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wednesday october

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2012

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

New BOG committee meets opposition

Elizabeth Moomey Staff Writer

Two words have been thrown around about the recent North Carolina Board of Governor’s picks: conservative and controversial. On Sept. 13, the BOG announced 27 new members for its UNC Advisory Committee on Strategic Direc-

tions. The members will serve 2013 to 2018 and will decide the terms of financial spending, academic standards and the missions of North Carolina’s colleges and universities to further prepare students for the workforce. NC Policy Watch, a progressive, nonprofit and non-partisan public policy group, has been critical of

recent appointments in particular. New members include North Carolina House Speaker Thom Tillis and North Carolina Senator Phil Berger, who recently signed the largest budget cuts in the UNC System’s history. Other members are Robert Ingram, the former president and chief operating officer of GlaxoSmith-

Kline, a pharmaceutical company, donated $96,000 to the Republican Party and N.C. Chamber President Lew Ebert, who is said to be more interested in the tax-cutting agenda of the Republicans than supporting important public investments in key state institutions like universities, according to N.C. Policy Watch. The high amount of conservatives

Dan Allen project postponed

has already caused backpedaling on a policy that would set a certain percentage of tuition increases to low-income families to help them send their children to a UNC school. The policy also mentioned decreasing the amount of liberal arts pro-

BOG continued page 3

Bell Tower electric system under repair Jessie Halpern News Editor

Taylor O’Quinn Staff Writer

The Dan Allen Drive gate project that was scheduled for the weekend of Oct. 4-7 has been postponed until further notice, according to the N.C. State Transportation website. Instead, crews will be working on a new traffic signal at the intersection of Dan Allen Drive and Yarbrough Drive. This project will take place Wednesday at 8 p.m. until Thursday at 6 a.m. According to Public Communication Specialist for NCSU Transportation Christine Klein, Dan Allen Drive will remain open, but traffic may be reduced to one lane on this portion of the street and traffic assistance will be provided. Since this is only preliminary work, the signal will not yet be activated. Route 7 of the Wolflink Shuttle will take a detour through Gorman and Hillsborough streets from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. Wednesday. All evening service of the Wolfline will be stopped for fall break after 10 p.m. Wednesday. The service will run for a limited amount of time for faculty and staff members Thursday and Friday. Klein said Routes 6, 7 and 8 will also operate on limited schedules. The Dan Allen Deck pay lot will be closed Friday to accommodate two construction jobs. A permitted area of the Dan Allen Deck will be open from the Hillsborough and Yarbrough street side only. Signs will be posted to remind drivers about the closings. “Anyone who normally parks in the Dan Allen Deck pay lot will need to use the Coliseum Deck pay lot,” Klein said. The Dan Allen Gate was a piece of a 10-year project ‘puzzle.’ Klein said the construction of the Dan Allen Gate has been postponed so N.C. State may conduct further traffic pattern studies in conjunction with the City of Raleigh.

CONTRIBUTED BY READYFORCE

A Hacker Tour representative talks to students at the College of Engineering Career Fair Tuesday. The Hacker Tour is led by Readyforce, a social networking site that helps students get jobs with start-up companies.

Hacker Tour stops by engineering career fair Jessie Halpern News Editor

Readyforce, a social networking company that connects students with jobs at start-up companies, will be on campus Wednesday at the College of Engineering Career Fair. The company is visiting N.C. State as part of its Hacker Tour, an expedition to appear at 25 campuses across the country in eight weeks. Traveling on the tour bus is Anna Binder, vice president of client services, and two other Readyforce employees who act as tour managers. Readyforce works like a “dating site” for professionals because it’s all based on online profile matching, according to Binder. “The student profile emphasizes what students are passionate about, not so much what they have experience in because a lot of students don’t have experience,” Binder said. “There is a place to showcase interests and relevant coursework as well.” Once a profile is made, Binder said students can start searching for the companies who are also members of Readyforce—mostly tech start-ups ranging from small to large. In their search, students are able to learn about specific companies through information and video before requesting to be “introduced.” Once that request is sent, the company gets an email notification to

view a student’s profile. Three weeks, 10 campuses and 1,300 additional student profiles later, Binder said the tour is going strong. “Eventually, we want to be the place where every student starts their career, but we’re starting out with engineering students and tech startups,” Binder said. “We live in the land of startups, and all startups are desperate to hire engineers, so it was a natural place to start.” Though the Hacker Tour is focusing on engineering, Readyforce does not. Binder said the site is open for and used by students of all majors who wish to connect with any of the 100 companies registered thus far. The Hacker Tour arrived on campus Tuesday afternoon, and Binder said her team has been impressed. “When you show up to the career fair, there’s a small army of students in red to welcome you,” Binder said. “No one was stressed out, and everyone was helpful.” One aspect Binder said she found surprising is that the career fair is open to students from other schools, as well as alumni. “That is unheard of, but it really makes the fair attractive,” Binder said. “I think it’s awesome.” The Hacker Tour has set up in an engineering building on Centennial Campus and is easily found by looking for their colorful tour bus. Binder’s focus has been helping

Sign up for Campout ends tonight at 10 p.m.

insidetechnician

Staff Report

Biden campaigns in N.C.

Pack hopes to replicate magic

See page 3.

viewpoint features

students on campus learn about start-ups and getting them to sign up on the website, but connecting with employers isn’t the only incentive to visiting the tour. “No one leaves our booth without a T-shirt,” Binder said. Readyforce is a startup company itself, yet with only a few years under its belt, the organization has raised more than $14 million. Based in San Francisco, the company was created as a means of improving the job search for students, according to its website, readyforce.com. “Readyforce was founded on the belief that the traditional job search process is broken,” the website said. “This is true for both job seekers and hiring companies. We exist to make the job search process better and easier.” Binder became involved with the company after working in human resources for most of her career. “The thing I spent the most time on was figuring out how you attract, recruit, hire and motivate people to do amazing things,” Binder said. “When I left my last job, I really wanted to do something that was connected to the work that I’m passionate about and made it easier for college students to connect to jobs that they’re excited about.” In addition to connecting students with other companies, Readyforce is also looking to hire software engineers.

