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Technician          

monday november

7

2011

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Kevin Cook/Technician

Remember, remember...

...the fifth of November TOm o’brien’s wolfpack remains undefeated against tar heels after notching fifth straight victory.

See page 8.

Indian celebration educates Traditional Indian celebration gives students a chance to learn.

Tyler andrews/Technician

Catharine Holly, played by sophomore in art and design Lauren Caddick, receives a shot from the Doctor, performed by senior in marketing Rob Steinberg, on Monday, Oct. 24 in the Kennedy-McIlwee Studio Theatre.

One-act plays showcase students, professionals Professional actors and director work with students on one-act plays. Lauren Vanderveen Staff Writer

Tennessee Williams’ Garden District, two one-act plays, had their final showing Sunday to a sold-out Kennedy-McIlwee Studio Theatre. Both plays contained themes of homosexuality and human desire that were considered even more sensational during Williams’ time. Lynda Clark, who played Violet

Venable, and Jan Morgan, who played Cornelia Scott, were both featured guests in the plays. Yamila Monge, a freshman in psychology, portrayed Sister Felicity in Suddenly, Last Summer. “In the play, I was basically protecting [Catherine Holly],” Monge said. “Tennessee Williams always has this thing against the Catholic Church and I’m more of a metaphor than anything else.” Playing the character had its trials and tribulations, Monge said. “Personally, being a nun was kind of difficult because in real life I’m the opposite of a nun. I’m really loud and

outspoken. Being more concerned and reserved, that took a lot of work,” Monge said. Monge further detailed how she was able to collaborate with Lynda Clark. “Just the way she prepares for a role, she becomes the person, like she feels the emotions and she expresses it in everything…and I just thought that wasn’t an easy thing to do,” Monge said. “I learned so much from what she had to offer and I’m glad I was able to work with her.”

Grad Fa ir

“Diwali is one of the major festivals in India, which is celebrated across the length and breadth of the nation.”

insidetechnician

Story headline story. See page #.

viewpoint features classifieds sports

Plays continued page 3

Class Rings

10% off all Caps & Gowns and Diploma Frames

“Maitri wanted to get together the Indian community to share the joy and have fun despite being thousands of miles away from home,” Malladi Jatin Bhatia said. Staff Writer According to Sonika Rawal, a docMaitri, the Indian graduate associa- toral student in the School of Archition, organized Diwali Dhamaka to tecture and part of Maitri’s commitcelebrate the Indian Festival of Diwali tee, said that a lot of hard work goes at the Engineering Building II lawn into organizing such events. “Each event that Maitri organizes Friday. does have a lot of It was meant to logistics that go show the Diwali into it. While each c elebr at ion to of our team mempeople who are bers is caug ht not familiar it. up with regular “Diwali is one of course work, we the major festivals work around our in India, which is schedules to get celebrated across together and plan the length and the event. Right breadth of the from booking the nation. We also venue to planwanted to showHaritha Malladi, graduate student ning what procase the Diwali grams will take to people from other countries who were unfamiliar place during the event to getting in with the festival,” Haritha Malladi, a the restaurants and even publicizing graduate student and part of Mairti’s and reaching out to all the students, Team Maitri has a lot on its plate,” committee, said. The event also gave Indian students Rawal said. who are far from home the chance to celebrate. indian continued page 3

4 5 7 8

r i a F d a r G Graduation Announcements

Nov. 8-10 10am - 4pm

Diploma Frames


Page 2

page 2 • monday, november 7, 2011

Corrections & Clarifications

Technician POLICe BlOTTER

Through Vanessa’s lens

November 3 10:22 a.m. | Suspicious Incident Carmichael Gymnasium Staff member reported unauthorized use of printer.

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Laura Wilkinson at editor@ technicianonline.com

Weather Wise

10:41 a.m. | Larceny Metabolism Unit Staff member reported corral panels and gate stolen.

Today:

11:53 a.m. | Suspicious Person University Plaza Report of subject yelling at passing students. Officers spoke with non-student who held permit to speak.

68/42

1:31 p.m. | Intoxicated Subject Varsity Drive Lot Report of intoxicated subject. Officer responded but subject had left on bus. No further disturbance reported.

Sunny.

Tomorrow:

68 43

3:47 p.m. | Fire Carter-Finley Stadium Units responded when Wolfline bus caught on fire. No injuries. Fire was extinguished.

Mostly sunny.

FIST BUMP

Wednesday:

69 48

photo By Vanessa Movasseghi

D

an Bowman, a freshman in computer science, fist bumps a N.C. State hockey player for good luck before the second period of the game against Duke at the Cary Ice House Friday. Bowman, a Carolina Hurricanes fan, enjoys watching hockey and came out to support the Pack at their home game. The final score was 6-4, State.

