Issuu on Google+

TECHNICIAN          

technicianonline.com

Clinton campaigns in Raleigh Elizabeth Moomey & Megan Dunton Staff Writers

Former President Bill Clinton made a pitstop in Raleigh’s Pullen Park Sunday, to gather support for the re-election of President Barack Obama, and to keep “North Carolina blue.” North Carolina, a contended state in the presidential election, has received much attention from both Obama’s and Governor Mitt Romney’s campaigns, and many speculate the state will be decided by a slim margin. The crowd was filled with campaign signs stating “Forward,” “Medicare No Vouchers,” “Fighting for Us” and “Bill Clinton 2016.” In the 2008 presidential election, Obama won by fewer than 14,000 votes.  Jim Hunt, former North Carolina governor, introduced Clinton and said the vote may be just as split this year. “Here in North Carolina, the presidential election could be decided by just a few votes,” Hunt said. “Four years ago, North Carolina was the closest race in the nation. This year the race will be even closer.” Many have stopped classifying North Carolina as a swing state because Obama has not visited since the Democratic National Convention in September. Though North Carolina hasn’t seen much of Obama, his campaign in the state has remained active. Vice President Joe Biden and first lady Michelle Obama have frequented universities and major cities in the past weeks.   Mitt Romney’s campaign has implied that it controls the North Carolina vote by a considerable

monday november

5

2012

Raleigh, North Carolina

Students pack in for Pack Howl Concert Alex Petercuskie Staff Writer

RYAN PARRY/TECHNICIAN

Former President Bill Clinton speaks at a rally for Obama at Pullen Park Sunday. President Clinton spoke to supporters about the importance of getting everyone out to vote on Nov. 6 and turning North Carolina “blue” once again.

margin, large enough to remove its campaign’s chief spokesperson. Clinton’s visit echoed the North Carolina Democratic Party’s motto, “Keep North Carolina blue.” Early voting is typically driven by Democrats, according to David McClennan, a political science professor at William Peace University. But McClennan said this election will be different because Republicans don’t want to be steamrolled like they were in 2008.   “North Carolina matters,” said Dan Blue, Wake County state senator. “Look to your left and right and challenge him or her to match your efforts, in the next 51 hours, to make

sure this is a blue state.” Chris Jones, a freshman in political science, said he agrees with Blue. To help with the voting effort, Jones said he encouraged his roommate to vote. “It’ s not who he wants to vote for, it’s that he won’t vote,” Jones said. “That’s the problem.”   Clinton detailed several reasons he supports Obama, including Obama’s economic policies, support for women’s rights, efforts to make college more affordable and decrease in military spending.   Obama’s position on women’s rights and college loans is an important issue for Antoinette Jones,

a sophomore in political science and vice president of College Democrats. She said these were the pivotal reasons why Obama received her vote. Senator Kay Hagan, an attendee of Clinton’s speech, reiterated the Obama’s stance on women’s rights, saying Obama is a stark advocate for women and has advanced policies that promote fairness and a level playing field. “The first bill signed into law by President Obama was the Lilly Ledbetter Act, so women could have equal pay,” Hagan said.

CLINTON continued page 3

Red and white bedeck homecoming parade Sara Awad

Chancellor Randy Woodson, Provost Warwick Arden, Mr. and Ms. Wuf and many other promiStudents, alumni and members of nent figures in the University atthe community gathered to watch tended the event. the Homecoming Parade make its The parade was also one of way through Hillsborough Street the many events of HomecomSaturday evening. ing Week that played host to the The parade started at the corner of spirit of competition. To comDan Allen Drive and Hillsborough pete, student organizations, soStreet and ended at Pullen Road. rorities and fraternities designed Parade-goers shouted until their floats that would be evaluated by voices grew hoarse both the judges as they f locked to and the audisee colorful f loats ence. and grab candy According to that participants Homecoming on f loats threw to Pa rade cha i r them. Kathryn Howie, The colorguard, this was the first A i r Forc e a nd year that audiJohn Sprague, member of Army ROTC began ence members NCSU Pipes and Drums the festivities with could particiGrand Marshal Cullen Jones follow- pate in the voting process. This ing behind. Jones graduated from type of voting was made possible the University in 2006, and is most through N.C. State’s Homecomfamous for his swimming career in ing App on Guidebook. the Olympics. Jones earned two gold Humanitarian efforts were recmedals and a world record in the ognized as members of CSLEPS 4-by-100 meter freestyle. asked the crowd for spare change The N.C. State Dance Team and that could be donated to Hurricheerleaders also kept the parade cane Sandy victims. going with twirling batons, red flags N.C. State Pipes and Drums and pom poms, while the march- brought some Scottish culture to ing band played the Red and White the event. Though band member Song. John Sprague was exhausted by The parade could not end with- the end of the parade, he said, out the entrance of the night’s guests the support of the crowd was of honor: N.C. State football team inspiring. captains Sterling Lucas and Mike “It was great seeing people line Glennon and head football coach Tom O’ Brien. PARADE continued page 2 Staff Writer

“It was great seeing people line up the streets.”

student tee shirt design contest

SAMANTHA O’BRIEN/TECHNICIAN

Susan Youngstead, junior in psychology, holds a sign during the SlutWalk on Friday.

Slut Walk provokes awareness on gender inequalities Jessie Halpern News Editor

More than 30 students participated in a Slut Walk Friday afternoon to promote an end to the blame placed on victims of sexual abuse. The walk was the second one held on campus — the first was in the middle of the summer. Anokhi Shah, a senior in psychology, organized both events on campus, though she said the movement is not affiliated with N.C. State in any way. “A lot of people blame the victim, that’s why we came out here to protest it,” Shah said. Slut Walk is a movement that started after a Canadian police officer commented on a sexual abuse case in 2011, saying, “if women want to stop getting victimized, they should stop dressing like sluts.” Friday’s Slut Walk gathered participants in the Brickyard, where they held signs and walked to the

Bell Tower and back. “No matter what a victim is wearing, where they go, how they act, or how many sexual partners they’ve had, they didn’t ask for sexual assault,” Shah said. Representatives from the counseling center and the Women’s Center were present to give out information and be available in case any victims wanted to step forward and ask for help. Shah said the name of the walk seemed to alienate some people, but for the most part the event was successful. “We reiterated our point,” Shah said. “I really hope some people got things out of this. Some walked with us on their way to class, though we also got weird looks.” For more information on the Slut Walk movement, visit: http://www. slutwalktoronto.com/ To request help, counseling or information pertaining to sexual assault, visit: http://oied.ncsu.edu/ womens-center/category/services/

BRICKYARD TODAY @ 12 no

on

SUPPORTS STUDENT SCHOLAR

SHIPS!