N.C. State’s Bell Tower has been silent for more than one week due to old parts and lightening damage. The Bell Tower has been synonymous with N.C. State for more than 60 years, and assistant vice chancellor for facilities, Jack Colby, said it hasn’t lost it’s voice—at least since he’s been at the University. “This is the first time as far as I know that the Bell Tower’s sound system hasn’t worked in at least 10 or 12 years,” Colby said. Associate vice chancellor for facilities, Kevin MacNaughton, said the Bell Tower’s chimes come from an electronic system run by an office in Holladay Hall and not an actual bell. “We believe the root of the problem was lightening damage,” Colby said. “We’ve had other issues relating to lightening damage in the tower before, but those involved the light system.” Colby said the original problem was looked at and fixed last week, but because of the age of the components in the tower, one of the electronic systems broke. The Facilities Department has been working with a company in California for more than a week to replace the parts and they have recently been shipped, Colby said. “The system is very old, and with older technology, it’s far more difficult to obtain replacement parts and make repairs,” Colby said. “The best case is that we’ll have it fixed by the end of the week, but it all depends on when we get those parts.” Colby said there are several planned events that require the Bell Tower to chime in the near future and fixing it as soon as possible is a priority. As of Tuesday, no students have made any inquiries about the Bell Tower’s lack of sound, according to Colby.

See page 8.

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classifieds sports

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Registration to attend this year’s Campout ends tonight, Oct. 3, at 10 p.m. Students who attend Campout will receive six extra loyalty points, increasing the chance of receiving men’s basketball tickets when the season starts, including a ticket to the UNC game. This year Campout has partnered with Primetime with the Pack — the former Red and

White game — to kick off the basketball team’s season. Primetime with the Pack includes two intersquad scrimmages with the men’s basketball team and a three-onthree basketball tournament for students. Primetime with the Pack will be open to the public. Primetime with the Pack has also been chosen as one of five midnight madness kickoff events to be shown on ESPNU. The event will be held in the PNC Arena Friday, Oct. 12, and there is

a limit of 3,500 people who can attend. Similar to previous years’ Campouts, there will be random checkpoints throughout the night and students must follow the N.C. State Code of Student Conduct as well as Campout guidelines. Wolfline buses will be running between main campus and the PNC Arena, though there may initially be traffic delays due to State Fair traffic near the arena.


Page 2

PAGE 2 • WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

TECHNICIAN

THROUGH KATHERINE’S LENS

Fee increases recommended

The front page photo in Tuesday’s edition of Technician should be credited as photo by Bobby Klimczak.

Staff Report

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Mark Herring at editor@ technicianonline.com

WEATHER WISE Today:

81/66 Chance of rain.

“For the truth is a terrible thing”

Tomorrow:

77 59

PHOTO BY KATHERINE HOKE

S

enior in economics and nuclear engineering Nick Tran performs an excerpt from the formerly banned book, “All the Kings Men” on the practice stage in Thompson Hall on Tuesday. Tran’s performance was part of a production called “Red, White and Banned,” a collaboration between NCSU Libraries and University Theatre in celebration of the 30th anniversary of banned books week. Though this performance was purposed as a way to speak out against censorship, Tran typically uses theater as a “therapeutic way to get away from school work.”

Partly cloudy.

Friday:

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POLICE BLOTTER

Partly cloudy.

SOURCE: WWW.WUNDERGROUND.COM

GET INVOLVED IN TECHNICIAN Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copy edit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday to Thursday 9 a.m. to midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or e-mail Editor-inChief Mark Herring at editor@ technicianonline.com

Sept. 29 1:05 A.M. | ASSIST OTHER AGENCY Off Campus NCSU PD assisted Wake County ALE in locating student who had used fraudulent ID on Hillsborough Street who fled the scene. Student was located and arrested by ABC for underage possession, possession of fraudulent ID, and resisting, delaying or obstructing a public officer. Student was also referred to the University for violations. 1:49 A.M. | SUSPICIOUS PERSON Owen Hall Student reported belligerent non-resident roaming hallways of building. Officer checked the building but did not locate subject.

1:49 A.M. | MEDICAL ASSIST ALCOHOL Owen Hall Units responded and transported student in need of medical assistance. Student will be referred for underage alcohol consumption. 12:06 A.M. | ALCOHOL VIOLATION Tucker Hall Report of several subjects drinking alcoholic beverages. Subjects left the area prior to officer arrival. 2:40 A.M. | MEDICAL ASSIST ALCOHOL Carroll Hall Units responded to student in need of medical assistance. Transport was refused. Student was referred to University for underage alcohol consumption. 5:04 P.M. | BURGLARY Tucker Hall Report student had awoken to find unknown subject in their bed. Subject left room upon her waking. Crime alert was sent out to campus community.

Sept. 30 2:51 A.M. | TAMPER WITH FIRE EQUIPMENT Broughton Hall Units responded to alarm caused by dust from three discharged fire extinguishers. FP notified and responded to scene. Building was aired out and alarm reset. 8:33 A.M. | SUSPICIOUS PERSON Withers Hall Non-student was trespassed after being located in men’s restroom. 2:39 P.M. | INFORMATION UNIVERSITY Public Safety Building Student felt uncomfortable after encountering non-student. Subjects have history regarding same boyfriend. 6:59 P.M. | SUSPICIOUS PERSON Western Manor Apartments Report of someone breaking into mailboxes. Officers made contact with faculty member who was having difficulty opening mailbox. Misunderstanding resolved. No further action. Oct. 1 10:28 A.M. | ASSIST OTHER AGENCY Western Boulevard/Dan Allen Drive NCSU PD assisted RPD with vehicle crash involving injury. Student was struck and injured while attempted to cross Western Boulevard. Student was transported for treatment. 7:06 A.M. | ASSIST OTHER AGENCY

Hillsborough Street RPD requested NCSU PD check address for possible suspect in homicide. Officers determined no such address exists. RPD notified. 7:07 A.M. | ASSIST OTHER AGENCY Wood Hall RPD requested NCSU PD interview student who may have had information regarding homicide. Officers interviewed student and obtained verbal statement regarding suspicious person. Information forwarded to RPD. 8:16 A.M. | LARCENY Tucker Hall Staff member reported theft of pieces of volleyball set. 12:35 P.M. | FOLLOW UP Public Safety Building NCSU PD served warrants on two students for possession with intent to manufacture, sell or deliver marijuana and for maintaining a dwelling in reference to earlier event. Both students were arrested. 2:00 P.M. | LARCENY D.H. Hill Library Student reported theft of unattended bookbag. 8:01 P.M. | FIRE Talley Student Center Units responded to alarm activated as result of electrical malfunction in lighting fixtures that caused smoke in room. No damage or injuries reported. Appropriate notifications made.

ON THE WEB See exclusive audio/photo slideshows. Answer the online poll. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline.com. Check it out!