Mostly sunny. source: Patrick devore

Get involved in technician Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copy edit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday to Thursday 9 a.m. to midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or e-mail Editor-inChief Laura Wilkinson at editor@ technicianonline.com

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FIVE

DOLLARS

NCSU students pay only $5 for ARTS NC STATE performances

this week

Today Kirk Adam – Modern Abstracts All Day Crafts Center An exhibition of acrylic paintings by local artist and Crafts Center instructor Kirk Adam.

the Department of History, and Toni Thorpe, program coordinator at the African American Cultural Center, will lead the tour. The tour will begin at the steps of D.H. Hill Library and conclude at the African American Cultural Center for refreshments and reflection.

Intramural Sports Registration All Day Online Registration is open for NFL Pick’M. Sign up online at http:// ncsu.edu/stud_affairs/campus_ rec/intramural/.

Tuesday Kirk Adam – Modern Abstracts All Day Crafts Center An exhibition of acrylic paintings by local artist and Crafts Center instructor Kirk Adam.

The Urge to Draw, the Cause to Reflect: Drawings, Sketchbooks, Provocations All Day D.H. Hill Library Gallery The exhibit features drawings and sketchbooks by College of Design Dean Marvin J. Malecha, FAIA.

Intramural Sports Registration All Day Online Registration is open for NFL Pick’M. Sign up online at http:// ncsu.edu/stud_affairs/campus_ rec/intramural/.

Women Empowered: Inspiring change in an emerging world All Day African American Cultural Center Gallery

Dance Program Fall Concert

Earth With Meaning: Photographs of Alan Cohen Noon-8 p.m. Gregg Museum Alan Cohen “makes visible the unseen” in places marked by history or the processes of natural events. Instead of sweeping views, he aims his cameras downward to record the exact spots that permeate memory.

John Cheek, Guest Pianist

Red, White & Black Walking Tour 4:30-5:30 p.m. Meet at steps of D.H. Hill Library Come learn about the spaces and places on campus that have had a significant impact on the lives and experiences of African American students and the larger community. Walter Jackson, associate professor in

M.C. Richards: The Fire Within

Tuesday, Nov 8 at 6pm • Gregg Museum This 62-minute documentary film offers a funny, inspiration-provoking encounter with the influential Black Mountain College poet-potter M.C. Richards, noted for her boundless energy, contagious good humor, and sassy demeanor. FREE Thursday & Friday, Nov 10 & 11 at 8pm Stewart Theatre As part of the celebration of its 25th anniversary year, the Fall Concert will include works by Dance Program students, faculty and alumni. This concert will include the premiere of As One Should Always by Ashley Walls, the work that earned her the first NC State Creative Artist Award in dance. A reception will follow Thursday night’s performance. Thursday, Nov 10 at 7pm Kennedy-McIlwee Studio Theatre Pianist John Cheek will perform and discuss Sonata No. 3 by composer Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson. Dr. Cheek is a Fulbright Scholar, and a professor of music at Lenior-Rhyne University.

Shana Tucker

Friday, Nov 11 at 7pm & 9pm (two shows) Kennedy-McIlwee Studio Theatre A sultry pastiche of acoustic pop and soulful, jazz-influenced contemporary folk. Shana just released her debut album, Shine, described by The News & Observer as “a delectable combination of folksy acoustic pop and in-the-pocket jazz, topped off with her easy croon.”

Raleigh Civic Symphony

Sunday, Nov 13 at 4pm • Stewart Theatre Raleigh Civic Symphony presents “Giants,” a program of music by Beethoven (Overture to Egmont), Brahms (Variations on a Theme of Haydn) and Tchaikovsky (Symphony no. 2). Dr. Randolph Foy conducts.

Earth With Meaning: the photographs of Alan Cohen

Thru Dec 17 • Gregg Museum of Art & Design One of the most unusual photographic installations to hit the Triangle in years.

Ticket Central 919-515-1100 2nd floor, Talley Student Center ncsu.edu/arts

The Urge to Draw, the Cause to Reflect: Drawings, Sketchbooks, Provocations All Day D.H. Hill Library Gallery The exhibit features drawings and sketchbooks by College of Design Dean Marvin J. Malecha, FAIA. Women Empowered: Inspiring change in an emerging world All Day African American Cultural Center Gallery Earth With Meaning: Photographs of Alan Cohen Noon-8 p.m. Gregg Museum Alan Cohen “makes visible the unseen” in places marked by history or the processes of natural events. Instead of sweeping views, he aims his cameras downward to record the exact spots that permeate memory. Graduation Fair 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

NCSU Bookstore The N.C. State Bookstore will host the official Fall 2011 Graduation Fair Nov. 8-10 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Representatives from Balfour Class Rings, University Frames, Oak Hall Caps & Gowns, CB Graduation Announcement and the Alumni Association will be available to assist graduating seniors and parents with questions and to place orders. Students who will be participating in the December commencement ceremony may also purchase their caps and gowns at this time. Ten percent off all caps and gowns and diploma frames if purchased at the grad fair. 125th Anniversary Planning Committee Meeting 3-4 p.m. Winslow Hall Conference Room M.C. Richards: The Fire Within 6-8 p.m. Gregg Museum of Art & Design A funny, inspiration-provoking encounter with the influential Black Mountain College poetpotter investigates the source of creativity. Her art-of-many-genres wove together community, agriculture, craft and spiritual ideas. Richards regarded the end of life as only another fulfilling adventure, “living toward dying, blooming into invisibility.”