GO.NCSU.EDU/T-SHIRT-CON

TEST

Students packed Reynolds Coliseum Thursday night for the Pack Howl Concert, N.C. State’s annual homecoming concert. Featured artists included country music band Gloriana and rapper Wale. Before the concert, some students said they were curious about the choice of artists because of their stylistic differences. However, after the event, some students believed the two choices worked well together and attracted diverse groups of students. Lauryn Collier, president of Union Activities Board, said she was surprised by the low ticket sales leading up to the event. Collier said she anticipated an early sellout due to the diversity of the acts chosen by the UAB and the Alumni Association. Both organizations considered what music college students currently listen to when deciding what acts to book. However, one change made this year may have contributed to the lack of ticket sales. Tickets were only available for purchase online through a website called Ticket Central. In the past, students could pick up their tickets at the ticket office in the Talley Student Center. Collier said the website, Ticket Central, centralizes the process of buying tickets with no cost. In addition, Collier said the website makes purchasing tickets easier for the general public and alumni because they don’t have to come to campus. Concert tickets for students cost $12.50 in advance and $15 at the door. Another possible cause of fewer ticket sales might have been that tickets were free last year. Anna Martin, freshman in meteorology, said she thought the concert could have been advertised better, which might have contributed to the show’s

HOWL continued page 3

insidetechnician

Celebrating Guy Fawkes with music and fire See page 7.

‘Hoos spoil Homecoming See page 8.

viewpoint features classifieds sports

4 7 7 8


Page 2

PAGE 2 • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

TECHNICIAN

THROUGH GREG’S LENS

CAMPUS CALENDAR

November 2012

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Mark Herring at editor@ technicianonline.com

WEATHER WISE

Su

M

Tu

W

Th

F

28

29

30

31

1

2

Sa 3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

23

28

29

30

Monday BIOLOGY CLUB MEETING 102 David Clark, 5:30 p.m.

Today:

AN AFRICAN ELECTION, FILM AND PANEL DISCUSSION ON RACE AND THE ELECTIONS Witherspoon Student Center, 7 p.m. Tuesday ELECTION DAY Polls are open in all Wake Country precincts from 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

54/35 Mostly sunny.

DON WATKINS LECTURE: AYN RAND’S FREE MARKET REVOLUTION Mann 216, 7-9 p.m. Ayn Rand Institute fellow Don Watkins will talk about his book on the free market and the role of government in the economy.

Tomorrow:

50 35

Reaching for support

Slight chance of rain.

F

PHOTO BY GREG WILSON

reshman in accounting, Gina Miana, brushes up her bouldering skills on the traverse climbing wall outside Carmichael Gymnasium Sunday afternoon. Used and kept up by students, the one hundred meter wall gives climbers a place to practice traverse climbing any time of day. “I was introduced to rock climbing on my fall break trip that I took through the Outdoor Adventures program here at State, and I haven’t been able to stop since.”

Wednesday:

48 36

Wednesday DEAN’S COFFEE CHAT: DIGITAL HUMANITIES Caldwell Lounge, 8:30-10 a.m.

Chance of rain all day.

SOURCE: ZACHARY FAIR, DANIELLE DELLANE

ON THE WEB See exclusive audio/photo slideshows. Answer the online poll. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline.com. Check it out!

PARADE

continued from page 1

up the streets,” he said Delta Gamma member Demi Faria said the parade was “ a lot of fun and it was great to see our sisters and partners Alpha Sigma Phi and cheer them on.” Parade-goer Chidera Anumudu’s favorite part

FIVE

DOLLARS

NCSU students pay only $5 for ARTS NC STATE performances

this week

NC State Dance Program Fall Concert

Thursday-Friday, November 8-9 at 8pm • Stewart Theatre This program will feature the Movement Studies Project by the nationally-acclaimed NCSU Dance Company, and the Identity Projects by the dynamic Panoramic Dance Project.

MANA – Beyond Belief

Thursday, November 8 at 6pm • Gregg Museum of Art & Design An entertaining, award-winning feature documentary about the power of precious objects, which asks, “What do Elvis Presley’s guitar, African voodoo and the Shroud of Turin have in common?” Q&A with co-director Roger Manley following the screening. FREE

Low and Lower

Friday, November 9 at 7pm Kennedy-McIlwee Studio Theatre Cellist Brooks Whitehouse and bassist Paul Sharpe are Low and Lower, America's #1 selling cello-bass duo. This ensemble's performances are a mash-up of artistry, virtuosity and comic relief.

Kathy Mattea

Saturday, November 10 at 8pm Stewart Theatre The beloved Grammy-winning singer of such classics as “Eighteen Wheels and a Dozen Roses” and “Where’ve You Been” returns to NC State. Kathy Mattea’s music is woven through with bluegrass, gospel and Celtic influences.

Dr. Olga Kleiankina, Piano Faculty Recital

Sunday, November 11 at 4pm Stewart Theatre NC State’s acclaimed pianist offers a concert titled Russian Music: From Mysticism to Lyricism, featuring works of Scriabin, Medtner and Rachmaninoff.

Ticket Central 919-515-1100 2nd floor, Talley Student Center ncsu.edu/arts

of the parade was when the cheerleaders came through. “I thought it was awesome because they had a lot of school spirit,” Anumudu said. Howie said the planning for the event began early in December. Space for f loats and securing permits were discussed through meetings with Campus Police, and parking and a general list of contacts had been brainstormed by early fall. Crowd favorites included a float designed by the College of Natural Resources, which featured rapper Thomas Easley performing his own original song inspired by Homecoming’s theme, A Wolfpack State of Mind.

CAIDE WOOTEN/TECHNICIAN

Students on the College of Natural Resources Float wave to parade-goers on Hillsborough St. during the Homecoming Parade Friday.

QUOTE OF THE DAY

Traditionally, moral idealism has been on the side of those who want to expand government in the name of “the common good.” Ayn Rand turned that on its head. She placed moral idealism on the side of individualism and capitalism. This, argues Ayn Rand Institute fellow Don Watkins, is Ayn Rand’s Free Market Revolution, and it is the key to ending Big Government.

“The first bill signed into law by President Obama was the Lilly Ledbetter Act, so women could have equal pay” Sen. Kay Hagan

GET INVOLVED IN TECHNICIAN Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copy edit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday to Thursday 9 a.m. to midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or e-mail Editor-inChief Mark Herring at editor@ technicianonline.com

Technician was there. You can be too. The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information.


News

TECHNICIAN

CLINTON continued from page 1

Clinton went on to discuss concerns with Romney’s campaign. He said one of Romney’s main problems is his contradicting manner. “In an extreme makeover of sorts, he has been tying himself in knots trying to say what he clearly said,” Clinton said. Clinton found other ways to point out Romney’s lack of consistency to the 4,000 member audience.   “When I was a kid, and I got caught with my hand in the cookie jar, I took my hand out of the cookie jar before my mother whipped me,” Clinton said.  “When Governor Romney gets his hand caught in the cookie jar, he just digs down for more cookies.”

