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TECHNICIAN          

monday september

10 2012

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Campus views of Arizona’s Women’s Health and Safety Act Megan Dunton

The main mission of the Women’s Center is to be a catalyst and resource that advances gender On Aug. 23, Arizona lawmakers equity and social justice through passed a law titled the Women’s education, advocacy and leadership Health and Safety Act, which de- for the campus community. The fines pregnancy as starting two center’s main vision is a Wolfpack weeks before conception. community that champions gender This law means that women in equity and promotes respect for all. Arizona are no longer legally alHowever, many do not see this law lowed to get an abortion after the as a negative, such as the Univertwentieth week of pregnancy. This sity’s chapter of Students for Life. is based on the disputed medical “We agree with the bill because theory that fetuses can feel pain it saves lives and makes abortion after twenty weeks of pregnancy. safer,” Teresa Pincus, president of Before the law, women in Ari- Students for Life and a junior in zona were legally civil engineering, allowed to get an said. abortion up until Pincus said the the twenty-third bill made abortions or twenty-fourth safer through new week, as established regulations includby the historical ing hospital privicourt case, Roe v. leges, stating that Wade. women who unTeresa Pincus, In North Carodergo an abortion president of Students for Life lina, a woman is must be within 30 allowed to get an miles of a hospital abortion without a medical rea- in case something goes wrong and son up until the twentieth week are in need of medical attention. of pregnancy. After the twentieth The FDA must also approve drugs week, there has to be a medical rea- and equipment used in abortions. son to abort a pregnancy that would The main mission of Students for threaten the life and health of the Life is to inform and educate people mother. about the pro-life position. “Our Ashley Simons-Rudolph, director main goal is to share our idea that of the N.C. State Women’s Center, all life should be protected from has been following Arizona’s Wom- birth to natural death,” Pincus said. en’s Health and Safety Act and is Pincus expressed that Students well aware of the new law’s back- for Life focused on both the life and ground. health of the mother and the fetus The Women’s Center does not instead of just the mother. take an official stand on abortion. Abortion has been a hot topic in However, it does facilitate discus- politics. Arizona was not the only sions to enable people to form their own opinions on women’s issues. ARIZONA continued page 3 Staff Writer

NATALIE CLAUNCH/TECHNICIAN

Members of Costa Rican dance group Pura Vida perform at Fiesta del Pueblo in Moore Square Sunday, Sept. 9. The festival was a celebration of Latino community and culture within Raleigh.

Fiesta del Pueblo advocates Latino identity Mark Herring Editor-in-Chief

As Triangle residents came to Moore Square in Downtown Raleigh Sunday to celebrate Latino culture at the 19th annual Fiesta del Pueblo, civic organizers seized the opportunity to educate Hispanic voters. Fiesta del Pueblo, an event organized by Hispanic advocacy group, El Pueblo, Inc., attracted Latinos and non-Latinos alike to share typical Latin American food, music and performing arts. Merchants of artisan goods represented 19 Latino countries and food vendors lined Martin Street, selling tacos, pupusas, empadas and arepas. As hundreds of cultural enthu-

siasts filled the closed-off park, civil liberty societies, political groups and representatives of law firms manned booths to educate the growing Latino constituency about civil services and political platforms. Rep. David Price spoke to the crowd of visitors, with the help of a translator to reach out to the bilingual audience. Price represents North Carolina’s fourth district, which contains half of Wake County. “[At the Democratic National Convention] there were also people we never heard of, ordinary Latino citizens, residents of this country, aspiring to a better life, especially those young people we call Dreamers, many of whom are here today,”

Price said. “The Dreamers — what they want is not only to remain in this country, but to pursue their education … we should have passed the Dream Act.” As politicians campaigned at the event, volunteers like Adam Bungarner, 2012 graduate in food science and nutrition, worked with El Pueblo, a non-partisan organization, to register voters. “We’re getting people to register to vote because it’s really important here in North Carolina,” Bungarner said. “At the RNC and the DNC, you could see how both parties were con-

FIESTA continued page 2

“...all life should be protected from birth to natural death...”

Cain to speak on Wednesday Staff Report

TYLER ANDREWS/TECHNICIAN

Herman Cain speaks at the Wake County Republican Convention on March 22, 2012.

Herman Cain will visit Stewart Theatre Wednesday evening, bringing his College Truth Tour 2012 and campaign against President Barack Obama on behalf of the GOP to campus. Since Cain suspended his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination primary Dec. 2, 2011, the Tea Party activist hasn’t suspended his tour across the nation to advocate for conservative policies. Cain visited North Carolina in April while on his Solutions Revolution tour, stopping by UNCChapel Hill and the Wake County

GOP Convention at the N.C. State Fairgrounds. “If there is one thing I know for sure, is that the young people of America have to get in the game to ensure that the decisions and policies coming out of Washington will lead them to a future that allows them to live their American dream,” Cain said in a promotional video on his website. “Unfortunately at this present time, that future does not look so bright.” Cain visited the University of Iowa and Iowa State University

CAIN continued page 3

Initiative promotes student diversity Jake Moser Staff Writer

The N.C. State Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity was recently awarded a $3.6 million grant by the National Institutes of Health. The program aims to get student groups who are typically underrepresented involved in the fields of biomedical and behavioral research. Specifically, the IMSD wants to bring the social and cultural perspectives of these groups to the research field in order to create a diverse workforce. The $3.6 million grant was paid for by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, which is part of the NIH, an organization that actively supports diversity in the field of research. The NIH started out in 1887 as a one-room hospital for Marines and merchant seamen and now gives out millions of dollars in research grants every year. In addition, the NIH’s goals are to improve and

protect national health as well as to expand the knowledge base in medical and associated sciences by investing in research. The Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity selects 30 promising freshmen and sophomores and follows them throughout their time at the University. The program funds mentored lab research to give these students experience and guidance during their undergraduate years. Other services provided by the IMSD include supplying undergrads with courses tailored to the biomedical and behavioral research fields and preparing students to enroll in and complete a doctoral program in these fields. After graduation, the IMSD provides support and two years of funding to students pursuing their doctorates. Trudy Mackay, principle investigator for the IMSD, believes diversity in a lab will create a more efficient atmosphere. “The major issue is that scientists, professors and researchers in

the biomedical and behavioral research fields are mostly white males, and everyone else is heavily underrepresented,” Mackay said. “We want everyone else to get real meaningful lab experience and to understand the research culture. Our goal is to get less biased representations.” The grant was given to the N.C. State IMSD after a proposal was written to the NIH. “Diversity is very important because it allows us to fully tap all of this nation’s resources,” David Shafer, co-principle investigator for the IMSD, said. “Having people from different backgrounds doing research makes us more competitive. We want to ensure that everyone has an opportunity to pursue a career in research.” The N.C. State IMSD is closely associated with the North Caro-

DIVERSITY continued page 3

KATHERINE HOKE/TECHNICIAN

The Love Language performs outside CAM Raleigh for a Hopscotch Music Festival day party on Friday Sept. 7.

