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tuesday august

21 2012

Raleigh, North Carolina

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Shedding light on food security for underpriviledged students Jose Chavira

lege,” McLeary said. Bonds defined food insecurity as “a lack of consistent availabilTwo students are working to es- ity and access to food due to fitablish a food pantry on campus to nancial hardships.” provide nonperishable food items “We want to increase the sucand toiletries to members of the cess of all students and help N.C. State community in need. support struggling faculty and Monique McLeary, a junior in staff,” Bonds said. biological sciences, and Monique The focus of this initiative is Bonds, a junior in nutrition sci- focused on combating hunger ence, have named solely on N.C. the project Feed the State’s campus. Pack. They say they “We believe began working on it that food inafter they became secu r it y is a aware of the need global issue, and for such an organithe N.C. State Monique McLeary, junior in biological sciences zation on campus. community is McLeary said the not immune,” movement was a collaborative ef- Bonds said. “There is a lack of fort. food assistance services on cam“This was inspired by the merging pus and, therefore, this initiative of energies from staff, faculty and is a solution to the problem.” students who were eager to address Feed the Pack is currently the food insecurity they were seeing working with a number of Union our campus,” McLeary said. versity organizations, includMcLeary said members of the ing CSLEPS, Student GovernN.C. State community in extreme ment, the Counseling Center, economic difficulty may not be able the Women’s Center, Greek Life to afford healthy food. She said Feed and Housing. The food pantry the Pack would give those people a will headquartered in 379 Harplace to turn. “Eating is a basic right, not a priviFEED continued page 2 Correspondent

“Eating is a basic right, not a privilege.”

Solar pavilion illuminated to life Laura Wilkinson

ergy Management, the Phillips Foundation, Progress Energy, SAS and the Wolfpack EnviTwo years after a group of envi- ronmental Student Association ronmental technology majors won to help fund the project. the Think Outside the Brick comKichak said the company Solar petition, its idea of a solar pavilion World donated three brand-new will be realized. solar panels that were more powIn 2010, students Sonum Nerur- erful than originally planned for, kar, Eliza Jones, Bryan Maxwell and Facilities created a customand Zach Schnell received $1,000 to made enclosure to match the enimplement their solar panel project. vironment around the residence A ribbon-cutting ceremony to open halls. the pavilion to the public will be “I don’t think that students held Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. between have ever been this involved in Syme, Gold and Welch residence a project and had as much inhalls. put, joint with faculty at N.C. A n e nc l o s u re State, in t he between the three history of the residence halls has school,” Kichak three brand-new said. “You don’t solar panels on the rea l i ze how roof that send enmuch work ergy down to two goes into these out lets, or four small projects plugs, that memon campus; we bers of the N.C. don’t rea l i ze Sonum Nerurkar, State community how many peoco-president of Wolfpack can use to power ple have their Environmental Student their electronics hands on any Associaiton outside. project at any I s a ac K ic h a k, given time.” a senior in chemical engineering The solar panels should last for and the project developer, said the 15-20 years, though the electrical members of the development team equipment used to convert the quickly realized the original $1,000 energy won’t last quite as long, allotted wouldn’t be nearly enough according to Kichak. Students to fund the project. For Solar is in charge of keeping The group decided to fundraise money set aside from fundraisand offer donors a tax write-off, ing to pay for repairs. but that was not possible unless the The panels are 225 watts each, group was a nonprofit organiza- though they will produce a total tion. With that in mind, Students of 550 watts total after converFor Solar was created as a club and sion inefficiencies are accounted nonprofit to handle the fundraising, allowing donors like Southern EnSOLAR continued page 2 Deputy News Editor

“Alternative energy is a big deal and a big issue...on a national level.”

insidetechnician news viewpoint features sports

Countdown to the Vols 1-2 4 5-6 7-8

See page 8.

Broadcasting with a mission

In Raleigh, the same philosophy that brings people to the “farm to fork” movement is attracting people to seek a radio community beyond the public or college level, according to Kelly Reid, an alumna of N.C. State. After graduating from N.C. State at the height of the recession, Kelly Reid and Jacob Downey soon realized that many people craved connections and a community like the one they developed while working at radio station WKNC, 88.1 FM. In order to create such a community, Reid and Downey worked together to help found the early stages of a place where Raleigh citizens can connect with the help of low-power FM radio. The pair hopes through the project, called Little Raleigh Radio, listeners will be able to not only hear what Raleigh is all about, but also be able to contribute. “When you think about radio stations, it’s a question of what are

you connecting people to,” Downey and radio broadcast, the pair also said. “I loved the connections that hopes to create a storefront office I made through volunteering at for the radio. According to Downey, WKNC, and I wanted to be able this aspect of the pair’s plan is repto start making those connections resentative of their overarching viwhere I lived.” sion for an open source policy radio Reid and Downey plan to release community. Little Raleigh Radio on the internet “We want people to see the radio in late October with a radio broad- being made, see what’s being made cast hopefully foland be empowered lowing next year. to make it themWith less than $900 selves,” Dow ney left before reaching LITTLERALEIGHRADIO.ORG said. “We want to their $10,000 goal “CURATE AND HOST” remind the DJs that YOUR CONTENT on Kickstarter, the the whole point of duo’s dream of a having the window studio for their stream and broad- is to say, ‘you’re looking out at your cast may soon be realized. city and when people are walking “The more specialized we get as a by the window, they are looking out society, there’s a danger of becom- at the radio station.’ That, at least ing isolated,” Downey said. “If we for me, is what makes that idea so can get people [to talk] to each other beautiful.” and, more importantly, listening, Unlike public radio and college then to me, that’s where community radio, Downey and Reid say Little comes from. Radio is just perfect for Raleigh Radio is geared to produce that.” In addition to the internet streams RADIO continued page 2