PAGE 3 • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012

Despite the opposition during the 2008 primaries, the “Obama-Clinton bromance,” a nickname Michelle Obama coined, lives on since the DNC. Clinton has proven to be an important asset to the Obama campaign, providing a democratic catalyst to many swing states Obama can’t visit himself. Clinton made 16 campaign appearances last week, with more schedule up until the election, and boasts a current 69 percent favorability rating. “He’s not a n Oba ma groupie to say the least,” Democratic consultant Mark Siegel said. “That makes his support even more attractive and credible.”

TYLER ANDREWS/TECHNICIAN

A girl waves a flag as she waits to hear former president of the United States Bill Clinton speak on Sunday in Pullen Park. Clinton spoke of the urgency of voting and gave reasons for supporting President Obama in the 2012 presidential election.

HOWL

continued from page 1

RYAN PARRY/TECHNICIAN

Rap artist Wale performs during the Pack Howl concert at Reynolds Coliseum Thursday. The Pack Howl kicked off with a homecoming pep rally and finished with concerts by country group Gloriana and rapper Wale.

disappointing performance in ticket presales. “Many of my friends didn’t even know there was a concert,” Martin said. Martin went to the concert to see Gloriana perform and said it was cool that the band skipped the Country Music Awards to perform at N.C. State instead. Martin said the band announced that it had opted out of performing at the annual award show. Martin said because the concert was during a weekday, it was a little tricky getting there on time. “I had class and it was dif-

ficult for me to get there on a Thursday,” Martin said. “They wouldn’t let me bring my backpack in and I had to go back to my dorm room, so I ended up being a little late.” University sponsored concerts have had their share of controversies in the past, especially when it comes to the explicit lyrics of some rap artists. Collier mentioned that although performers in the past have used explicit content, such as rappers Chiddy Bang and Ludacris, UAB does its best to find a good fit for University students. “If we think the students will enjoy it, and it won’t be clean, but it will be successful, then we will still do it. Some people may be offend-

ed, but we do the best we can in determining our options,” Collier said. “At the end of the day, the Ludacris concert was really successful, and that’s what students remember.” Collier said choosing performers is a complex process and a number of factors must be considered, including genres, availability, price range and popularity. Accord i ng to Col l ier, the concert probably cost somewhere in the range of $100,000 in order to cover costs such as performers, production and space in Reynolds Coliseum. “Every event is a learning experience,” Collier said. “The Alumni Association did a great job of organizing the schedule for the week.”

RALEIGH: Triangle Town Center · Opening October in North Hills Shopping Center DURHAM: The Streets at Southpoint GREENSBORO: 1951 Battleground Avenue CHARLOTTE: SouthPark · Northlake WWW.FINKS.COM


Voter’s Guide 2012

PAGE 4 • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012

PAGE 5 • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012

STATE AUDITOR

LT. GOVERNOR

PROFILES COMPILED BY JESSIE HALPERN, LAURA WILKINSON, SARA AWAD & SAM DeGRAVE | PHOTOS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE CAMPAGIN WEBSITES

GOVERNOR

Debra Goldman

D

Pat McCrory

Walter Dalton

M

Barbara Howe

W

cCrory served as mayor of Charlotte for seven terms. His main focus is improving the economy through a reform in leadership, regulations and the tax code. McCrory said he believes in the use of a variety of energy sources for greater efficiency. To ease transportation, McCrory says he will reexamine the Highway Trust Fund. McCrory is also a firm believer in giving parents and students a choice in which schools students attend for their K-12 education as well as improving their reading and math skills. For higher education, McCrory will work to create multiple educational paths for students to secure employment.

H

alter Dalton has served as Lieutenant Governor, a state senator and attorney. According to Dalton’s website, his achievements include the Innovative Education Act, which promoted early colleges, and chaired the Senate Education Committee. Dalton supports small businesses and helped create the Joining Our Business and Schools (JOBS) Commission to better the economy and prepare students for the future. He is Chair of the North Carolina Rural Economic Development Center’s New Generation Initiative as well as North Carolina’s Logistics Task Force. Dalton is devoted to cancer research and hopes to expand health care to rural areas.

owe said she supports giving more power to the individual, allowing for less party domination within the state government, according to her campaign website. Howe is in favor of a “tuition tax credit scholarship program,” fewer taxes and regulation to help entrepreneurs, a ban on the death penalty and a repeal of the marriage amendment. “You should be free to live your life as you see fit as long as you do not harm another individual,” Howe said on her website. NC Voter Guide said Howe received her bachelor’s degree in English and psychology and afterwards showed a passion for homeschooling, breastfeeding and liberty.

Dan Forest

D

an Forest said he bases his platform on bringing business back to North Carolina and harness the workforce. His leadership experience includes his role as office president of the Little Diversified Architectural Consulting, the state’s largest architectural firm, according to his campaign website. Forest, an advocate for small government and staunch pro-life supporter, said low taxes and small businesses will revamp North Carolina’s economy. Forest’s campaign has received major support from the super PAC Citizens for Accountability, an organization that also supports his mother, U.S. Rep. Sue Myrick, according to the News & Observer. Forest said in a promotional video on his website that education must be “run from the bottom up,” citing North Carolina’s ranks as 44th in the nation in education isn’t good enough.

Linda Coleman

L

inda Coleman has served as director of state personnel, commissioner and chair of the Wake County Board of Commissioners and served three terms in the state House of Representatives. Her platform centers on creating jobs and defending North Carolina’s reputations as a hub of business and innovation. Her plan to revamp the state’s business world is supported by supporting K-12 education throughout the state. “My platform is built on the premise of moving our state forward,” Coleman stated. According to her website, Colman supports a movement toward energy independence. “While North Carolinians are hurting at the gas pump day after day, we need to get serious about an energy-independent North Carolina,” Coleman said on her website.

CONGRESS

District 13

George Holding

H

olding has been known to be tough on crime as a U.S. Attorney, in which he’s prosecuted drug traffickers to corrupt public officials, according to his campaign website. The native of Raleigh upholds conservative values of small government, and kicked off his campaign saying, “Two hundred years ago, no one — not Jefferson, nor Adams nor Washington — dreamed government was going to end up catering to every need people have from cradle to grave.”

District 4

T

Steve Troxler

A

s commissioner of agriculture for two terms, Troxler has seen North Carolina’s food protection agency become one of the best in the country and Canada, a record attendance at the State Fair and ensured the preservation of “6,000 acres of farmland,” his website says. According to his website, Troxler is responsible for the introduction of healthier foods into our state’s schools and added expanded the state’s markets to Beijing, China. In an interview with WRAL, Troxler said he is also in support of the 2008 farm bill, which provided funding to “new farmers.”