The Fee Review Advisory Committee met Tuesday afternoon to vote on student fee requests for the 2013-2014 school year. ccording to Student Body President Andy Walsh, the committee has recommended $79.10 in fee increases for next year, or a 5.72 percent increase, working under a 6.5 percent increase cap. “The next step for these recommended fee increases are to be considered by the chancellor — where he can amend them — and then sent to the Board of Trustees for approval. After that they are sent to the Board of Governors for final approval with the recommended tuition increases at N.C. State,” Walsh said.

RECOMMENDED INCREASE: • • • • • • • •

UAB: $4.00 Student Media: $3.70 Student Center Operation: $24.10 Sustainability Fund: $3.00 Recreational Sports: $14.90 Intercollegiate Athletics: $5.00 Student Health Services: $9.40 Education and Technology: $15.00

SOURCE: STUDENT GOVERNMENT

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Today “NC STATE: THEN & NOW” PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBITION AND FREE CLASS Craft Center, All Day REGISTRATION OPEN: DELTA FALL WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS All Day PINHOLE CAMERA CHALLENGE - PHOTOGRAPHY EXIBITION & COMPETITION All Day FALL ENGINEERING CAREER FAIR McKimmon Center 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. TUITION REVIEW ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING Avent Ferry Technology Center, 11 a.m. to 12:15 a.m. Winslow Hall Conference Room AUDITIONS FOR ALICE IN WONDERLAND University Theatre, Thompson Hall 7 p.m. Thursday BUSINESS OPERATIONS CENTERS IMPLEMENTATION TEAM MEETING All Day REGISTRATION OPEN: DELTA FALL WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS All Day

DIRECTED & CHOREOGRAPHED BY

DENIS JONES

STUDENT TICKETS JUST $15!

ART WITHOUT ARTISTS Gregg Museum of Art & Design 12 p.m. to 8 p.m.

WANTED:

Student Speaker for 2012 Fall Graduation Exercises

Applications available at: 1008 Harris Hall or

http://www.ncsu.edu/registrar/graduation

OR VISIT NCTheatre.com

Application Deadline:

Thursday, October 18, 2012

Return applications to: Registration and Records 1008 Harris Hall

FALL BREAK All Day Friday ART WITHOUT ARTISTS Gregg Museum of Art & Design 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. BUSINESS OPERATIONS CENTERS IMPLEMENTATION TEAM MEETING All Day REGISTRATION OPEN: DELTA FALL WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS All Day


News

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 3 • WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012

Biden campaigns in N.C. Laura Wilkinson Deputy News Editor

COURTESY OF WHITEHOUSE.GOV

BOG

continued from page 1

grams at universities for a curriculum that focuses on job training instead. Another criticism is the addition of the recently resigned UNC-Chapel Hill Chancellor Holden Thorp. Thorp recently resigned amid several scandals with the university’s athletics program pertaining to allegations of academic fraud. The BOG said they will continue to watch how he response to the scandals. Other members have sup-

ported Thorp’s membership. Ann Goodnight said Thorp was doing a superb job in leading a campus that brought in $767 million in research funds last year, and Ed McMahan said Thorp was just cleaning up a mess he was inherited, according to Indiana’s The Republic. The net worth of the newest members has been thrown in the mix as well. In an editorial column in Indy Week, the spending of Art Pope, the CEO of the chain of discount stores Variety Wholesalers, was brought up. Pope, through his foun-

Vice President Joe Biden visited North Carolina Tuesday afternoon as part of the Democratic presidential campaign. After canceling a first attempt to land at Charlotte Douglas International Airport due to a thunder cloud storm cell sitting on top of the airport runway, the vice president and motorcade successfully made the second landing attempt. “Air Force Two had a ‘missed approach’ to the runway and proceeded to circle the area while waiting for the weather to clear. Once the weather cleared, the aircraft came back in and then landed on the second approach with no problems,” the vice president’s office said. After landing, Biden spoke at The Fillmore Charlotte, criticizing Republican candidate Mitt Romney’s stance

dation, gave $3 million to Rightchange.com, a conserexpand UNC’s Academic vative political group other Center for Stuchancellors dent Athletes and from East another $600,000 Carolina to N.C. Central UniverUniversity for a sity, UNCconstitutional law Greensinstitute. Also, boro, the spending of North millionaire and Carolina pharmaceutiA&T Unical entrepreneur versity and Fred Eshelman AppalaNorth Carolina Student was mentioned chian State Power Union for his donation University. of $35 million to However, the UNC School of Pharmacy many are upset over the lack and another $3 million to of student and faculty repre-

“The majority of the decisionmaking of this body is set behind closed doors...”

on tax reform. He said the Barack Obama because they Republican’s policies would are government freeloaders hurt the middle and lower who pay no income taxes, classes by giving tax cuts to calling themselves “victims” the rich and raising taxes for who will not “take personal the middle class. responsibility and care for Biden blamed former presi- their lives.” dent George W. Bush for the Both Biden and Obama recession the country is fac- have made a note to mention ing. Romney’s “They talk off-the-cuff a b out t he comments Great Recesduring the sion like it campaign. fell out of the After leavsky in 2008,” i ng C h a rBiden said, lotte, Biden also placing traveled to t he bla me UNC-AsheVice President Joe Biden on Bush’s tax ville, delivcuts and the ering similar wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. remarks to the ones earlier in “What did it do? It produced the day. the Great Recession, which Obama and Romney will absolutely eviscerated the face off Wednesday Oct. 3 middle class.” from 9-10:30 p.m. in a presiBiden also commented on dential debate on the topic of the leaked video in which domestic policy. Romney discounted 47 percent of Americans, saying they will vote for President

“They talk about the Great Recession like it fell out of the sky in 2008.”

sentation on the board. There is currently one student representative and one faculty representative. The North Carolina Student Power Union, which includes N.C. State students, wrote an open letter to the new board requesting more representation and more transparency with the public. “While these meetings are technically listed as “open” to the public, by only meeting in Chapel Hill and not allowing for public comment, thousands of voices are being shut out of this process. The majority of the decision mak-

ing of this body is set behind closed doors; however, the decisions being made will have a profound effect on hundreds of thousands across the state, and for generations to come. The committee will not be able to make decisions that best embody the hopes and needs of the people of North Carolina without developing a critical and truly open process for gaining public input,” the letter stated. The next BOG meeting is Oct. 11 at the Center in Chapel Hill.