COMMENTARY

Hopscotch shows off new music and local talent On the first weekend in September, residents of the Triangle displayed everything that was, is and will be exceptional about its music scene. Despite intermittent thundershowers, Hopscotch Mu sic Fe s t iv a l Will Brooks 2012 showed its Staff Writer local-music guns while mixing in international artists in a presentation that showed how truly world-class the Raleigh-area’s music scene has become. Among the talent at Hopscotch were UNC-Chapel Hill alumnus Sam Logan and N.C. State alumnus Derek Torres, both of brother bands Lilac Shadows, led by Logan, and T0W3RS, led by Torres. The musicians made a special scavenger hunt EP release over the weekend. T0W3RS’ new EP “Wyatt” was split up into cassette tape singles, or “Cassingles,” and hid throughout downtown Raleigh.

“Each cassette coincides with a letter of the record, which is Wyatt,” Torres said. “There is another separate Hopscotch artist on every B-side.” Among the bands featured on the tapes’ b-sides were Gross Ghost, Toddlers, Lollipops, Jenny Bestzt and Lilac Shadows, who played at various shows over the weekend. T0W3RS gave a solid yet obscure performance on Saturday night, using projectors to display moving art and two gymnasts in bright colored unitards who danced on stage at the Contemporary Art Museum, Raleigh. Projections were a common theme of many shows, including Dan Deacon’s memorable performance. On Friday night, Baltimore’s Deacon blended his synth-heavy compositions with flashing lights, projections and even a phone-application, as the crowd was part of

HOPSCOTCH continued page 5


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CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

TECHNICIAN

DIVERSITY

THROUGH KATHERINE’S LENS

continued from page 1

In the Tuesday, Sept. 4 edition of Technician the article, “A tragic tailgating shooting: prisoners’ perspectives,” the interviews were conducted by Nathan Hardin. Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Mark Herring at editor@ technicianonline.com

WEATHER WISE Today:

80/55 Meditation Station

Sunny

Tomorrow: PHOTO BY KATHERINE HOKE

80 56 Sunny

N

ick Casale, a freshman in electrical engineering peacefully rests in a window sill in Daniels Hall on Sunday as he listens to a dharma talk on attachment. The talk, given by Ajahn Brahm (through YouTube), was part of the Buddhist Philosophies club’s sunday meeting which also included a half hour of sitting and walking meditation. “I really got into Buddhism this summer when I started reading books about it,” Casale said. The club meets Wednesdays at 7 p.m. and Sundays at 11 a.m.

Wednesday:

81 56 Sunny

ARIZONA continued from page 1

SOURCE: ZACHARY FAIR & CAMERON MOORE

state to limit abortion to 20 weeks. Alabama, Indiana, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Nebraska and

Oklahoma already limited abortion based on the debated medical theory that a fetus can feel pain once a certain number of weeks have passed. W hen asked how she thought groups would respond to the new legislation, Simons-Rudolph said the

women’s rights community will follow it very closely and advocates of women’s rights will consider the health and ethical consequences of the new law. She believes that many groups will be engaged and continue to provide support for women.

However, Pincus noted a new bill making its way through the North Carolina legal system that says a woman has to have an ultrasound performed 24 hours before she can have an abortion done as to know the development of the fetus.

lina Alliance to create Opportunity Through Education, which is funded by the Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate Program. Like the IMSD, these groups help underrepresented groups get their doctoral degrees and enter the research field or the professoriate in science, technology, engineering, mathematics or the social sciences. The IMSD also offers services to graduate students. These students work in the lab as research assistants and have the opportunity to attend and participate in academic conferences. Mackay has faith in the effectiveness of the IMSD and thinks the program will be a success thanks to the new grant. “We have some great students in the program now, and I want to see that this program really has an impact,” Mackay said. “I want to demonstrate our capacity to produce Ph.D.s, and hopefully we can help students realize their goals.”

Federal law in North Carolina says abortion is legal. However, the North Carolina law is not based on the assertion that the fetus can feel pain after 20 weeks.

Carmichael locker room undergoes changes Alex Petercuskie Staff Writer

NATALIE CLAUNCH/TECHNICIAN

A vendadora pours piña colada at the Fiesta del Pueblo in Moore Square Sunday, Sep 9. The fiesta was a celebration of latino community and culture within Raleigh.

FIESTA

continued from page 1

tent for the Hispanic votes. The Latino community in North Carolina is huge, not just in numbers, but in influence — they contribute so much to our economy and are invaluable to our society.” Though the political presence was strong, Guadalupe Jimenez, a junior in extension education, said El Pueblo balanced the political outreach to not favor any particular party. Jimenez, a Mexican American and president of Mi Familia Hispanic student society, said the event was successful in embracing all aspects of Latino culture. “It’s great to see so many

CAIN

continued from page 1

last week and N.C. State is the third stop on his 30-school tour. Many of the stops are in contested states with uncertain swing voters, and Cain preceded Obama’s and Romney’s stops in Iowa. “[Romney] understands

Latinos out here, not just to enjoy food and music, but also to learn about services and engage in the community,” Jimenez said. “There aren’t a lot of Latinos encouraged to vote right now — they think, ‘What is my vote going to mean? I’m not going to make a difference.’ But Latino or Hispanic voters are the ones that are going to make that landslide difference in November.” Jimenez said many Latino students are fired up, especially after the failure of the Dream Act in Congress, and said although many Latino students will probably vote Democrat, they’re disillusioned with Obama’s presidency. “Obama promised that he

would pass the Dream Act, but many students are disappointed it was killed in Congress,” Jimenez said. “He couldn’t help that it didn’t pass Congress, but many Latino students want Obama to win for some reasons, but they’re still hesitant that he hasn’t done more for Latinos.” Amidst the smell of typical Latino food on the grill, salsa music in the air and a mixed chatter of Spanish and English, Fiesta del Pueblo demonstrated one thing, according to Jimenez: Latinos are fired up to express themselves and their identity, through politics and culture.

what it takes to run a successful enterprise,” Cain said in a report by the UI Daily Iowan. “It takes vision, strategy and the right people to execute the strategy … Businesses just want the government to get out of the way.” Attendees don’t have to register online, but if they do they will receive VIP treatment and front row-center

seats. Cain will speak at 6 p.m., Wednesday, at Talley Student Center’s Stewart Theatre. Though atendees won’t need tickets to see Cain speak, those who register at www.collegetruthtour.com will receive priority seating.