M

LABOR COMMISSIONER Renee Ellmers

B

efore being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 2010, Ellmers worked as a registered nurse. She grew up in Michigan and graduated from Oakland University with a degree in nursing. Ellmers turned her attention toward politics in 2009 to fight what she saw as a government takeover of patients rights. She currently serves on House Committees on Foreign Affairs and Small Business. Ellmers said that her goal is to fix the broken government, broken attitude and process that she said exists in Washington.

Tim D’Annunzio

Steve Wilkins

W

ilkins is a native of Durham, and served in the Army for 22 years, serving during a deployment to Grenada and two tours of duty in Iraq, during Operation Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom. He currently serves on the Moore County Chamber of Commerce’s Board of Directors, and said he wants to see small businesses become the job creating engine. He stated on his website that the current federal tax system is outdated and that the government must remove tax loopholes.

David Price

rice, who has served in Congress since 1987, represents the district that houses Research Triangle Park. Throughout his tenure at Capitol Hill, Price has advocated his support for the biomedical and pharmaceutical industry, and has helped double funding for the National Institutes of Health, according to his website. Price, a graduate from UNC-Chapel Hill (for his bachelor’s degree) and Yale University (for his masters and doctorate), began his career in politics as a professor of political science at Duke University. Price currently serves on the House Appropriations Committee and is a Democratic representative on the Homeland Security Appropriations Committee.

Cherie Berry

B

erry’s past experience includes owning a small business and spending eight years in the N.C. House of Representatives. In 2001, Berry took office as N.C. Commissioner of Labor and is currently running as an incumbent. Under her administration, North Carolina became the 4th safest state in which to work. According to her website, North Carolina’s occupation injury and illness rate is at an “all-time low.” In her personal statement, given to The News & Observer, Berry focused on how she is different from her opponent. “Simply put, workplaces are safer and healthier now than at any other time in our state’s history,” Berry stated.

John Brooks

J

ohn Brooks’ website states Brooks has been the state’s labor commissioner for the past 16 years. He has also worked as an attorney, held many office positions with Occupational Safety and Health and was N.C. General Assembly’s initial administrative officer. His philosophy is that employees should receive adequate monetary compensation and health benefits for their work. Brooks believes the states should have more say in the country’s labor laws and old laws should be revamped. As a former attorney, Brooks believes he is better equipped to promote “advocacy” as well as knowledge of labor laws.

TREASURER

im D’Annunzio spent his career as a business owner. His platform is founded on the principle that government should not be spending citizens’ money for them. “If everyone voted according to the principles they use to manage their lives, we would have a conservative landslide in every election,” D’Annunzio told The News & Observer. According to his website, D’Annunzio supports a balanced budget, free enterprise and a smaller government. He is also a social conservative.

P

AG. COMMISSIONER

Mike Causey

M

alone is a Vietnam veteran and draws his government experience as a human resources profession, working in the state of North Carolina for the past 20 years. As a congressman, Malone said he hopes to build the workforce by strengthening small businesses, but also considers government intervention, like introducing legislation to establish a modern-day Civilian Conservation Corps, a program that boosted jobs in the Great Depression.

S

VIEW MORE

TECHNICIANONLINE.COM Check out the website for more profiles on the candidates for other local races.

B

eth A. Wood has served as North Carolina auditor since she was elected in 2008. Wood’s platform focuses on ensuring that N.C. citizens’ tax money is accounted for and reported to avoid “fraudulent and wasteful spending in government.” During her first term, Wood said she identified waste in government spending and plans to continue doing so.

Walter Smith

A

ccording to Walter Smith’s website, Smith’s experience stems from his mayorship in Boonville, his 30-year tenure with the U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency and his own work on his Yadkin County poultry farm. “I DO NOT have all the answers,” Smith said on his website. However he assures voters that he will utilize “all of the resources available” and use quality preparation as a tool to promote “agriculture, agribusiness and consumer safety.” Smith says he will create a “HOTLINE” to enhance communication with taxpayers. Other initiatives Smith endorses include the protection of family farms and the expansion of local markets.

INSURANCE COMMISSIONER

District 2

Charles Malone

ebra Goldman has been a member of the Wake County Board of Education since 2009 and is a nationally certified firefighter and EMT. Goldman’s platform focuses on advocating the principles of fiscal conservatism and “hammering home” the ethics of government accountability. In a personal statement given to The News&Observer, Wood said North Carolina has lost faith in becoming cynical on government. She said she has a proven record of standing firm and finding the right answers.

Beth A. Wood

Steve Royal

teve Royal’s past business experience includes being a self-employed CPA. His platform centers on addressing North Carolina’s debt. “The motto shall be: Absolutely No Payto-Play. No more games with the financial reports, period,” Royal stated to The News & Observer. Royal’s plan includes total transparency in the office of the treasurer and restoring “Main Street” values versus “Wall Street” values.

J

Janet Cowell

anet Cowell has served as N.C. Treasurer since 2009 and is running as an incumbent. Her prior experience involves business consulting, city council and a three-year term in the N.C. Senate. Cowell’s main goals include defending North Carolina’s AAA bond rating and overseeing the state health plan, which she has done since 2011. Her platform includes protecting retirement funds, advancing financial literacy and promoting economic development. “I look forward to serving the people of our great state in my capacity as treasurer and have worked hard to earn their trust and confidence,” Cowell said to The News & Observer.

ike Causey, a former lobbyist, is a small-business owner and retired insurance executive. In a personal statement in The News & Observer, Causey said he believes in the constitution and a free market system of insurance. His platform includes reforming the NC DOI, establishing an “around-the-clock” customer service and crisis command center in the Department of Insurance and a consumer advocate in the department. “I will hold insurance companies accountable in paying claims,” Causey said.

Wayne Goodwin

W

ayne Goodwin has been the North Carolina Commissioner of Insurance since 2009, was assistant commissioner from 2005-2009 and a member of the House of Representatives from 1997-2004. Goodwin’s platform focuses on consumer protection, a competitive market and anti-fraud efforts. In a personal statement in The News & Observer, Goodwin stated he ordered a historic $156 million health insurance refund to 215,000 N.C. families.

SECRETARY OF STATE Ed Goodwin

E

d Goodwin’s past involves working for Naval Criminal Investigative Services and the Chowman County Commission, where he served as chairman. His platform focuses on providing new solutions and getting the North Carolina business climate in a position that will create jobs and recruit new industries. “Reducing burdensome regulations, cutting taxes and providing a more transparent government will be at the forefront of my agenda,” Goodwin stated to The News & Observer. Goodwin opposes government control of healthcare, regulation of the private sector and is a “strong social conservative,” according to his website.

