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TECHNICIAN          

A tragic tailgate shooting­: prisoners’ perspectives

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STORY BY CHELSEY FRANCIS intent to inflict serious injury and accessory after the fact, and was sentenced to 12 years in prison. The brothers are at a medium custody prison, and Timothy is serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole. Two years ago, Technician met with Timothy and Tony Johnson in Caldonia Correctional Institution in Tillery, N.C. to talk about life in pris-

on and the brothers’ memories of the shooting. The victims’ families refused to comment on this story. “The little decisions that you make have big consequences.” -Timothy Johnson

PRISON TIME Inside a medium security prison in Tillery, N.C., brothers Timothy and Tony Johnson spend their days completing the tasks they are assigned. At night, they stay awake and think about how things could have gone differently Sept. 4, 2004. The prison is the stereotypical picture of such an institution, with old, white brick and an intimidating facade. As if the four sets of gates and the tunnel that visitors must walk through to get in the prison aren’t enough, barbed wire surrounds the complex. Every other week, the brothers’ parents walk through this tunnel and pass through the metal detectors to visit their children in Caldonia Correctional Institution, where they are destined to spend the rest of their days. The brothers were convicted in the shooting of Brett Harman and Kevin McCann at a 2004 NCSU football game. According to the brothers, being in prison has rehabilitated them instead of leaving them the same people they were when they were first incarcerated. “You see a lot of people who get in trouble for maybe a breaking and entering and come to prison and do a year and go home and come back a lot of times, and I just don’t see how they could,” Timothy Johnson said. “After being in here a week, I knew that would have never been me. I don’t understand being comfortable here.” The days for Timothy and Tony are busy, taking care of their individual tasks from Monday to Friday every week. Timothy works in one of the prison’s supply warehouses while Tony is a janitor. It’s overwhelming for the brothers to wrap their minds around their life sentences. They said what they miss most in their lives — their former lives on the outside of the barbed wire — are the little things. “The ability to dream,” Timothy said. “When you have as much time as we have, you can’t really make plans for the future, or hope for this, or hope for that—that’s something that’s gone.” While Timothy said he misses the beach, Tony said he regrets he will never be able to have a family. “[To have] a family, have kids,” Tony said. “All that’s nonexistent anymore.” With regards to the shooting of Harman and McCann, there were turning points in both Timothy and Tony’s heads. “Obviously this is something I’ve replayed countless times, many sleepless nights,” Timothy said. After his incarceration, Timothy lost contact with his then-girlfriend, Lianna. “Since I’ve gotten in here, I’ve tried to leave drugs and alcohol alone, and I started going to church and I’m trying to see what I can do to make myself the kind of person that wouldn’t be in this situation,” Timothy said. “[Lianna] just wasn’t at the same path, and I didn’t see that it was going anywhere.” Tony said McCann and Harman’s group blatantly wanted a fight. “But there’s no mistake about it. This other group, they wanted a

4

2012

Paul Ryan brings victory rally to ECU Cameron Gupton News Editor of The Eastern Carolinian

ing right.” An earlier confrontation with Harman and McCann had taken place a short distance away from where the brothers were tailgating, according to Tony. “When I pulled out [of the tailgate spot], I was driving, I feel a beer hit my car, so I stop and a guy comes up,” Tony said. “I had long hair then, and he pulls my hair from the back window, so another two guys come up and I step out of the car, and we start fighting, and it ends up I’m on the ground. It’s three against one, so I’m getting stomped out.” Tony called Timothy on his cell phone during the fight and said he thought Timothy would have seen the altercation because it happened only yards away in the parking lot. Timothy, who didn’t witness the event, said he thought Tony was overreacting about the fight at the time. “Because he’s yelling, I’m mad, ‘cause he caused a big deal about what looked like nothing to me. I keep hanging up on him, I don’t even give him a chance to explain,” Timothy said. Before entering the game, Timothy thought he knew where the men from the earlier altercation were. “So, I change shirts, I make sure

Paul Ryan, the Republican vice presidential nominee, visited Eastern Carolina University’s campus Monday and led the Romney-Ryan victory rally at the Student Recreation Center. Guests lined up outside of the Student Recreation Center as early as 7 a.m. in the hopes of being admitted into the event. Doors opened to guests at approximately 11 a.m. There were about 2,000 attendees in the SRC and 700 in Mendenhall Student Center watching a live feed of the rally. Students offered numerous reasons as to why they chose to attend the rally. “I want to get more pumped up and more motivated right after the Republican National Conventiot,” said senior political science major Justin Owen. Other students came to listen to Ryan’s speech and become more involved. Callie Leigh, a senior in business administration, said she came to the event to see Ryan and listen to him speak. Randi Lee said she was motivated to attend the rally because of her friends. “Before, I wasn’t very politically involved,” Lee said. According to Lee, her friends sparked her interest in politics after the Republican National Convention last week. The victory rally began with the crowd chanting “Purple, Gold” and “Romney, Ryan.” Shortly after, the event was officially opened with a prayer. Justin Davis, Student Government Association president, then addressed the student body. “In just a few minutes, the next Vice President of the United States will be in this building,” Davis said. Davis’ speech focused on the importance of staying educated, getting active and staying involved this election season. “We are a leadership university and tomorrow starts here,” he said. “Stay involved, stay educated and stay enthusiastic.” Important North Carolina Republican politicians such as Ed Goodwin and Robin Hayes followed by addressing issues affecting state residents and spoke highly of both Mitt Romney and Ryan. “Paul Ryan is just like us,” said Goodwin, an ECU alum and current candidate for North Carolina Secretary of State. “There may be a few Paul Ryans among us today.” North Carolina gubernatorial candidate Pat McCrory, began speaking at 1:45 p.m., announcing Ryan was officially in the building. McCrory spoke about his political campaign and his personal faith in the Romney-Ryan campaign. “He is a natural leader,” McCrory said, refering to Ryan. Mc-