N.C. State continued the transformation of Carmichael Complex by updating lockers in both the men’s and women’s facilities, but one change has left some students confused.   University Recreation recently added 1,100 half-and full-sized lockers to better accommodate students and faculty. Prior to the addition, students had limited access to cubby lockers only, which were too small for storing backpacks or laptops.  “Cubby lockers were the only options students had. Half-size and full-size lockers faculty and staff could check out,” Heather Sanderson, associate director of operations for University Recreation, said. Currently, students are permitted to only check out lockers for the day, as opposed to a semester or overnight, an option students always had in the past. However, according to Sanderson, the transition is temporary and part of a larger plan to benefit students.   Another reason for the increased number of lockers is the slight advantage faculty and staff had over students when it came to accessing gym facilities. Sanderson said it is uncommon for students of a university to pay more than the faculty and also emphasized that the new lockers, in addition to a new plan, will minimize this disparity. Sanderson has worked for the University during the past two months.  “Faculty and staff pay less than students do. Philosophically, we don’t agree with that,” Sanderson said. “So, we are changing that policy

SAM O’BRIEN/TECHNICIAN

Daily lockers in the women’s locker room in Carmichael Gym.

to where it’s equivalent and they pay more, but that plan is still in transition. The goal is by spring semester to have this going.” Part of the proposed policy will eliminate lockers from g y m membership plans that are available to faculty and alumni in order to create more equal access for students. Currently, a fullservice membership plan includes a lock and locker, clothing, towels and other amenities. With the proposed policy, lockers would be readily available for students and checked out according to one’s needs, whether he or she needs a locker for a day or a semester. Some students think the addition is very helpful, especially for students enrolled in physical education classes. Gina Miani, a freshman in business administration, said she likes using a half-size locker while working out at the gym, and she believes having the option to rent a locker for the day is extremely beneficial to physical education students. While Miani thinks semester lockers would take space away from students renting lockers on a daily basis, some students who have attended

the University longer are confused about the current policy, which does not allow them to check out lockers for a whole semester. Alex Johnson, a senior in business administration, said he was shocked that the University did not notify him in any way about the temporary change, nor did it provide students with any explanation as to why the change took place.   “At the start of the semester there wasn’t an email sent out to forewarn students that they would no longer be able to have a semester locker, thus allowing gym goers and those in a P.E. class to plan ahead,” Johnson said. “The only explanation I ever received was that people complained about some sort of late fees, so they decided to take it away from everyone. Whether this was the real reason, I still don’t know.” Johnson added that the current policy regarding lockers, whether just for the fall or not, has resulted in a huge inconvenience for many students, and the University should have done a better job of informing students.


News

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 3 • MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2012

Obama talks jobs, economy in Iowa Alison Sullivan Staff Writer of The Daily Iowan

Less than 24 hours after his acceptance speech at the Democratic National Convention, President Barack Obama s toppe d i n Iowa City to reiterate the issues he reflected in his speech Thursday night. “We can do better,” Obama said to the crowd of roughly 8,000 packed onto the University of Iowa Pentacrest. “We need to create jobs even faster. We need to come out of this crisis stronger than when we came in. There’s a lot more that we need to do.” Obama said improving the economy was a priority, cutting the deficit and expanding job growth through focusing more on wind and renewable energy, providing more manufacturing jobs and easing the burden of taxes on the middle class. And with students making up a significant portion in attendance, several students said policies that will provide them with jobs post-graduation are important. “I know a lot of college kids who have degrees and

are having a hard time finding jobs,” UI student Steve Kelm said. Though the 19-year-old human physiology major said going into the medical field will be easier to find jobs than others, he wants to make sure the government can provide jobs for his peers. Iowa’s unemployment has maintained much lower levels than the national average, which decreased from 8.3 percent in July to 8.1 percent in August, according to the unemployment report released today by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.  In July, the unemployment rate in Johnson County was 4.6 percent, compared to 5.3 percent the year before, according to statistics from the Iowa Workforce Information Network. Also in attendance across the street in Hubbard Park were a small handful of students protesting the president’s visit. UI sophomore Jake Marks said jobs are the most important thing for him as a college student, and he feels Obama had enough time to straighten things out. “This country’s debt is on me, my kids, my greatgrandkids,” Marks said. “It’s getting pushed onto us.”

Marks said he would feel safer under Republican candidate Mitt Romney and his background as a businessman will be beneficial if he were elected. But one economic expert said turning around the economy isn’t as easy as either the candidates portray. “If there was a magic wand or a secret formula that you could turn around the economy someone would do it and they’d win,” said John Solow, University of Iowa economics professor.  “As a general matter people put way too much emphasis on the individual candidate.” Richard Parker, a lecture in public policy at the Harvard John F. Kennedy School of Government, said the long and slow recovery is typical and the economy will likely improve over the next four years, regardless of who is elected. “This is the sort of recession caused be a financial system meltdown,” Parker said, adding on average that would take seven years to recover. “My own assumption yes things will continue to improve, but not sure at what pace.” Solow said though most candidates declare promises

ADAM WESLEY/THE DAILY IOWAN

President Barack Obama speaks to a crowd of students from the University of Iowa Pentacrest Sept. 9.

of fixing the economy if elected, the state of the economy also faces efforts from Congress and even the global political climate. “Its like a large ship; it turns very slowly,” Solow said. And Obama didn’t forget to reach out to students, telling them by reducing spending in areas like  bailing out banks and reducing military spending, more money could be provided to students to go to college. “All of you who are students here, this is the ticket

to a middle class life,” Obama said. This evening also marked Obama’s continued efforts to snag the youth vote, which includes approximately 46 million eligible 18 to 29-yearolds in the coming election according to the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement. That’s roughly 21 percent of the voting population. And college students are the most likely to vote, according to a survey from CIRCLE. In the 2008 election, 70 percent

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of the college student population voted and 87 percent of registered college students casted a ballot. Before Obama and Biden’s respective wives joined them onstage, Obama rallied the crowd, repeatedly telling them it was up to them to keep the progress he had in motion. “We will win Johnson County. We will win Iowa and we will finish what we started,” he said to the roaring audience.

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PAGE 4 • MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2012

{ AHMED’S VIEW }

Goodbye, Mittens Romney

M

ittens Romney lay still in his litter box—eyes shut, not breathing—dead. I woke up Sunday morning to the alarm on my Blackberry. As I tapped t he screen to d ismiss the alarm, I saw the text from my Ahmed Amer roommate: Viewpoint Editor “The kitten is dead.” I ran out into the living room to find that the text message was, in fact, the truth. I tapped his little head with the tip of my fingers, maybe he was just in a very deep sleep—he wasn’t. There he was, lifeless, in a pile of his own crap. Perhaps in his dead-in-the-bathroom state, Elvis would have been a more appropriate name for him. But even before Mittens Romney had died, he always slept in his litter box instead of his bed. I guess, on some level, even Mittens Romney knew he was s***... Don’t get me wrong. I really cared for him—he was adorable. But, in terms of being a cat and doing cat things, he was pretty terrible. Yes, I know that sounds horrible, but sometimes, even when you care about someone or something, you have to consciously be honest about their flaws. Otherwise, you’re setting yourself up for disappointment. I had gotten Mittens Romney a little more than a week earlier—I saw him in an ad on Craigslist while I was looking for apartment furniture in the “Free Stuff ” section. In an almost split second decision, I decided I would take him. There was no resisting his fluffy, dark brown and white coat and green eyes. “He doesn’t really eat much, he just follows me around everywhere. He’s so sweet,” said the woman who found him. He had been left on her doorstep, separated from his family. He was the runt of the litter. I didn’t really examine the then-nameless kitten; I was just so excited to bring him home. I loaded him into the crate and brought him back to my apartment. From then on, he was Mittens Romney, the one percent kitten. Yes, I was going to spoil him rotten. I brought him into the living room and opened the door to the crate. Immediately I knew there was something wrong with him. He waddled out slowly. I looked down at him with a huge smile, expecting him to do something cute, something so cute that I could take a video of it on my cell phone and upload it to YouTube—as if to say, “Look world! Look how cute my cat is, and ignore the fact that I’m lonely.” He just looked up at me and mewed repeatedly. I set up his food and water bowls and carried him over to them; Mittens Romney just kind of gave them a blank stare, turned around, waddled back to where I was standing