Elaine Marshall

E

laine Marshall has served as Secretary of State since 1997 and is running as an incumbent. Marshall’s platform focuses on adapting to the economy and technological developments. Her personal statement, according to The News & Observer, said she has cracked down on Ponzi schemes, protected investors, busted producers of counterfeit goods and focused on helping the economy by cracking down on crime. “I have a strong belief that open government is good government and have worked to increase transparency and reporting, particularly shining a light on lobbying activities,” Marshall stated on her website.


Viewpoint

PAGE 6 • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012

TECHNICIAN

Chewing over the important questions The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

A

pparently the most important question to ask before filling out your ballot tomorrow is this: “Who sucks the most?” The Vote with Your Gum poll encourages passersby with flavorless gum to vote for which presidential candidate they think “sucks the most.” To answer that question, it’s important to keep in mind the question within the question — it’s like questionception. Considering the literal, implied meaning of the question “Who sucks the most?” is the first step to answering it. We throw around the word “suck” a lot: This sucks, that sucks, he sucks, she sucks, we suck — but what is it that we’re sucking exactly? We don’t think we have to tell you. The implicit meaning of “who sucks the most” is much more vulgar than what we think when we use it. We at Technician are not prudes by any

means — however, any political poll/speech that resembles the underside of a high school cafeteria’s table is counterproductive to helping the electorate understand who it’s voting for. We wouldn’t be so harsh on the gummy-poll if it were the only distraction from real issues, but it seems that the coverage people are most familiar with has to do with binders full of women and whether Obama made eye contact with Mitt at the debates. Conversations on issues of real importance and consequence are rare. We hope the voter guide in today’s paper will help spawn conversations about candidate’s agendas and policies, rather than what kind of mustard they put on their hotdog (we’re guessing Mitt’s partial to the Grey Poupon). As the races (let’s not forget those at the state level) come to a finish, making sure voters are

“We throw around the word “suck” a lot ... but what is it that we’re sucking exactly?”

aware of who they’re voting for — and who they’re voting against — is more important than ever. This gummy-poll is just a waste of paper, time and gum. That gum rightfully belongs on the wall of the underpass on Dan Allen Drive. And if we haven’t been clear about our thoughts on this poll being a bad idea so far, let us say it does much worse than distract from healthy political discourse by actually being bad for your health. We can’t think of a worse microbial nightmare than touching

your hands and saliva-ridden gum to an area where dozens before you have done the same — during flu season, too. If the editorial board could vote in this poll, we would put our wad of Juicy Fruit on whoever stapled the paper to the cork board outside of Owen Residence Hall, because that’s who sucks the most. Send your thoughts on gum polls to viewpoint@technicianonline.com

{

Democracy is us

T

wo days, two students, one black, one white, came into my office with the same worry. Both expressed concern that come Nov. 6, 2012, something Rupert W. bad was goNacoste, ing to hapPh. D pen at N.C. Professor of State. Even Psychology though the h i s tor y of anti-black and anti-gay graffiti on our campus since the election of President Barack Obama made that worry somewhat rational, I was surprised. What caught me off guard was that those two students said there is hostility on our campus about the upcoming presidential election. Something is amiss. I don’t mean that there is anything wrong with students having different political leanings, political opinions and favorite candidates for the presidency. That is healthy for our democracy. What is amiss, I believe, is that there is animosity among students about our sitting president; animosity. Our American democracy is an extraordinary experiment in governance. Every four years we live with the potential of a change in leadership that will not come by violent overthrow of government, but by votes. Even with a leadership change, our governance structure remains the same. No matter who is president, we remain a constitutional democracy with three branches; executive, legislative and judicial. So no change in the president is revolutionary. Yet with the election of President Barack Hussein Obama, some people acted as if our whole way of political and social life was in jeopardy. On our campus some acted out, painting the Free Expression Tunnel with racial slurs and physical threats to the life of our new president. Some, it seems, do not know what it means to live in the greatest democracy on earth. In the 1995 movie, The American President, this statement is made: “America isn’t easy. America is ad-

vanced citizenship. You gotta want it bad, ‘cause it’s gonna put up a fight.”   Look, I served our country in the U.S. Navy. And I served under a president that I had not voted for. Even so, President Richard M. Nixon was our, was my, commander in chief. Crook and all, after taking his oath of office, he was THE president of the United States. So let me tell you, American democracy is hard; it puts up a fight for our loyalty. A mer ic a n demo c r ac y works though, because it is the constitution that makes us great. Women and men who have served will tell you that we do not take an oath to the president, we take an oath to defend the Constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic. It is just that in American governance, the President is THE elected representative of the Constitution. That is why it is illegal to threaten the life of any president. Try that and those who have sworn to protect the Constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic, will come and find you to lock you up.   Another reason our democracy works is that we change leadership through voting. Not through violence, because that is a threat to the Constitution. Try violence and those who serve in that capacity will come and find you to lock you up. So when the votes are counted, we have a president, whether our particular vote went to that person or not. That is what will happen Nov. 6, 2012.  We will vote.  And we will then see who is elected president. That person will be president of the United States who deserves all our respect and civility. We should handle that as educated citizens, whether Mr. Obama or Mr. Romney wins by the democratic vote of we-the-people. Slurs and hatred have no place and no point in the outcome of the election. Dr. Nacoste is professor of psychology and faculty advisor to Wake Up! It’s Serious: A Campaign for Change.

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695 Editorial Advertising Fax Online

515.2411 515.2029 515.5133 technicianonline.com

IN YOUR WORDS

}

What is the American dream? BY GREG WILSON

“Doing something that you like doing, so you don’t hate your job. But more importantly, putting others before your self interest.” Zach Marinakis sophomore, biological sciences

“Wife, middle class suburban house, one dog, and 2.5 children.” Robert Baily sophomore, engineering

Dereck Freeland, junior in biological engineering

{ EDITOR’S NOTE Letters to the editor are the individual opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Technician staff or N.C. State University. All writers must include their full names and, if applicable, their affiliations, including years and majors for students and professional titles for University employees. For verification purposes, the writers must also include their phone numbers, which will not be published.