GET INVOLVED

Planting seeds for natural remedies, medical research Nikki Stoudt Deputy Features Editor

In July, N.C. State’s Plants for Human Health Institute, PHHI, located in Kannapolis, hosted a pair of Bhutanese scientists who assisted the team with research on various healthy plant compounds. Chencho Dorji and Mani Prasad Nirola visited the institute in order to work hand-in-hand with Mary Ann Lila, director of PHHI, and to gain essential experience using the equipment they will one day bring to their labs in Bhutan. Lila’s first trip to South Asia four years ago successfully broke a barrier barring Western medical research from Bhutan, she said. Scientific collaboration continues to grow, and for Lila, having Dorji and Nirola visit was a significant leap in the right direction. “Until 2008, the Bhutanese government didn’t allow Western scien-

MLG returns to Raleigh, with money See page 6.

tists to do research within the borders at all,” Lila said. “All because [Bhutan] was consistently forced to give up the knowledge and resources produced by its own scientists.” The institute’s goal of global scientific sustainability and its opposition to conventional pharmaceutical therapies convinced both the Bhutanese Ministry of Health and the Ministry of Science, as well as the Bhutanese prince, that PHHI was worth a shot. “Our original objective was to make friends,” Lila said. “After hearing from us, the leaders were more than willing to explore the program. They were more enthusiastic than we ever hoped for.” The Bhutanese government’s enthusiasm came from PHHI’s focus on a field of study called bioexploration. Bioexploration is the search for, and discovery of compounds in plants that could potentially benefit human health.

The concept of bioexploration involves providing technology and resources for a developing country rather than taking it away. PHHI supplies all the necessary equipment for researching compounds in plants native to a certain area and trains local scientists to use them. It’s important, according to Lila, that the scientists are given ownership of their own discoveries. Most recently, the research team has found cancer-fighting components in blueberries, and antimalarial compounds in a kind of Alaskan algae. “We hope to take these discoveries and apply them to the public arena,” Lila said of the work Dorji and Nirola conducted. According to Lila, the fresh perspective from international scholars has helped further PHHI’s research. In addition to Bhutan, the

BHUTAN continued page 2

Running the world with Ryan Hill

A new season of televised entertainment begins

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See page 5.

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News

PAGE 2 • TUESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2012

TECHNICIAN

Wolfline extends to Cameron Village Jessie Halpern News Editor

CONTRIBUTED BY THE PLANTS FOR HUMAN HEALTH INSTITUTE

BHUTAN continued from page 1

team at PHHI has extended a hand to 17 other countries around the world and is already planning another outreach project in November to Bolivia and Chile. PHHI’s existence and programs are f inanced largely by the endowment given in 2008 by David Murdock, owner of Dole Foods Company, Inc., who saw the potential benefits of a partnership. In coming years, the total donation will reach about $1.5 million—on one condition. “Mr. Murdock financed the building, landscaping and technological half,” Lila said. “He asked N.C. State to match that number by funding the human resources portion.” Since then, PHHI has established partnerships with many corporations, all of which are striving to improve the quality of human health. In addition to corporate partnerships, faculty from eight different universities have come together to work on PHHI’s innovative projects. “It’s rare that you see people from Duke, N.C. State and UNC-Chapel Hill working together,” Lila said. “Any-

BEHIND THE RESEARCH: MARY ANN LILA’S RESEARCH FOCUSES ON IDENTIFYING BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS IN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, ESPECIALLY IN CERTAIN BERRIES. SHE IS PARTICULARLY INTERESTED IN FOODS THAT APPEAR TO HELP FIGHT CHRONIC DISEASES AND ENHANCE ENDURANCE. LILA WON A FULBRIGHT SENIOR SCHOLARSHIP IN 1999 TO CONDUCT RESEARCH IN NEW ZEALAND.

SOURCE: PHHI

where else it’s all about rivalry.” PHHI will continue to focus on spreading knowledge of science and technology as it relates to nutrition. The work conducted by Dorji and Nirola on the antimalarial algae will be the institute’s primary goal in the coming months. To Lila and the team at PHHI, collaboration is the key to advancing human health. “You’ve really just got to listen to one another,” Lila said. “Whether it’s an international friendship, or a colleague from down the road, you have to keep an open mind and ear at all times. Someone might know something you don’t—something that could change the way we see the world.”

Hillsborough Street may be the place to go for a quick bite between classes, but when it comes to groceries, shopping and dining, Cameron Village has it all. Now, a new stop on the Wolfline is getting students, faculty and staff there for free. The Wolfline began service to Cameron Village Aug. 1 using the venue’s existing stops on Cameron and Clark streets. Pat Hunnell, public relations counsel for Cameron Village, said this strengthens the relationship the shopping center already has with N.C. State. “We’re really excited to

put this link between Cam- or even those who just don’t eron Village and the Uni- want to give up their parking versity,” Hunnell said. “We spot,” Hunnell said. already have Hunnell such a great said the new relationstop will alship w it h low students, N.C. State, faculty and but this will staff to head connect us over to Camphysically.” eron Village Hunnell for lunch or said Ly nne fulfill their Worth, wardrobe Pat Hunnell, public relations Cameron and grocery counsel for Cameron Village Village’s vice needs easier. president of “We have leasing, was the prime mover a lot of University people who behind the change. Hunnell walk, but this means they said Worth has worked hard won’t be limited by weather,” to create a friendship between Hunnell said. Cameron Village and N.C. While Hunnell said use of State. the new stops has been rela“This will make it easier for tively light since they began, people who don’t have cars– Hunnell attributed the lack

“Our merchants are great supporters of N.C. State and the faculty.”