Steering Committee works to ensure accreditation Sam DeGrave Deputy News Editor

N.C. State is working on a new Quality Enhancement Program focused on critical and creative thinking to secure its accreditation in 2014. Every 10 years, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools reviews universities and decides whether it will affirm their accreditation. In September 2013, N.C. State will present a complete draft of its QEP. To ensure the program’s de-

velopment, Provost Warwick Arden assembled a 10-person Steering Committee to help develop the University’s QEP. The committee, which is made up of seven faculty, two administrators and one undergraduate student representative, is working with four other groups that together make up the QEP Coordination Committee. According to Stephen Reynolds, a professor of physics and co-chair of the Steering Committee, accreditation is essential to all universities,

however only universities seeking accreditation from SACS are required to present QEPs. Learning in a TechnologyRich Environment, a program developed eight years ago as a part of a QEP, left some lasting impacts at N.C. State such as distance education classes, Reynolds said. However, he said the QEP currently in production will leave a more lasting impression on the University. Reynolds described the process of developing the

QEP as ambitious in comparison to years past. “I want to put N.C. State on the map for innovative thinking,” Reynolds said. There are at least five other universities that are focusing their QEPs on creative or critical thinking, including the University of Louisville, Georgia State University, Meredith University, North Carolina A&T and Wake Forest University, according to Reynolds. Reynolds applied the focus of the QEP to the process of

2008

1958

THEN & NOW

Homecoming 2012 125th Celebration

@NCSUHomecoming • Homecoming.ncsu.edu

developing it, which is composed of both a creative and critical phase. The Steering Committee is still in the creative phase and is currently working on ideas for programs. “We’re still dreaming up stuff right now,” Reynolds said. “The sky is the limit right now.” Reynolds encourages students to visit the website, http://accreditation.ncsu. edu/, to learn more about the process of developing the QEP and to suggest ideas for the program. Some students are skeptical about the worth of their opinions to the Steering Committee after a spring Chancellor’s Liaison meeting. Bryan Hum, a senior in international studies, attended

the meeting and said that despite asking students for QEP suggestions, the Steering Committee chose a focus that was not favored by the majority of students. According to Hum, the committee seemed to value the student’s opinions, but he did not believe the committee respected what they had to say. Though Reynolds was not involved in the Chancellor’s Liaison meeting, he encourages students to still submit ideas for the program. “I have already heard about the unhappiness among the students, but for whatever reason, that decision got made, and I hope students won’t decide not to participate in what I still think is a very exciting opportunity,” Reynolds said.


Viewpoint

PAGE 4 • WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012

{

OUR VIEW

TECHNICIAN

}

Presidential debates...watch them This newspaper anticipates that at 9 p.m. tonight students will gather into crowded dorms and apartments by the tens to — not get an early, drunken start on the weekend — watch the first of the three presidential debates. Perhaps it’s possible to combine the two activities into a clever drinking game in which you, the viewers, drink every time a candidate has a gaffe. Although, with the prevailing sentiment being that these debates are a forum for candidates to do a lot of talking without really saying anything, maybe there won’t be much drinking. Who knows? It might be worth a shot… Some may feel that Technician is

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief. beating a dead horse with copious election coverage and urging students to stay involved — and perhaps we are — but we feel it would be an affront to democracy if every student on campus didn’t vote. Of course, when we say “vote” we don’t only mean choosing between the two candidates from major political parties — although the third party candidates fall behind in celebrity, they’re still important. So it’s equally important that third party voters watch the debates, too. Perhaps they’ll find that they can align themselves with a major

par t y candidate who promises to lead in a way minority parties like. Or, after watching the debates, third party member may reaffirm their loyalty to their parties. For voters on the fence, these debates will be an opportunit y to watch candidates answer questions on the spot. And although a lot of their answers may be at-

tempts to avoid “dangerous” questions, there will surely be genuine moments. An op-ed in the Los Angeles Times by Doyle McManus points to an interesting trend in debates between incumbent presidents and new candidates: the challenger usually wins on stage. Jimmy Carter out-debated Gerald Ford in

“We feel it would be an affront to democracy if every student on campus didn’t vote.”

1976 and lost four years later to Ronald Reagan. And Reagan “stumbled in his first debate against challenger Walter F. Mondale.” If Romney can keep the trend going to his advantage, then it’s likely that he’ll close the gap between him and Obama in major polls. Lately, it seems that media outlets have reported on little more than gaffes in terms of election coverage. Perhaps there will be more to report on after the debate, but nonetheless, it’s an opportunity to hear the candidates unfiltered. Send your thoughts to viewpoint@ technicianonline.com

Crazy little thing called busyness

W

hether you are a senior in the final stretch of your collegiate career, a little baby freshman who is just starting this new phase in your life, or you fall somewhere in between the two extremes, you are all hearing the same thing: get involved. If only I had Lauren a dollar for Noriega e ver y t i me Staff Columnist I have been told that succinct piece of advice over the years, I probably wouldn’t have to take up the second job that I recently acquired. It seems to be a very common theme going on, providing the ever-present soundtrack to our college lives. It is almost as though, by nature, we are going to sit around and do nothing whatsoever. Surely, this is possible but everyone has their natural inclinations and ways that they will ultimately become immersed in when the right time and opportunity comes. However, the issue that arises is when we have already allot-

ted so much of our time to a few different areas, we are still told that we need to further diversify ourselves. What are we to do? We have to stay competitive with the thousands of other students at this school, therefore we really only have one choice. We are subconsciously forced to add another obligation and commitment to our ever-full plate. After all, if we don’t automatically describe our feelings for the upcoming week as “busy,” we clearly are not doing enough to occupy our time. This leaves us traipsing around campus like zombies, or even more humiliating, using our fitness walking skills to power walk to every meeting, class, job or meal that we may be juggling all in one day. To put it plain and simple, it is completely exhausting. Unfortunately for us all, we don’t have the powers to add more hours into a day, so something has to give. We are forced to make sacrifices and the hardest part is deciding where the sacrifices should fall. As the prudent and ever-intelligent students that we

are, we know that school is not the part of our life to put onto the chopping block. So what is the thing that we ultimately decide that we can live without? In most cases: sleep. If you were to walk around D.H. Hill late at night, you will without a doubt see a plethora of students burrowing in an egg chair just to get a few moments of sleep and rejuvenation. It has gotten incredibly bad, ladies and gentlemen, but what else are we supposed to do to stay current with all of the pressures that are constantly placed on us? In many ways, I wonder if this is just the training ground for the future ahead of us. Maybe not our immediate future, when we are going to be working the lovely nine-to-five work shifts, but maybe past then. I am not a psychic, therefore I cannot predict the future. However I will tell you this, I don’t think that I have ever been as busy as I am right now, so if you want me to save you an egg chair or a coveted spot in the quiet room, just let me know.