Dear Students, This is an important week for our nation, for our University and for many of you who will be exercising your right to vote for the first time. I hope you have taken the time to register and made use of early voting opportunities here on campus to cast your ballot for federal, state and local officials. If you have not

CAMPUS FORUM

}

yet had the chance, I encourage you to vote tomorrow. If we want a voice in  the system, we must vote. I clearly remember the 1976 election – the first election in which I was eligible to vote. It was an engaging moment to participate in the selection of a president, members of the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, as well as state and local officials. It was my first foray into the political system of this great country, and I have not missed an election since. In addition to ensuring your voice is heard, I also want to ask you to consider the time after the polls close. We will all watch the returns closely, as the presidential election in particular is likely to be a tight race. We will celebrate, or not, depending on the outcome and our personal preferences. It is my hope that

as we in the Wolfpack community celebrate, or not, we all choose to do so in a manner befitting the process and our University. I encourage you to watch the returns and to be participants in the exciting social experience surrounding the reports of vote counts and electoral college calculations, and also, in true Wolfpack tradition, to be respectful of one another as the votes are counted and the winners are announced.  Tomorrow is important, so let’s participate in a way that makes us all  Wolfpack Proud! Dr. Mike Mullen Vice Chancellor and Dean Division of Academic and Student Affairs

Editor-in-Chief Mark Herring

News Editor Jessie Halpern

Sports Editor Jeniece Jamison

Viewpoint Editor Ahmed Amer

Photo Editor Brett Morris

editor@technicianonline.com

news@technicianonline.com

sports@technicianonline.com

viewpoint@technicianonline.com

photo@technicianonline.com

Managing Editor Trey Ferguson

Associate Features Editor Jordan Alsaqa

Associate Features Editor Young Lee

Design Editor Zac Epps

Advertising Manager Olivia Pope

managingeditor@technician online.com

features@technicianonline.com

features@technicianonline.com

design@technicianonline.com

advertising@sma.ncsu.edu

“Reaching all of the goals that you set for yourself in life.” Shaun Monroe freshman, agriculture education

EMAIL GREENE ASKAPROFNCSU@GMAIL.COM

P

rofessor Greene will respond to questions in a biweekly advice column.

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2011 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features CAMPUS & CAPITAL

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 7 • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012

Celebrating Guy Fawkes with music and fire Katie Sanders Staff Writer

Saturday at Guy Fawkes Raleigh, country bands performed in front of a bonfire while spectators played with cornhole boards painted like the Union Jack, coming together in an eclectic mix of Southern and British culture. Nov. 5 is a day of remembrance in the United Kingdom of Guy Fawkes’ failed attempt in 1605 to blow up the House of Lords and kill King James I. This year, thanks to The Oxford, a British pub in downtown Raleigh, it was celebrated with a street party. “We like to keep a lot of the British traditions alive in the food and some of the drinks,” Dustin Slemp, event coordinator for Guy Fawkes Raleigh, said. Therefore, when Nov. 5 came around, it seemed only natural to introduce Raleigh to another British tradition by celebrating the date with a block party and music festival. “We thought it would be fun, considering how the British are celebrating it today which is by throwing huge parties, and fireworks and bonfires in the street,” Slemp said. Fire was therefore a large part of the celebration as well. In order to follow the tradition of burning Guy Fawkes in effigy, Guy Fawkes Raleigh included a huge metal statue of his Fawkes’ face that contained a bonfire. The concept was to make the statue like a jack-o-lantern, in that it contained the fire while still

showing Fawkes’ image. “I think fire is the Guy Fawkes tradition,” Beyond Joy, a propane flame effects specialist and creator of the flaming Guy Fawkes statue, said. “It’s a fun holiday – people like seeing fire downtown, so it’s a good way to bring them down.” Fire per for mers f rom Cirque de Vol also performed with fire dancing and juggling. “With the whole fire theme of it, we wanted as much fire as possible – I think that’s what really separates us from other block parties,” Slemp said. A unique mix of local and international, Guy Fawkes Raleigh also repurposed the holiday and used it to celebrate not only England, but also local culture. “We really wanted to push how this was a Raleigh thing,” Slemp said. “So we have the Raleigh City Farm and the three local bands.” Raleigh City Farm was supported through the night’s festivities. “Being as how we wanted to do a very local, Raleigh-based event, we thought they’d be perfect. They’re still small, they’ve only been around about a year and they really need funding, so we really want to help support them” Slemp said. Guy Fawkes Raleigh also recruited musicians that were based out of the Triangle. Performers included The Old Ceremony, as well as Jack the Radio and Brooks Wood. “Raleigh’s kind of pushing in this really kind of cool,

POLICY

The Technician will not be held responsible for damages or losses due to fraudulent advertisements. However, we make every effort to prevent false or misleading advertising from appearing in our publication.

DEADLINES

Our business hours are Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Line ads must be placed by noon the previous day.

GEORGIA HOBBS/TECHNICIAN

A fire statue bearing the image of Guy Fawkes is the centerpiece of the 3rd annual Guy Fawkes Night celebration on Fayetteville St. Nov. 3.

artsy, young direction and we felt like that was the right way to go. Plus there are some really great local bands that aren’t being tapped into and we wanted to do that,” Slemp said. George Hage and A.C. Hill, the vocalists and guitarists of Jack the Radio, met at N.C. State and formed the band there. “It’s kind of indie rock, but infused, I guess, with some southern feel to it,” George Hage, vocalist and

guitarist of Jack the Radio, said about the band’s sound. “One thing we try to focus on to separate us from other local bands is that we have two lead singers, and two of the other guys actually sing a lot of backup.” Brooks Wood, also an N.C. State alum, played what he described as “Americano folk country.” “Raleigh’s a pretty good breeding ground for music and upcoming artists,”

Classifieds

Wood said. “George [Hage] and I used to play in a band together. We’ve all kind of jammed,” Wood said. “It’s all about a community — there are so many overlapping bands you could draw a Venn diagram of all the different players that overlap.” While Hage and Wood didn’t necessarily play English music, they felt the celebration of local and Southern culture still fit well with the holiday.

“I kind of had to brush up on what Guy Fawkes is,” Hage said. “I think it’s kind of spun away from the British celebration of saving the king to kind of an excuse to have a good time and celebrate freedom and being free; maybe not worrying about your day to day life, going to listen to music, light some things on fire, and enjoy the city.”

RATES

For students, line ads start at $5 for up to 25 words. For non-students, line ads start at $8 for up to 25 words. For detailed rate information, visit ­technicianonline.com/classifieds. All line ads must be prepaid.

To place a classified ad, call 919.515.2411, fax 919.515.5133 or visit technicianonline.com/classifieds

Announcements

EmploymEnt

Help Wanted

Around CAmpus

Help Wanted

ServiceS

Spring Break

FT and PT Veterinary Assistant

BAHAMAS SPRING BREAK

Attention Pre-Vet Students - FT and PT

$189 for 5 days. All prices include:

Post a Classified Online at

Sammy’s Tap & Grill - Now hiring

Veterinary Assistants are needed for ultra

Beautiful 2 bedroom/1 Bath Off of

VA L PA R K

technicianonline.com!!

experienced servers and bartenders and

well equipped small animal hospital 20

Greenleaf

AFFORDABLE PARKING!

Accommodations on the island at your

It is FREE for students as long as you use

food runners. Please apply in person -

miles east of Raleigh. FT position is ideal

Beautiful 2 bedroom/1 bath, spacious,

WALK TO CLASS AND DORMS!

choice of thirteen resorts. Appalachia

your @ncsu.edu email.

2235 Avent Ferry Road, Mission Valley

for individual with veterinary school

washer/dryer included.