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Law enforcement officers from six agencies responded to the crime scene of shooting at the State Fairgrounds Sept. 4, 2004. Fans had to wait three hours before they were allowed to get to their cars.

confrontation,” Tony said. “They wanted something to happen.” During the trial, it was speculated that the brothers left the tailgating lot to get a gun before confronting the group with McCann and Harman. However, at the time of the interview in 2010, the brothers denied this claim. “The story’s been told that we left and got a gun and were looking for these guys,” Timothy said. “That wasn’t the case.” Timothy said he was unaware of

THE ALTERCATION a potential confrontation until just before the shooting occurred. “I hadn’t even gotten the idea that anything had even happened until right before everything happened,” Timothy said. “I was just trying to go to the game, when [Tony] walks up surrounded by eight guys. At first I was trying to be peaceful and say, ‘We don’t want any problems, y’all just go away. I’ll handle him.’ [Tony] was already agitated because they’ve already had a confrontation.” Looking back on the situation, Timothy said the fight was a problem waiting to happen. “They were drinking, we were drinking. It’s a volatile situation,” Timothy said. Although Timothy said he regrets the incident, he feels he did the best he could in the circumstances. “Now, once somebody’s on top of him with a knife, at that point, I don’t regret anything that I did. I regret that it happened, I regret how it turned out, but I feel I made the best decision I could at the time,” Timothy said. “It probably wasn’t a good decision, but at the point I don’t see how I could’ve changed anything.” Looking back on the day of the shooting, Tony said he wished he had listened to his then girlfriend. “I remember my girlfriend stayed the night with me beforehand. She literally begged and cried and didn’t want me to leave. I always think back and wish I had just stayed home and listened to her,” Tony said. Although Timothy arrived at the tailgating lot by the fairgrounds on Trinity Road before Tony, Timothy

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n Sept. 4, 2004, the N.C. State community reacted with shock to the tragic shooting of Illinois-natives Kevin McCann and Brett Harman. N.C. State student Timothy Johnson, a junior in psychology at the time, was later charged with first- and seconddegree murder. His brother, Tony Johnson, was charged with assault with a deadly weapon with

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Former N.C. State student Timothy Johnson, charged with counts of first and second-degree murder, was denied bond during a hearing Sept. 9, 2004. Timothy and his brother Tony Johnson were charged for the murders of Kevin McCann and Brett Harman at a tailgate shooting.

rode with Tony to find a parking spot elsewhere for Tony’s car on Blue Ridge Road. “There were some open spots and we walked back to where we were tailgating,” Timothy said. “Then we smoked a blunt on the way, I had one rolled and ready for him when we got there, and we sat where we parked the car and did a couple of lines of coke, and we started walking back.” After returning to where the group was tailgating, the brothers said they hung out with their friends at the tailgate. “A little while later, we realized we could pull my car forward and let him pull in, so we go get his car and do that. That’s where the grill was, he brought the grill,” Timothy said. The confrontation with the other group began shortly after Timothy moved his car to the tailgating spot. “Some other guys were throwing a football, and Tony’s bent down by the grill and the football kind of bounces over there, almost hits him and bounces off,” Timothy said. Tony said his perception was altered because of the drugs. “I got upset. It wasn’t no big issue, but I got upset at the fact that the ball came over there,” Tony said. “My mindset was different than it is now: I was drinking, smoking weed and doing coke, so I wasn’t think-

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Republican Vice Presidential nominee Paul Ryan at the victory rally at East Carolina University.

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Crory emphasized that Wisconsin, Ryan’s home state, and North Carolina have similar values, therefore he feels Ryan is a good choice. McCrory then introduced Ryan by asking the crowd to give him a big “purple, ECU welcome.” Ryan began his speech by tackling the topic of the state’s workforce. “The unemployment rate in North Carolina is 9.8 percent and last year, under Obama, 1.4 million businesses filed for bankruptcy,” he said. Ryan told the crowd that Romney has experience in business and that the prosperity of the sector correlates

directly to more employment. “Mitt Romney turned around businesses, started small businesses and helped businesses grow,” he said. Another topic Ryan covered was the nation’s future use of energy. “We have got a lot energy in this country,” he said. “Let’s use that energy.” After discussing employment and energy, Ryan discussed the issue of taxes. “We just want you to keep your money in the f irst place,” he said. “We don’t think the president’s idea of taking money from families and giving it to companies like Solyndra is right.” Ryan then emphasized the importance of the upcoming election and the role the state may play in it.

“No matter what generation you come from, this is the biggest election of your life,” he said. Ryan highlighted North Carolina’s significance as a swing state as well. “Friends, North Carolina is crucial. Eastern North Carolina is crucial,” he said. “This is one of those elections where a handful of states may make a difference.” After the event, Davis said it was amazing to see such a large student turnout. “Just to see the students come out and get an education is amazing,” he said. After the rally ended, Ryan left the SRC to speak in the Mendenhall Brickyard where he reiterated points from his speech.

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SHOOTING continued from page 1

there are no bowls or drugs visible in the car and I’m about to shut the door and I go around and get ready to lock the other side, and Tony comes back and I hear a commotion,” Timothy said. “He’s arguing with these guys and there’s a line of guys follow-

ing him.” After the ensuing argument, Timothy reached into the car to get a gun, in hopes that having it would have calmed the crowd. “I was hoping we could dial things down and not even have to pull the gun, because at that point you know the cops are coming,” Tim said. However, this was not the case. “I see Brett, he throws [my

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A representative from the victims’ families talks to reporters during the trial of the tailgate shooting.