FEED

continued from page 1

TYLER ANDREWS/TECHNICIAN

Sophomore in aggricultural business management Thomas Page loads bags of food into a truck in the Brickyard on Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2011. The efforts were part of a canned food drive that took place as an event during homecoming week.

RADIO

ideas, Little Raleigh Radio is prepared to bring in the comcontinued from page 1 munity to “curate and host” what it cares about. For the a more unique experience for pair, this open-source philisteners. For Reid, Little Ra- losophy is what is at the core leigh Radio will capture more of the natural and dynamic intimately what she feels Ra- community that it hopes to leigh sounds organize. like. If ever y“Makthing goes ing radio smoothly, hyper-local The radio station needs support R e i d a n d is becoming and has reached 87 percent of its Downey m o r e a n d $10,00 goal on kickstarter.com h o p e t o more imporshare the intant because so much of the terests, music and more inmedia that we are exposed timate nonfiction pieces of to, whether it’s Pandora or Raleigh citizens that larger whether it’s WKNC, is not media organizations can’t organic and is not local,” cover. Reid said. “Pandora is an alReid and Downey have asgorithm. WKNC is service sembled a team of about 25 records by major promoters volunteers and held its first in the United States that pro- general interest meeting at mote the same catalog.” King’s Barcarde Aug. 17. According to Reid, in the The pair continues to release same way that a museum is more information about their a public place where people project at littleraleighradio. come and have a unique ex- org. perience interacting with

KICKSTART THE PROJECT

PHOTO COURTESY OF JACOB DOWNEY

Little Raleigh Radio, a grassroots media organization looking to serve Raleigh and only Raleigh.

Jeannette Walls Best-Selling Author of The Glass Castle Monday August 27, 2012 7 p.m. Jones Auditorium • Meredith College Free and open to the public

Event details: meredith.edu/presidential-lectures

relson Hall. It’s set to open later this fall. “We would also like readers to know that this initiative is very receptive to any help we can get,” McLeary said. Feed the Pack welcomes volunteers, donations and the sharing of ideas. The first big event for this initiative was a food drive during Packapalooza Saturday, where students collected donations of nonperishable food items.

SOLAR

continued from page 1

for. “We made it to power three laptops for six hours a day for four days straight without any sunlight,” Kichak said, noting there should never be more than four days without sufficient sunlight. Jones, one of the original creators of the project, said the idea was born at a Wolfpack Environmental Student Association meeting about the Think Outside the Brick competition. “We all felt that solar energy is something that can really change the way N.C. State generates electricity, and it can really help our consumption of electricity,” Jones said. Nerurkar, another of the original creators, said she wanted students to understand they can make a difference.

of traffic to the summer and said she hopes the start of the school year will bring people out. To promote the stop, Cameron Village is using a YouTube video featuring N.C. State students who have “moved” to Cameron Village to avoid the long walk from campus. In addition, a social media campaign encourages people to “like” the Cameron Village page on Facebook and enter to win a $500 gift card that can be used at any Village shop or vendor. “Our merchants are great supporters of N.C. State and the faculty, they are really excited and welcoming of this addition,” Hunnell said.

A student organization to manage Feed the Pack and sustain it once it’s up and running is currently in the works. Students and other campus community members interested in finding out more about this initiative may visit Feed the Pack’s Facebook page at facebook. com/FeedThePackPantry or email the group at feedthepackpantry@gmail.com “With inadequate finances, inadequate food supply is not far behind,” Bonds said. “This initiative will contribute to the betterment of campus food insecurity.”

OUTSIDE THE BRICK: THE UNIVERSITY’S SUSTAINABILITY COMMISSION OF STUDENT GOVERNMENT HOSTED THE THINK OUTSIDE THE BRICK COMPETITION.STUDENTS SUBMITTED A PROJECT PROPOSAL TO A PANEL OF UNIVERSITY STAFF MEMBERS, STUDENT SUSTAINABILITY LEADERS AND THE STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT. SOURCE: STUDENT GOVERNMENT

“Alternative energy is a big deal and a big issue, not just with universities and students, but also on a national level,” Nerurkar said. “We want students to learn from seeing other initiatives students have started.” Hannah Osborne, a junior in history and vice chair of the Sustainability Commission for Student Government, said she was excited to see the group’s hard work come to fruition. “We’re so excited for the completion of the solar pavilion, and we feel confident that it will serve as a visible landmark of sustainability for the Wolfpack nation,” Osborne said.


News


Viewpoint

TECHNICIAN

W

Ask a professor

e all have our f a nt a s ie s i n life. Mine (at least the PG one) happens to be writing a n adv ice column. I’ve been a voracious consumer of a d v ic e columns Steven for 30 years Greene or so, startAssociate professor ing with the venerable Dear Abby and Ann Landers. I’ve regularly followed dozens of advice columns through the years since and often thought, “I could do that.” What I really wanted, though, was to have some particular expertise to share. Recently it hit me: I do. When I think about all my conversations with students through the years regarding my courses, advising or just how this university actuallyworks, there’s a lot that I know that you don’t and maybe are afraid to ask a professor whom you actually know. So, here you go—ask me! You should probably know a little bit more about me if you’re going to ask me for