AVOID TICKETS & TOWS! ---- 3021

Travel. www.BahamaSun.com

Shopping Center. Must be available

aspirations as on the job educational

One month’s rent security deposit.

HILLSBOROUGH ST VALPARK.COM -

800-867-5018

weekends. www.sammysncsu.com

opportunities will be far superior to those

go to https://post.craigslist.org/

919-821-7444

available at most animal hospitals. Call

manage/3377463809/2qrpj for pictures.

Debra at 919-889-9764 if interested.

call 919-319-6368 for info/showing

Sudoku Level:

Sudoku

Email debra@claytonanimalhospital.com

By The Mepham Group

Level:

1 2 3 4

HAS

CONVENIENT

Round-trip luxur y par ty cruise.

Email anatshvueli@mac.com

By The Mepham Group

1 2 3 4

FOR RELEASE NOVEMBER 5, 2012

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 1

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Solution to Saturday’s puzzle

11/5/12

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

© 2012 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

Solution to Tuesday’s puzzle

11/7/12

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

© 2012 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

ACROSS 1 Chinese temple instrument 5 Nestling noises 10 Leave at the altar 14 Diva’s showpiece 15 Group of experts 16 Pierre’s possessive 17 Return on one’s investment, in slang 20 Replay technique, briefly 21 Relaxing time in the chalet 22 “There oughta be __” 25 Hi-fi spinners 26 Plain dessert 30 Playing decks 35 Diplomatic bldg. 36 Juanita’s aunt 37 Yukon’s country 38 Prada imitation, perhaps 42 More greasy 43 Extended family 44 “Bon voyage!” 45 Fruity-smelling compound 46 Jay-Z, for one 49 L.A. bus-and-rail org. 51 Speak indistinctly 52 Begin 57 Gate-hanging hardware 61 Announce one’s arrival gently ... as opposed to words that start 17-, 26-, 38- and 46-Across 64 Voting no 65 In an unusual way 66 Student’s stressor 67 Very familiar note recipient? 68 “Fetch my smelling salts!” 69 Avg. levels DOWN 1 Goes on and on 2 Unwritten 3 Barcelona boy 4 Joke writer 5 HMO alternative 6 Musical sensitivity 7 One-named Irish folk singer

11/5/12

By Patti Varol

8 Magazine with a Stylewatch spinoff 9 Eat noisily, as soup 10 Elbows rudely 11 “In the morning” radio host 12 Security device 13 __ torch: patio light 18 Finish the laundry 19 Perform another MRI on 23 Oldman or Newman 24 Ragamuffin 26 Orange __ tea 27 Old Dodge autos 28 Horseshoeshaped fastener 29 “The Trial” writer Franz 31 Furthermore 32 Synagogue scholar 33 Times to send in the troops 34 “Full House” costar Bob 37 Panama crosser 39 Co. in Paris 40 “Sesame Street News Flash” reporter

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

Lookin’ for the answer key? VISIT TECHNICIANONLINE.COM

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

41 Hula swivelers 46 Family-friendly, filmwise 47 German coal valley 48 Native American groups 50 Sierra Nevada resort 52 Tax-sheltered accts. 53 Store opening time

11/5/12

54 The “I” in IHOP: Abbr. 55 End-of-the-week letters 56 Scandinavian literary collection 58 Bakery call 59 Happy 60 Spreading trees 62 Ancient 63 Yiddish cries of dismay


Sports

COUNTDOWN

• 5 days until the Pack takes on the Wake Forest Deamon Deacons in Carter-Finley Stadium.

INSIDE

• Page 7: Coverage of the Guy Fawkes event in downtown Raleigh.

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 8 • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012

FOOTBALL

‘Hoos spoil homecoming

N.C. State-Wake Forest to kickoff at 3 p.m.

Rob McLamb Staff Writer

The ACC has announced the N.C. State-Wake Forest game this coming Saturday will be a 3:00 p.m. kickoff at Carter-Finley Stadium. The game will be televised on RSN (Regional Sports Network), more information about where to watch will be available later this week. N.C. State will be celebrating Parents & Families Day this weekend as well. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Cross-Country completes Three Stripe Invitational The N.C. State men’s and women’s cross-country teams hosted the Three Stripe Invitational Saturday morning at the WakeMed Cross-Country Course, where both squads posted second place finishes in their respective 5K races. Despite the second place finish, the Wolfpack men were led by three unattached freshmen at the front of the field, who took three of the top four spots in the race. Newcomer Adrian Ross broke the 15-minute barrier with a 14:58 time, which was good enough for second place. Sam Parsons was next to cross the finish line with a 15:02 clocking, followed by Sam Roberson in fourth place with a 15:04 time.

SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

ATHLETIC SCHEDULE November 2012 Su

M

Tu

W

Th

F

Sa

28

29

30

31

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

23

28

29

30

Today VIRGINIA TECH V. N.C. STATE College Park Md., 1 p.m. WARRIOR WAVE PRINCEVILLE INTERCOLLEGIATE Princeville Makai Golf Course, all day Tuesday N.C. STATE V. TBD College Park, Md., 7 p.m.

JOHN JOYNER/TECHNICIAN

Graduate student quarterback Mike Glennon tries to throw the ball as he is tackled for a safety during the homecoming football game in Carter-Finley Stadium Saturday. The Cavaliers routed the Wolfpack 33-6.

somebody else; when you lose, you have got to look in the mirror and you have got to critique yourself first. That starts with me.” “If we do the right things, we’ve shown we can be a good football team and we can win.” Glennon struggled all day, going 23-46 for 197 yards with one touchdown and two interceptions. Similar to last week’s performance in Chapel Hill, the Wolfpack receivers dropped several passes which ultimately cost State valuable chances to make the game more competitive. Redshirt sophomore wide receiver Bryan Underwood, who had his streak of consecutive games with at least one touchdown reception ended at eight, echoed his coach’s theme of accountability. “Dropped balls, didn’t make plays … we were hurting ourselves,” said Underwood. “If I had to say one [reason for the loss], it was one thing: it was lack of focus.”