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friend] Chris out of the way over the car, he gets a little leverage on him and he spear tackles Tony,” Timothy said. “I see him come up, and he’s sitting on Tony. He goes back with his left hand, and at that point, I’m reaching for the gun.” At this point, with Brett sitting on Tony, Brett made a motion to scare him. Timothy said this antagonized him to fire the gun. “[Brett made] a stabbing motion, so I shoot him in the shoulder, aimed for the shoulder, just trying to get him off of him. I don’t have a lot of experience with firearms — I’d never really shot a gun before,” Timothy said. “At the same time I shoot him, his buddy, who turns out to be Kevin, tries to wrestle me, grabs the gun and it’s turning towards me, so I tried to push it to him and shoot him to get off of

me. I turn around and get Tony up, and help him get up, we look around and take off running.” During this altercation, Tony had been cut in the leg and ended up having to get 15 stitches. According to Timo-

AFTER THE ALTERCATION thy, he was panicking because of the shots that he had fired. “I was sloppy drunk before this had all happened, but right now the adrenaline’s kicked in, and I’m not feeling the alcohol anymore. But you’re still not thinking clearly,” Timothy said. “Unless you’re trained for a situation where guns are involved and people are getting hurt, you don’t know how to deal with it.” Timothy said he had Tony drop him off at his apartment complex, but he hadn’t real-

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Timothy Johnson looks out the window of the Caldonia Correction Institution in Tillery, N.C., where he serves a life sentence.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2012, 2012 • PAGE 3

ized he didn’t have the keys to the apartment and had to call his friend Rachel French to pick him up. “[We] go get rid of the gun and the clothes, and go pick Lianna up and go to somebody’s house, and I dyed my hair and I go back to this house that Rachel was living in and I start talking to her older brother and I tell him what’s happened,” Timothy said. French’s older brother convinced Timothy to turn himself in. Knowing� French used to work for attorney Robert Nunnely, Timothy called him for advice. “I’m on the phone with [Robert Nunnely] when officers bust in the door and come to the place, I told Lianna to go unlock it. So I sit there and put my hands on the floor, but I was making plans to turn myself in,” Timothy said. “Because it didn’t seem like murder to me, at

he brothers’ case was closed in 2008, and after realizing the finalization of their sentences, Timothy and Tony are trying to make the best of their lives in prison. “Prison’s as good as it can be,” Timothy said. “It’s not where we thought we would be seven years ago.” The brothers admit their actions were capricious and said they wish they could travel back to that moment. “Even if we would have gone to the game 15 minutes early, been there for warm-ups, we wouldn’t have been there when all this happened,” Timothy said. “If we hadn’t been around drugs and alcohol, maybe we could have made a quicker decision that would have stopped all this.” The brothers are stuck with the consequences of that September afternoon, with their thoughts and reflections on their actions looming over them. “When you’re young, you think you’re

first I panicked and tried to get rid of everything.” Tony was not caught. “After they caught me while I was planning to turn myself in, Tony turned himself in because he heard I had been arrested,” Timothy said. “Not knowing what was coming, he was going to face it with me. That’s real love.” Timothy said he also had respect for Kevin Johnson, the man he killed. Reflecting on the event with a mind free of drugs, alcohol and panic, he said Kevin was brave. “I have a lot of respect for Kevin,” Timothy said. “He charged a man with a gun because it was pointed at his friend.”

invincible, and you think there is always tomorrow to correct the mistakes you’re making today,” Timothy said. “What we didn’t realize was how serious the consequences would be. But prison in itself will not rehabilitate anyone — it’s not set up that way. But like any place in life or time, it’s a chance to change yourself if you work at it.” In terms of rehabilitation, Timothy has a point: with his sentence, he won’t be returning to normality. Staring down a life term, he will have plenty of time to rethink Sept. 4, 2004. Yet to this day, he still doesn’t regret his actions and is ready to move on. “I believe [Brett and Kevin] made mistakes that day, we made mistakes that day, and they’ve obviously paid for it, and we’re paying for it still, to a lesser degree day by day,” Timothy said. “To a certain point you’ve done all the thinking you can about certain things, you can’t continue to let it eat at you, you’ve got to see what you can do to get better.”


Viewpoint

PAGE 4• TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2012

TECHNICIAN

{ FROM THE U.S. SECRETARY OF LABOR }

Laboring for your future

M

y father was a laborer. He worked in the fields, on the railroads and in the factories doing grueling and dangerous manual labor so that I could be the first member of my family to go to college. You’re reading this column in Hilda L. Solis a college newsU.S. Secretary paper, so maybe of Labor you, too, owe your chance to get this education to someone in your family who sacrificed for you. Or perhaps you’re the one who’s making the sacrifice — working nights and weekends to put yourself through school or taking out loans that could take decades

to pay back. As we celebrate Labor Day, I’ll be thinking about my father and the sacrifices so many of our families have made to help us realize our full potential. My dad never dreamed he would raise a future U.S. Secretary of Labor. But since he did, I want to use this holiday to talk about the urgent need to invest in the next generation of American workers. Higher education is no longer a luxury -- it’s a necessity. The unemployment rate for Americans with a college degree is half the national average. College has never been more important, and it has never been more expensive. Tuition and fees at our colleges and universities have more than doubled over the last two decades. For the first time, Americans

now owe more on their student loans than they do on their credit cards. The average college student who borrows today will graduate with $26,000 in school debt. We all understand that this country is still fighting back from the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes. But President Obama rejects the argument that we can afford to cut higher education — and shortchange our future — due to a recession or red ink. Think about all the discoveries, businesses and breakthroughs that never would have happened if we let an affordable college education become the victim of our economy’s swings. America has always made a commitment to put a good education within the reach of those willing to work for it.