{ CAMPUS FORUM }

Give credit where credit is due

I am personally disappointed that the news agency that covered the freeze in 2009 that has over 8,000 views on YouTube has steadfastly refused and forgotten about OUR Campus Freeze. Also, we had informed our people to help take part in NC State Recycles. In addition, I was PROMISED by photographers and some writers from the Technician that OUR event was to be covered. I even sent in an interview statement as asked. To further inform, OUR video will be included in a documentary by Improv Everywhere, the mega-famous YouTube site who did the original one in New York at

{

IN YOUR WORDS

EDITOR’S NOTE

Grand Central Station, which will feature over 200 cities and ours is the ONLY one in RALEIGH with such recognition. As well, it is my hope that Technician knows about the 2 flash mobs planned for Oct. 12 and 19 (Primetime with the Pack and Brickyard) featuring Gangnam Style. Wolf TV, N&O, NBC, ABC, all know. I hope Tech. does too. I understand the policy Technician has regarding about writing stories on things that have passed but this is a major slap in the face to the 420 people, nearly 2,000 views in a month online, and major recognition we have done and hard work we did to 100 people (it was more like 50 cuz I was there) to holding bottles (which is a great cause, don’t get me wrong).

Letters to the editor are the individual opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Technician staff or N.C. State University. All writers must include their full names and, if applicable, their affiliations, including years and majors for students and professional titles for University employees. For verification purposes, the writers must also include their phone numbers, which will not be published.

On behalf of Improv NC State’s 154 members and the 420 people who took part and our resources and media coverage, please resolve to give us our due credit for doing it first and better. Michael Ramos junior, Biological Sciences and Human Biology

}

What are your plans for fall break? BY KATERINE HOKE

“Going to Richmond to visit my girlfriend.” Connor Walsh sophomore aerospace engineering

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695 Editorial Advertising Fax Online

515.2411 515.2029 515.5133 technicianonline.com

“Internship and work on a seven-page paper due Monday. Probably in that order.”

Rachael Jordan, junior in architecture

For the sake of conversation

I

did some quality eavesdropping this evening. In between class and my weekly meeting with Technician I sat down for a quick bite to eat at Porter’s Tavern. Sitting a few chairs down from me at the bar were Anna Betts three Staff Columnist N.C. State professors, one of whom I’ve had before, grabbing a beer and catching up. The trio conversed like close friends, and loudly enough for me to listen to their entire conversation. Admittedly, I enjoy listening to the conversations of strangers. I find these little peaks into their lives fascinating, and often times I have to catch myself before I stare too long. I’m sure that sounds creepy, and to them it probably is, but I just can’t help myself. My favorite game as a child was “spy,” a game in which I would hide behind ingenious things like sofas or, to my mother’s dismay, inside circular clothing racks. Once hidden, I could fully enjoy the candid conversations of the mysterious “adults” that inhabited my world. I would listen as they spoke about grown up things like budgets, jobs and family. I’d imagine myself as an adult at a dinner party, entertaining my friends with a story about my kid or empathizing with them about working

too much.   The conversation between the professors was simultaneously every thing I’d imagined it would be, and much, much more honest. They spoke about teaching namely the frustration they felt when students expected exams to be exactly like the study guide, and the resulting sacrifices they had to make in order to appease students. There was wisdom in their stories which made me think about the college education system in a way I never have before. As college students, we tend to think we’re pretty special. Because of this mentality we expect things to be handed to us. We have certain assumptions regarding our college classroom experience, and the second our experiences don’t align with our expectations, it’s the professor’s fault. If there’s material on the exam that wasn’t on the study guide, we freak out because it wasn’t given to us beforehand. This mind-set is pretty silly when you actually think about it. We’ve gotten accustomed to only having to know what’s on the study guide instead of taking the material in as a whole and fully learning it. Professors now have to tell students exactly what they’ll be tested on to avoid mutiny. We’re doing less and less analyzing and more and more regurgitating. In my opinion, exams should reflect thoughtful interaction with the learned material, not the

repetition of the study guide. We came to college to think and to be challenged, and our professors pursued this career because they desired that dynamic classroom. Somewhere along the way we lost some of that spark. We’ve gotten used to PowerPoints laying out exactly what’s expected of us, and therefore professors present the material in that way because it’s expected of them. As a result, classes have become boring and mundane, and exams have become predictable. Even as an English major, t he discussion in many of my classes is minimal. Students enter the classroom ready to be spoon-fed the material and unprepared to actually engage with it. That type of environment doesn’t yield long-term knowledge­­ - it just makes us good at cramming and regurgitating. It’s what we learn through active engagement with our professors and classmates that really sticks with us. College is interesting, and it’s a level of education that many people aren’t fortunate enough to have. We’re surrounded by opportunities for both personal and academic growth, but we’ve become lazy. Each and every student is lucky to attend this university, and we should treat our education with the respect it deserves.

“As college students, we tend to think we’re pretty special”

Send your thoughts to viewpoint@technicianonline.com

Nicole Guiberteaux graduate student, social work

Editor-in-Chief Mark Herring

News Editor Jessie Halpern

Sports Editor Jeniece Jamison

Viewpoint Editor Ahmed Amer

Photo Editor Brett Morris

editor@technicianonline.com

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Managing Editor Trey Ferguson

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Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2011 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features SCIENCE & TECH

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 5 • WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012

‘Pseudoscience’ professor encourages skepticism Katie Sanders Senior Staff Writer

O ver t he yea rs, John Hubisz, a visiting professor of physics, has become a certified expert in ghosts, mystical creatures, UFOs and other paranormal aspects of life. He didn’t intend to get into the paranormal initially, though; his true passion lies in teaching. Hubisz wanted to engage his students more and talk about what they were interested in. One of his main goals was to teach his students that there is always something more to learn and question. Hubisz spent much of his teaching career working with middle school students. Ever since he began teaching in 1955, Hubisz has always required each of his students to ask him at least eight questions throughout the year. He then devoted part of the lesson in each class to answering each and every one of them. “Students ask great questions if you let them,” Hubisz said. “The most common question is ‘Why is the sky blue?’ Then they start asking better and better questions.” Because this means part of the lesson plans are dictated by the students, Hubisz’s lessons often plunge into pseudo-science and false science - topics like Bigfoot, ancient aliens and crop circles seem to pop up every year. “I treat all the questions as legitimate questions,” Hubisz said. “You start asking good questions, and the answers sort of drop out.” However, this means he has had to learn along with the students, since the supernatural wasn’t originally his area of expertise. Hubisz found many students asked questions relating to the paranormal. Over the years, he has

