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november

21 2011

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Pullen Park welcomes new business A new cafe had opened up in the newly renovated Pullen Park.

Students speak: tuition increase Students show support and dissent at a meeting discussing possible $330 tuition increase.

Elise Heglar News Editor

After undergoing nearly two years of renovations, Pullen Park has reopened full of improvement, including a new cafe that supports locally produced food. The park has been under construction since December 2009 and the project cost about $6 million to complete. Pullen Park is North Carolina’s first amusement park; it was established in 1887. On Saturday, the park opened for the first time since construction started. Students and Raleigh families alike strolled through the new park where they were able to enjoy updated facilities, including a new climatecontrolled carousel house. In addition to the updates made to original park facilities, a new cafe has been added. Pullen Place Cafe and Catering offers healthy eating options for park visitors that are locally produced. “We’re a cafe located in the park serving locally sourced food at low prices. We want to be a food destination for N.C. State students and the people of Raleigh,” Steve Mangano, one of the Pullen Place founders, said. According to Mangano, providing local food was one of the main priorities of the business. The menu will be seasonal in accordance to what local producers are able to provide. “It’s something that we’re very passionate about. The park is a place where the whole community comes together, so the opportunity to offer locally produced food to the public was too good to pass up,” Mangano said. The menu of the café is very different from standard amusement park fare; while it does include hotdogs and hamburgers, things like hummus and pita, deli sandwiches and salads are also available.

monday

Will Brooks Staff Writer

sarah tudor/Technician

On Saturday, Nov. 19, Pullen Park officially re-opened it doors to the community offering an array of new activity, including a cafe. Pullen Place Cafe, serves local food varying from hummus and sandwiches to burgers and brat wurst. The cafe has gluten free and vegetarian options as well. The cafe will be open daily from 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

Mangano said that offering healthy spersed around the park. “We’re able to serve a lot of people. options was one of the most important things to the owners. The menu has Storage is really our biggest issue, not a wide variety and a fairly low price so much volume,” Mangano said. Rianne Whittington, freshman in point, with no individual items priced political science, says at over $7. she is excited to visit “ S t u d e nt s c a n the newly updated come by to get somepark since it has conthing quick and then sistently been under return to the park renovation since her and enjoy their day,” arrival at the UniMangano said. versity. While the Pullen “I definitely want Place facilities are to go see it sometime small, Mangano says Steve Mangano, Pullen Place soon. I’ve heard a lot that serving large founder of people talk about quantities of people it but I have never at once will not be an issue. It is a walk-up service and there visited it before,” Whittington said. Whittington is excited to see a cafe are 50 outdoor seats available near the café in addition to covered areas inter- offering local food and healthy menu

“We want to be a food destination for N.C. State students...”

options. “The only options on campus are the dining hall or places like Chickfil-A and Taco Bell, so it’s good to have some healthy options offcampus,” Whittington said. Matt Walker, senior in communications, found it interesting that Pullen Park not only added a cafe, but that it provides so many healthy eating options. “I find it interesting that it’s a healthy food place and not something like a McDonald’s,” Walker said. Walker also said that having a full-service cafe makes Pullen Park stand out as a city park. “I’ve never seen a city park with a cafe. It makes it different and more attractive,” Walker said.

Students made an appearance at the board of directors meeting Friday morning to make a case against the newly proposed tuition increase of $330. The meeting inclined students to come forth with ideas and criticisms of the University budget. Daniel Eckert, junior in computer engineering, explained at the meeting that the University has put an emphasis on research, which is increasing costs and lowering classroom value. “One of the things that I have seen is the difference between research and scholarship from a professional perspective,” Eckert said. “We are asked to continually pay more and more money for an education that’s trending away from a closeness in the classroom.” Senior Class President John Tucker made an appearance at the meeting, explaining that students need to be informed about the cut. With the information delivered through the monthly “HOWL” email, over one hundred students responded for and against the change in tuition. “It was incredible how many students actually supported a tuition increase, but they understood what it was going towards,” Tucker said, “The most common theme for those who were for a tuition increase was an increase in the amount of faculty and staff salary increases.” An increased response from students has been taken well by Student Government, including Chandler Thompson, student body president. Chandler explained that she wanted

tuition continued page 3

Annual ‘Windhover’ open mic night features a variety of acts ‘Windhover’s’ second open mic night of the year showcased various types of talent. Zach Green Correspondent

Windhover, the University’s literary and art magazine, showcased various types of talent during their second open mic night of the year.  The event began with food and patch-painting table for attendees to get involved in the evening artistically. It then continued with the 16 performances from students, faculty and alumni sharing their creative talent; there were both solo and group performances covering a wide range of artistic expression such as poetry, short story readings and musical performances. “There’s such a wide variety of things to do,” Jaimie Harwood, senior in English education, said. Past editions of Windhover were available to look through and see how the publication has changed through the years. The most recent edition was available, as well as information about contributing to the upcoming edition. A critique sheet was available allowing for feedback on different components of the book, as well as a section for new ideas for future publications. “The quality of the book was good,” Jonathan Weeks, junior in human biology, said, “More well produced than I assumed.” The patch-painting table was popular with attendees and seemed to be a hotspot of activity. Small squares of cloth pre-stenciled with designs from

windhover continued page 3

ben tran/Technician

(From the Left to Right)Chelsea Schwabe, a senior in communications, Ashley Oskardmay, a sophomore in biochemistry, Olivia Springer, a sophomore in communications, Krystal Rodas, a freshman in human biology, and Tracy Johnson, a senior in parks and recreation sing their final song in their annual Ladies in Red concert on Nov. 19.

Ladies in Red offer creative arrangements The annual Ladies in Red concert Saturday night featured new arrangements of popular music. Anna Riley Staff Writer

Chris Phipps/Technician

Foreign exchange student Lela Johnston performs a French Canadian song at the Windhover Open Mic Night on Friday, Nov. 18. Lela was joined by her friend and fellow foreign exchange student Ibrahim Zafar for their first open mic night.

NEW ARRIVALS

We are STATE!

The Ladies in Red female acapella group featured new arrangements of popular music during their annual concert Saturday night. The Ladies in Red have been performing since 1993 and typically have one big show per semester. This semester the “Ladies” were Tricia Artim, Gracie Bell, Tracy Kristin Johnson, Ashley Oskardmay, Chelsea Schwabe, Olivia Springer and Krystal Rodas. They performed their yearly show to a packed theater of onlookers and

supporters. Sponsored by the N.C. State Music Department, the group has a diverse makeup of girls with various singing talents. Though a professional staff supports them, the girls manage themselves and are responsible for the quality of their productions. This year, music directors and members of the group Chelsea Schwabe and Ashley Oskardmay took the ladies in a Top 40 direction, selecting and arranging popular songs and riffs for performances. “[Ashley and I] have been doing collaborative arranging with songs we like and putting a creative spin on them,” Schwabe said. “We [music directors] have a vision for the group

ladies continued page 3

NOW OPEN LATER! Mon - Thurs 8am to 8pm Friday 8am to 6pm Saturday 10am to 4pm


Page 2

page 2 • monday, november 21, 2011

Corrections & Clarifications

Technician POLICe BlOTTER

Through Oliver’s lens

Nov. 16 1:07 a.m. | Traffic Stop Main Campus Drive Student was issued citation for speeding.

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Laura Wilkinson at editor@ technicianonline.com

10:32 a.m. | Stalking Public Safety Center Student reported receiving Facebook message from unknown non-student.