Frankly, it’s baffling to me to see partisan calls for cuts in higher education. Some politicians are backing a plan to reduce investments by almost 20 percent. That would deny a college education to one million students across the country and slash financial aid for 10 million more. These cuts would not go to reducing our deficit; they would pay for a new $5 trillion tax cut weighted toward the wealthiest Americans. Earlier this year, President Obama fought to make sure the interest rate on federal student loans didn’t go up; his opponents wanted to double them. We won that fight. Earlier this year, we set up a new college tax credit to help more middle-class families save up to $10,000 on their tuition over four years. We won that fight, too. The other party’s

leaders want to repeal it. The Obama administration has helped more than 3.6 million additional students obtain Pell grants, and he’s fighting to double work study jobs. We know the return on this investment will be worth it and then some. This Labor Day, we should all join the debate on college affordability happening in Washington. No single issue has a more direct impact on the financial burden you’ll carry after graduation or the dynamism of the economy you will enter. My father, and many of yours, worked hard to give us a chance to achieve whatever our talents would allow. Let’s pay it forward, so more members of our American family get their shot, too.

{OUR VIEW} What to expect from the DNC

T

oday marks the start of the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C. The GOP had the misfortune of going first, meaning the Democrats have had time to respond to what was said, or not said, at the Republican National Convention. The electorate, news outlets and maybe even some of our imaginary friends all watched and listened as the RNC in Tampa, Fla., took place last week. The speeches that dominated media coverage from the RNC were those given by Paul Ryan and Clint Eastwood. Paul Ryan’s speech has been called “an apparent attempt to set the world record for the greatest number of blatant lies and misrepresentations slipped into a single political speech” by Sally Kohn, a contributor to Fox News. And it’s kind of hard to disagree with that statement, considering Ryan tried to blame the United States’ credit rat-

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IN YOUR WORDS

}

What did you do over Labor Day weekend? BY BRETT MORRIS

“All my friends came over to my house and we had a party. Enjoyed good food and then danced to music.”

“My dad came down to visit for two very long, long, long days. He came for Friday and Saturday and he wanted a tour of the whole campus and it was just long.”

Jessica Raynor freshman, comunication

Lucas Fautua freshman, political science

ing downgrade on President Obama, when the U.S. was downgraded because Republicans threatened to not raise the debt ceiling. This was one of many untruths Ryan slipped into his speech. Then there was Clint Eastwood, who took the stage with a chair in which sat an invisible—and rude—President Obama. The speech inspired applause from Republican delegates, but provided little insight to real-world issues. Mitt Romney did a good job of not making any inflammatory statements. The governor showed his human side in his speech when he talked about his mother and father’s relationship and his father’s passing. It’s safe to assume that the Democrats have been using some of the time between conventions to craft some smart-alecky responses to what was said at the RNC. Perhaps they should hit back on some of what was said (namely Paul Ryan’s speech,

to set the record straight). However, it would be a disservice to the electorate to make attacking the other party the focus of the convention. Sadly, it is unrealistic to expect politicians to seize the opportunity to talk about real, pressing issues when everyone is eagerly listening—so it’s important for the citizenry to look past the negative remarks. The truth is, both Obama and Romney would have agreed on most issues before the campaigning began. After all is said and done, when the smoke from the political battle has cleared, the issues facing our nation will still be very real — and once again, Americans will realize that fighting among themselves solves nothing. So what will we learn from the DNC? Nothing — just as much as we’ve learned from the RNC. Both parties are beating the drums of war to rally their troops. It’s up to us to look past the rhetoric and into the facts.

Answers from a professor

Steven Greene Associate Professor

Zac Epps asks, “What do students do during class that annoys a professor most?” Tough one, because there’s so many to choose from. For me, it’s actually holding conversations beyond a simple aside to a classmate that drive me crazy — in large part because it is (fortunately) so rare. Back in my grad school days I did a lot of subbing in high school and middle school. Those teachers have it so much harder because the students are constantly talking and refusing to pay attention. The great thing about college is that — I don’t know if it’s maturity kicking in or the fact that the education costs money — this

rarely happens. Thus, when it does, it’s especially galling. This isn’t high school anymore. We also hate students using laptops and smartphones during class. Believe me, when you are checking your Facebook status instead of taking notes it is glaringly obvious. Alternatively, if you are looking down below your lap and smiling, we’re going to assume it’s a smartphone — not something else going on down there. Perhaps somewhat unusually, I’ve never been all that bothered by students falling asleep. I know I’m not boring, so it’s on them, not me, and I realize there’s plenty of all-nighters going on. Now, if I were one of my boring colleagues (not that I know any professors who are boring), I might feel differently about this one… Emily Prins asks, “What’s the difference between a professor and a lecturer/ instructor?”

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Job security. When I got to graduate school (at The Ohio State University) I was surprised to learn all the very important distinctions between the people who teach classes at a university and I was kind of amazed to realize how clueless I had been on the matter as an undergraduate. I had not realized a huge portion of the people teaching in a modern university are not actually professors. Presumably, most people are aware that some of their instructors are graduate students working on their Ph.D.s hoping to become professors themselves someday. Sadly, though, there are way more people with Ph.D.s than there are openings to be a professor. Universities take advantage of this fact to have a ready-made low-wage labor force. People like me are hired as assistant professors, which means teaching classes is technically only about 40 percent of your job, typically. For most people I know,

we are expected to devote 40 percent of our efforts towards teaching, 40 percent towards research/scholarship (i.e., publish or perish) and 20 percent towards service (not actually service for people that need it, but serving on department and university committees etc., i.e., lowgrade torture). When it comes time for tenure six years later, you are evaluated, however, as if the numbers are 85 percent research, 10 percent teaching, and 5 percent service. Pass this bar, and you are an associate professor and you get to stick around as long as you want, barring gross incompetence. Pass this bar again through continued quality research and you are a full professor. It’s a great gig if you can get it, but what many students don’t realize is that we are expected to be 40 percent teachers in theory, and much less in practice (at least if we want to get tenure). Alright, that took a while, but, explaining what a “pro-