advice. I went to Duke as an undergraduate programs undergrad. (Don’t hate! I re- for political science, which ally pull for the Pack, too!) means I’ve really gotten to I went to Ohio State for my see the seedy underbelly of Ph.D. Before teaching here, N.C. State bureaucracy (the I taught at Texas Tech, and horror, the horror!). Since I Oberlin. So, I know big and have tenure, I can actually small, public and private. I say what I think of most evgrew up in northern Virginia erything and not worry about and have lived in Cary since I getting fired for it. And as for moved to State along with my ruffling the feathers of some wife and four colleagues— kids. (They I’ve ne ver really don’t been partictake a lot of ASKAPROFNCSU@GMAIL.COM ularly afraid time, so I’m of that eialways lookther. ing for extra stuff to do, like With “Ask a professor,” I newspaper advice columns.) want to use my unique knowlAt State, I am a political sci- edge as a professor—10 years ence professor, and I teach all at N.C. State, 13 total—to anvariations of American Gov- swer your questions about acernment. Most of the stu- ademics, University life, how dents I encounter think I’m things here “really” work or reasonably good at it. (Even if whatever else you want. Heck, you are not a political science after reading thousands of major, I want you in my In- advice columns in my life, tro to American Government I’m feeling pretty confident class—it’s a GEP course.) I about solving your relationalso mentor graduate stu- ship or roommate problems, dents in their own teaching. too. So have at it. I cannot I am the academic adviser promise my answer will make for about 40 political science you laugh (though, I’ll try my majors each semester—and darndest), but I can promise if there’s anywhere you learn you honesty (that’s what the this university’s dysfunctions, tenure is for). So, send me it’s advising. For the past few an email at askaprofncsu@ years I’ve been director of gmail.com.

EMAIL GREENE

I

n terms of entertainment and just pure fun, Packapalooza was easily one of the most memorable events N.C. State has ever hosted. It was right up there with Ludacris’ concert at Reynolds in the fall of 2010. Upperclassmen who attended the event were asking “Why haven’t we done this before?” As for freshmen, Packapalooza set a high–perhaps impossibly high–bar for future campus-wide events. But when you consider the success of this event, the anniversary it is meant to mark seems arbitrary. What is the significance of 125? Don’t get us wrong, we love this university, and 125 years is a birthday worth celebrating. But shouldn’t we–current and past students and faculty, along with the surrounding community–celebrate N.C. State every year? The University is no doubt hoping for a successful fundraising campaign as part of the 125th

PAGE 4 • TUESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2012

{OUR VIEW} anniversary celebration. That being said, alumni only give when they feel a strong connection to their university. More than 30,000 people visited Packapalooza. Undergrads (of all years), graduate students, alumni, faculty and members of the community came to recognize N.C. State a nd its achievements. But all along, its organizers have warned u s not to expect a celebration on t his sca le again in the near future. It’s almost as if all the good stuff was saved up for the big 125. But isn’t 126 bigger than 125? We can’t let increments of 25 govern the appropriateness of a celebration. Packapalooza was a success because it brought the N.C. State community together even as it strengthened our bonds with the community beyond our campus’ borders. So why aren’t we doing this every year? Perhaps future

Packapaloozas could be a bit more modest in scale, but what would it hurt to really give the students something worth remembering (and something to look forward to) every year? If we did that, perhaps when today’s students leave this fine institution to make their fortunes in the world, t he y ’ l l re member N.C. State when they deposit their fat paychecks. Hats off to all of the organizations planning Packapalooza, namely UAB and Student Government. It was fitting of one of the nation’s best universities, and we’re glad the weather cooperated just long enough for them to pull it off in such stylish fashion. Speaking of weather, perhaps the sweetest part of Packapalooza came after Hillsborough had cleared— UNC-Chapel Hill’s FallFest was cancelled Monday due to rain.

“We can’t let increments of 25 govern the appropriateness of a celebration.”

{LAUREN’S VIEW} Tales of a concert junkie

I

t’s a quiet Sunday night and I am sitting at home listening to the latest swoon-worthy masterpiece that Jason Mraz has introduced to men and women worldwide. I hear h i s de l ic ate , ye t dramatic voice croon through my headLauren phones, the Noriega soft, yet inStaff Columnist tricate guitar work serenading my ears and heart alike. I am listening along, but I am desperately wishing that I could be at the concert to experience this performance firsthand, though, and not through my current iTunes playlist. I don’t mean to paint the picture that I am the world’s biggest Mraz Maniac (or whatever the members of his fan club call themselves), but there is one thing that I will always be a fanatic about: live music. T h roug hout my h ig h school days, I spent the majority of my weekends at local music venues listening to my favorite bands play. The hours that my friends and I used to spend waiting outside the music halls of uptown Charlotte just to secure the coveted front-row general-admission spots were numerous. My obsession with concert culture has since escalated to the point where I have found myself traipsing around countries where I don’t even speak the native tongue just to hear the musical stylings of artists like Stevie Wonder and Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band perform. Some

might say my obsession has gotten a tad out of control, but there is just no stopping me and my love of concerts. You might just wonder what exactly is so special about going to concerts. I’ve heard all the complaints: The music is too loud, the artist doesn’t sound exactly like they do on the record, the venues are too hot and crowded, and so on. But here is my defense: There is absolutely nothing better than seeing your favorite band playing one of your favorite songs in person, right in front of you. There is nothing more beautiful than hearing the emotion in their voice firsthand. There is nothing that could possibly compare to hearing the hidden meanings and stories behind each and every song. You suddenly feel like you are part of the song, as if you were there for the entire songwriting process. There is nothing more exhilarating than being able to dance and sing along with some of your go-to concert buddies, especially if these people are friends you’ve acquired through the music scene. There is just nothing like it, at least to me. Nothing beats that adrenaline rush, that undeniable high that you feel throughout the set list, nothing at all. That’s why I’ve already seen 80 concerts in my lifetime, and it’s why I hope to pass the 100-concert mark before I graduate in May. So if you would ever like to participate in the splendor and excitement of live music, look no further. I’m your girl. Send Lauren your thoughts to letters@technicianonline. com.