Weather Wise Today:

10:44 a.m. | Larceny Staff member reported bicycle stolen. 4:12 a.m. | Larceny Sigma Nu Report of theft of decorations from rear of residence. Further investigation revealed members of Sigma Phi Epsilon took items. Two students were referred to the University for theft.

73/55 Cloudy.

7:26 a.m. | Larceny Jordan Hall Student reported bicycle stolen.

Tomorrow:

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“It’s never too cold for music.”

Scattered showers.

Wednesday:

J

ustin Hayslette, engineering undesignated transfer, plays drums along with the other two members of his band called “Day and Night” near the Free Expression Tunnel. Guitarist Justin Baker says he has always had a passion for music and being in the band allows him to play more than ever. Hayslette added, “It’s never too cold for music. Right now my fingers are freezing and hurt but I’m still here to play.”

67 40 Showers. Source: Patrick Devore

Talley Update Schedule: Next 7 days. Note this schedule is subject to change. Work around East Cates Avenue, Talley Student Center, Price Music Center and Alexander Hall: 1. Complete storm sewer piping. 2. Complete site grading as far as possible until next phase of construction. 3. Complete testing and inspections of new water main. Source: TJ Willis, assistant director of Student Centers

photo By Oliver Sholder

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Monday Kirk Adam - Modern Abstracts All Day Crafts Center An exhibition of acrylic paintings by local artist and Crafts Center instructor Kirk Adam.

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Intramural Sports Registration All Day Online Registration is open for NFL Pick’M, Pool Battleship and Ultimate Tournament. Sign up online at http://ncsu.edu/stud_ affairs/campus_rec/intramural/. Women Empowered: Inspiring change in an emerging world All Day African American Cultural Center Gallery Earth With Meaning: Photographs of Alan Cohen All Day Gregg Museum Alan Cohen “makes visible the unseen” in places marked by

National Honor Society of the Arts and Sciences Zeta of North Carolina Chapter, NC State University Congratulates its New Members November 20, 2011 Samuel Myers Alcorn Carrie Alexandra Atwell Valorie Vyctoria Bailey Alexis Barnes Joseph Fuller Beasley Evan Hunter Brisson Myranda Conway Victoria Crisci Richard McAlister Deans Allison Aurora DeLargy Kimberlee Durham Jonathan Powell Evans Kevin Favreau Jasmine Marie Frantz Kyle Nicholas Goodman Mary Virginia Gregg Jefferson Evans Guilford Mary Catherine Hamner David Higgins Ian Thomas Hill Lindsay Margaret Holman Michael Thomas James II Amanda Margaret Jones Miranda Croft Lemyre Annie Caroline Linker Jesse Louzon-Hadley Christine Love Katie Manning Emily Katherine Marquez

Molly Anastasia Matty Ashley N. Meade Se Heui Moon Matthew Thomas Morris Andrew Emery Nagler III Jessica Lynn Neville Samantha Jo Opachan Matthew Phillip Ostrowski Christina Marie Parrett Elizabeth Paul Robert Grafton Pearce Dayne Plemmons Sean Ressler Mollie Corinna Richardson Katie Elaine Robertson Vincent T. Santagata Ronnie Labib Shammas Alan Patrick Sheridan Stephanie Theresa Sherman Hillary Beth Spangler Gretchen Louise Stokes Rita Nevada Strang Matthew Benjamin Tucker Andre Kurepa Waschka Sarah Elizabeth Watkins Lacey White James Ellis-Robert Wrenn Kevin Yabo Zhao

history or the processes of natural events. Instead of sweeping views, he aims his cameras downward to record the exact spots that permeate memory. University Recreation Fitness: Blood Pressure and Body Fat Testing Noon-1 p.m. Fitness Suite, Carmichael Recreation Center Screening will take place in the Fitness Suite on the second floor of Carmichael Recreation Center. There is no charge for these assessments. Chat with the Chancellor 2-3 p.m. Port City Java, Park Shops Student Centers Board of Directors Meeting 6-7 p.m. Talley Student Center Boardroom Join the Student Centers Board of Directors as they discuss matters regarding the campus student centers. Learn more about the Talley Student Center Project. All students and faculty are invited to attend. Olga Kleiankina Faculty Recital 7-9 p.m. Stewart Theatre Our renowned faculty pianist is at it again with a fellow faculty member and our favorite cellist, Jonathan Kramer, to bring us another outstanding concert. After hearing them take on Bartok, Franck, Weber and Chopin this past spring semester, we cannot wait to hear what they have in store for us this semester. Joseph Miller Poetry Reading 7:30-9 p.m. Caldwell Lounge, Caldwell Hall During the final meeting of the semester of the English Club, Joseph Miller will do a poetry reading.

Tuesday Kirk Adam - Modern Abstracts All Day Crafts Center An exhibition of acrylic paintings by local artist and Crafts Center instructor Kirk Adam. Intramural Sports Registration All Day Online Registration is open for NFL Pick’M, Pool Battleship and Ultimate Tournament. Sign up online at http://ncsu.edu/ stud_affairs/campus_rec/ intramural/. Women Empowered: Inspiring change in an emerging world All Day African American Cultural Center Gallery Earth With Meaning: Photographs of Alan Cohen All Day Gregg Museum Alan Cohen “makes visible the unseen” in places marked by history or the processes of natural events. Instead of sweeping views, he aims his cameras downward to record the exact spots that permeate memory. Occupy NCSU Meeting 7-8 p.m. 321 Mann Hall Occupy NCSU is organizing a student movement aimed at combatting increased tuition and fees while seeking to rid N.C. State of corporate influence.

dance music theatre

NC STATE CREATIVE ARTIST AWARD The Creative Artist Award will recognize original work in music, dance and theatre, created by NC State students. Each winner will receive a $500 cash prize, and the selected works will be performed in 2012-2013 by the appropriate ARTS NC STATE performing arts program. This award is open to any currently enrolled, full-time NC State University student. DETAILS: ncsu.edu/arts/students

8:41 a.m. | Breaking & Entering ES King Village Report apartment had been entered through window by unknown subject. Drawers had been gone through and cash taken. 2:14 p.m. | Damage to Property EB III Staff member reported door damaged and nearly torn from hinges. 2:38 p.m. | Dispute - Civil Disturbance Poe Hall Two students were involved in argument while in class. Investigation ongoing. 8:34 p.m. | Suspicious Person Alexander Hall Report of subjects thought to be stealing bicycles. Officers checked the area but subjects had left the area. Nov. 17 1:27 a.m. | Suspicious Person North Hall Report of unknown subject lingering in the area. Subject left prior to officer’s arrival. 12:12 a.m. | Damage to Property Thomas Hall Student reported vehicle had been keyed. 11:10 p.m. | Larceny Admin II Staff member reported theft of parking boot on an illegally parked vehicle. 2:39 p.m. | Larceny Council Building Report of missing water downspouts at this location.