SAM O’BRIEN/TECHNICIAN

Dr. John Hubisz, visiting faculty member of the physics department, talks about his career as a teacher. Students asking questions about myths like the Bermuda Triangle got him interested in studying physics and finding out why those myths could not possibly be true. “It’s been disproved in so many ways, and yet people still want to believe it,” he said.

acquired a personal research library on the paranormal of more than 20,000 books on subjects like the Abominable Snowman, Nessie and the Bermuda Triangle. For example, he has primary sources to show that Nessie the Loch Ness monster was made up to combat the economic depression in the area; after her invention, hotels and restaurants around Loch Ness filled. The inventors even came out and explained their motivations later. However, people still believe in the lake monster, even after submarines in the 1930s were sent in search of her and came back emptyhanded. Hubisz has also done extensive research on the Bermuda Triangle. For enthusiasts he

recommends two books on he has “busted” have been the subject, arguing for and easily explained through against the area’s mysticism: elementary physics. Often The Bermuda Triangle by the strange noises “ghosts” Charles Berlitz and Bermu- produce can be stopped by da Triangle opening winMystery: dows that tend Solved by to vibrate or Larry Kusreplacing old che. floorboards This that have gotexpertise ten damp and has pulled warped with Hubisz the temperaJohn Hubisz, pseudoscience into a l l ture changes. expert and physics professor sor ts of “There are paranorlots and lots mal projof simple exects. planations for some of the “One time I got a call that things people think of as this house was haunted, and ghosts,” Hubisz said. they wanted to get out of their Hubisz also helps publish lease,” Hubisz said. the Skeptical Inquirer, a biHe has yet to see a real monthly magazine that exghost, though. All the ghosts amines all that is new in the

GraDUaTe

Fa I r Interested In Graduate school?

“Students will ask great questions if you let them.”

world of the supernatural. Hubisz is most involved with the magazine’s investigations of UFOs. The Skeptical Inquirer will send out group of experts in aerospace and photography to where UFOs have been spotted to ask questions and analyze the area and photographs. “Unidentified flying objects are great,” Hubisz said. “I’d really like to see one that’s unidentified. Because most often someone … is going to come back and tell you that it wasn’t unidentified at all, we know exactly what it was.” For example, UFO sightings always follow Russian rocket launches because each rocket drops two fuel packages. It is so predictable that members of the Skeptical In-

quirer staff can now, based on the Russian launch schedule, predict where and when they will occur. Hubisz’ teaching method of encouraging students to ask questions has led Hubisz to more than the supernatural; it has also helped to shape some of the more practical problems he sees with the education system. Teachers at middle schools where Hubisz once taught have even begun to adopt his methods. Hubisz believes that this line of teaching has the potential to reinvigorate the school system. Tight now, he says, we teach too much from often-misleading textbooks. “Teachers have to fix this. There’s no two ways about it,” Hubisz said.

Support N.C. State’s Grains of Time & Ladies in Red in Dorton Arena on Thursday, Oct. 11. Buy your tickets now for a great night of college a cappella music!

Attend the 2012 Graduate Program Fair

Hosted by NC State University Career Development Center

Thursday, October 11, 2012 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

nc state McKimmon center -Corner of Gorman St. and Western Blvd.

Over 60 graduate programs are registered to attend!

Sponsored by The Princeton Review

For tickets and more info on State Fair concerts go to

www.ncstatefair.org

Technician was there. You can be too. The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information.


PAGE 6 • WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012

Features

TECHNICIAN


Sports

TECHNICIAN

AMERSON continued from page 8

Let’s go back to the Chickfil-A Bowl against Tennessee on Aug. 30th. A Tennessee team, who last year was 106th in the country in total offense, managed to burn Amerson not once, but twice for huge plays. Tennessee quarterback Tyler Bray aired it out for Cordarrelle Patterson, who completed a 41-yard touchdown in the back of the endzone. On the second big play, Bray found Zach Rogers a good 10 yards behind N.C. State’s last defender, leaving Amerson shrugging, as if to ask, ‘where is my over-thetop help from the free safety?’ These total communication breakdowns in the secondary

ROUNDUP continued from page 8

would help me out / Before they ever let the other half find out / But if they could see how far I’ve let you down / Anyone with half a heart would let me drown.” It’s getting uglier for Georgia Tech, who was blown out in Atlanta 49-28 by Middle Tennessee State. That is the

PAGE 7 • WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012

gave Tennessee 14 points, a large momentum swing, and eventually, a win. To be sure, not all of the loose coverage fell on Amerson in the Tennessee game. It is one thing to get an interception against Southern Alabama or The Citadel in a blowout, playing against stagnant triple option offenses. It is an entirely different story playing against high-octane offenses and the game is tight, but the coverage isn’t. On Saturday against Miami, we saw that same Amerson shrug of disbelief that has become much too familiar for State fans. State allowed 566 passing yards and five passing touchdowns from Miami quarterback Stephen Morris. Many will pin the loss on graduate student

quarterback Mike Glennon’s tormenting interception that couldn’t have come at a worse time, when all State had to do was run out the clock until overtime. Yes, Glennon’s turnover put a lot of pressure on a defense that had been struggling all day. But, after rewatching the next play, where Morris hurled a 62-yard prayer toward the endzone to Phillip Dorsett, at least one of the three backs in the area would make a play on the ball, right? To me, that concession was unacceptable. Morris broke the all-time ACC record with his 566 passing yards on Saturday. As a defender, that is not the side of a record that you want to be on. In order for the Wolfpack to succeed in the rest of the season, they need

Amerson and his secondary to step up and set the tone on defense. Players and coaches will be the first to tell you that to be a contender in any league, you have to be able to win close games.Doing the little things, particularly making effort plays and communicating to each other, compels a unit to be stronger than their one star player. Right now, the Pack is 97th out of 120 in pass defense, despite the freakishly strong and blazingly fast defenders they have. In order to improve that number, the initiative is simple: get Amerson, Wolff, Bishop, Johnson and Wilson on the same page, and find a way to win close games.

same Blue Raiders team who lost to McNeese State earlier in the year and then obliterated an ACC team in its own stadium. 

Cause we were all once young and stupid.” Call the ‘Canes reckless and in over their heads, but Al Golden has Miami on its way back to national relevancy. Playing No. 9 Notre Dame up in Chicago might be a little bit too much to ask for UM, but the ACC’s leader in passing attempts by its starting quarterback (31 more than Mike Glennon) will have some fun throwing the

ball around the lot. 