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{

“I

ANNA’S VIEW

}

Hell on two wheels

learned how to ride a bicycle this summer.” I said in response to one of those get-to-know-you questions Anna Betts posed on Guest Columnist t he first day of class. When fielding such questions in the past, I’ve routinely said that I’m left-handed, but this year I have some new ammo. Learning to ride a bicycle is a huge rite of passage when you’re a kid. It’s like that scene in Forrest Gump when his leg braces fall off as he’s running. It takes traveling under one’s own power to the next level. It didn’t happen like that for me. Don’t get me wrong, my mom tried to teach me. I have a vague memory of biking around a parking lot without training wheels. It was during this brief spell of

two-wheeled freedom that the unimaginable happened– I fell. I didn’t fall off into a pit of snakes or run over a puppy dog, I just tipped over. I doubt I even felt anything through the ridiculous amount of protective clothing I was wearing, but nevertheless I fell off. For a perfectionist, something like this was crushing. I’m the type of p e r s on who wants to be t he best at everything I do, and I want to be like that right away. This makes things like riding a bike quite difficult because it’s learned through trial and error. So instead of getting back on my bike and trying again, I quit. I quit because I resented the bike for not being easier to ride. I was angry at myself

for not being able to do it. It would be 13 years before I touched a bike again. It wasn’t too bad, though. I grew up on a horse farm down a halfmile-long gravel road that’s about seven miles outside of town, so any friends who came to visit had to come by car. Family and friends have of fered to teach me at various times over the years, but I always r e f u s e d . It wasn’t until a beach trip this May that I finally got back on a bicycle. It took me about 45 minutes and a few pushes from my patient boyfriend before I was off! It was just me and my rusty red beach cruiser traveling around the quiet, flat neighborhood. I felt like the adorable little boy in the “Thumbs Up for

“I quit because I resented the bike for not being easier to ride.”

Editor-in-Chief Mark Herring

News Editor Jessie Halpern

Sports Editor Jeniece Jamison

Viewpoint Editor Ahmed Amer

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Rock and Roll” YouTube video—happy of myself. I spent the entire evening traversing the neighborhood’s empty streets, occasionally running into a trash can or shrub. I was humbled by how uncomplicated it was to move forward. I told my classmates about my new skill with a chuckle– not only because it’s uncommon for a 21 year old to be unable to ride a bike, but because the action is so simple. I had spent the majority of my life refusing to learn something so elementary. That’s all in the past now. I’m starting each day as someone who knows how to ride a bike. As someone who’s figured out how easy it is to break the stubborn cycle of perfectionism. As someone who’s gotten over themself. Send Anna your thoughts to letters@technicianonline. com.

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2011 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

TECHNICIAN

TUESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2012 • PAGE 5

A new season of televised entertainment begins STORY BY LAUREN VANDERVEEN

T

he return of the fall means back to school, upcoming elections and, of course, the final film of the Twilight saga. It also means a new line-up of shows coming to our television screens, and whether you’re interested in comedy, drama, or the post-apocalypse, there should be something for everyone this season.

Revolution Network: NBC Premiere: Sept. 17, 10 p.m.

E

xecutive produced by J. J. Abrams (Lost, Fringe), Revolution has quickly become one of the most anticipated shows of the season. This dystopian drama picks up 15 years after the earth suddenly loses all power. Of course, like any show helmed by Abrams, the reason why is shrouded in mystery and intrigue. It’s up to a select few to battle unruly militia and unforeseen forces to bring the world out of darkness.

Animal Practice Network: NBC Premiere: Sept. 26, 8 p.m.

A

nimal Practice may be the sitcom with the most to prove. The show will focus on Dr. George Coleman (Justin Kirk), a New York veterinarian whose eccentricities and animal patients run amuck. This is until his exgirlfriend (Joanna Garcia-Swisher) inherits the hospital. Also starring Tyler Labine and Bobby Lee, Animal Practice is full of cult talent looking to burst into the mainstream.

The Mindy Project

Nashville

Network: FOX Premiere: Sept. 25, 9:30 p.m.

Network: ABC Premiere: Oct. 10, 10 p.m.

F

OX continues to build its stable of comedies with The Mindy Project. Named for its star, the show follows a doctor (Mindy Kaling) whose social and professional life becoming increasingly intermingled. Anyone who has become a fan of Kaling’s comedic styling on The Office may want to give this romantic comedy a spin.

The New Normal Network: NBC Premiere: Sept. 11, 9:30 p.m.

I

n the latest show from Ryan Murphy (Glee, American Horror Story), The New Normal follows Bryan (Andrew Rannells) and David (Justin Bartha), a couple looking to start a family. They find help from Goldie (Georgia King), a single parent who offers to become their surrogate. Murphy’s quirky characters and unique storytelling may give him a third hit this fall.

A

show that seems targeted exclusively to fans of country music, Nashville seems to follow in the footsteps of musical shows Glee and Smash. Connie Britton (American Horror Story) stars as a queen of country battling for the spotlight with an auto-tuned new starlet played by Hayden Panettiere (Heroes). For those who prefer a country twang to their drama, this may not be a bad choice.