Wolfline Updates for Thanksgiving Break Tuesday, Nov. 22: All Wolfline service will end at 10 p.m. No night service, no Wolfprowl service this week. Wednesday, Nov. 23: Faculty and staff service only Route 6 Carter-Finley, Route 7 Wolflink Shuttle and Route 8 Southeast Loop will operate. Thursday, Nov. 24-Sunday Nov. 27: University closed, no Wolfline service. Sunday, Nov. 27: Holiday Shuttle operates from 5-9 p.m. Monday, Nov. 28: Fall Wolfline service resumes. Source: Kim Paylor, Transit Manager

Chat with the Chancellor Monday, Nov. 21 2-3 p.m. Port City Java, Park Shops Chancellor Woodson’s open office hours are specifically designed to solicit student feedback and serve to help him gather a clear understanding of student needs. Source: Chancellor’s Office


News

Technician

tuition

continued from page 1

students to be more informed about what is going on with their tuition. “Some students really felt the budget cuts this year, and they communicated that to me in their emails,” Thompson said. Thompson proposed a tuition talk in the Brickyard so that students can voice their concerns openly in a large, popular space for students. She made it clear that tuition information needs to be released and interacted with the student body. “The last thing that I think anyone wants to see happen is another ‘July Surprise,’” Chandler said. Last year a tuition increase was proposed in July, right before school started and while most students were away from the University. The increase

windhover continued from page 1

Windhover were available for people to paint. “It’s a really cool addition, people said it was one of the reasons they came,” Alanna Howard, editor-in-chief of Windhover, said The patches were added to the event in order to give attendees the opportunity to participate in a hands-on way.  “We wanted a way for everyone to participate,” Chelsea Amato, design editor and a senior in graphic design, said. According to Amato, the designs were based off of Greek myths and signified different forms of art. The bee, a symbol of the foundation of society, was also incorporated into the designs. The performances started around 7 p.m. and continued

came without warning to students. Chancellor Randy Woodson explained in an email that the Board of Governors determines all tuition changes and that the Board of Trustees recommends tuition to them. “Following this process the BOG authorized universities to consider a one time “catch up” in tuition given the very low tuition we have relative to our peers,” Woodson stated in the email. Woodson explained that among the University’s land grant “peers,” our University has the second lowest tuition; the catch-up in tuition will be a $1,200 increase over five years. Annually, students will see an increase of about $240, the lowest percentage increase proposed by any UNC-System school. “In spite of this the significant reductions have resulted in limited class sections and

much larger class sizes,” Woodson stated in the email. Woodson said that the Board of Trustees would like to see faculty pay raises, an increase in hiring, and continuation of providing “critical financial aid.” Budget cuts and tuition increases have been a theme of the UNC system from the beginning of the recession, problems that all universities are learning to deal with. Eckert said he believes that the problem is where a confused staff is spending the money. “We put a 30 percent increase in enrollment and we want a 15 percent increase in faculty,” Eckert said, “I would encourage us to address the identity crisis that we seem to be having in terms of where the money is being spent, and where the money is coming from.”

for well over an hour. The night consisted of mostly poetry and musical performances with a couple of short story readings. Each performance lasted roughly five minutes. While most of the performers were current students, several of them were returning alumni. For the piano and vocal duo, Michael Valeri, sophomore in chemical engineering and Danielle Souder, sophomore in industrial design, this event was a chance for them to showcase their talents with fellow students. “It’s really cool that there are events like this on campus, we never had an avenue to share our music before,” Souder said. There were performers from various colleges within the University, highlighting the diversity of the event. “Events like this are great for the school,” David Delgado, senior in science education, said.

There were also two acts by international students, both of which were musical performances. Muntazar Monsur, a student from Bangladesh, performed a love song he played on guitar and sang in Bengali, the language of his home country. The other international act was singer and guitar duo Cynthia Noury, senior in communication and Danny Riordan, junior in math. Noury is from Montréal Canada and Riordan from Ireland. The pair performed a Canadian song that had topped the charts in previous years. “It’s really nice to see the artsy side of State,” Riordan said. Tim Reavis, senior in psychology, has performed his poetry at multiple Windhover events in the past. He said he enjoyed this year’s event. “I really liked the feel of this one,” Reavis said.  

monday, november 21, 2011 • Page 3

ladies

continued from page 1

—where we want to take it —and we’re looking to appeal to a younger crowd and reach out to the N.C. State community.” According to Schwabe, Saturday night’s performance boasted one of the girls’ best arrangements yet. She said their song “Hell on Heels” was a collective harmony that turned out to showcase their best assets and talents. “Each of our parts mattered. Each was an important piece of the song as a whole,” Schwabe said. Group member and sophomore in communications Olivia Springer said she agreed with Schwabe about

the arrangement. “’Hell on Heels’ really fit our voices. It definitely was a very appealing song,” Springer said. Springer said she felt strongly about the group’s “Rolling in the Deep” and “Crazy” mash up. She said it was a vocalintensive song that was fun to perform. Songs that are popular and relatable with the university community are, according to Springer, vital for good performances. “It’s really important, especially for an a cappella group, to give people stuff they’ve heard before but with a twist. That’s what draws people in,” Springer said.   Stephen Wrightenberry, senior in mechanical engineering and former member of the Grains of Time, is a fan of the Ladies in Red. He said he thinks the girls have a solid

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foundation of talent that will carry them to success. Wrightenberry said his old group, which is an all-male version a capella group, is supportive of the Ladies’ musical direction. “They have some raw talent that is unmatched. All the girls have really strong voices and as a group they perform well together,” Wrightenberry said. Schwabe, senior in communications, said although she is leaving the group when she graduates in May, she feels comfortable about the future of the Ladies in Red. With Oskardmay taking over the musical direction of the girls, Schwabe said the group will only get better. “I feel like I’m leaving them in a good place. We’ve progressed and grown so much and Ashley is going to be a really strong leader,” Schwabe said.

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Viewpoint

page 4 • monday, november 21, 2011

Technician

{Our view}

The Facts:

Last week AASAP organized homecoming week. Homecoming week organized school spirit through activities in and around campus and culminated in the N.C. State-Clemson football game Saturday. N.C. State won 37-13

Our Opinion:

Start to finish; homecoming was a success this year. Whether its free food, shirts, or that dropping of a rival and a top 10, homecoming fired on all cylinders. The student-lead homecoming week was something special, something that should be applauded.

{

F

A perfect homecoming

resh off the heels of dropping the Heels and dropping one to Boston College we entered Homecoming Week. We entered into a week of celebration. We entered a week that magnetized the N.C. State family, bringing students, alumni, faculty and the community together all through a football game. Often unrecognized, but possibly one of the most impressive aspects of homecoming week is the student leadership involved. Homecoming Week is organized by the Alumni Association Student Ambassador Program and assisted by other student organizations on campus. Through partnerships with local companies and other groups ASSAP provides all homecoming activities free of charge to students, all they have to do is show up and show

Following the trends

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

their spirit. AASAP efforts have made  homecoming at N.C. State the largest student-led homecoming in the ACC. AASAP started homecoming week with a ‘Kick Off ’ that lived up to the theme ‘Tame the Tigers’. With inflatables, crafts, caricature artists, the circus theme hit home in a great way. Homecoming shirts and pizzas were available free of charge to any students who showed up and while supplies lasted. The success of the event foreshadowed the success of the rest of the week. Throughout the week AASAP fed students through their ‘Wear Red Get Fed’ campaign, an event easy on the eyes and the stomach. Every day in the

brickyard, AASAP partnered with local restaurants to bring food to students wearing at least a handful of red. Food was provided by student favorites such as: Moes, Dominos, and Marco’s. Food flew out of as soon as it was delivered. Generally, within an hour supplies were exhausted, leaving nothing but a sea of red in the brickyard. As school sprit approached its peak, we took to the streets. The parade on Hillsborough Street Friday displayed the creativity and the vigor found at N.C. State. The parade was a sight to behold. Paper-mache tigers were juxtaposed against wolves. Students dressed themselves in tiger costumes and

caged themselves. And as the band marched down the street and the chancellor cruised by a tangible sense of community was solidified for all those spectating. The only thing that stood in the way of a perfect homecoming week were the #7 Clemson Tigers. With the electricity of the week coursing through the veins of everyone in CarterFinely Stadium on Saturday we all knew we were about to see something special; however, what we saw exceeded all expectations. Glennon’s arial assault and our lock-down defense yielded a score that still requires a double take. It was the perfect cap to the most iconic week of the college experience.