fessor” is, is complicated. Since professors are only expected to have 40 percent of their job actually be teaching, universities would have way too few courses being offered (or all huge classes) if there was not another source of teaching. That’s where the lecturer/instructor comes in. These are typically persons hired to teach on a per-course basis (usually without any additional benefits) who have (or are working towards) a Ph.D. in the field. Their only responsibility as far as the university is concerned, however, is teaching that class. Many are hoping that eventually they can land a job as an assistant professor. Others just really love the teaching without any research or service expectations. Regardless, for the university, it’s a great source of cheap labor. A full professor in many departments might be teaching four courses a year (or less in many) and earn $100 thousand (plus a good deal more in health care and

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retirement benefits). Those four courses could be taught by an adjunct instructor for less than $20 thousand. Wow — why don’t we just do it all that way, you might ask. Well, someone has got to serve on all those committees, advise students, sign countless forms, etc., in ways that make this university run. And, I’ll be the first to admit that not all the scholarly research we produce exactly makes the world a better place. But some of it does. And extending the limits of human knowledge (ohhh, that sounds good) is actually a big part of our job. Probably more than you wanted to know, but this is the sort of thing I’ve always felt that every undergraduate should know, but few of them do. Keep the questions coming to askaprofncsu@gmail.com. I’m still waiting to solve my first relationship or roommate problem!

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2011 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

TECHNICIAN

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2012 • PAGE 5

Hopscotch hosts local and national talent Will Brooks

a great music scene that we should have a music festival,” Currin said. Hopscotch, Raleigh’s largL owen hagen at tended est and most diverse music UNC-Chapel Hill and lived festival, is one of the biggest in Chicago and Austin, Texas annual events for the city. before returning to the TrianThe festival, coordinated by gle. Now Currin’s co-worker alumnus Grayson Currin and at the Independent Weekly, he visited by many Triangle col- felt that the Triangle needed lege students, is now prepar- an outlet for its world-class ing for the Thursday kickoff talent. of another weekend of local After two years, the success and national talent. of the festival speaks for itself. The festival, now entering “The first year we lost its third year, promises to be $8,000, but the second year a larger, more diverse event we made about $20 $30 thouby not only sticking with its sand,” Currin said. “The local, independent groups, goal of the festival was never but also by bringing in more to make a lot of money, but famous groups, such as The if we sell out the festival we Roots. are going to “The really make a lot of great thing money.” about HopIn addition scotch is that to a positive in some ways income, it’s the same t here has as when it been steady started,” expansion of Currin said. the festival. “Part of that Hopscotch is the mix of has come Grayson Currin, local talent, from hosting Hopscotch Coordinator national talbands at 10 ent and indowntown ternational talent with a mix venues its first year to 13 in of genres.” its second and 15 this year. Currin, who works along- The venues range from small side Hopscotch’s founder and bars to a century-old former co-coordinator Greg Lowen- church, as well as Memorial hagen, said that the festival’s Auditorium. intent has remained the same While expanding, the fessince its first run in 2010. tival has garnered support “[Lowenhagen] had the from students working a few idea that since we have such miles down Hillsborough Staff Writer

“The really great thing about Hopscotch is that in some ways it’s the same as when it started.”

Street. “I’m going with three guys from N.C. State and one UNC student,” Alex Thomas, a junior in chemical engineering, said. “However, I’ll probably run into a few other people I know while I’m there.” Thomas, who attended Hopscotch last year, said that the festival lit up the downtown area. “I think the best part of last year’s Hopscotch was the atmosphere,” Thomas said. “There were tons of day parties and street vendors and everyone gave off this really awesome music festival vibe.” Josh Poole, a sophomore in mechanical engineering, decided to volunteer at the festival in exchange for free admittance. “I chose to volunteer because volunteers only have to work one shift all weekend and in return get free all-show passes for every night they aren’t working,” Poole said. According to Currin, volunteers make up the majority of the staff during the festival. “When the festival hits, our staff swells from just Greg and me to about 300 people,” Currin said. “That includes about 250 volunteers and various production assistants that we hire.” Currin, who wrote for Technician and graduated with a degree in biological sciences in 2005, is the music editor of the Independent Weekly and a

contributing editor at Pitchfork Media, in addition to his role at Hopscotch. After working at the Independent and Pitchfork, Currin said that he has grown to appreciate how exceptional the music scene is in the Triangle. “We bu i lt Hopscotch through talent that we found here,” Currin said. “All of these bands to me are really amazing.” As a music critic and the sole proprietor in attracting bands to the festival, Currin said he simply chose artists who he thought to be the best in the country, with about half being local musicians. For some students, it isn’t only the local talent that is bringing them to Hopscotch.

Thomas and Poole both said that they looked forward to watching Dan Deacon of Baltimore, who is famous for playing in the crowd rather than on stage. “I decided to go to Hopscotch this year because the lineups looked really good,” Thomas said, “I’ve been in love with Built to Spill for a while and I feel like Dan Deacon and Deerhoof will both put on really great shows.” Currin said that regardless of crowds that bands like The Roots, The Jesus and Mary Chain, and Dan Deacon may attract, there will always be a local focus. “I hope that Hopscotch is really able to expose students at N.C. State and other

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schools to show how strong that fabric in this community is,” Currin said. “I think it’s something that really defines the place that we are.”