Copper

666 Park Avenue

Go On

Network: BBC America Premiere: Aug. 19, 10 p.m.

Network: ABC Premiere: Sept. 17, 10 p.m.

T

he next supernatural thriller to hit our screens – and set to compete with NBC’s Revolution – comes in the form of a Manhattan apartment complex in 666 Park Avenue. The Drake building’s tenants and managers find all their desires strangely becoming reality, with the question remaining of what building owner Gavin Doran (Terry O’Quinn, Lost) has in store for them.

Network: NBC Premiere: Sept. 11, 9 p.m.

T

he first original series from BBC America, Copper follows Kevin Corcoran (Tom Weston-Jones) as he returns from the Civil War in 1864. Corcoran becomes a police detective in New York City, only to find it festering with criminals, booze and conflict. Promising plenty of historical issues and content, Copper promises a lot for fans of period pieces.

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ne of several new NBC comedy series this fall, Go On stars Friends alumnus Matthew Perry, as Ryan King, a sportscaster who joins a support group after the death of his wife. What ensues, including a “who has the better sob story” contest, aims to provide a level of therapeutic laughter. Time will tell if Perry will finally have his first post-Friends hit.


Features ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

PAGE 6 • TUESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2012

TECHNICIAN

MLG returns to Raleigh, with money Jordan Alsaqa

Raleigh events have seen in the past. While MLG events frequently pull in visitors After two successful years, from out-of-state, the numit seems that Major League ber of nearby universities and Gaming is ready to become a the strength of the local video fall fixture in Raleigh. Start- game industry have helped ing Friday, Aug. 24 and run- increase local awareness of ning throughout the week- the event. end, MLG will be back for The out-of-state business, round three in Raleigh. meanwhile, is a boon to the Another year means an- city, which is why Raleigh has other chance for the event to continued to work with MLG impress and entertain fans to provide hotel and restauof e-sports while also show- rant connections for visitors. ing the city the growing le“The current estimate is gitimacy of the professional that there will be a $2 milvideo game circuit. lion direct impact to the RaIn the pursuit of this goal, leigh economy just based on MLG has taken steps to pro- the event and various sales,” vide new content and incen- Goldberg said. tives for fans from all around To achieve that estimate, the state to come out. In par- MLG is providing new events ticular, MLG has made the and features to fill the weekround held end for fans in Ra leig h a nd br i ng one of it s back those most imporwho have tant compevisited MLG titions of the Ra leig h in year. the past. “It’s a big Those who deal for us attend this to come back year will be to Raleigh,” able to view Katie Goldt he ac t ion Katie Goldberg, VP of Communications berg, the vice on four difpresident of ferent stagcommunications for MLG, es, up from last year’s three. said. “There are only four One stage will be dedicated championships this year, and to fighting games like Mortal we chose to have the summer Kombat and SoulCalibur V. season end in Raleigh.” Another will feature the popOne of the most important ular battle arena game League factors in that decision was of Legends, which has grown the heavy local traffic that the in popularity since its debut Associate Features Editor

“The current estimate is that there will be a $2 million impact to the Raleigh economy.”

ALEX SANCHEZ/TECHNICIAN

Members of team Abnormal, Jessie Meacham and Leland Pascual, compete in a Call of Duty: Black Ops match at the Major League Gaming Pro Circuit’s stop at the Raleigh Convention Center Aug. 26, 2011. Meacham, Pascual and their two other teammates practice two hours a day online as a team.

as an official game last year. StarCraft II, in keeping with its status as one of the world’s most well-known competitive video games, rounds out the competition lineup. Two stages will be dedicated to the game, with competitors on the main stage once again playing in soundproof booths. League of Legends players will also be playing in the booths, allowing for maximum concentration. Beyond the competitive games, the convention floor

will remain a place for attendees to soak in a bit of news about the future of gaming, as well as more than a few items of sponsored swag. “There will be tons of both events and sponsors around the center,” Goldberg said. “The PlayStation booth will be offering demos of upcoming games for attendees to try. There will also be new products from MLG to try out and buy, including game controllers and equipment.” For those who may be un-

able to attend the event, MLG continues to provide full streaming of major matches on its website. The enormous undertaking requires a team constantly working throughout the weekend, but the streaming service has bolstered the popularity of Major League Gaming by allowing fans to stay up on how their favorite teams are doing. MLG remains an event very much for the hardcore gamer, but the spirit and grandeur of

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the event will be familiar to anyone who’s been to a major sports game. Though it’s far from a mainstream event, MLG Raleigh is quickly becoming an important event for the city, which has continued to welcome the competition back each year. With plans to make 2012 the biggest year yet for MLG, the hope is to draw in and entertain everyone from the seasoned fan to the curious newcomer this weekend.