Not just a Gamer: Power, Politics and American Sports 6-8 p.m. Green Room, Talley Student Center Not Just A Gamer: Power, Politics and American Sports is a fascinating tour of the good, the bad, and the ugly of American sports culture. In the film, author Dave Zirin first traces how American sports have glamorized militarism, racism, sexism, and homophobia, then excavates a largely forgotten history of rebel athletes who stood up to power

5:14 p.m. | Breaking & Entering - Auto Administration II Building Staff member reported vehicle had been broken into.

and fought for social justice beyond the field of play. The film will be moderated by Joe SimonsRudolph, professor of psychology, and Amanda Ross Edwards of the School of Public and International Affairs. “Global Sustainable Livelihoods: Using Innovation to Drive Development” 7-8:30 p.m. 216 Poe Hall The Global Issues Seminar Series, co-sponsored by the Office of International Affairs and the School of Public and International Affairs, will feature panels of N.C. State experts tackling global issues that are relevant to North Carolina, the nation and the world. These seminars will showcase what NCSU is contributing in terms of teaching, research, extension and engagement to these internationally pressing issues. This panel will address innovative methods for fueling sustainable economic and community development. Wednesday Graduation Fair 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. NCSU Bookstore The N.C. State Bookstore will host the official Fall 2011 Graduation Fair Nov. 8-10 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Representatives from Balfour Class Rings, University Frames, Oak Hall Caps & Gowns, CB Graduation Announcement and the Alumni Association will be available to assist graduating seniors and parents with questions and to place orders. Students who will be participating in the December commencement ceremony may also purchase their caps and gowns at this time. Ten percent off all caps and gowns and diploma frames if purchased at the grad fair.

Talley

Table Talk Wednesday, Nov. 9 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. Talley Student Center Lobby • Take a virtual tour of the new Talley • See and touch the interior finishes • Learn about dining options opening in 2013 Town Hall Meetings 3 p.m. & 6 p.m. 1202 Talley Student Center • • • •

Design status updates new dining options in Talley Ways to communicate/connect View the live webstream Source: Campus Enterprises

on the Web See exclusive audio/photo slideshows. Answer the online poll. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline.com. Check it out!


News

Technician wolfpack pride

monday, november 7, 2011 • Page 3

Brent Kitchen/Technician

Junior defensive end Isaac Swindell poses after running onto the field prior to the team's game against the Tar Heels at Carter-Finley Stadium Saturday. State beat Carolina 13-0 to claim its fifth straight victory in the rivalry. Photo by Brent Kitchen

indian

continued from page 1

Tyler Andrews/Technician

Mrs. Venable, played by actress Lynda Clark, stares into the crowd as she tells a story about her recently deceased son.

Plays

continued from page 1

Jaimie Harwood, a senior in English, explained how she had a similar experience as the character Miss Foxhill. “Every scene I was in, Lynda was in,” Harwood said. “It was good to just watch her and her process. She put emotion into every second…and even little things throughout the process that she would tell us, like ‘Lines are the least important things that an actor does while onstage.’ It kind of struck a chord with me because I’m always big on lines. I need to learn my lines, I need to do them right.” Harwood also gave credit to John McIlwee, the director. Harwood said, “I love John McIlwee. He kind of gave us guidelines and let us go with it wherever we wanted to and if he needed to rein us in, he’d rein us in. He always told us, ‘You can do more, just keep going.’” Before its premiere Sunday, the show entirely sold out. Jillian Varner, a senior clerk

for Ticket Central, said, “They weren’t sold out until probably sometime in the beginning or middle of October. But what happened was University Theatre sold a lot of seats this year over the summer so a lot of the tickets were season ticket holders and we didn’t have very many individual tickets left available to sell for such a small theater.” While the overall revenues have yet to be determined, it’s predicted they will be substantial. Varner said, “I don’t know how much [total] we’ve made but we’ve sold out every show, or if not, we’ve had one or two tickets left for every show and [the theatre] seats about 100 people.” Tennessee Williams’ popularity as a playwright is one theory about why the show sold so well. Monge said, “Tennessee Williams is a big deal and I think people are like ‘Oh, