ideas for coming to Raleigh was to pull from the talent at N.C. State and UNC-Chapel Hill,” Peden said. “We’ve gone a step further,” Hill said. “We’ve made a commitment not only to North Carolina, but to my hometown of Raleigh; we’re investing here.” With 150 stores carrying their products, High Cotton is sold all the way from Maine to Texas. It will be in Raleigh, though, that they first open a retail store all their own. “We’ll be able to show our story to folks in hopes that they’ll understand what we’re doing,” Hill said. Elizabeth Hardy, a 2008 graduate of N.C. State’s College of Textiles and a recent hire of High Cotton, has lent a helping hand in their recent growth. “I’m helping with fabric sourcing and developing,” Hardy said. “Two weeks ago I went with Judy [Hill] to pick out the fabric for our new spring collection. I get to use what I’ve learned in New York, where I was for four years after graduating, but here in Raleigh with High Cotton. It’s the perfect combination.” Being one of the two College of Design graduates working at High Cotton, Peden credits a majority of his hire to the College of Design. “I credit my getting this job to the College of Design and my professors there,” Peden said. “There are two people, Kathleen Rieder, assistant professor of Art and Design, and Chandra Cox, head of the department of Art and Design. … They’re the reason

COURTESY OF HIGH COTTON TIES

High Cotton Ties features designs representative of classic Southern style. New products and styles, such as polos and T-shirts, have broadened the company’s repertoire.

I have this job. They set me up for success big time.” According to Hill, it’s this recipe of Hardy, Peden and the homegrown culture of the business that has set High Cotton up for success. “It’s because of the culture, our products are made by people in the south,” Hill said. “We go so far as to use cotton from North Carolina for all of our products. We try not just to make them here but to pick the cotton for most of our products here too.” In the end, according to Hardy, the locality and natural angle High Cotton takes is what makes them and their product so different. “There’s so much product out there,” Hardy said. “Coming from New York I’ve seen how a lot of companies throw food at the wall and see what sticks. They run out of time and they’re trying to please all of their retailers … the product suffers. With the way High Cotton makes every piece, we’re not going to make that same mistake.” High Cotton Ties will have their grand opening with First Friday on March 1 at 19 West Hargett St.

COURTESY OF HIGH COTTON TIES

High Cotton Ties are available and appropriate for any occasion. The line includes everything from traditional stripes to unconventional patterns.

COURTESY OF HIGH COTTON TIES

High Cotton Ties are machine washable and more durable than traditional silk bowties.


focused

PAGE 6 • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013

TECHNICIAN

Who will speak at commencement? C

ommencem e nt i s bot h a n end and a beginning. It is the end of a student’s journey in college, a time to stand with the thousands who shared this journey and to reflect upon it. But it is also the beginning, a time to walk forth

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief. into a new life with the thousands who shared the milieu of the University and studenthood. And to motivate graduates for this passage, universities traditionally invite a commencement speaker to speak on graduation day. Some of the most distinguished members of our society have addressed graduates in universities across the country. Fame isn’t the primary qualification for being a commencement speaker, it is necessary for speakers to have affected the world in a significant way: to have proven that through their own actions,

they can speak meaningfully about contributing to the world. A commencement speaker should be inspirational — graduates should feel like doing things not presented as normal choices in the classroom. In this, the speakers should be realistic idealists. The speakers should also be insightful. They should say something graduates would otherwise not have thought or been advised about during college. It definitely shouldn’t be a 10-minute-long truism. In other words, they should be all that our commencement speaker last year, former N.C.

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY TREY FERGUSON

{CAPS OFF TO FORMER SPEAKERS}

2008 Erskine Bowle s The 2008 UNC-System President

2009 Dr. John Seely Brown Co-Chairman of the Deloitte Center for Edge Innovation

Technician Disapproves

2010 Charlie Rose American television talk show host and jouranlist

State and current San Diego Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers, was not. Rivers told the class of 2012 about the three priorities of his life: faith, family and football. He sermonized about how “if that [football] doesn’t get you fired up, I don’t know what will.” and talked about his hobbies (“golf, fishing, whatever”). This is not what any graduating N.C. State class deserves. Some members of Technician’s editorial staff graduating this May actually say that they would rather go to Duke’s commencement ceremony and listen to Melinda Gates rather than their own. UNC-Chapel Hill impresses this year, featuring AOL co-founder Steve Case. So who is our commencement speaker this year? We won’t know until March. But UNC-CH and Duke found out about theirs in October

and November, respectively. Maybe it’s appropriate why they have speakers that aren’t mediocre … the relevant powers there actually seem to care. It’s not a “big-nameschool” thing. The University of Tennessee at Knoxville in 2010 brought in Al Gore, and last year, NC A&T had Michelle Obama. A commencement address should be a culmination of one’s time at university, not a review of it, and surely not a floundering formality like last year’s. But there was one thing Rivers said that our student government and administration should take to heart. The quarterback looked earnestly at his audience, and then spoke his final words: “Class of 2012, go all the way.” To whoever chooses the commencement speaker, go all the way, and make sure that this year’s commencement stands out to be as memorable and special an occasion as such a culmination merits.

Technician Approves

2011 James Rogers CEO of Duke Energy

Technician’s Top 12 Picks

2012 Philip Rivers San Diego Chargers Quarterback and N.C. State alum

VOTE NOW

TECHNICIANONLINE.COM Cast your vote for your favorite speaker.

OUR COMPILATION OF PEOPLE WHO CAN SPEAK PUBLICLY ABOUT IMPORTANT ISSUES

Cynthia Breazeal

Tom Regan

Morgan Spurlock

Sue Gardner

Barbara Ehrenreich

Neil deGrasse Tyson

Breazeal teaches and researches at MIT and directs the Personal Robotics Group, a lab that designs social robots. She built Kismet, a robot that can convey emotion, and another of her creations, Leonardo, can mimic human expressions. Her expertise pertains not just to technology, but als o to psychology and interpersonal interactions.

Regan, a professor emeritus of N.C. State’s Philosophy Department, is considered the philosophical leader of the modern animal rights movement. His expertise isn’t just limited to vegetarianism: Regan is what Technician considers “a homeboy”: a scholar who has helped put the University on the academic map.

This documentarian from West Virginia made a name for himself with Supersize Me, a movie that exposed obesity and aggressive fast-food marketing in the U.S. Spurlock’s adventurous nature has led him to subject himself to many of the world’s hardships, but his sense of humor and courage handlebar mustache make him quite the storyteller.

Who could graduate from college without the help of Sue Gardner, the executive director of the Wikimedia Foundation, the host of Wikipedia? Gardner’s work with Wiki has not only impacted us as students, but she has expanded the company’s readership and contributor-ship globally.

Ehrenreich made a name for herself after she published Nickel and Dimed in 2001, a book based on her experience living on minimum wage in the United Stated. She considers herself a humanist and refers to her writing as advocacy and activism for social justice.

Tyson is an astrophysicist and a common contributor to NOVA SceinceNow and The Colbert Report for science news. Tyson’s leadership in science education and communication has made him the de facto spokesman for NASA and STEM education.

Marshall Brain

Naomi Wolf

Rajendra K. Pachauri

V.S. Ramachandran

Angela Davis

Cookie Monster

Brain is the founder of HowStuffWorks. Before achieving success as an entrepreneur, author and public speaker, he earned a master’s degree in computer science from N.C. State, and taught in the computer science department here for six years.  

Wolf became the leader of the “third wave of the feminist movement” after her 1991 book, The Beauty Myth. Her works expose chronic societal problems, like sexism and ethnocentrism, but her social criticism is ultimately hopeful and encourages higher social standards.

Since 2002, R.K. Pachauri has been the chairperson of the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007. Perhaps our most eminent alumnus, he received his master’s degree in industrial engineering from N.C. State.

Ramachandran is a neuroscientist who teaches at UC San Diego, and as the director of the Center for Brain and Cognition, he has pioneered research in the physiology of psychology. He is not only a leader in medical research, but social progression and development in India.

An activist and scholar, Angela Davis was at the forefront of the Civil Rights Movement and the Communist Party USA. She taught at UC-Santa Cruz, and has written prolifically on “feminism, African American studies, critical theory, social consciousness and prisons,” among others subjects.