Sept

embe

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Features ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

PAGE 6 • TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2012

TECHNICIAN

‘Lawless’ spotlights strong performances, plenty of action Lauren Vanderveen Staff Writer

Joining the ranks of The Untouchables and Public Enemies as dynamic Prohibition-era movies comes this year’s Lawless. Based on the real lives of the three bootlegging Bondurant brothers, John Hillcoat’s gangster film is teeming with small-town blood feuds and crime. Shia LaBeouf (Transformers), Jason Clarke (Public Enemies) and Tom Hardy (The Dark Knight Rises) star as the brothers Jack, Howard and Forrest, respectively. They, like many of their time, took advantage of the national ban on alcohol to make a profit by illegally making and selling their own. In place of the booming city, Lawless takes place against the simple country backdrop of Franklin County, Va. The peace is shattered when Charlie Rakes (Guy Pierce), an agent from Chicago, is sent in to bring them all down. Rakes is a megalomaniac, racist and, above all,

as lawless and corrupt as the rest of them. With such tension came numerous heightened scenes of brutality and sexuality. In such, Lawless flies the flags of both western and action films. From the high speed jalopy-car chases to the climactic pistol shootout, action drives the plot forward. There is even a 100-foot-high explosion, though it admittedly stretches the reality of the small town setting. However, the root of the story, as well as where the strongest sense of emotional resonance comes from, is the relationship between the three brothers. Jack, the youngest, has the biggest strife of them all. He is constantly goaded and pushed by his brothers to be stronger, braver and to prove himself. LaBeouf ’s performance makes it easy for those with siblings to empathize with the character. The opening scene, which f lashes back to their boyhoods, firmly establishes Jack’s place in the shadow cast by his brothers. When Jack is unable to shoot even a

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defenseless pig, Forrest takes the gun and gets the job done. The film spends a great deal of time focusing on Jack’s attempt to live up to the bar set by his own flesh and blood. With the help of his friend Cricket Tate (Dane Dehaan, Chronicle), Jack demonstrates his worth by making a sell to the notorious gangster Floyd Banner, played by Gary Oldman. LaBeouf portrays Jack’s eagerness and hungry ambition with surprising ruthlessness and vulnerability. The eldest Bondurant brother, Forrest, is the most morally complex of the three. Despite heading an illegal moonshine business and beating with brass knuckles anyone who tries to harm the people close to him, he refuses to give in to a corrupt authority that wants a cut of his profits. Tom Hardy could be described as this century’s Humphrey Bogart thanks to his performance as Forrest. Not only is the same talent there, but the infamous and unintelligible mumble is as well.

PHOTO COURTESY OF FILMNATION ENTERTAINMENT

Shia LaBeouf and Mia Wasikowska in a scene from the Prohibition-era film Lawless.

Gary Oldman is another highlight for the film, fully becoming the intimidating Banner. His range is eclectic and undeniable. Unfortunately, Oldman appears in only three scenes, one of Lawless’ greatest travesties. The sluggish pacing of the plot could have used more of Oldman’s spark and originality. Similar circumstances held true for one of the main love interests in the film, with

Jessica Chastain (The Tree of Life) playing Maggie Beauford, an enigmatic woman who shows up from Chicago to live a slower life in Franklin County. Chastain nails the fierce and compelling demeanor of her character, even as Maggie is directly exposed to the dangers that come with the Bondurants’ bootlegging. Much like Oldman’s Banner, it would have been satisfying

to see Chastain as more than a character placeholder. Though the tone and cadence of Lawless evokes nostalgia for Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, it is unlikely the film will hold up well in the years to come. For now, this real tale of bootlegging brothers is intriguing enough to be a worthwhile time at the theater.

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Sports

TECHNICIAN

SOCCER

continued from page 8

“Were stepping up and playing really well,” freshman defender Leighanne Davis said. Sunday, the game was temporarily delayed due to lightning, forcing fans to clear the stadium. Once the lightning threat was over, the rain began to fall. However, the wet playing surface didn’t appear to affect the Pack as it earned a 3-0 victory over the Elon Phoenix. Four minutes into the game, State created its first chance with a shot from redshirt sophomore forward Jennie Krauser. Elon goalkeeper Kate Murphy deflected the shot out of bounds, setting up a corner. State was given another corner opportunity but could not capitalize. The first goal came with 37 minutes left in the first half off of a beautiful strike from 25 yards out by Krauser. The shot went over the outstretched arms of the Phoenix goalkeeper and bounced off the bottom of the crossbar into the goal. The Pack continued to possess the ball and create chances, but did not score for the rest of the half. At halftime, the rain made way for the sun. It took the Pack only four minutes to double the score in the second half, with a cross from sophomore forward Cheyenne Spade which found the head of redshirt freshman forward Rachel Harris. Ten minutes later, the Pack

added its third goal of the game. This time, freshman midfielder/forward Sharon Wojcik collected a loose ball and fired a shot over the Elon goalkeeper into the back of the net, giving the Pack a 3-0 lead. The defense held strong the entire game with the help from defensive starters Shelli Spamer, Jessica Baity, Reilly Brown and Meaga n Proper. The only serious threat by the Phoenix came with four minutes left in the game. Elon’s Raychel Diver attempted a shot from outside of the 18-yard box, forcing Wolfpack goalkeeper Victoria Hopkins to make a diving save. State outshot Elon 22-3 with seven shots on target. Elon’s goalkeepers combined for five saves while Hopkins grabbed two saves for the Pack. The Pack looks to take it one game at a time and continue its run of good form. “We started off rocky, but we got it together here in the last four games,” Krauser said. The Pack will look to extend its four-game winning streak Friday night against Appalachian State at Dail Soccer Field. Following that, the Pack will take a trip to Lawrence, Kan. to face the Kansas Jayhawks Sunday.

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2012• PAGE 7

RYAN PARRY/TECHNICIAN

On the sidelines, left-back Sterling Lucas listens to defensive back coach Mike Reed inside the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, Georgia. N.C. State fell to the Tennessee Volunteers 35-21 in the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game Friday, Aug. 31, 2012.