and started whining again. It seemed he wasn’t hungry, which was fine with me. I just wanted to play with him. I got down on the floor with one of his toys—a knitted mouse with a bell attached to its tail. I shook it and rolled it over to him. He looked up at me and whined. Maybe he didn’t hear the bell. I picked up the toy and shook it right next to his face, all the while thinking, “Wow, if someone was doing this to me, I’d probably be really pissed, too.” He looked up at me and whined. I picked him up and sat down with him in my lap. He finally quieted down and began purring so loudly that I could feel his tiny little body vibrating. He looked chubby because of his long fur, but there really wasn’t much to Mittens Romney. He was all bones. This went on the entire time I had Mittens Romney. I would have to sit with him and hand-feed him. Otherwise, he wouldn’t eat because he was afraid I’d leave him. In addition to his abandonment issues, Mittens Romney didn’t really have strong legs to stand on. His hind two legs were “cow-hocked” (they pointed outwards) and often fell out from under him— hence the waddling. He couldn’t run or jump, so he relied on others to pick him up and move him from platform to platform. So even if he didn’t really like the position he was in, he just kind of accepted it. It was sad and pathetic, but not his fault, really. His inability to fight back did, however, make it very easy to give Mittens Romney a bath. So there he was—dead. I looked down at his tiny, lifeless body, not really knowing what to make of the situation. I thought I had done everything right as a pet owner, I even had an appointment at the vet for him the next day, but I couldn’t help but feel guilty. In one hand I wrapped up Mittens Romney in a thin, red Delta Airlines blanket I kept from a flight I took last spring. In the other hand I brought with me a hammer to dig his grave—I never thought I’d need a shovel when I moved into my apartment. I buried Mittens Romney next to a tree near the stairs to my doorstep. While hacking away at the roots, I couldn’t help but realize the irony of injuring and impeding on something very alive to mourn the dead. Mittens Romney was not destined to be a very successful cat, and maybe I had known that from the moment I realized his problems, but chose to ignore it because ... well, he was just so fluffy and cute. He didn’t deserve the hand he was dealt, that’s for sure. But even in the face of death, life goes on. Send your thoughts to letters@technicianonline.com.

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695 Editorial Advertising Fax Online

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IN YOUR WORDS

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What do you think about the new ticket system for athletic events? BY GREG WILSON

“It was really confusing at first, but they sent out a few emails over the last two days that cleared everything up. I think it’s definitely better than last year.”

“I didn’t get a ticket, but I’ve heard from a few people that it was a bit more confusing than the system we had last year.”

“I didn’t use the ticketing system too much last year, but I was able to navigate the new site pretty easily this morning.”

Jake Frederick, sophomore in engineering

Kurt Clayton, senior in technology engineering education

Nick Beyrer, sophomore in mechanical engineering

{ JESSIE’S VIEW } The Democratic National Convention experience

B

y the end of my week in Charlot te , “DNC ” stood for “do not care.” Of course I still cared about the election and the speakers, but anything else? Old news. Oh, Jessie Halpern you’re still giv ing t he News Editor same speech about abortion? Heard it. It’s going to rain on your protest? Should’ve gotten an umbrella when it happened yesterday. You think we should’ve covered the RNC more? We did our best. I understand the people who were upset over the quantity of Technician’s DNC coverage, but what I don’t understand is that people don’t think before they tweet. We didn’t cover the DNC because we’re “flaming liberals.” In fact, I’m not a registered Democrat. We covered the DNC because we could afford to have live reporters there, which is quite helpful when you’re trying to break news. If the RNC were closer, I assure you we would have covered it with equal attention. For those of you who still aren’t satisfied, notice that every day of the DNC, we published an article of Republican importance, and during the RNC, we coordinated with two student newspapers from Florida universities for contributed content based on their live coverage. In total, Technician has worked with four different colleges that reported on the Romney-Ryan campaign visits. Whether you read my 12 articles on the convention or not, here’s what it was like being thrown into the

lion’s den with only a semiuseful press pass to my name. Day 1: Setting eyes on the holy grail of my college journalism experience wasn’t what I’d expected. My first day at the DNC, I sent in five articles, which is more than I normally write in a week. In addition, I was responsible for manning the Technician Twitter account, keeping the people back in the office informed, switching off the arena pass between myself and the other Student Media representatives, talking to the photographers and keeping myself alive, all of which would have been much easier if I had four arms and a copy of myself. It was the longest 13 hours of my life, and I’m pretty sure I almost died three times. Day 2: Did I mention the DNC required a lot of walking? By the second day, I was regretting the fact that I didn’t bring any sandals. Tr y i ng to navigate uptown Charlot te w it h closed-toed anything is not a good idea. I spent most of the day t u ned in to the live feed f rom the podium (because even the press had to share access to the arena) and knocked out another five articles. Whereas the first day was an introduction to the convention and its structure, the second day was about the issues discussed, so after getting some solid footing in Charlotte, literally, I was able to focus more on the specific party platforms.

Day 3: Having set my alarm for 7 a.m., I rolled out of bed at 9 a.m. and headed uptown. With my claws firmly gripping my arena pass, I passed the time until President Barack Obama’s speech by attending the LGBT Caucus. Standing at a small podium, just two rows away from my seat, I saw second lady Jill Biden, Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis, Obama Campaign manager Jim Messina, Newark Mayor Cory Booker and other distinguished guests amp up a crowd of about 200 LGBT advocates. When I ran over to the arena (after finding out James Taylor was performing), I was pleasantly surprised by the night’s lineup. The final day of the DNC not only had the president and vice president on the schedule, but James Taylor, Mary J. Blige, The Foo Fighters, Scarlett Johansson, Kerry Washington and Eva Longoria made appearances as well. It was obvious the Dems were going all out, but what I didn’t realize was that I wou ld n’t be able to get out. Due to the last-minu t e v e nu e change, the Time Warner Cable A rena wa s much fuller than anticipated, causing the fire marshal to close it off entirely. Photographers weren’t permitted on the floor for hours, and for the entire night, no audience member could leave and re-enter. What that meant for me, besides the fact I wouldn’t be able to get the giant soft pretzel I’d been wanting for two days,

“The crowning moment of the DNC wasn’t seeing our current leaders— it was seeing our future ones.”

Editor-in-Chief Mark Herring

News Editor Jessie Halpern

Sports Editor Jeniece Jamison

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Editor’s Note In this guest column, News Editor Jessie Halpern shares her experience from the Democratic National Convention. Technician does not endorse any presidential candidate.

was that I was stuck in the arena from 5 p.m. to approximately midnight — no food, no bathroom breaks and no outlet to charge my laptop. With one hour left of battery and at least five speakers left on the docket, including Biden and Obama, the editor in chief and I arranged for the Obama story to be written in the Technician office so I could use my precious battery for live Tweeting. Unfortunately, my computer didn’t make it that long, and I sent an estimated 45 tweets from my iPhone. Needless to say, I have not been on Twitter since I returned. I can honestly say covering the convention is an experience I’ll never forget. While getting drenched in a white blouse and accidentally flashing the entire security line was memorable, it wasn’t the highlight. The crowning moment of the DNC wasn’t seeing our current leaders—it was seeing our future ones. From the speeches, it was easy to tell which mayors, governors or representatives would be on the Democratic ballot in the next eight years, and that is an unreal thing to witness, regardless of political preference. Send your thoughts to letters@technicianonline.com.

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2011 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 5 • MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2012

J.Rok the Kid: power in rhyme Kenneth Pham Correspondent

There are a few hip-hop aficionados who are disappointed at the state of their beloved art. Jared Bumgardner, a junior in business administration, is one them. According to Bumgardner, ‘Pac and Biggie would be ashamed. However, unlike many students who share his disappointment, Bumgardner made music that he hopes his fallen idols would be proud of. Bumga rd ner, a Nor t h Carolina native, released two mixtapes since last year. Driven by his disappointment in contemporary hip-hop and inspired by artists like J. Cole and Nipsey, Bumgardner found a voice and an audience. Within the past year, Bumgardner, also known as Jrokthekid, found a sponsor in Flysociety and released two mixtapes. Last Friday, Bumgardner performed at Volume 11 in front of more than 200 people. With a promotional deal with Afton, he plans to perform much more. However, for Bumgardner, hip hop is not just a response to what he considers “trash.” To Bumgardner, hip hop is also therapeutic. Bumgardner said he found himself stressed when he came to college. He left behind a family, girlfriend and old friends. Single and alone, Bumgardner said he found that  he was able to release his stress through free verse poetry. Through the influence of a close friend, Jared Holden, Bumgardner recorded his first song from a remix of “I Need a Dollar” by Aloe Blacc, not expecting much. “The beat inspired my lyr-

HOPSCOTCH

TYLER ANDREWS/TECHNICIAN

Hip-Hop artist and junior in business administration Jared Bumgardner, also known as Jrokthekid, is using his skills to record music and perform at venues in Raleigh.

ics to that song. The song is year.  Six months later, Bumfocused on my childhood, garder’s second mixtape upbringing and struggle of “Young Soul” was released everyday life,” Bumgard- and Bumgarder was sponner said. sored. Shortly af“Flysocite r e nte rety, a clothing college, i ng br a nd Bumgardi n M a rc o, ner said he California, found himhas been reself in the ally generous said by Jared Bumgardner, habit writing w it h t hei r junior in business more lyrical promotional administration content than packages,” that of free Bumgardner poetry. said. “To date they have sent Bumgarder’s first mixtape me three boxes filled with is titled “The Kid” which shirts, belts, stickers and was released Feb. 21 of last other accessories. Fly Fifty

“I feel like my music really reflects my attitude.”

like a desperate attempt to add members, but upon listening, it was easy to see that continued from page 1 everyone was very talented the light show. and had their new roles in At a free and public Hopthe band cut out nicely,” Nick scotch day party, The Love Murphy, junior in chemical engineering, said. 
Murphy, who spent the entire weekend at Hopscotch, said he liked the new image the band DOLLARS NCSU students displayed. pay only $5 for “Their new music is ARTS NC STATE performances a different side of The Love Language that uses the new members to create a very eclectic sound,” Murphy said. Aside from adding eight members, former drummer Jordan McLamb switched roles to singing and playing The Capitol Steps guitar up front with Saturday, Sept 15 at 4pm & 8pm lead singer and brother Stewart Theatre Stu McLamb. For over thirty years, the Steps have Though the perforbeen putting politics and scandal to music. The funniest political mance boasted new arcomedy troupe in the nation is rangements to old songs returning to NC State for two and five completely new shows, and tickets are going fast! instrument-focused tracks, there was no talk of when to expect a new Crafts Classes album. Check the Crafts Center website (ncsu.edu/crafts) for details on all fall crafts classes, as well as a list of classes starting soon that still have space While The Love Lanavailable. Learn how to turn wood, make jewelry, throw a pot, knit, guage remained silent weave, repair a bike, and lots more! about its plans, new bands like The LolliARTS NC STATE 2012-13 pops have been releasHave you seen our season brochure? Discover what the arts have to ing a great amount of offer at NC State! Copies are available on campus at Talley Student new music. Center, and at the entrances of the Bookstore and DH Hill Library.

has also been generous, sending me a box of six snapbacks and encouraging me to wear them.” Along with sponsors and parents, Bumgardner also credits his budding success to three other individuals. Calling themselves “Young Soul Family,” the group handles the “behind the scenes” work so he can continue working on his music. His sister, Rebekah Bumgardner, is in charge of the mixtape artwork, videos, photo shoots and sending his mixtapes to labels. His cousin, Alex Brown, a student at Duke University with

a double major in electrical engineering and computer science, is his producer. He works with Bumgardner to ensure that the music lines up and is produced how he envisions it. The last member of the “Young Soul Family” is his close friend, Holden, who has been helping him with his lyrics composition and offering him support since the beginning. “I understand everyone enjoys a party song, but I think the heart of hip hop comes from real lyrics and real stories. I think my music really reflects my attitude. I don’t smoke weed. I don’t

drink often. I want to inspire kids who are not as strong as I was. It’s okay to be different. It’s okay to stand up for what you believe in. That is my story. I respect any artist that makes real music with a background and a story.” Bumgardner said. Bu mga rd ner pla ns to continue to update fans through his Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/ jrokthekid and his YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/Jrokthekid.

Language of Raleigh showed a completely new side of their band, switching from a fivepiece rock group to an elevenperson mini-orchestra. “The Love Language’s new lineup at first glance seemed

FIVE

this week

You can also read the brochure online at go.ncsu.edu/arts1213 COMING SOON!

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels

Wednesday-Sunday, September 26-30 • Stewart Theatre The new University Theatre season opens with a hilarious battle of cons that keeps audiences laughing, humming and guessing to the end!

Ticket Central 919-515-1100 2nd floor, Talley Student Center ncsu.edu/arts

KATHERINE HOKE/TECHNICIAN

Hopscotch attendees take cover during a rainstorm as they wait for the Roots to take the stage at City Plaza on Sept. 8. Though the storm lasted an hour and half many waited it out and saw the Roots perform their full 90 minute set.

Iggy Cosky, who records all of The Lollipops music at home by himself, played his fourth show ever at Hopscotch Friday. “Lollipops is a solo bedroom recording project that I started back in May,” Cosky said. Within five months, Cosky has released two full-length albums and tagged along with Raleigh label Diggup Tapes, and said he simply wants his music to sound like how a lollipop tastes. “Not to be overly ambitious, but we’re trying to catch [the essence of a lolli-

pop] with the music,” Cosky said. The Lollipops were featured on one of T0W3RS’ cassingles and plan to release more music in the near future. Throughout the weekend, 15 venues displayed performances from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m., so choosing a final act of the festival didn’t come easy, but Baltimore-based Wye Oak played an impactful, culminating performance. “Wye Oak gave the best performance — they could really do a lot with just two people,” Murphy said. “It was a great way to bring the

majority of Hopscotch goers together one last time.” Wye Oak displayed just how big a performance a twopiece can give and exhibited new, more electronic music to boot. The festival brought a diverse group of musicians to the Triangle and a set of performances that have set the course for the next year in indie music. Though the weekend’s thunderstorms forced organizers to cancel Brooklyn-based band Escort’s performance, the festival was far from a washout.

Technician was there. You can be too. The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information.


PAGE 6 • MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2012

Features

Hepcat race cycles for a cause

TECHNICIAN

Nikky Vaught Staff Writer

It was a hipster’s dream come true this past Saturday as cyclists, cats and the Hopscotch Music Festival came together for one event. Cyclists from around Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill showed up donning fake cat ears, tails and other feline paraphernalia to participate in the second annual Hopscotch Hepcat Charity Bike Race. The race started at noon and lasted roughly an hour and a half, with bikers choosing their own distances. “You choose your own route,” said Brian Sweeney, a Raleigh resident, UNC-Chapel Hill alumnus and participant in the race. “There are various checkpoints around Raleigh, so you could choose which you go to … I’ve lived [in Raleigh] about two years, knowing the roads and everything is part of what makes the race interesting.” Following the race, bikers and their supporters were encouraged to buy shirts, posters and raffle tickets. Raffle ticket prizes included biking gear donated by various sponsors such as Oak City Cycling Project, Outlier Tailored Performance and State Bicycle Co., among others. Additional raff le prizes included high-valued cat and dog supply gift baskets and music CDs by artists performing at Hopscotch. “Hopscotch is a very big deal downtown,” said Jared Harber, Hepcat co-founder and N.C. State alum. “There are all these day parties and everything is music-related. We wanted to do something involving urban cycling, something other than just

KATHERINE HOKE/TECHNICIAN

Sophomore in history Tom Coine rides through Mt. Hope Cemetary after completing a checkpoint in the Hepcat race Saturday, Sept. 8. Coine, who placed 17th in the race, participated because it promised “good people, good friends, and riding bikes.”

another day party.” anyone who is supposedly “We rea l ly li ke Hop- hep, or hip. scotch,” Tina Haver, Hepcat Haver adopted two cats co-founder but ran into and U NCsome trouble Chapel Hill affording a lum said. supplies and “We wanted surgeries. to work with SAFE Haven them to do Cat Shelter good for and Clinic charity in- said by Tina Haver, Hepcat co- offered infounder stead of just expensive doing good spaying and for ourneutering. selves.” With her experience, along The organization’s name, with an affinity for biking, Hepcat, comes from an old, she and long-time friend jazz slang term referring to Harber founded Hepcat to

“I love bikes. I love cats. I really enjoy doing this...”

support SAFE Haven. Established in 1995, SAFE Haven Cat Shelter and Clinic was Raleigh’s first “no kill” animal shelter. SAFE Haven Cat Shelter’s primary goal comprises providing spay and neuter services to cats and small dogs, as well as housing stray or abandoned cats. The shelter also offers adoption under the condition that the adoptive parents don’t declaw the cats and keep them inside. In addition to spay and neuter services, the clinic also offers a standard physical examination, rabies and distemper vaccinations and

ear and nail cleaning. “This is the second year they’ve done this race, and it’s really helpful in terms of feeding and cleaning and taking care of the cats,” said Janet Hemsel, a 14-year volunteer with SAFE Haven. “We get other donations, but this really helps a lot.” According to Hemsel, the shelter has saved over ten thousand cats, with over five thousand adopted. It’s currently at total capacity, so people are encouraged to adopt. SAFE Haven will also benefit from an upcoming foot-

race, “Run for Their Lives,” Oct. 6. This was the second year Hepcat put on a charity race, but Haver claims that she wants to continue each year. “I love bikes. I love cats. I really enjoy doing this, helping people who help so many abandoned cats. We want to do it forever, forever and ever,” Haver said. For more information on SAFE Haven Cat Shelter and Clinic, visit safehavenforcats. org.

University grounds getting greener with expansions Andrew Branch Senior Staff Writer

Cheating the “no turn on red” sign at Avent Ferry Road and Western Boulevard is over for good. N.C. State recently replaced the wide, pothole-filled cut-through by the Avent Ferry Complex with plant-lined sidewalks. But while the corner may look like just another greenspace project, the detailed landscaping is part of a campus-wide collaboration by University planners to increase foliage. Through the University’s diverse buildings, infrastructure and aesthetic projects, University Facilities is making a large, concerted effort to increase green landscaping to make campus more beautiful and responsible. The old cut-through, with its ankle-spraining, tireshredding hazards on the edge of the busiest road past campus, was judged to be an eyesore and a pedestrian safety problem, according to Tom Skolnicki, a University landscape architect. “Now it’s a really pretty urban garden space with ADA accessible walkways and green space,” said Sarah Ketchem, interim director of Facilities’ Grounds Management division. “I think it really improved the look of that area.” Such projects have surfaced across campus in recent years. The number of trees planted, which make up large portions of the projects, is an indicator of the overall effort. Ketchem said Landscape Construction Services and

Grounds Management spent about $20,000 planting 66 trees through reforestation projects in the 2011-12 fiscal year. Through new construction projects and trees under warranty that had not survived, LCS planted 584 trees. The campus-wide effort began in view of the many building improvements of the early 2000s that were funded by a state bond referendum, according to Skolnicki. “These improvements were made to the buildings themselves, but a lot of the landscape between the buildings didn’t receive as much attention from the bond projects,” Skolnicki said. Beauty isn’t the only benefit of the projects, he said. From strategically placing trees to shade walkways and cars to reducing the University’s carNATALIE CLAUNCH/TECHNICIAN bon footprint, Skolnicki said The Avent Ferry Complex underwent renovations over the summer, replacing a destroyed road with a green walkway. trees are easy and practical. As opposed to planting things we are trying to take funds from student fees and whatever funding becomes paratively short time on camtrees that will be cut down into consideration prior to outside donations, among available in the last quarter pus, can’t look over the last in two years for a building planting so that anything other sources. Projects for of the fiscal year. decade and see the aesthetic project, Ketchem said there we do plant has the best op- Housing and Transportation With many academic de- improvements to campus. is a collabportunity are funded by each respective partments continuing to cut “These incremental landorative planto t hrive,” department. classes after large budget cuts scape improvements have ning effort. Ketchem But smaller projects in- from the state, MacNaughton proven to be a very positive That colsaid. ternal to Facilities, like the said the nature of the fund- investment,” MacNaughton laboration The effort, corner of Avent Ferry Road ing’s late availability prevents said. “Returning alumni have has helped however, and Western Boulevard (the it from going to perhaps bet- remarked repeatedly about to plan on a costs money. cost of which Technician did ter uses. how much better the campus deeper level Each project not receive by press time), “Unfortunately, it is too late looks.” than simply is approved are often financed by surplus to redeploy all of these funds Students can see the Unisaid by Sarah Ketchem, interim aesthetics, separately, funds. toward academic purposes,” versity’s emphasis on greendirector of Facilities’ Ground taking into meaning According to Associate MacNaughton said, “but ery in action during the fall Management Division account fufunding for Vice Chancellor for Facili- some are where we can do semester as the Hunt Library ture coneach project ties Kevin MacNaughton, a quick classroom improve- courtyard takes shape. Of the struction projects and the has a different source. those surplus funds are often ment project.  We have done small, lapsed-salary-funded underlying aspects of campus Large projects, such as the “lapsed salaries,” or budgeted countless numbers of those projects, students will see that affect plant health – like future Hunt Library and salaries for positions that be- over the years using these new landscaping along the the harmful heat of under- Talley Student Center court- come vacant. If left unspent kinds of funds.” walkway from Sullivan Drive ground steam tunnels. yards, are funded through by July 1, the funding reverts According to MacNaugh- near West Lot to the Lee/ “We’re realizing there are their respective building to the state, so Facilities has ton, funds were used as best Fountain complex, accordall these other factors in con- projects which, as with Talley a list of small improvements as they could be and that ing to Skolnicki. struction and utilities – all Student Center, derive their designed and ready to go for students, given their com-