We grew up with Cookie Monster, and the famous character from Sesame Street has taken up vegetables to address childhood obesity. Mr. Monster is a leader in entertainment and Epicureanism, and most importantly, he’s still a better speaker than Philip Rivers.

STUDENT OPINIONS on page 2

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Sports

TECHNICIAN

SWIMMING

PAGE 7 • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013

continued from page 8

est time in school history in the 200-meter breaststroke, nearly breaking the twominute mark and finishing ahead of the rest of the field at 2:00.08. “It’s kind of bittersweet to do it and we still lost,” Matysek said. “It’d really be a lot more fun to do it and contribute to a win, but it’s still pretty cool to ball out and beat some UNC guys and get my name up on that board, hopefully for a while.” Freshman Simonas Bilis, senior Joe Martin, junior Jonathan Boffa and sophomore David Williams won the 200-meter freestyle relay with a time of 1:19.89. In the 400-meter medley relay sophomore Hannah Freyman, sophomore Lauren Poli, junior Zina Grogg and senior Marifrances Henley recorded the third fastest time in school history, completing the event with a time of 3:43.73, just beating out the Tar Heels by .08 for first place. Freshman Payton Schrum set a pool record in the 100yard breaststroke at 1:03.93, good for first place and fifth all time in school history.

MEN’S

continued from page 8

when it left his hand. After a pair of turnovers, Leslie was fouled underneath the basket and went to the line for a one-and-one situation with the score at 78-76, Pack. Leslie missed the front end of his one-and-one and

JOANNAH IRVIN/TECHNICIAN

Freshman swimmer, Haley Tomlinson, swims the butterfly during the 400 yard individual medley against UNC-Chapel Hill on Saturday. The Wolfpack women lost to the Tar Heels with a score of 157-142. The Wolfpack’s final meet will occur at the ACC Championship in Greensboro, Feb 20-23.

“This is the first year that we’ve actually been competitive with [Carolina],” Schrum said. “Now they’re actually scared of us. They were scared coming here. They didn’t know what was going to happen.” Although the team lost the meet, Henley was all smiles after her final competition at N.C. State. “This is my fourth year with the team and this is the closest it’s ever been,” Henley said. “So the fact that my team is moving forward in a

positive way is awesome.” Hannah Hopkins took secThe Wolfpack dominat- ond at 277.80. In three-meed the Tar ter, the two Heels in swimmers diving. State swapped took the top spots as t wo s p ot s Hopkins in women’s scored a one-meter 318.52 and and threeMumma meter scored springboard. 307.50. In one-meThe men Marifrances Henley ter, sophotook first in women’s senior swimmer more Raone-meter chael Mumma took first with and the first three spots in a score of 308.02 and senior three-meter. Senior Hud-

then fouled Miami’s Durand Scott on the other end, who made one of his two free throws.  State got the ball back and Gottfried called a timeout to set up a play for Lewis, who had the hot hand throughout the game. Lewis drove to the basket and pulled up for a 12-footer, but missed. Miami grabbed the rebound

and after a timeout sent the Wolfpack faithful home disappointed. “It all happened so fast,” Leslie said. “It was very similar [to the Maryland game]. It’s just one of those things. ” At the end of the day, Gottfried said the loss does not overshadow the good things he saw from his team. Facing a Miami team that has

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“So the fact that my team is moving forward in a positive way is awesome.”

seemingly run away with the ACC, he felt encouraged by his squad’s perseverance. “If we keep playing hard like that, if we keep competing like that, good things are [going to] happen for our team,” Gottfried said. Despite falling short at the buzzer, Gottfried said he was pleased with his team’s ability to continue fighting. When

Classifieds

son Rains took first in both events with a onemeter score of 366.75 and a three-meter score of 385.95. “It’s been a wild roller coaster today, being a senior and having all this great support here,” Rains said. “It was really, really awesome to do what I did today and perform well in front of this big support.” The Wolfpack will take a break from action for the next few weeks and prepare for the ACC championships. Head coach Braden Holloway is not happy about coming away with a loss but saw a lot of positives that the Pack can take away from the meet and build on for the ACCs. “I think we can do better,” Holloway said. “We had a lot of people step up today. We had some freshmen coming out of the woodworks to show what the future can be like. We can bank this and bring it back out in a month. I was happy overall. We did pretty well today.”