Wolfpack Club helps to send students to Atlanta 55 cheer on State inside of Georgia Dome. Sean Fairholm Deputy Sports Editor

N.C. State sent one full bus to Atlanta this past Friday in support of the football team’s season opener against Tennessee. Despite a 35-21 loss, the Wolfpack Club’s donation made it possible for 55 students to enjoy transportation and college football for just $19 each. “We were hoping for two buses, but as we saw the registration we wanted to just fill one bus instead of having two half-filled buses,” Student Body President Andy Walsh said. “We were getting such a nice gift from the Wolfpack Club, and we really wanted to uphold that by not spending their money just because we

had it.” Last March, NCSU was unable to organize a bus trip to St. Louis for the Pack’s Sweet 16 game against Kansas due to the short period of time between rounds. However, Walsh noted that these types of trips are always on the table.  “If we do want to provide that service in the future, we just have to be cognizant for both the bowls and March Madness,” Walsh said. “We have to find the right partnerships to make that happen. Both the Athletics Department and the Wolfpack Club are really great at supporting us.”  With a raucous crowd of mostly Tennessee fans, Walsh and others had concerns about student safety in Atlanta, but had no issues throughout the game. 

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“We had no issues going on through it,” Walsh said. “When you send students places, you don’t want them caught in fights or anything like that. We had all of the students sign the student conduct policy to say they were abiding by it, so drinking was clearly not allowed on the trip because it was sponsored by someone, and we wanted to ensure that we got students back and forth safely.” With one Tennessee student dying tragically at Friday night’s game after falling 35 feet during the celebration of a touchdown, Walsh said that he felt horrible about having that type of incident occur during a sporting event. “I’m actually going to be writing a note to my counterpart at Tennessee and just letting him know that we are feeling for him and that it

is really awful,” Walsh said. “You don’t want to have that happen at a football game.” Prior to the game in Atlanta, Walsh and others at State visited with former Wolfpack players to discuss fundraising for the Coaches Corner project which will be completed by the fall of 2013. “It’s kind of an exciting time for the project now that the renderings are available to the public,” Walsh said. “We’ve really taken some good steps forward, and we’ve had some donors step up. We’re really working with some of the former players to get the word out and working with some of their former teammates to get the project awareness out.” 

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Sports

COUNTDOWN

• 4 days until the football team takes on UCONN in Storrs, Ct.

INSIDE

• Page 7: Wolfpack club helps to send students to Atlanta

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 8 • TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2012

FOOTBALL

Tripping over Rocky Top

Cornerback C.J. Wilson suspended 4 games

Sean Fairholm Deputy Sports Editor

Wolfpack head coach Tom O’Brien an nounced Monday that cornerback C.J. Wilson has been suspended four games by the NCAA for failing to pass the minimum requirement of hours spring 2012. O’Brien cited family issues as the main cause and stated that Wilson took 12 credit hours in the summer, finishing with a 3.5 GPA. Wilson, a current graduate student, completed his undergraduate degree December 2012 and will be eligible to play in week five against Miami. SOURCE: ESPN

Men’s soccer extends season-opening win streak N.C. State men’s soccer tacked on a pair of wins this weekend, improving its overall record to 4-0. The Wolfpack handily defeated Delaware Friday evening by a 6-0 count and earned a comeback victory over Santa Clara Sunday afternoon, winning 2-1. The victories mark the first 4-0 start for the Pack since 1987. That season, State began the season 5-0 before the streak was snapped. State will look to tie that start Friday, Sept. 7 when it travels to UNC-Greensboro. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Volleyball takes 2 of 3 at tournament in Reynolds Wolfpack volleyball snagged a couple victories this weekend, defeating South Florida 3-1 Friday evening and Kent State 3-0 Saturday afternoon, improving its overall record to 5-0 on the season, tying 2010 for its best start since 1995. However, the streak ended Sunday evening as Virginia Commonwealth took down the Pack in five sets, 3-2. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

QUOTE OF THE DAY “This can still be a heck of a football team. There’s no reason why we can’t go win 11 games, and that is how we are going to approach it.”