{

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.c. State faced Clemson in their homecoming football game on Saturday. The following is an account of the game via twitter.

ESPNCFB - ESPN CollegeFootball #UpsetAlert: “The #NCState sideline & fans are going crazy & rightfully so” Mike Patrick. Pack leads #7 #Clemson 24-3. 4:58, 2ndQ. kyledoss - Kyle Doss Tom obrien, i like the new approach. Lets stop em in our end zone and score!

PackFootball - NC State Football Pack’s 27 points in 2nd quarter was most since 2005. Most points Clemson has given up in a quarter since 2003. ESPN_ACC - ESPN ACC NC State has scored on its last seven drives!? Seven! Clemson doesn’t deserve a comeback at this point. espn - ESPN Raleigh, NC, is #UpsetCity right now. The Pack lead the Tigers 30-3 in the 3rd quarter -> es.pn/ sfShPm

by Apoorva Karnik

CollegeGameDay - College GameDay Another season, another #Clemson meltdown...#NCState upsets the #Tigers 37-13 in Raleigh. “I liked the tailgating at football games.”

wral - WRAL NEWS in NC NC State crushes No. 7 Clemson 37-13 bit. ly/uTJfca

PackAthletics - NC State Athletics Wolfpack Rolls Over No. 7 Clemson, 37-13, With 2nd-Quarter Blitz. #Winning #TigersDeclawed goREDandWHITE - Chandler Thompson I love that ESPN says “Eaten by Wolves” when referring to NC State’s big win over Clemson today! #ncsuhomecoming Tame the Tigers! The_RAVE_Review - G Baby Aye, this years homecoming was live. I’m proud of NCSU.

Mark_Gottfried - Mark Gottfried Congrats to #wolfpacknation coach Tom O’Brien and #PACKNATION football team. What a win. Phenomenal job. The basketball team is proud!

Have an opinion? We want to hear it. HOW TO SUBMIT Letters must be submitted before 5 p.m. the day before publication and must be limited to 250 words. Contributors are limited to one letter per week. Please submit all letters electronically to viewpoint@

technicianonline.com. The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write for news, features, sports and viewpoint. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information.

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695 Editorial Advertising Fax Online

}

What was your favorite part of the Homecoming Week?

collected By Trey Ferguson

KegsnEggs - Adam Kramer NC State is beating Clemson 17-3. This is the part where we all act surprised.

in your words

515.2411 515.2029 515.5133 technicianonline.com

Ben Kornegay senior, fishiries and wild life

Christian O’Neal, junior in mechanical engineering

The state of television

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s you f lip through the channels you are inundated with commercials for cars, cosmetics, restaurants, foods, banks and everything else you ca n drea m of finding in the annals of the well that is the commercial sector. I f you’re Jon Lewis Staff Columnist lucky you happen upon a snippet of actual TV. You’ll find parts of cartoons that remind you of your childhood. Sometimes you come across an old movie that you think you might have liked a long time ago. If you are astute, you might flip to a news channel and catch up on what’s going on in the world.  If you keep on surfing, however, you are bound to find yourself confronted by the demons of horrendous TV which few manage to escape. A place where the domestic disputes between trashy men and women are celebrated and the housewives of every city in America are in a constant catfight for pride that rivals the tension found between the gangs of LA, a place where Bridezillas torment the lives of everyone around them in an effort to establish their dominance as Queen of the

Universe. This dark world of ‘reality’ television has been poisoning the minds of our youth for far too long. On MTV, a network that is supposedly about music, there is a show called 16 And Pregnant. The first time I heard the name of the show, I knew that nothing good would ever be seen. As I do before everything I write, I did some research which in this case was to actually subject myself to the show and confirm my original thoughts. Making it through the whole episode took more will power than I had myself. I actually had to go and find Dr. Ludovico and ask him for the machine that he used to cure Alex of his violent tendencies just so I could make it through. Watching teen pregnancy and irresponsibility being celebrated instead of reprimanded is infuriating to think about. Having a child is no light matter and the show completely fails to represent that. When TV makes it look so easy to have a child while still in high school, it’s no surprise that the United States has a higher rate of teen pregnancy than any other developed nation in the world. Despicable attitudes and poor world outlooks also have found a footing in ‘real’ TV. Shows that seem to be about cakes actually focus on the drama between the chefs and a show about wedding dresses is actually subjugating us to the

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horrible people trying on the dresses. While watching Say Yes to the Dress, I didn’t know what to expect. Maybe some silly garbage about what it’s like to make wedding dresses and dealing with girls getting married. Instead, I realized that it was all about shallow divas not getting along with their moms. I believe that weddings are about getting to be with the person you love for the rest of your life. Turns out I was wrong. These girls know that if they don’t get the perfect dress, their whole wedding will be ruined, despite the fact that the person they want to spend the rest of their life with is patiently waiting for them no matter what they wear. What a pitiful sentiment to broadcast to women everywhere. The more I watch the more crap I see. TLC, MTV, TruTV have been beaten to death years ago and networks like the History Channel, Discovery, and the SyFy channel are in a quick spiral toward the ground. Why don’t we stop watching these terrible shows and reclaim the glory that our American Culture is entitled to? Send Jon Lewis your thoughts on the state of television to letters@technicianonline.com.

Design Editor design@technicianonline.com

Advertising Manager Ronilyn Osborne advertising@sma.ncsu.edu

“All of the banners put up on the Hillsborough street, paintedon the windows. I liked the creativity of students.” Christian Day senior, buisness administration

“The parade. There were people dressed up in different costumes.” Erin Leech freshman, industrial design

“I liked the game. Everyone was talking that N.C. state was going to lose. I went there and then we just killed them. We won.” Carmina Fareerz freshman, human biology

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2011 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features

Technician

Turkey-day tips to prevent infection Food safety experts share ways to prepare turkey for Thanksgiving.

thawed for four to five hours in cold water. On average, the thawing time in hours should be about half the weight in pounds. “As the turkey thaws, some Ameya Kulkarni juices ooze out of it, which may Staff Writer contain traces of Salmonella The aftermath of Thanksgiv- and Campylobacter,”Chapman ing vacation, observed among said. “You should puncture the many University students, turkey and check whether the often includes issues such as internal temperature is around diarrhea, dysentery and other 165-degrees Fahrenheit. Also, gastrointestinal disorders. the thawing should not be Well, this is more than just a done in open areas like the coincidence. The cause of these back porch or car trunk. This health problems lies in the tra- may lead to the contamination ditional roasted and stuffed of the turkey with bacteria, turkey consumed for Thanks- mostly Salmonella and Campylobacter.” giving feast. Though most of the bacterial Ben Chapman, assistant professor of consumer sciences, growth occurs on the body of a and Hosni Hassan; professor cut and exposed turkey, some of microbiology, biochemistry, microbial development may toxicology and food science; even take place in the body of have analyzed this recurrence a living turkey if it is not reared of gastrointestinal disorders in a proper poultry farm. “The production farm ought after Thanksgiving. Chapman has worked in the to rear the turkeys, providarea of food science for the last ing the right diet and a clean, proper en10 years. vironment,” “Turkey Hassan said. is suscep“If microbial tible to getdevelopment ting exposed occurs, it is to bacterial virulent and pathogens at may i nfec t the time of the liver and slaughtering,” intestine of Chapman Ben Chapman, assistant the bird.” said. “These professor of consumer sciences A f ter t he bacteria are t u rkey ha s housed on the surface of the turkey and find a thawed, it is ready to be cooked. proper nutritive base for their The turkey needs to be washed growth. You cannot identify before it is set for cooking. This that the turkey is spoilt, just is the most crucial moment for the spread of bacteria elsewhere by looking at it.” Experts advise that any tur- in the kitchen or the surroundkey, regardless of the time it ings. “Washing reduces the numis bought, needs to be kept in the refrigerator. If bought in ber of bacteria on the surface advance, it shouldn’t to be de- and inside the turkey,” Hassan said. “Turkey should be very frosted for two to three days. After removing from the properly washed. However, refrigerator at the time of care should be taken in order cooking, the turkey should be to restrict the water getting

“You cannot identify that the turkey is spoilt just by looking.”

Tips for safe preparation of Turkey for thanksgiving : •

• •

• • •

Buy a turkey, with its guts removed, 2-3 days in advance of Thanksgiving feast, from a reliable source. Refrigerate it at 40oF or below. Thaw the turkey in cold water and never thaw it outside, exposing it to a variety of bacteria. Wash the turkey thoroughly, restricting the spray of water to a limited area. Sanitize the area with hot water after washing the turkey. Cook the turkey at a very high temperature, in order to kill the bacteria, if any. Stuff it carefully and roast it, making your turkey ‘Ready-to-eat’ and enjoy the splendid Thanksgiving meal.

sprayed to other areas of the kitchen. Even if the bacterial growth on the turkey is cleared, it can settle on some other media such as cooking utensils or vegetables.” Once the turkey is roasted, stuffed and becomes a part of the meal, people have the tendency to keep the leftovers outside. However, this can lead to further damage of the cooked turkey and make it unfit for consumption. “The meat should be cut off the bone and stored in ziplock bags in the refrigerator,” Chapman said. “This can prevent the growth of pathogenic microbes on the leftover turkey and it can be consumed later.” “There are always bacteria, both pathogenic and helpful, staying and dividing around us, continuously,” Hassan said. “Everyone has to be cautious throughout, wash hands often and restrict ourselves from getting infected from them.”

monday, november 21, 2011 • Page 5

E. coli related illnesses raise health concerns

The risks of E. coli remain an important health issue.

“[E. coli] spreads through the fecal-oral route”. However, there are many different ways for the “fecal-oral route” to occur. According to Kathariou, E. coli can come Eric Rizzo in contact through food, waStaff Writer ter, contact with animals, or E. coli is necessary for the touching surfaces. “Some farmers try to treat human body to function. However, serious illness can [animal feces] and use it as feroccur when humans come tilizer,” Hosni Hassan, profesin contact with a rouge form sor of microbiology, biochemistry, toxicology and food sciof this bacterium. The question is though, ence, said. “If it’s treated well, what makes this rouge you can kill the bacteria, but if form of E. coli? According to it’s not you will have E. coli. If Benjamin Chapman, assis- it gets on a plant, it will get in tant professor in consumer the plant, so it’s not a matter science, this strain is due to of washing produce to get rid the difference in the genet- of E. coli.” According to Hassan, it only ic makeup of the bacteria. The different genes in bad takes 10 E. coli cells to produce E. coli cause the production symptoms. “Even touching an animal, of Shiga toxins, which cause you may get 10, 15 or 100 cells a victim to become ill. The Shiga toxins are re- of E. coli, then they can grow,” sponsible for the symptoms. Hassan said. “They also have According to Chapman, the the ability to pass through first symptom people get is the stomach without being killed.” According to Hassan, bloody diarrhea. “This occurs when E. coli the growth of bacteria is expois growing in the intestines,” nential; so 10 cells of E. coli will Chapman said, “which shed grow rapidly on a surface. With the recent State Fair to get rid of the toxin”. outbreak, Then the all of these toxin is insources had troduced to be conto the sidered. Acblood syscording to tem, which Chapman, travels to t here i s a t he k idprocess to ney, where finding the blood clots source of the can form, Sophia Kathariou, associate E. coli outaccording to Chap- professor of food bioprocessing break. O nc e a n man. These blood clots can stop the outbreak of E. coli is recogkidney from functioning, nized, the first step is doing an or can end up in eyes and epidemiological study. This means that investigators from cause blindness. Along with kidney failure, the State Health Department bloody diarrhea and blind- question everyone who is ill. ness, if someone comes in Once they identify the comcontact with E. coli, they monality between everyone may exhibit fevers, kidney experiencing symptoms, they infections or urinary tract interview people who also exinfections, according to perienced the commonality. In the case of the State Fair, Sophia Kathariou, associate professor of food bio- once investigators identified processing and nutrition the fairground as the commonality, they interviewed everyone sciences. “Like a lot of food-born who became ill as well as unafpathogens,” Chapman said, fected fairgoers. The interview

“We still don’t know why some people are infected and others are not.”

E. coli Facts • • • • • • •

Full name: Escherichia coli Found in the intestines of endothermic animals Can cause food poisoning and become lifethreatening in humans Discovered in 1885 by Theodor Escherich Can lead to kidney failure Symptoms include fever, fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain, and diarrhea Very young children and the elderly are at a higher risk of developing serious illnesses. Source: Medical News Today

consisted of a questionnaire, containing over 20 pages. From here, interviewers found the differences between where the sick people went and where the unaffected people went. In the case of the State Fair, this difference was the animal show. After the general source of E. Coli is recognized, investigators then go and test for E. coli at the location, in this case the animal show. According to Kathariou, every form of E. coli has a fingerprint, which is used to confirm that the strain found on location has the same genetic makeup as the one that caused victims to become ill. According to Hassan, the State Fair presents the problem of children touching animals, not washing their hands, then consuming food, effectively providing a direct, “fecal-oral route”. Although only 27 people were affected by E. coli from the State Fair, according to Chapman, there were many more people that came in contact with the bacteria. “We still don’t know why some people are infected while others are not”, Kathariou said. With the previous State Fair E. coli outbreak, according to Hassan, the State Fair made some improvements, putting out disinfecting towels for the public to use. However, the risk will never be zero, according to Kathariou, at a place like the State Fair.

Technician was there. You can be too. The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information. Andrew So/Technician

A student walks by the gum-covered wall of Dan Allen tunnel. The tradition of sticking gum to the wall has endured for over two decades.

Chewing over a sticky situation The history and debate over the gum wall provoke artistic thought and maintenance controversy. Katie Sanders Staff Writer

Passing by the Dan Allen Drive gum wall, one is confronted with the issue of whether the display of prechewed globs is art or an eye sore. “It’s certainly an expression. I don’t know what they’re trying to say, but it’s interesting,” Taylor Sams, a freshman in statistics, said. The constantly morphing mass of pre-masticated mush resides on the walls of the tunnel under the train tracks on Dan Allen Drive. It’s exceptional, to say the least. And N.C. State considers it one of the artistic landmarks on campus. “It’s somewhat of an icon as far as campus is concerned,” Kyle Burns, a freshman in political science, said. He said he wasn’t a huge fan of the gum, but he did think it added character to the University.