asked about the last play, he kept it simple. “Look, sometimes in sports you have years where you have all those plays go in your favor. Sometimes they don’t,” Gottfried said. “I thought there was a lot of competitive greatness in our team to keep digging.” With the loss, State falls to 16-6 overall, 5-4 in the ACC,

WOMEN’S continued from page 8

State led at the half, 36-24, as the Deacons were held to 33 percent shooting in the opening 20 minutes. Wake Forest responded in the second half and managed to cut the deficit to just two points with 12 minutes remaining in the game when �senior guard Lakevia Boykin, a Raleigh native, completed a three-point play. The Pack, however, was able to shift momentum back in its favor by holding the Deacons scoreless over the next three minutes of play. State held Wake Forest to 15 points for the remainder of the game. “Wake Forest has been very good offensively all season long,” Harper said. “I am really proud of our defensive effort today. I thought that was where this game was won.” N.C. State shot 38.6 percent from the floor, but the Pack was 55.6 percent from three-point range. State outrebounded the Deacons, 4936, for the afternoon. “We did not shoot well in the second half but we did a nice job attacking and getting to the rim,” Harper said. The Wolfpack will return

while the Hurricanes remain undefeated in ACC play with a perfect 8-0 record, 17-3 overall. The Wolfpack’s next game will be against Duke at Cameron Indoor Stadium Thursday night.

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Level: 1 2 3 4

1 2 3 4

FOR RELEASE FEBRUARY 4, 2013

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 1

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Solution to Saturday’s puzzle

2/4/13

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every Technician, as of January 7, 2013,digit has1 to 9. For strategies launched a brand new, fully interactive, on how to solve multimedia website that better caters Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. to you, our readers. The new easy-to-

Solution to Tuesday’s puzzle

2/6/13

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

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ACROSS 1 David Copperfield’s forte 6 High-ranking Indian 10 Like the Sahara 14 Last new Olds 15 Alike, in Lourdes 16 Madcap 17 Main idea, as of an argument 20 “__ Pinafore” 21 Handy bags 22 Inventor Howe 23 Candy in a wrapper 24 WSW’s opposite 25 Stick to a strict budget 32 Beauty parlor 33 Saying to remember 34 Tool for a lumberjack 36 Cultivate the soil 37 Car pedal 38 Needed a BandAid 39 Till now 40 __ fatale 41 Town near the tip of Cape Cod 42 To the point 45 Notes after mis 46 Contents of a cruet 47 Saltwater candy 50 Rested (against) 53 __ Beta Kappa 56 Burnout cause 59 Part of USA: Abbr. 60 Like dedicated fans 61 18th-century Swiss mathematician 62 Goes bad 63 High roller’s rolls 64 Baseball’s Pee Wee DOWN 1 Sitcom set in Korea 2 Homecoming visitor 3 Jeweler’s inventory 4 401(k) alternative, briefly

2/4/13

By Bernice Gordon

5 Have inside 6 Take a break 7 Flu-like symptoms 8 Pokes 9 Three racing Unsers 10 Colorful garden shrub 11 Wife of a 6-Across 12 Ancient Peruvian 13 Turns blue, perhaps 18 Campus residence 19 Like someone pacing back and forth 23 Forehead 24 Rim 25 Comical Soupy 26 Material 27 Cheese city in northeast Italy 28 End of Rhett’s sentence that begins “Frankly, my dear” 29 Like a newborn 30 Relative worth 31 Put forth, as effort 32 Le Carré character

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

Lookin’ for the answer key? VISIT TECHNICIANONLINE.COM

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35 Tokyo’s former name 37 Puts money (on) 38 Songwriter Jacques 40 Wears at the edges 41 Social network for short messages 43 Bids 44 Male offspring 47 Old Russian monarch

2/4/13

48 Prefix with sphere 49 Guitar ridge 50 Volcanic output 51 City west of Tulsa 52 Does some sums 53 Ashen 54 Hurries 55 Legal memo opener 57 Carpentry tool 58 Feel bad about


Sports

COUNTDOWN

• # 3 days until men’s basketball travels to Cameron Indoor Stadium to take on Duke.

INSIDE

• Page 7: Continued coverage of swimming and diving’s meet against North Carolina.