FSU

continued from page 8

McNabb did to me when I first went to Boston College… He’s a good pocket passer but he’s much more dangerous when he gets on the perimeter, unlike Morris who would get out of the pocket and want to throw it first. With Manuel, it’s probably 50-50 whether he’s going to throw it or pull it down.” Wolff echoed his coach’s sentiments. “It’s going to be difficult,” Wollf said. “Stephen Morris ran to throw the ball; E.J. Manuel can do both, so we’re going to have to work on containing the quarterback.” O’ Brien is fielding a banged up offensive line reminiscent

of his early years in Raleigh when State suffered a myriad of injures. The veteran coach knows the Pack will have its work cut out against the Florida State defense, which is loaded with upperclassmen and did not give up a touchdown until its fourth game of the season. This Saturday night, N.C. State will look to summon more of the magic that has led the Wolfpack to have one of the more successful records against Florida State in recent years. State has won three of the last five matchups in Raleigh, including a memorable 28-24 win at CarterFinley Stadium in 2010 that was sealed by Nate Irving recovering a Christian Ponder fumble in the final minute.

 

Miami (4-1, 3-0 ACC) “Young and Stupid” by Close to Home “I’ve struggled and fought / Given all my efforts and thoughts / I’ve suffered for this / Your words show your ignorance / Let it go, let it go /

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North Carolina (3-2, 0-1 ACC) - “Blue Light” by Bloc Party “And you didn’t even notice / When the sky turned blue / And you couldn’t tell the difference / Between me and you.” As expected, Carolina had no issues beating Idaho (0-5) and now hosts Virginia Tech in a match up that looks a

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lot more competitive than it did in the preseason. Bryn Renner, the conference’s leader in touchdown passes, has been sensational early on for UNC and will look toward continuing that against a struggling Hokies defense.  Virginia (2-3, 0-1 ACC) - “Paper Wings” by Rise Against “And I can’t tell if you’re laughing / Between each

smile there’s a tear in your eye / There’s a train leaving town in an hour / It’s not waiting for you, and neither am I. After losing to a good Louisiana Tech team, Virginia now has to travel to Durham for a game against a Duke team with a ton to play for. With only four rushing touchdowns this season, the running game has turned from a strength into a stagnant part of the Cavs’ offense.

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Solution to Monday’s puzzle

10/2/12

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

© 2012 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

Solution to Thursday’s puzzle

10/5/12

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

© 2012 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

indie rock / hip-hop / dance / electronica / metal / folk / post rock / local / soul / a capella

ACROSS 1 Hunger hint 5 Shorn shes 9 Indonesian island 13 Pinza of “South Pacific” 14 Pulsate 16 Yaks, e.g. 17 Endures an onslaught of criticism 20 Prognosticator 21 RR terminus 22 Center opening? 23 Aus. setting 24 Puts the kibosh on 26 Kind of contact banned by the NFL 32 Golden Bears’ school, familiarly 33 “Joanie Loves Chachi” co-star 34 Like James Bond 35 Carpeting computation 37 Cyclist Armstrong, or what completes the ensemble found in the four long across answers 40 It may be impish 41 24-hr. news source 43 “If __ a nickel ...” 45 Category 46 Use a sun visor, say 50 Currently occupied with 51 She, in Lisbon 52 Justice Dept. bureau 55 Greeting card figure, maybe 56 Pacific Surfliner and Acela 60 Vulnerable spot 63 Muslim pilgrim 64 Passover month 65 Melville South Seas novel 66 Candy bar with a cookie center 67 More than just hard to find 68 Stir-fry cookware DOWN 1 Cop’s quarry

10/3/12

By Michael Dewey

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Sports

COUNTDOWN

• 3 days until the football team takes on No. 3 Florida State at Carter-Finley Stadium.

INSIDE

• Page 7: More commentary on junior cornerback David Amerson.

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 8 • WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012

FOOTBALL

Pack hopes to replicate magic Rob McLamb

Payton named to Biletnikoff watch list

Staff Writer

Football redshirt junior wide receiver Quintin Payton is one of 11 players that have been added to the Biletnikoff Award Watch List. The Biletnikoff Award is given annually to college football’s top wide receiver. This season Payton ranks sixth in ACC receiving yards per game and 10th in receptions. He also leads the Wolfpack in catches with 19 and in receiving yards with 421. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Men’s basketball ranked No. 9 The Sporting News has ranked the Wolfpack No. 9 in its preaseason top-25 poll. The publication also ranked Duke No. 6 and North Carolina No. 13. The Pack is also ranked No. 4 according to the Blue Ribbon Yearbock and No. 6 by ESPN’s Andy Katz. The Sporting News also named junior forward Calvin Leslie a preseaon All-American. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

ATHLETIC SCHEDULE October 2012 Su

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Friday WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL V. MIAMI Coral Gables, Fla., 7 p.m.

N.C. State will try to rebound from its undisciplined performance last weekend in Miami when it hosts the No. 3 Florida State Seminoles at Carter-Finley Stadium on Saturday. Gametime is 8 p.m. and the matchup will be televised on ESPN2. The Wolfpack (3-2, 0-1) will look to avoid starting the conference season with two straight losses for the first time since 2009. State dropped its first four league games in route to a 5-7 record that season. Head Coach Tom O’Brien was not thrilled with the Pack’s performance in Miami Gardens last Saturday. State had six turnovers along with 14 penalties for 100 yards in a sloppy performance that was out of character for the Pack since the former Marine took charge of the program six years ago. “That’s what is frustrating at this point, to make those eight pre-snap penalties that we did on Saturday,” O’Brien said. “We’ve been so good the last couple of years of being the least penalized team in the conference.” Last season, State had an equally bewildering performance on the road at Boston College before coming home to upset the 7th ranked, and future ACC champion, Clemson Tigers, 37-13. O’Brien sees some similar-

PHOTO COURTESY OF ETHAN HYMAN/NEWS AND OBSERVER

N.C. State freshman running back Shadrach Thornton (10) fumbles the ball after being hit by Miami’s Gionni Paul (36) during the first half Saturday, Sept. 29, at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens, Fla.

ities with the game this week and is hoping for more of the same against the favored Seminoles. “Certainly the Clemson game, they were a top-10 team,” O’Brien said. “That’s the challenge and that’s the great part of coaching, being around kids and making sure they get focused. Sometimes here we lost our focus but I think we’ll be focused on Saturday night with this team coming in.” Graduate student safety Earl Wolff, part of the State secondary that got burned for an ACC record

566 yards passing by Miami junior quarterback Stephen Morris, will face stiffer competition this week against Florida State signal-caller E.J. Manuel. The Raeford, N.C. native also feels emboldened by the Pack’s upset win over the Tigers last season. “I would say a lot of people had that same mindset [before the 2011 Clemson game]; they didn’t think we could win,” Wolff said. But as a team it’s all up to us, it’s how we prepare, practice and play Saturday. We made a whole lot of mistakes

against Miami that shouldn’t have happened. You have to learn from it or it will continue to happen.” In order for the Pack to have a chance, according to O’ Brien, stopping Manuel will be essential. “The first thing we have to do with [EJ Manuel] is try to keep him in the pocket,” O’Brien said. “Manuel got out of the pocket last year and we missed him with six guys, he kind of ran over us. “He looks a lot like Donovan

MEN’S SOCCER V. DUKE Dail Soccer Stadium, 6:30 p.m.