“I bet UNC doesn’t have anything like it,” Jaclyn Smith, a freshman in polymer and color chemistry, said.  Nobody really knows how the gum wall came to be or why it was first allowed to exist. There isn’t any recorded initiating event or reason for the tradition. “This was something that just sort of evolved; people started doing it and others started contributing to it,” Jack Colby, assistant vice chancellor for Facilities Operations, said. But now that it exists, Facilities allows it to grow in the name of tradition, though it occasionally cleans it to keep it from getting out of hand. Even so, it’s cleaned usually only when graffiti becomes a problem, according Bud Brannock, Paint Shop supervisor. “It’s because of the graffiti, not because of the gum,” Brannock said. Tradition trumps sour judgments, according to Colby. “Periodically if it gets to be too much, [our grounds crew] will go and clean it off, and then everybody starts the process over again,” Colby said.

“There’s no policy or anything else associated with it, it’s just one of those unique things about N.C. State’s campus, like the Free Expression Tunnel.” Even some longtime Facilities staff don’t remember a time before the gum wall existed and plenty of students can supply dates to prove that it’s been here at least 20 years. “I remember talking to my dad about it,” Andrew Finegin, a sophomore in mechanical engineering, said. “And my dad went here - he graduated in ’84 - and he said it was still here when he was here, so it’s been here for a while.”  Finegin found the wall gross, but rather humorous. While it is a tradition, students debate the actual value of the wall. A few of them find it repulsive and unsanitary. “Personally, I think it’s pretty unattractive, pretty disgusting—like a stain on our campus,” Zachary Cade, a junior in environment technology and recourse management, said. He advocates getting rid of the wall. “I think it’s absolutely disgusting,” Sams said in agree-

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ment with Cade. “It can stay as long as it doesn’t get absolutely repulsive with stuff falling off on you.” However, other students find it quirky and endearing. “I think it is a valuable form of street art,” Garrett Zafudo, a freshman in English, said. “The first time I saw it I actually thought there were a whole bunch of gems on the wall and then I saw it was gum, but still, it’s pretty cool.” “I like the big baseball mounds of gum that are on there sometimes,” Andy Joslin, a sophomore in computer science, said. Other gum walls include one in Seattle, the Pike Place Market Gum Wall and one in California named Gum Ally, but their histories are muddy too. “It’s fairly unusual—I’ve never seen anything like it anywhere else,” Colby said.

FIVE

DOLLARS

NCSU students pay only $5 for ARTS NC STATE performances

this week

Olga Kleiankina Faculty Recital Monday November 21 at 7pm, Stewart Theatre This recital by our renowned faculty pianist will open with Five Variations on a Slovak Melody by Bohuslav Martinů. Dr. Kleiankina will be joined by cellist Dr. Jonathan Kramer for Sonata in F for Cello and Piano by George Enescu, and Sonata in G Minor for Cello and Piano, Op. 19 by Sergei Rachmaninoff.

Crafts class registration begins next week NCSU students may register for Spring 2012 crafts classes beginning Monday, November 28. Registration for all others begins on Monday, December 12. Go to ncsu.edu/crafts to see the class offerings.

Visit the Gregg Museum: Earth With Meaning: the photographs of Alan Cohen (thru Dec 17)

Ticket Central 919-515-1100 2nd floor, Talley Student Center ncsu.edu/arts


Features

page 6 • monday, november 21, 2011

Technician

Students experience a night in the cold “A Night without a Home” gives students the chance to experience the struggle of the homeless.

National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week

Ashley Simons

Staff Writer

As the temperature outside drops, thermostat temperatures inside are being turned up. Imagine not having any heat at all though. Imagine not even having a roof over your head. For many people, this is a reality. An estimated 3.5 million Americans experience homelessness every year. Because, homelessness is so prevalent and apart of the norm, it is often overlooked and not acknowledged. As National Homeless and Hunger Awareness Week is being observed, the Baccalaureate Student Social Work Association is proactively participating in creating awareness both on N.C. State’s campus and in the community. Students in BSSWA wanted not only to raise awareness, but also gain first hand experience to help them work better within their field. “As a social work major, it’s important to understand the homeless client population and their struggles to effectively serve them as a social worker,” Amir Hunter, senior in social work, said. This year marks BSSWA’s first time participating in National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week. In promoting awareness for this national endeavor to end hunger and homelessness, BSSWA hosted programs each night for students to attend. Monday’s movie night was a

• • • • •

Started by the National Coalition for the Homeless Takes place from Nov. 12 to Nov. 20 Aimed at promoting efforts to end the problem of hunger and homelessness Works to dispel myth of homelessness as “someone else’s problem” Meant to engender sense of community among activists involved in the issue Allows members of the homeless community to be heard

Source: nationalhomeless.org

viewing of The Soloist, a story about a musically gifted homeless man, who is discovered by a journalist who tries to help him get his life back on track. Tuesday’s event was an educational forum with one of N.C. State’s own instructors from the department of social work Susie Barnes as the speaker. On Wednesday, a “Stone Soup Dinner” was hosted at White Memorial Presbyterian Church. BSSWA’s biggest event was ‘A Night without a Home’. The event created a simulation of homelessness for students to spend the night sleeping in a cardboard box. Around 7 p.m. students showed up layered in coats, hats, gloves, and scarves to set up their cardboard abode for the night. “A Night without a Home,” is intended to give students a sense of the life and difficulties homeless people experience everyday. “Although a single night

Ben tran/Technician

Tiffany Thompson, a junior in social work and Sarah Cocharan, a freshman in social work lay in the Brickyard for National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week.

outside can in no way simu- from local shelters. The speaklate homelessness, we hope to ers represented The Healing promote advocacy, protest, Place, a men’s homeless shelter for recovand eduering adcation,” dicts, and Tiffany The Helen ThompWright son, junior Center, a in socia l women’s work and homeless president shelter. of BSSWA, “It’s an said. eye openDuring Sha’michel Lilly, er to real“A Night freshman in social work ize there without are people a Home” students engaged in casual con- out here in far worse situations versation and heard personal and we are very fortunate,” stories from representatives Sha’michel Lilly, freshman in

“It’s an eye opener to realize there are people out here in far worse situations and we are very fortunate.”

social work, said. “Being out in the cold is definitely and experience.” Despite the freezing below 40-degree temperature, the “A Night without a Home” participants did their best to stay warm and tough it out. “We wanted to raise awareness and make people understand all the resources we have at our fingertips and those who don’t”, Loren Bahouth, junior in social work, said. BSSWA, along with thousands of other groups and organizations, host events similar to ‘A Night without a Home’ each year. All across the country, advocates participate in National

Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week to help get communities involved. The National Coalition for the Homeless, co-sponsors of National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week, has created a guide that is available online, of different ideas and activities for communities to plan to help raise awareness and support. Although National Hunger and Homeless Awareness Week is only once a year, BSSWA will continue to serve and help raise awareness for the homeless and hungry population.