“I think it really improved the look of that area.”


Sports

TECHNICIAN

SOCCER

continued from page 8

into the back of the net to give State a 1-0 lead. Martinez was in top form through the weekend after being named one of the National Players of the Week by College Soccer News for his performances at the John Rennie Nike Invitational last weekend in Durham. After the Martinez goal, UNCG tried to equalize the match by piling on the pressure, but the Wolfpack defense was equal to the task. State doubled its lead later in the first half. Ray provided the assist again for the Wolfpack as he found sophomore forward Zabarle Kollie. Kollie’s glancing header from Ray’s left wing cross was expertly finished into the far corner of the net to make the score 2-0 going into halftime. Kollie provided hustle and determination up front for the Pack and he was rewarded for his efforts in the 69th minute. The sophomore Liberian stole the ball away from UNCG’s goalkeeper and promptly passed to Martinez who fired into an empty net. The 3-0 lead proved to be enough for State as the match finished 3-1 after a Spartan goal in the 78th minute. After its victory on Friday, the Pack came home for its

match against Marist (2-3) the shot into an open goal on Sunday. to give the Pack a 1-0 lead. State did not have to wait “I wasn’t expecting it,” long for its first scoring said Agnew. “Luckily I was chance. Sophomore defend- in the right place at the right er Moss Jackson-Atogi found time.” himself six yards away from Marist’s only goal-scoring the Marist goal with a free chances came through long heading opportunity, but free kicks sent deep into directed his shot right at the State’s 18-yard box to set Marist goalkeeper. up taller players for headTwo minutes later the Pack ing opportunities. After a spurned a golden opportu- few chances that amounted nity. Sophomore forward to nothing, the Red Foxes Monbo Bokar latched onto stole a goal against the run a through ball after making of play from the Wolfpack a run in behind the Marist defense. Marist won a free defense to set up a one-on- kick and sent the ball to the one with the goalkeeper. back post. Before it could be However he cleared, one spurned his of the Red chance as he Fox players sent his shot headed into into the side State’s goal netting. to t ie t he State had match. t he l ion s’ The Pack share of ball immediately Alex Martinez, forward possession responded and scoring with one of chances in the first 20 min- its goals of the season. Only utes. The pressure quickly a minute after the match was built up on the Marist defense leveled, Martinez received the and soon after the Pack had ball on the right flank, beat a goal to show for its efforts. his defenders and fired a left In the 16th minute, Ray footed shot that bent around got the ball on the left flank the Marist goalkeeper and and beat his defender to the into the upper left section of touchline. As the goalkeeper the goal. came to challenge him, Ray “I just decided to hit it,” sent his cross across the Martinez said. “Thankfully mouth of the goal. The cross it went in the top corner right fell straight in the path of over the ‘keeper and I was freshman midfielder Con- very happy.” nor Agnew, who dispatched Ma r t i ne z’ f i rec racker

“We haven’t really done much yet and we know that”

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MEN’S SOCCER SCHEDULE: 08/24 at Liberty – W, 2-0 08/26 vs. Mercer – W, 2-1 (OT) 08/31 vs. Delaware – W, 6-0 09/02 vs. Santa Clara – W, 2-1 09/07 at UNC Greensboro – W, 3-1 09/09 vs. Marist – W, 3-1 09/14 vs. Maryland – 7 p.m. 09/18 vs. Campbell – 7 p.m. 09/21 at Clemson – 7 p.m. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

proved to be the goahead goal as State went into halftime winning by a score of 2-1. The second half didn’t feature the excitement of the first half as both teams scrapped to keep possession for long periods of time. In the 85th minute, Bokar extended State’s lead with a right-footed rocket into the Marist goal to finish the scoring at 3-1. State’s weekend success marks the first time since 1982 that the Pack is 6-0. “We haven’t really done much yet and we know that,” Martinez said. “The ACC starts next week and we have to keep working for that. That’s [winning the ACC] our number one goal.”

Classifieds

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED BY RACHEL WEISS

Safety Dontae Johnson tackles Connecticut running back Lyle McCombs as he breaks through into the secondary. McCombs scored the only touchdown for the Huskies on the after a 43-yard swing pass set up a 5-yard touchdown run.

UCONN

continued from page 8

himself as a breakout player. With three catches for 48 yards, Payton now has seven receptions for 177 yards through two games. Alongside Payton, Underwood also has registered a touchdown catch in each of the first two games. On defense, senior safety Brandon Bishop joined Wolff and Amerson as players with one interception on the afternoon. Wolff and senior

N.C. STATE VS. CONNECTICUT COMBINED STATS: First Downs: 23 Punts: 17 Yards Per Rush: 1.2 Third Down Conversions: 8-for-31 Punt Yardage: 671 Total Offensive Yardage: 497 COMPILIED BY SEAN FAIRHOLM

linebacker Sterling Lucas are tied for the team lead with 17 tackles on the season.

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Solution to Saturday’s puzzle

9/10/12

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Solution to Tuesday’s puzzle

9/12/12

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

Technician was there. You can be too. © 2012 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma or email©editor@technicianonline.com 2012 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved. for more information.