“We are going to come back next week, correct what we did wrong and learn from our mistakes.” The Wahoo offense marched up and down the field all day with impunity, and it was instantly clear the Virginia coaching staff and players put last week’s bye to good use. Guided by an effective quarterback tandem of Mike Rocco and Phillip Sims, who collectively went 20-33 passing for 198 yards passing, along with a stellar performance from sophomore tailback Kevin Parks who tallied 115 yards rushing on 25 carries with one touchdown, the UVA offense put State on the back foot immediately after receiving the opening kickoff. The Cavaliers summarily marched 75 yards on an 11-play drive that was culminated by a one-yard touchdown burst by Sims to take a lead they would never relinquish. After an exchange of turnovers and a Wolfpack punt, Virginia

head coach Mike London, a Tom O’Brien disciple, turned to the other member of his quarterback tandem. Rocco did not disappoint as he led a 68-yard Cavalier charge to paydirt, ending with the junior signal-caller connecting with sophomore wide receiver Darius Jennings for an 18yard touchdown pass. After that play, the rout was on. Next week N.C. State will look to rebound from its worst home loss since a 31-point drubbing at the hands of 13th ranked South Florida Sept. 27, 2008. The Wolfpack will host the Wake Forest Demon Deacons Saturday. It will be Parents and Family Day at Carter-Finley Stadium, with game-time set for 3:00 p.m. The match-up of between in-state foes will be televised by Fox Sports South. “Nobody is giving up,” said O’Brien. “We are going to come out fighting next week.”

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

WARRIOR WAVE PRINCEVILLE INTERCOLLEGIATE Princeville Makai Golf Course, all day

Wolfpack wins big in opening exhibition against Crusaders

Wednesday WARRIOR WAVE PRINCEVILLE INTERCOLLEGIATE Princeville Makai Golf Course, all day

Jeniece Jamison Stports Editor

Thursday NATIONAL INDOOR CHAMPIONSHIPS Location TBA, all day ITA NATIONAL INDOORS New York, N.Y., all day

QUOTE OF THE DAY “That’s probably the tempo you’ll see us play a lot.” Kellie Harper, head women’s basketball coach

Randy Woodson Chancellor 64-25

N.C. State v. Virginia

The “Carolina Hangover” is the expression used to describe N.C. State’s inability to win the following week after defeating UNC-Chapel Hill. In one of the most lifeless and sloppiest performances in head coach Tom O’Brien’s tenure in Raleigh, State was comprehensively defeated by Virginia, 33-6, Saturday afternoon at CarterFinley Stadium on Homecoming. The loss drops the Pack to 5-4 overall and 2-3 in the ACC, as it enters into the final quarter of its season, now with little chance of earning a berth to the conference championship game. The State offense sputtered all day. The Pack could only muster 216 yards of total offense in the afternoon, with the rushing game accounting for a meager 19 yards on 24 carries. Virginia entered the game having only forced 4 turnovers the entire season. The Cavaliers, on a six-game losing streak and winless in the conference prior to Saturday, were able to more than double that total as they picked off three passes from graduate student Mike Glennon and recovered two fumbles from the error-prone Wolfpack. O’Brien, now 38-34 overall in Raleigh, was left to answer for the Pack’s poor outing, and the veteran coach did not attempt to shirk responsibility for the fiasco. “We didn’t respond,” said O’Brien. “That’s on me. I have got to get it corrected and make sure this football team gets back to doing what it has to do to win football games.” “When you win, you look through the window and find something good to say about

Starting the season with two turnovers and two missed wideopen layups against a division II opponent in the North Greenville Crusaders isn’t the best way to start the first two minutes of a season. But, going on an 18-3 run early in the game sparked by a layup from junior forward Kody Burke is not a bad recovery either as N.C. State defeated the Crusaders, 111-39, in an exhibition matchup. This was the fourth preseason matchup between the two and this edition resulted in the largest deficit on the scoreboard. The Pack ’s defense stood strong in the first half, holding NGU’s starters to zero points in the half and forcing it into shooting 25.9 percent from the field.

Andy Walsh Student Body President 64-25

Tom Suiter

WRAL Sports Anchor 62-27

“We’ve tweeked our defensive system a little bit since last year,” fourth-year head coach Kellie Harper said. Ju n ior for wa rd Ma rkei sha Gatling, a junior college transfer, made her debut for the Pack in the center slot of the starting lineup. Gatling finished the game with a double-double, 11 points and 10 rebounds. “Keisha is a very unselfish player,” Burke said. “I remember a play when she could have easily scored the ball, but she passed the ball to me. Just the fact that she’s going to draw defense it opens me up a bit.” On the opposing end of the floor, State shot 67.9 percent from the field in the half. Junior guard Myisha Goodwin-Coleman started the game 3-3 from beyond the arch in the first half and dished out three assists. Burke also shot a perfect 100 percent from the field in the

Mark Herring

Editor-in-Chief of Technician 53-36

Jeniece Jamison Sports Editor of Technician 64-25

first half and posted 12 points. The Wolfpack shot out to a 55-20 lead in the first half. The Pack also continued its dominance in the second half. The lead ballooned to 72-24 five minutes into the half, spearheaded by the effort of Burke. She scored the first six points of the half for State. “I never told them ‘go’ tonight,” Harper said. “This is their natural tendency. That’s probably the tempo you’ll see us play a lot.” State tested its depth in the second half as every dressed player saw time for the Pack in the second half. Eight of the 11 players that saw time on the floor scored in double-figures for the Pack and the team totaled 25 assists for the game. “Right now I have a lot of confidence in a lot of players on my roster. We feel like we can sub freely. We’re still working out some combinations. You still do that seven games

Sean Fairholm

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician 58-31

Nolan Evans

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician 60-29

into the season. “I’m primarily the passing point guard and with these two running in front of me, I know Kody’s going to finish,” Goodwin-Coleman said. Redshirt sophomore forward Lakeesa Daniel didn’t touch the floor due to having broken bones. According to Harper, there is no certain timetable for her return.   The team broke the century mark on the scoreboard with a layup from sophomore forward Kiana Evans with four minutes left in the half. Freshman guard Kaley Moser provided the assist. The Pack will open its regular season against Wofford on Friday at 12 p.m. in Reynolds Coliseum.

Jonathan Stout

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician 57-32

Pulse of the Pack WKNC Sports Talk Radio Show 64-25

Trey Ferguson

Managing Editor of Technician 59-30

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

Oregon v. USC

USC

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

Oregon

USC

Alabama v. LSU

LSU

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Oklahoma State v. Kansas State

Kansas State

Kansas State

Kansas State

Oklahoma State

Kansas State

Oklahoma State

Kansas State

Kansas State

Kansas State

Kansas State

Texas A&M v. Mississippi State

Mississippi State

Texas A&M

Texas A&M

Mississippi State

Texas A&M

Mississippi State

Texas A&M

Texas A&M

Texas A&M

Texas A&M

Texas v. Texas Tech

N.C. State

Texas Tech

Texas Tech

Texas Tech

Texas Tech

Texas

Texas Tech

Texas Tech

Texas Tech

Texas Tech

Texas

Nebraska v. Michigan State

Nebraska

Nebraska

Michigan State

Michigan State

Michigan State

Nebraska

Nebraska

Michigan State

Nebraska

Nebraska

Clemson v. Duke

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Arizona v. UCLA

UCLA

Arizona

Arizona

Arizona

Arizona

Arizona

Arizona

Arizona

Arizona

Arizona


Technician - November 5, 2012