Sports

Technician Men’s basketball

monday, november 21, 2011 • Page 7

Pack falls despite Leslie heroics storm

continued from page 8

Vanderbilt defeats N.C. State 86-79. Staff Report N.C. State (3-1, 0-0 ACC) were handed their first loss of the season when they lost to No. 20 Vanderbilt (3-1, 0-0 SEC) 86-79 in the first round of the TicketCity Legends Classic in the Izod Center in New Jersey. The game also marked the return of sophomore forward C.J. Leslie to the team, who had missed the first three games of the season. Leslie played like he had never been away as one of the star performers for the Wolfpack, scoring 20 points and shot 7-of-9 as State gave a stern test to the team that had a pre-season ranking of as high as No. 7. Junior for ward R ichard Howell also had a big game as he scored 16 points and had a team leading nine rebounds,

clemson continued from page 8

UNC-Chapel Hill and Boston College, three games which he combined to pass for only one touchdown, Glennon passed for 253 yards and three touchdowns. The longest completion was on an explosive play to redshirt junior Tobais Palmer for 43 yards. Palmer shook a defender and juked another en route to third quarter touchdown to put

along with sophomore guard Lorenzo Brown, who had 13 points for the night, put up a stiff resilience against the Commodores. However, it proved to be too little for the Pack as Coach Mark Gottfried got his first taste of defeat since taking over. State started the game without junior forward and threepoint specialist Scott Wood, who was out with a sprained ankle, which handed freshman forward Tyler Harris his first start in his young career in the Wolfpack colors, as he had seven points and six rebounds. Vanderbilt guard John Jenkins put on his best performance of the night as he scored 28 points, 20 of which came in the first half and was responsible for four of the nine scores made from downtown by the Commodores. State twice took the lead when redshirt senior guard Alex Johnson shot for three

with the Wolfpack down 64-63 in the second half, and again when junior center DeShawn Painter scored in the paint with the Pack trailing 76-75 with 2:43 to go. However, he failed to capitalize on both opportunities as Leslie was forced to sit out for the last six minutes due to leg cramps. From that point on it was all Vanderbilt as Jenkin’s fourth three-pointer of the game gave them an unassailable 81-77 lead. Vanderbilt ended shooting 52 percent, compared to the 50 by the Pack with the threepoint shooting proving to be the major difference between the two sides as State shot 4-of9 while the Commodores made 9-of-25. State next takes on Texas Monday at 6:30 p.m. in their final game in the Legends Classic at the Izod Center in New Jersey.

ally be expected to storm the field. It’s a tradition in college football unlike any other - major upsets and monumental victories end with a massive gathering of students, players, coaches, media and anyone else who can find their way on to the field.  Put together any argument or compromise you would like, but it is simply illogical to allow State students to rush the field in the same fashion as Virginia did earlier this year against Georgia Tech or the same as when the Ramblin’ Wreck handed Clemson its first loss of the year several weeks later.  The reason is exactly the same as to why Carter-Finley’s stands are the closest to the field in the ACC conference. It’s the same for why Oklahoma State has a strict rushing the field policy in place when the scene

the Pack up 37-6. While the victory is State’s sixth of the year, Manning said he compares next week’s game at home against Maryland to a different type of playoff. “I treat these games like high school playoffs,” Manning said. “It’s win or go home for us right now, so that’s the mentality we’re playing with.” O’Brien echoed Manning’s thoughts toward the matchup with the Terrapins and said his players still have some making up to do in his mind.

“I told them tonight, I’m still mad at them for losing the last one [at Boston College],” O’Brien said. “I’m not going to forget that one. The only way for them to make that up is to beat Maryland.” In the final moments before the two teams met on the field to shake hands, a few players dumped a cooler full of Gatorade on O’Brien. He said he felt the shower was a bit premature. “They better save that until a bowl game,” O’Brien said. “Until we’re done. Until we win.”

VIRGINIA

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match proved to be a battle between the two squads with 17 ties and nine lead changes in the fourth set. “At the UVA game I think we came out very connected,” Salata said. “We were ready to play in both matches, obviously in the Virginia Tech match we were struggling but we pulled out the

Classifieds

reverses and the Pokes play home games at Boone Pickens Stadium.  The walls of both stadiums are high to enhance spectator viewing and to prevent fan interference. You may have confidence in your personal abilities to jump down sections seven and eight at Carter-Finley, but NCSU would probably rather not have thousands of 18-22 year olds piling on top of each other.  Even after the game ended and some Pack players jumped into the student section, they struggled to pull themselves up to be congratulated. If our football players have any issues whatsoever getting up, maybe we should choose the alma mater over some type of law suit.  And hey, I wanted to storm the field Saturday night before the game even started, but I also think driving 85 mph on the Beltline is fully acceptable. Unfortunately, that’s illegal and the cops agree. Why can Iowa State, Baylor and Virginia rush the field? It’s not exactly an idea wrapped in protective cellophane, but the whole pro-

cess is safer and more practical.  The vast majority of Iowa State students stand in sections 28-32 at Jack Trice Stadium, and the clearing wall to get on to the field is approximately five to six feet tall. At Baylor, students sit directly behind the opposing team’s bench, as well as the adjacent corner of the end zone. The barrier to get onto the field is a standard bleacher railing with several stairs leading to the ground.  At Virginia, students and fans simply run on to the field at Scott Stadium from a hill.  Although they are just two of the most recent examples in college football, the majority of FBS teams have student sections with legitimate access to the field. We don’t, and not getting to storm the field is a direct effect of the limited access.  The views on whether students can rush the field will always vary at any institution, particularly one where field access is complicated.  Either way, it’s one of the best issues State football will ever have.

first two sets. “We were playing better and a lot more connected as a team in the Virginia match and at Virginia Tech we were playing as a bunch of individuals.” Freshman Dariyan Hopper led the Pack in kills with 19. Bunn believed that his team wasn’t completely focused in its second match. “We just weren’t locked in against Virginia Tech,” Bunn said. “We started of ok, they weren’t playing well and we didn’t take advantage of that.”

According to Wood, she believes that State did not play to its expectations. “I don’t think Virginia Tech is better than UVA, but also we played more cohesive as a team against UVA versus that Virginia Tech game,” Wood said. “We talked about playing more as individuals. That was one of the main differences.”

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Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

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11/21/11

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11/23/11

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ACROSS 1 Soccer great Mia 5 Spider’s creations 9 “Beat it!” 14 Steinbeck’s Tom Joad, e.g. 15 Afghanistan’s western neighbor 16 Fabric with a repeated scenic pattern 17 National consensus 20 Metal playing marble 21 Sincere 22 Propelled with sculls 23 Camembert cousin 24 Malice 27 Cooks on a spit 32 Biol. or chem. 35 Burn soothers 37 Turn on a pivot 38 Deerstalker’s excitement 42 Grows darker 43 Clark Kent’s birth name 44 Sound of fan support 45 Garlicky shrimp dish 48 Ran at an easy pace 50 Not taken in by 52 Hairdresser Sassoon 56 “The Four Seasons” composer 60 Rock fissure 62 Dark, quiet period 64 Davis who was married to Ruby Dee 65 Word with pyramid or chain 66 Cut down on 65Across 67 Hymn of praise 68 Females with pig tails 69 Means’ justifiers DOWN 1 “In what way?” 2 Japanese canine 3 Long-distance runner

11/21/11

By Donna S. Levin

4 Brawls 5 Hi-tech airport connection 6 One-named Deco artist 7 Scroogean exclamation 8 Derisive look 9 More than mono 10 Masked critter 11 Ready for picking 12 “__ well that ends well” 13 Track competition 18 Longtime chum 19 Part of a poker full house 23 Bovine hybrid 25 Unwell 26 Stole 28 Volcanic output 29 Defamatory remark 30 Yellowfin or albacore 31 Fourth man 32 Norms: Abbr. 33 Fashionable 34 Culinary author Rombauer 36 WWII Normandy battle site

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39 Doctrinal suffix 40 Cool, like a cat 41 Craps natural 46 Hay fever sufferer’s nemesis 47 __-European languages 49 Split 51 Petty quarrels 53 “Bon appétit,” from mom

11/21/11

54 Was sore after a workout 55 Riga natives 56 Cognac bottle letters 57 “__ Small World” 58 Carpenter’s clamp 59 Et __: and others 60 Vittles 61 Cinncinati team 63 Also


Sports

COUNTDOWN

• 5 days until State takes on Maryland at Carter-Finley Stadium.