For 59 minutes and 22 seconds of game play, N.C. State (0-1, 0-0 ACC) kept up with Tennessee (10, 0-0 SEC) despite quarterback Mike Glennon and cornerback David Amerson making some u ncha rac ter i st ic m i st a ke s against the Volunteers. Unfortunately, for 38 seconds of Friday night’s opener inside the decidedly hostile confines of the Georgia Dome, everything went hellaceously wrong.  Hours before the Vols went on to comfortably dispose of State with a 35-21 victory in the Chickfil-A Kickoff Game, State held a 7-6 lead in the first quarter and was driving in Tennessee territory. On a fourth and three play from the 35-yard line, Glennon fired to his left into the welcomJOHN JOYNER/TECHNICIAN ing hands of defensive back Pren- Redshirt junior tight end Asa Watson crashes to the ground, failing to gain control of a pass during hte first half of tiss Waggner who was lurking in the Chick-Fil-A kickoff game against Tennessee in the Georgia Dome Friday, Aug. 31, 2012. Over the course of the the weeds for his eighth career game, Watson recieved 4 passes for a total of 50 yards. Despite this, the Wolfpack fell to the Volunteers 35-21. pick. On the next play, quarterback Tyler Bray went right after half with those three huge plays,” around,” Payton said. “It’s not one N.C. STATE VS. TENNESSEE All-American cornerback David head coach Tom O’Brien said. guy who is going to get off every STAT LINE: Amerson for the second time on “We turned the ball over too many game. The tight ends are going to the evening and nailed wide re- times, and you can’t win when you get the ball, running backs are go- Score: NCSU (21), TENN (19) ceiver Zach Rodgers in stride for do those things. You can take this, ing to get the ball and wide receivers Total Yardage: NCSU (407), TENN (385) Passing: NCSU (288), TENN (261) a 72-yard touchdown.  that and everything else, but what are going to get the ball, so we’re not Yards per Pass: NCSU (6.0), TENN (6.5) Seizing momentum with a it boils down to is long runs, long sending one guy out.”  Rushing: NCSU (137), TENN (124) partisan Tennessee crowd sing- passes and interceptions stopping With O’Brien’s post-game mes- Yards per Rush: NCSU (4.4), TENN (3.3) ing Rocky Top at the top of its drives. sage being one of hope, Payton re- * EXCLUDING 38-SECOND TURNING lungs, the Vols forced State into “You’re not going to win football flected on the learning opportunity POINT IN THE FIRST QUARTER an unusual safety on the ensuing games [like that]. It doesn’t matter that comes from losing to a talented possession. As Glennon rolled who you play.”  opponent to start the season.  and we still have all of our conferout to his right and appeared Despite dropping a key noncon“Like we said in the locker room, ence games ahead of us. We’re going to have ample time to deposit ference game against a SEC oppo- one game is not going to kill our to learn from our mistakes and go the ball into the third row of nent who had failed to win in its season,” Payton said. “We’re going from there.”  the dome’s stands, the ball was last six trips to Atlanta, players and to go back to the drawing board on Summing up a night in which punched out of his hands and coaches focused on the silver lining Sunday and fix the things we did State displayed glimpses of being a sent bumbling to the back of after the game was over. One of the wrong today so we can get ready good football team while giving up the end zone. With the Volun- major positives State will look to in for UConn.”  big plays at inopportune moments, teers receiving the ball after the preparing for next weekend’s danFortunately for State, the team’s O’Brien shared the sentiment of his safety, wide receiver Cordarrelle gerous trip up to Connecticut is the ultimate goal of winning an ACC team and the coaching staff.  Patterson scampered 67 yards on emergence of junior wide out Quin- Championship was not altered after “This can still be a heck of a footthe next play from scrimmage to tin Payton who had four receptions losing a game out of the conference.  ball team,” O’Brien said. “There’s sharpen the devastating collapse.  for 129 yards. Payton was one of 10 “Obviously we want to win them no reason why we can’t go win 11 “We gave up too many big plays players to snag a reception for State.  all,” Glennon said. “But our goal is games, and that is how we are going on defense, especially in the first “We’re going to spread the ball to win a conference championship, to approach it.”

SOCCER

Good form extends women’s winning streak Daniel Neal Correspondent

Tom O’Brien, head football coach

DID YOU KNOW? N.C. State is now 0-4 in season openers against FBS schools under head coach Tom O’Brien. The last FBS team the Pack defeated in a season opener was New Mexico, a 34-14 victory in 2002. It also hasn’t finished a season with a winning record under O’Brien after opening with a loss.

Randy Woodson Chancellor

N.C. State vs. Tennessee #24 Boise State at #13 Michigan State Miami at Boston College Georgia Tech at #16 Virginia Tech Iowa at Northern Illinois Colorado vs. Colorado State

JOHN JOYNER/TECHNICIAN

Freshman forward Brittany Stanko attempts to steal the ball during the women’s soccer match against Elon in Dail Soccer Stadium Saturday, Sept. 1, 2012. The Wolfpack defeated the Phoenix 3-0.

Andy Walsh Student Body President

Tom Suiter

WRAL Sports Anchor

Mark Herring

Editor-in-Chief of Technician

Jeniece Jamison Sports Editor of Technician

N.C. State women’s soccer took home a pair of victories this weekend to improve the Wolfpack’s record to 4-2. The team’s newcomers assisted heavily in the game outcomes as freshmen scored six of the weekend’s eight goals. Friday night the Pack faced off against The Citadel and won 5-0. The Pack outshot The Citadel 195, with seven shots coming from freshman forward Caroline Gentry, younger sister of senior Wolfpack football linebacker Zach Gentry and former fullback Taylor Gentry. Freshman teammates Shannon Colligan and Brittany Stanko scored

Sean Fairholm

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician

Nolan Evans

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician

four of the five goals. Junior midfielder Ariela Schreibeis converted a penalty kick to account for the fifth goal. Colligan leads the team with three goals this season but gives her teammates the credit for her success. “[The team is] putting the ball in the box and giving me the opportunities that I’ve had, and I’ve been fortunate enough to put them away,” Colligan said. After losing much of last season’s goal scoring, head coach Steve Springthorpe said it’s great to have the freshman coming in and contributing right away. The freshmen are beginning to recognize their significance in the lineup, as well.

Jonathan Stout

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician

SOCCER continued page 7

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Michigan State

Boise State

Michigan State

Michigan State

Michigan State

Michigan State

Michigan State

Michigan State

Miami

Miami

Miami

Miami

Miami

Miami

Boston College

Boston College

Miami

Boston College

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Georgia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Iowa

Northern Illinois

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Iowa

Colorado

Colorado

Colorado

Colorado State

Colorado

Colorado

Colorado

Colorado

Colorado

Colorado State

#14 Clemson vs. Auburn

Clemson

Auburn

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Auburn

Auburn

Clemson

Auburn

Clemson

#8 Michigan vs. #2 Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Kentucky at #25 Louisville

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Louisville

Louisville

Louisville

Louisville

Louisville

Louisville

Louisville

Louisville

Louisville

Baylor

Baylor

Baylor

SMU

Baylor

Baylor

Baylor

Baylor

Baylor

Baylor

SMU at Baylor

Technician -- September 4, 2012  

A tragic tailgate shooting: prisoners' perspectives

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