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 8 • MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2013

‘MIAMI’ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

PNC gets rocked by a Hurricane

Wrestling falls to UNC Despite picking up wins at the 157- and 285-pound classes, the Wolfpack fell to North Carolina Friday, 30-6. Junior Matt Nereim picked up the 157-pound win against Chris Mears, 11-8. Freshman Mike Kosoy had the Pack’s second win of the match against Cody Klempay, 6-2. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Pack picks up victories at Hilton Garden Invitational Women’s track and field had wins in the jumps, throws and middle-distance events at the Hilton Garden Invitational Saturday afternoon. Junior Elizabeth Shuman claimed first place in the high jump. Senior Danielle Adams finished second in the event and sophomore Caitlynn Filla recorded her personal-best to finish fourth. Redshirt sophomore Tremanisha Taylor took the shot put’s top spot and junior Kenyetta Iyevbele won the mile run. Redshirt junior Andie Cozzarelli finished behind Iyevbele for second. Freshman Jonathan Addison also finished first in the men’s high jump.

SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

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Thursday WOMEN’S TENNIS V. UNCGREENSBORO J.W. Isenhour Tennis Center, 4 p.m. MEN’S BASKETBALL V. DUKE Durham, N.C., 9 p.m. Friday SOFTBALL AT PANTHER INVITATIONAL Miami, Fla, All Day

Following the timeout, senior forward Richard Howell led an offensive surge for the Wolfpack. Around the 10-minute mark, the Pack leading 25-24, Howell had 11 points while the rest of the team combined for 14. After a technical foul by Johnson on Warren, the crowd at PNC roared to life — and so did junior forward C.J. Leslie. Leslie was yet again the Pack’s top performer, scoring eight points in the final nine minutes of the first half. Leslie finished the game with 18 points and 12 rebounds. Purvis closed the half with an emphatic SportsCenter top10 worthy put-back dunk off a Leslie miss. A confident Wolfpack group went into the locker room ahead, 40-34. The Pack led the Hurricanes in all shooting percentages and rebounds in CHRIS RUPERT/TECHNICIAN the first half.  Head coach Mark Gottfried reflects on his loss to Miami Saturday at PNC Arena. The No. 19 Wolfpack fell to the No. Had the Wolfpack won, the 14 Hurricanes 79-78 after a last second tip-in by Miami’s Reggie Johnson. story of the game would have been Lewis’ breakout perfor- terrific,” Gottfried said. “I couldn’t Lewis said. “Obviously, I didn’t four ACC losses have all come by mance. Lewis, who has seen be any more proud of him. Maybe make the play happen. I didn’t make three points or less. Two of those little playing time this season a positive from this is that we’ve the shot. ” losses have come off last minute because of Lorenzo Brown’s pre- learned he’s ready to go. ” Lewis went on to call Brown the tip-ins by the opposition. eminent level of Lewis added that best point guard in the country. “I think we’re getting better all play, emerged he too was pleased Regardless of the result, Lewis’ the time — the frustrating thing is as the Pack ’s with his perfor- ferocious and fearless play prom- we have four league losses to show unquestionmance. ises good things for the Wolfpack’s for it,” Gottfried said. “It’s a game able leader in “I had to take ad- future at the point guard position. of seconds and inches, and the ball the second half. vantage of my opWith 8:56 left in the game, Miami was perfectly right there, in the right L ew is played portunity,” Lewis retook the lead and went up, 67-62, place.” muc h big ger said. “I thought before Gottfried called timeout. Purvis also weighed in on the than his 5’10” I played a pretty The Hurricanes lead was a product Pack’s struggles down the stretch. Rodney Purvis stature would good overall game.” of their 15-2 run, including 11 unan“We just [have to] find a way to freshman guard suggest, finishBut Lewis was swered points. But Purvis answered finish close games better,” Purvis ing the night his biggest critic the bell with a slashing drive and a said. with 16 points and five assists in regarding the second-to-last play quick three to put State right back He added that he thought his fi36 minutes. of the game. in the game. nal desperation heave had a chance “I thought Tyler [Lewis] “Coach told me to come off a ball The end of the game felt all too stepped up and was terrific, just screen and make a play happen,” familiar for Wolfpack fans, whose MEN’S continued page 7

“We just [have to] find a way to finish close games better.”