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TECHNICIAN

FOOTBALL

State scratches out first win Staff Report In a game with almost as many punts as first downs, N.C. State (1-1, 0-0 ACC) defeated Connecticut (1-1, 0-0 Big East) by a score of 10-7 in Storrs, Conn., Saturday afternoon to bounce back from a season-opening loss to Tennessee. The Pack will now play a pair of FCS opponents at Carter-Finley Stadium before going to Miami for the team’s ACC opener. State is now 9-1 in games following a loss at the start of the 2010 season. The first win of the year did not come without great difficulty on the offensive side of the ball. Following 48 yards of total offense on its first six possessions, State orchestrated a 15-play, 61-yard drive which let Niklas Sade strike a field goal for the first points of the afternoon. The 3-0 lead carried over to early in the third quarter where a bizarre turnover led to the Wolfpack’s only touchdown of the day; sen ior sa fet y Earl Wolff def lected a pass into the hands of Connecticut tight end John Delahunt, who then fumbled the ball back to Wolff after running downfield. Three plays later, NCSU quarterback Mike Glennon found

x – eliminated from bowl contention

Randy Woodson Chancellor

Overall Standings

16-4

sophomore wide receiver Bryan Underwood streaking down the right sideline for a 46-yard touchdown pass to make the game 10-0. Mid-way through the final stanza, Connecticut finally got on the board to make it a one-possession game with seven minutes remaining. UConn running back Lyle McCombs snatched a

swing pass from quarterback Chandler Whitmer and scampered 43 yards down inside the 10 yard-line before running in from five yards out to get the Huskies on the board. State answered with a 9-play, 48yard drive that eventually stalled at the Connecticut 27 yard-line, but took three minutes and 39 seconds off the clock and flipped the field position in the Pack’s favor. Desperate to drive down for a game-tying field goal in the waning minutes, Whitmer hit wide receiver Geremy Davis for a first down and got as far

as the Husky 45 before turning the ball over on downs. With a fourth and four play needing to complete to extend the contest, Whitmer’s slant pass was knocked away by All-American cornerback David Amerson, who was one of three members of the secondary to have an interception in the game. Among the few positives for State’s offense, junior wide receiver Quintin Payton continues to establish

UCONN continued page 7

MEN’S SOCCER

State takes pair of weekend games Staff Writer

Coastal Division #13 Virginia Tech 2-0, 1-0 ACC Miami 1-1, 1-0 ACC Virginia 2-0, 0-0 ACC Duke 1-1, 0-0 ACC Georgia Tech 1-1, 0-1 ACC x - North Carolina 1-1, 0-1 ACC

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED BY RACHEL WEISS

Running back Tony Creecy runs past a Connecticut defender in Saturday’s 10-7 win at Connecticut. Despite Creecy, Mustafa Greene and James Washington only rushing for a combined 82 yards on the afternoon, the defense countered by holding UConn to just over one yard per carry.

“State is now 9-1 in games following a loss at the start of the 2010 season. ”

Andrew Schuett ACC Football Standings Atlantic Division Wake Forest 2-0, 1-0 ACC #11 Clemson 2-0, 0-0 ACC #5 Florida State 2-0, 0-0 ACC Maryland 2-0, 0-0 ACC N.C. State 1-1, 0-0 ACC Boston College 1-1, 0-1 ACC

• Page 7: A continuation of the men’s soccer recap

• 5 days until NCSU hosts South Alabama in its home opener

PAGE 8 • MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2012

ACC results from weekend • #5 Florida State 55, Savannah State 0 – With 35 points in the first quarter and being on pace to exceed 100 points, the Seminoles steamrolled over the Tigers in a rain-shortened contest. • #11 Clemson 52, Ball State 27 – Through two games, Clemson is averaging 527 yards of total offense and has only committed one turnover. • #13 Virginia Tech 42, Austin Peay 7 – Although the Hokies used great special teams play to take care of the Governors, the 159 rushing yards given up is still troubling. • Maryland 36, Temple 27 – Building a 26-3 lead against a team that routed them last season, the Terps held off the Owls behind the effective play of quarterback Perry Hills. • Virginia 17, Penn State 16 – Rarely can any team win a football game when losing the turnover battle by four, but the Cavs survived with the help of PSU missing four field goals and an extra point. • #15 Kansas State 52, Miami 13 – The Hurricanes got torched for 288 rushing yards and put the ball on the ground three times en route to allowing the most points in a game since 1998. • Boston College 34, Maine 3 – BC did not get on the board until the middle of the second quarter, but the Eagles took care of business to earn their first victory of the season. • Georgia Tech 59, Presbyterian 3 – The only worrisome aspect of the Yellow Jackets racking up 712 yards while suffocating Presbyterian was the fact that Tech fumbled three times. • Wake Forest 28, North Carolina 27 – After being delayed for 75 minutes because of lightning, Tanner Price calmly guided the Deacons 93 yards down the field for a gamewinning touchdown. • #21 Stanford 50, Duke 13 – While Duke actually had more total offense against Stanford, four turnovers and 27 rushing yards made the Devils’ trip out to Palo Alto an absolute nightmare.

INSIDE

COUNTDOWN

The N.C. State men’s soccer team won both its weekend matches against UNC-Greensboro on Friday and Marist on Sunday. State, ranked No. 20 in the nation, came into the weekend hoping to improve on its 4-0 start to the season. Friday’s match saw the Wolfpack hit the road to take on UNC-Greensboro (3-1-2). The Spartans came into the match after posting impressive back-toback wins on the road and were revved up for their home opener against the Pack.

Andy Walsh Student Body President

12-8

Tom Suiter

WRAL Sports Anchor

“They had a good crowd,” said head coach Kelly Findley. “I think they’ve won the last five out of six games against N.C. State as well as they’ve won their last three home openers,” said head coach Kelly Findley. “It was a big game for us, they were up for it and they have a very experienced team.” State opened the scoring in the 12th minute through junior forward Alex Martinez. Sophomore winger Jonathan Ray sent in a cross from the left side of the field that found Martinez in the box. Martinez then beat his defender and shot past the Spartans’ goalkeeper

SOCCER continued page 7

Mark Herring

Editor-in-Chief of Technician

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11-9

Jeniece Jamison Sports Editor of Technician

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RYAN PARRY/TECHNICIAN

Fighting off a Marist defender, freshman Conor Agnew takes the ball down the field at Dail Soccer Field. The Wolfpack beat the Red Foxes 3-1 Sunday, Sep. 9 to improve their record to 6-0.

Sean Fairholm

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician

13-7

Nolan Evans

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician

Jonathan Stout

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician

Pulse of the Pack WKNC Sports Talk Radio Show

Trey Ferguson

Managing Editor of Technician

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14-6 N.C. State

N.C. State vs. UCONN

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

Miami v. Kansas State

Kansas State

Kansas State

Kansas State

Miami

Kansas State

Kansas State

Kansas State

Miami

Miami

Miami

ECU v. South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

South Carolina

Purdue v. Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Purdue

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Florida v. Texas A&M

Florida

Texas A&M

Texas A&M

Florida

Texas A&M

Texas A&M

Texas A&M

Florida

Florida

Florida

Georgia v. Missouri

Georgia

Georgia

Georgia

Georgia

Georgia

Georgia

Georgia

Georgia

Georgia

Georgia

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Wake Forest

UNC

UNC

UNC

UNC

UNC

UNC

UNC

Wake Forest

UNC

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

Oklahoma State v. Arizona UNC v. Wake Forest Oregon State v. Wisconsin LSU v. Washington


Technician - September 10, 2012  

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