Sports

TECHNICIAN

V-BALL

during the season because the team is on the road a lot. continued from page 8 However, each player makes sure they bring textbooks to There are four players in the away matches to study. school, and each player is in a “It’s important for us to get different year in school. all of our work done early, so Freshman defensive spe- that way when it’s volleyball cialist and libero Alex Taylor time, it’s volleyball time,” said that she liked math and Micek said, who is in civil science i n engineering. high school, “W hen it’s so it made homework sense to mat i m e , i t ’s jor in chemihomework cal engineertime.” i ng. HowLi ke a ny e v e r, s h e aspiring enAlexa Micek, senior defensive says the ulgineer, the specialist and libero timate push qua r tet of through the engineering door was from a friend who netters has post-collegiate also played volleyball. ambitions of becoming hired “I sort of just followed in by well-known organizations. her footsteps,” Taylor said. Middle blocker Alesha WilSomething each player son, a senior in chemical enmentioned was the impor- gineering, is no different and tance of time management. has set her sights high. Senior defensive specialist “I want to work for Apple and libero Alexa Micek said and make cell phone screens balancing school and vol- – indestructible cell phone leyball can become difficult screens,” Wilson said. “Hope-

fully I will be on the iPhone 7 crew and make it happen.” Although the players seem to be balancing the volleyball and engineering schedules well, they still admit that it can be difficult to handle at times. “I know I do more work than everyone else on the team, aside from the other engineers, so it can be a little difficult sometimes,” said Richardson, who boasts a 3.9 GPA. Despite the difficulties they may run into, they all agree that keeping an open line of communication with their professors is essential to their success as students. According to Taylor, her older peers have instructed her to do so, along with a few other tips to success. “Actually reading the textbooks and knowing the material and, of course, study really hard, which I’ve heard a lot from them,” Taylor said.

“It’s important for us to get all of our work done early.”

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TRACK

continued from page 8

PHOTO BY LUIS ZAPATA/TECHNICIAN

Senior defensive specialist and libero Alexa Micek dives for a dig during a match at Reynolds Coliseum. Micek is majoring in civil engineering.

Classifieds

POLICY

PAGE 7 • TUESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2012

“It’s crazy in Europe,” Hill said. “Track is a much bigger deal than it is over here. It’s on all of the sports channels. You hardly ever see it on SportsCenter here, but it’s on all of the sports channels there. It’s one of the biggest events in the world. You just get a sense of that over there in Europe.” Hill said he wants to return to Europe in the future to compete on the international stage. “Hopefully I’ll do it next summer and summers after that as a post-collegiate runner,” Hill said. “It’s not going to be a new experience for me. It definitely took some time to get used to it, so I won’t have to go through that again as far as being really tired over there. When you get there you have to make sure you’re resting.”

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2

3

4

FOR RELEASE AUGUST 21, 2012

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 1

Solution to Monday’s puzzle

© 2012 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

8/21/12

Back in the stands

August 22, 2012

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

ACROSS 1 Like a visit from Benedict XVI 6 Ginormous 10 Currier’s partner 14 Sans chaperon 15 Mystery writer __ Stanley Gardner 16 Maryland athlete, briefly 17 Former kids’ show title character named for the large pockets in his coat 20 U.K. record label 21 Egg container 22 Popular name for a tree-lined rd. 23 Any of the “Be My Baby” singers 26 Scott of “Happy Days” 27 Fuse blower 32 Like the first stage of a car wash 35 Really riles 36 TV Guide’s “We don’t know yet” 37 Pseudosophisticated 38 Chopper blade 40 “__ Harry Met Sally...” 41 Understand 42 Mrs. Dithers of “Blondie” 43 Nuisances 44 Apollo Theater tryout for nonpros 48 Morse creation 49 Yellow-disked flowers 53 Puppet pal of Fran and Ollie 55 Pants part 57 Teachers’ lobbying org. 58 Judge’s demand, and a hint to this puzzle’s theme words, which end 17-, 27- and 44Across 62 Hymn starter 63 Brussels-based defense gp. 64 Where eagles dwell 65 Toy with theme parks 66 No.-crunching pros 67 Kennel club classification

8/21/12

By David W. Cromer

DOWN 1 Harness race horse 2 Texas mission 3 Show up unannounced 4 Tiny soldier 5 Where the herd grazes 6 Plywood layer 7 Boats like Noah’s 8 Blind component 9 Perfect score 10 Slanty, typewise 11 Martini ingredients 12 Love personified 13 Notice 18 Division word 19 Shifted car parts 24 Notice 25 Biblical possessive 26 Oktoberfest draft 28 One of a powerful race of gods 29 __-Magnon 30 “As if!” 31 Beachgoers’ hues 32 Epic story 33 Utah city 34 Junkyard guard

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38 Casanova 39 Bruins Hall of Famer Bobby 40 Makes moist 42 Fragrant wood 43 __ Beta Kappa 45 City west of Cleveland 46 Gem State potatoes 47 Scandal suffix 50 Accustom (to) 51 Paranormal, say

8/21/12

52 Filled completely 53 __ & the Gang: “Celebration” group 54 Yen 55 Go past one’s breaking point 56 Jazzy James 59 Ltd. counterpart, in the States 60 Airport queue vehicle 61 Above, in verse

Technician was there. You can be too. The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information.


Sports

COUNTDOWN

• 11 days until the first game of the football season against Tennessee.

PAGE 8 • TUESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2012

INSIDE

• Page 7: Continuing coverage of Ryan Hill’s European ventures.

TECHNICIAN

FOOTBALL

Former golfers garner top-5 finishes on PGA Tour

Counting down to the Vols

Former N.C. State golfers Tim Clark and Carl Pettersson took home top-5 finishes at the Wyndham Championship, which ended Monday, in Greensboro, N.C. Clark finished second while Pettersson tied for fourth. Clark fell short of the win by two strokes, finishing 16 under par for the tournament. Petterrson finished two shots behind Clark at 14 under. Pettersson also finished third at the PGA Championship in Kiawah Island, S.C., the previous weekend. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Men’s tennis releases schedule

RYAN PARRY/TECHNICIAN

JOHN JOYNER/TECHNICIAN

A

The men’s tennis program has released its schedule for the 2012-13 season. N.C. State finished with a 20-10 overall record last season and clinched a berth in the NCAA Tournament for the fifth time in school history. The Pack will take on 15 ranked opponents from last season. It will open its season by hosting a tournament Sept. 1-3.

s the football team prepares for its season opener against the Tennessee Volunteers at the Chick-fil-A Kickoff Game on Aug. 31 in Atlanta, Ga. Technician takes a look behind the scenes of fall training camp.

SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

The preseason has been an eventful one for the Pack, including the departure of Tyler Brosius, return of sophomore running back Mustafa Greene, redshirt sophomore Bryan Underwood undergoing surgery and multiple members of the team sitting out of practice due to academic issues.

Women’s tennis schedule released Women’s tennis also released its 2012-13 schedule. Six of its scheduled opponents were in the final top-25 ITA poll last season. The team will open its schedule at the Southern Shootout in Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 21-23. The Pack will host East Carolina for its first dual match play event Jan. 31.

Going into the game, head coach Tom O’Brien and company still have many questions on the table that will be answered by the end of game preparation. Will graduate student quarterback Mike Glennon and junior cornerback David Amerson be able to duplicate the breakout success they enjoyed last season? Also, with targets that don’t have a significant amount of in-game experience, who will step up at the wide receiver position? The linebacking core also faces the same conundrum. With the kickoff of the 2012 season looming, O’Brien and the coaching staff have a number questions that will be or must be answered on the practice field at Dail Complex before stepping into the Georgia Dome.

SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

ATHLETIC SCHEDULE

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JOHN JOYNER/TECHNICIAN

Friday

TRACK & FIELD

MEN’S SOCCER V. LIBERTY Lynchburg, Va., 7 p.m.

Running the world with Ryan Hill

WOMEN’S SOCCER V. TEXAS Austin, Texas, 9 p.m. VOLLEYBALL V. JACKSONVILLE AT COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON TOURNAMENT Charleston, S.C., 4:30 p.m. Saturday VOLLEYBALL V. SACRAMENTO STATE AT COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON TOURNAMENT Charleston, S.C., 10 a.m. VOLLEYBALL V. COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON AT COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON TOURNAMENT Charleston, S.C., 7 p.m. Sunday WOMEN’S SOCCER V. LSU Baton Rouge, La., 2 p.m. MEN’S SOCCER V. MERCER, Dail Soccer Field, 4 p.m.

QUOTE OF THE DAY “I want to work for Apple and make cell phone screens – indestructible cell phone screens.” Alesha Wilson, middle blocker volleyball

Jeniece Jamison Sports Editor

A

fter the outdoor track and field season in the United States–a season that included winning the ACC Men’s Cross Country Championship and being named an All-American–senior distance runner Ryan Hill continued his dominance across the Atlantic this summer. Hill achieved personal bests and a Wolfpack record in Ireland and the Netherlands. “I know in the summer postcollegiate, professional runners and Olympians go over to Europe and run the circuit, because it’s a really well-run race,” Hill said. “The best in the world go over there. Since I didn’t have any cross country left, and I CONTRIBUTED BY N.C. STATE ATHLETICS wasn’t training hard for cross Senior track and field runner Ryan Hill competes in ACC action. Hill broke country, I decided to extend the several of his own school records this summer while competing in Europe. track season and try to run some faster times.” the Morton Games in Dublin, Ire- ally fast because everyone is really Hill set the school record for land, with a time of 3:56.78. Hill good there.” the 1,500-meter as a freshman took home fifth place in the race, Prior to going abroad, Hill also and broke his own record sev- as all of the runners finished with broke his own school record of eral times over a sub-four-minute 13:31.67 in the 5,000-meter event his career. In time. He had pre- at the Olympic trials. Hill fell just his latest reviously broken the short of making the team, taking cord-breaking N.C. State record home a fifth-place finish with a performance, set by Jim Wilkins 13:27.49 time. He finished as the he finished with in 1973 with a time top collegiate performer. a 3:38.36 time at of 3:58.33. “I broke a record in the 5K, the KBC Night “It was rea l ly which was really cool, and the 15 Ryan Hill, of Athletics in cool going over to [1,500-meter],” Hill said. “I just senior distance runner Heusden, the Europe,” Hill said. hung on with a really good field and Netherlands, “It’s something that had my best races.” July 7. His previous best time no one from State has thought about Hill said track and field is much was 3:39.58 in Palo Alto, Calif. doing. Me and one of the other guys more popular in Europe than in the For his next feat, Hill broke went over there, got a house and did United States. the four-minute-mile mark for some of the circuits over there. That the second time in his career at was really cool. The races are all reTRACK continued page 7

“It’s something that no one from State has thought about doing.”

JOHN JOYNER/TECHNICIAN

VOLLEYBALL

Volleyball makes the grade Nolan Evans Deputy Sports Editor

Nearly a quarter of N.C. State undergraduate and graduate students are enrolled in engineering. That number dips below 10 percent among student athletes at the University. As of the fall 2011 semester, only 50 of the more than 500 student athletes at N.C. State were listed as students in the College of Engineering. With the academic rigor of engineering and demanding schedules that student athletes must work around, it’s not shocking why the statistics are unbalanced with the University average. However, some members of the volleyball team seem to believe that being a student athlete actually helps the academic process, particularly with engineering. “Being an athlete, you have to balance your time, so it’s a lot easier for us more than it is for a lot of other engineers I talk to,” junior middle blocker and civil engineering major Meredith Richardson said. “They spend hours on stuff that took me only an hour to do.” Volleyball lays claim to the most players on a team sport to major in engineering at State.

V-BALL continued page 7


Technician - August 21, 2012