INSIDE

• Page 7: A recap of N.C. State men’s basketball.

Technician

Page 8 • monday, november 21, 2011

football

Turnovers lead to upset over Clemson

Women’s basketball tops TCU

Pack defense sets tone for defense as it keeps bowl hopes alive.

The N.C. State women’s basketball team (3-0) defeated TCU (1-3), 85-79, on Sunday at Daniel-Meyer Coliseum. Sophomore forward Kody Burke put up the third double-double of her career with 15 points and 13 rebounds. Senior forward Bonae Holston led the team in scoring with 17 points. Sophomore guard Myisha Goodwin-Coleman and freshman guard Krystal Barret also put up 15 points. The Pack returns to home play on Wednesday against Jacksonville at 7 p.m. at Reynolds Coliseum.

R. Cory Smith Deputy Sports Editor

When fans left CarterFinley Stadium Saturday afternoon, they were given a treat that not many expected. Even Coach Tom O’Brien said he was shocked at the outcome. “I really have no explanation for what just happened,” O’Brien said with a smirk when he first addressed media members in the Murphy Center. After scoring just 23 points in a span of three games, the Wolfpack used a 27-point second quarter to defeat the No. 7 Clemson Tigers. N.C. State (6-5 overall, 3-4 ACC) used an array of defensive and offensive stars to tame the Tigers (9-2, 6-2) as it was able to pull out a 37-13 win to keep its bowl hopes alive. The win was not only the first victory against a top10 team for O’Brien, but also the first win against Clemson—a losing streak that stretched back to 2003. O’Brien said he was impressed with the way the defense played throughout the game, but, more importantly, how it set up the offense in the second quarter. “I think they did a great job,” O’Brien said. “Our de-

Source: n.c. state athletics

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Monday Cross Country at NCAA Championships Terre Haute, Ind., TBA Men’s Basketball vs. Texas East Rutherford, N.J., 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Women’s Volleyball vs. North Carolina Raleigh, 1 p.m. Women’s Basketball vs. Jacksonville Reynold’s Coliseum, 7 p.m. Friday Men’s Basketball vs. Elon Reynold’s Coliseum, 7 p.m. Saturday Football vs. Maryland Raleigh, 12:30 p.m. Sunday Women’s Basketball at Creighton Omaha, Neb., 3 p.m.

man on the defense, it was Manning. The linebacker finished the game with 3.5 tackles for loss, a forced fumble and recovered the fumble that Norman forced in Clemson territory. O’Brien said that Manning’s performance was thanks, in large part, to the way the defensive line played. “Once we got our guys up front back, [Manning] and [Audie] Cole can make plays,”

O’Brien said. “[Manning]’s the most experienced guy we have at that position. He’s playing at a very high level, but I still think it comes back to the guys up front that are allowing him to make those plays.” The story offensively for the Pack was the resurgent play of redshirt junior Mike Glennon. After lackluster performances against Florida State,

clemson continued page 7

State goes 1-1 in Virginia

Storming field not practical

Senior Staff Writer

Volleyball split its weekend in the state of Virginia by defeating Virginia 3-1 and dropping its match to Virginia Tech, 2-3.  The Pack improved its record to 20-12. It is the first time State has had a 20-win season since 1996. In its first match against the Cavaliers, the Pack won its first, third and final sets of the match 25-18, 25-15 and 25-23. State dropped

Coach Tom O’Brien

sacks for a total of 11 yards lost and a forced fumble, the first of his career. The forced fumble on a sack gave State the ball at the Clemson six-yard line. Norman said the forced fumble was somewhat of a milestone for him in his career. “That was my first sack fumble on the season,” Norman said with a huge smile. “It was a big deal for me. I was just really excited.” If any player trumped Nor-

Commentary

Jeniece Jamison

“I really have no explanation for what just happened.”

fense was able to create good field position for our offense to start with, and it’s a lot easier when [the offense] gets some touchdowns out of it too.” Though the Pack offense put up 27 points in the second quarter, the defense, led by junior linebacker Terrell Manning and redshirt freshman defensive end Art Norman, put State in Clemson territory on three of the five scoring drives. Norman finished with 2.5

women’s VOLLEYBALL

Wolfpack defeats Virginia, falls to Virginia Tech.

Quote of the day

John Joyner/Technician

Junior safety Brandan Bishop celebrates after intercepting for a touchback during the third quarter against Clemson in Carter-Finley Stadium on Saturday, Nov. 19. The Wolfpack defeated the No. 7 ranked Tigers 37-13.

its second set 20-25. Senior Margaret Salata led the team in kills with 16. Senior Luciana Shafer followed Salata’s total with 12. Junior Megan Cyr led the Pack in assists with 47 for the match. According to Head Coach Bryan Bunn, Salata has come a long way in her development all year. “She’s just been fantastic this year,” Bunn said. “We’ve always been able to count on her to get a kill when we needed it. She’s come a long way since that night she got kicked out the gym. She’s worked hard to become a very different player.” Senior Kelly Wood led the team on the defensive end with 23 digs and freshman Alston Kearns finished with 16.

F

our top-10 teams were upset during this past weekend of college football and it would be immensely difficult to write four different conclusions to unforeseen scripts.  Students from Iowa State a nd Baylor c a me pouring Sean onto their Fairholm respecDeputy Sports tive fields Editor following massive weekend upsets of top-10 opponents, and fans of No. 4 Oregon sat stunned following a missed field goal attempt to tie Southern Cal

According Bunn, the Pack competed very well in its match. “We fought hard the first game against UVA,” Bunn said. “We came out and we were really ready to go. We competed in the three sets, they jumped out on us, and then we rebounded. They played well again but we fought through the fourth. Everybody played pretty solid.” Its second match with the Hokies was a comeback win for Virginia Tech. The Pack won its first two sets 25-22 and 26-24. From that point on State could not take a match and dropped its final three sets of the match 21-25, 24-26, and 11-15. The

virginia continued page 7

as time expired.  In a slightly bizarre scene, N.C. State’s clutch 37-13 rout of No. 7 Clemson finished with threats of zip-tie hand cuffs, pepper spray and the traditional playing of the alma mater.  Although treating the student section like animals in captivity is probably an exorbitant measure, as long as State plays at Carter-Finley, Wolfpack students can not and should not have the opportunity to rush the field.  Don’t get me wrong - it’s extremely frustrating to count 53 safety officers surrounding the field barely midway through the fourth quarter, especially when under normal circumstances students would virtu-

storm continued page 7

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Technician - November 21, 2011