Technician’s

RIFLE V. NEBRASKA Lincoln, Neb., All Day SWIMMING & DIVING AT ALL NORTH CAROLINA INVITATIONAL Greensboro, N.C., TBA Saturday FOOTBALL V. FLORIDA STATE Carter-Finley Stadium, 8 p.m.

very much alive with a manageable schedule and an offense that is averaging over 500 yards per game. 

ACC No. 3 Florida State (5-0, 2-0 - “On Top” by The Killers ROUNDUP ACC) “I’ve been down across a road or

COMPILED BY SEAN FAIRHOLM

ATLANTIC DIVISION

RIFLE V. MURRAY STATE Lincoln, Neb., All Day SWIMMING & DIVING AT ALL NORTH CAROLINA INVITATIONAL Greensboro, N.C., TBA WOMEN’S TENNIS AT USTA NATIONAL TENNIS CENTER INVITATIONAL New York, N.Y., All Day Sunday VOLLEYBALL V. FLORIDA STATE Tallahassee, Fla., 1 p.m. WOMEN’S SOCCER V. MARYLAND Dail Soccer Stadium, 1 p.m. WOMEN’S TENNIS AT USTA NATIONAL TENNIS CENTER INVITATIONAL New York, N.Y., All Day

DID YOU KNOW? The men’s basketball team’s last appearence in the AP top-25 poll came in the 2007-08 season.

Randy Woodson Chancellor

Boston College (1-3, 0-2 ACC) “The Artist In The Ambulance” by Thrice “My world goes black before I feel an angel lift me up / And I open bloodshot eyes into fluorescent white / They flip the siren, hit the lights, close the doors and I am gone.” After failing to beat an FBS team in the month of September, it will take nothing short of divine intervention to get Boston College into a bowl game and save its coach’s job.  No. 15 Clemson (4-1, 1-1 ACC) - “Stu’s Song” by The Hangover Soundtrack “What do tigers dream of when they take a little tiger snooze? Do they dream of mauling zebras, or Halle Berry in her Catwoman suit? Don’t you worry your pretty striped head.” Clemson avoided a hangover by going on the road and beating BC, 45-31. Hosting a defenseless Georgia Tech team should not be an issue this weekend, and aspirations of a BCS at-large bid are still

Andy Walsh Student Body President

Tom Suiter

WRAL Sports Anchor

two / But now I’ve found the velvet sun / That shines on me and you / In the back, uh huh, I can’t crack / We’re on top.” Florida State wasn’t perfect on the road against USF, as the Seminoles used 10 points off of three turnovers to cement a victory. A night game against a lost and confused N.C. State team awaits, but the ‘Noles can’t afford to sleepwalk if they want to stay in National Championship contention.  Maryland (2-2, 0-0 ACC) - “Turtle” by Alana Davis “Little boy wishes he wasn’t small / He’d give his turtle to be six feet tall / He’s got photos of Shaq and Ewing up on his wall / And he’d try a jump shot but he’s afraid he’ll fall down.” Maryland is the final conference team to play an ACC game as they host Wake Forest this weekend. It’s still a long road ahead up in College Park, but freshmen Stefon Diggs and Perry Hills give Randy Edsall’s team a lot of potential. 

Not sure how I got it, not a dollar in my pocket / And it kinda looks just like you / Mixed with Zach Galifianakis.” The good news is that Mike Glennon somehow has a reliable running game going into arguably the biggest match up of his career. The bad news is the player who was supposed to be a star on the other side of the ball has seemingly checked out mentally, and there’s plenty of blame to go around to his teammates — State is an embarrassing 101st in the country for pass defense.

COASTAL DIVISION Duke (4-1, 1-0 ACC) - “Feels Like The First Time” by Foreigner  “I have waited a lifetime / Spent my time so foolishly / But now that I’ve found you / Together we’ll make history.” The 2012 Duke Blue Devils, ladies and gentlemen... if Duke can defend its home turf this weekend against Virginia (2-3), the Devils will be one win away from getting back to a bowl game for the first time since current college freshmen were born.  Georgia Tech (2-3, 1-2 ACC) - “Half a Heart” by Barenaked Ladies “Anyone with a half a heart

N.C. State (3-2, 0-1 ACC) - “Tonight, Tonight” by Hot Chelle Rae “I woke up with a strange tattoo /

Mark Herring

Editor-in-Chief of Technician

Jeniece Jamison Sports Editor of Technician

FSU continued page 7

COMMENTARY

Exiled to Amerson Island Will Raynor Staff Writer

While watching the N.C. State vs. Miami football game on Saturday, I’m sure I was not the only one caught yelling at the TV when the Wolfpack defense repetitively conceded huge chunks of yardage due to blown coverage. Let’s face it, the secondary has been having some problems this season in both communication, and, although difficult to bring up, maybe in effort as well. When State plays big-name teams with capable offenses and deep threat receivers, those teams have, to put it lightly, presented challenges. Opposing wide receivers have been able to get separation far too easily and often. Fans must be confused as to how junior cornerback David Amerson, who has tied the record for most interceptions in Wolfpack history with 16, can only throw his hands up in confusion after allowing a pair of soft touchdowns on Saturday.

ROUNDUP continued page 7

Sean Fairholm

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician

Nolan Evans

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician

Jonathan Stout

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician

AMERSON continued page 7

Pulse of the Pack WKNC Sports Talk Radio Show

Trey Ferguson

Managing Editor of Technician

N.C. State v. Florida State

N.C. State

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Georgia v. South Carolina

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Washington v. Oregon

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LSU v. Florida

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Nebraska v. Ohio St.

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Miami v. Notre Dame

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Georgia Tech v. Clemson

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Oklahoma v. Texas Tech

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Virginia v. Duke Arizona v. Stanford

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Technician - October 3, 2012