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Wolfpack women down Deamon Deacons for third ACC win

MEN’S TENNIS V. ELON J.W. Isenhour Tennis Center, 4 p.m. GYMNASTICS AT MARYLAND College Park, Md., 7 p.m. TRACK AT VIRGINIA TECH ELITE MEET Blacksburg, Va., All Day

Staff Writer

had zero concern with Len’Nique Brown,” head coach Kellie Harper said. “I am very confident with her ability.” Junior center Markeisha Gatling scored 10 points and led the team with nine rebounds. State began the game strong, scoring 13 points before the Demon Deacons made a basket. At the midway point of the first half, State held an 18 point lead with Kastanek accounting for half of the Pack’s points. “We have been working so well as a team lately,” Kastanek said. “We have grown and learned so much from playing that I do not think anyone can throw something at us that we have not seen.”

The N.C. State men’s and women’s swimming and diving teams fell to North Carolina Saturday on Senior Day, the last meet of the regular season, despite breaking multiple pool and school records and several top-10 marks in school history at the Willis R. Casey Natatorium. The No. 22 men’s team fell to the 16th-ranked Tar Heels, 159.50-140.50, while the Wolfpack women lost to No. 14 UNC, 157-142. Freshman Louis Wojciechowski completed the 200-meter freestyle in 1:36.74, N.C. State’s fastest time of the season and the third fastest time in school history. Wojciechowski finished a full second ahead of the next closest swimmer to win the event for the Wolfpack. Another freshman stepped up for the Pack Saturday. Reed Wheeler completed the 100-meter backstroke in just 49.14, good enough for first place and the sixth fastest time in school history. Continuing the trend, freshman Christian McCurdy won the 200-meter breakstroke by setting a new school record at 1:46.92 in the 200-meter butterfly. Junior Jake Matysek grabbed the pool record and the fifth fast-

WOMEN’S continued page 7

SWIMMING continued page 7

Saturday SOFTBALL AT PANTHER INVITATIONAL Miami, Fla., TBA WRESTLING V. MARYLAND Reynolds Coliseum, 5 p.m. TRACK AT TYSON INVITATIONAL Fayetteville, Ark., All Day WOMEN’S TENNIS AT ITA NATIONAL TEAM INDOORS Charlottesville, Va., All Day

TRACK AT HUSKY CLASSIC Seattle, Wash., All Day

JOANNAH IRVIN/TECHNICIAN

Senior guard Marissa Kasttanek works to gain possession of the ball during the N.C. State 64-55 win against Wake Forest on Sunday. The Wolfpack win improved its 11-12 over all and 3-8 in the ACC.

Daniel Wilson & Rob McLamb Staff Writers

QUOTE OF THE DAY “I thought Tyler [Lewis] stepped up and was terrific, just terrific.” Mark Gottfried, men’s basketball head coach

State drops Tobacco Road meet Nolan Evans

WOMEN’S TENNIS AT ITA NATIONAL TEAM INDOORS Charlottesville, Va., All Day

TRACK AT VIRGINIA TECH ELITE MEET Blacksburg, Va., All Day

SWIMMING & DIVING

The N.C. State women’s basketball team (11-12, 3-8 ACC) defeated Wake Forest (10-12, 3-7) Sunday afternoon at Reynolds Coliseum, 64-55. The Lady Wolfpack earned its third conference win in the last four games after dropping its first seven games against ACC opponents. The team played without junior guard Myisha GoodwinColeman, who injured her left ankle in practice Friday. State was led by senior guard Marissa Kastanek who scored 23 points and grabbed eight rebounds in 39 minutes of action.

Kastanek made eight of her 16 shots, including three of five shots from three-point range. “The coaches, over the past couple of practices, have put a big emphasis on assist-passes, and that plays a big role,” Kastanek said. “If I can get open for just a split second and the pass is perfect, that helps me get my shot up.” Sophomore guard Krystal Barrett added 14 points for the Pack, tying her season high against Elon in December. Redshir t sophomore g ua rd Len’Nique Brown, who started in place of Goodwin-Coleman, also played 39 minutes and had four points and nine assists, the latter a team-leading statistic. “Knowing Myisha [GoodwinColeman] was not going to play, I


Technician - February 4, 2013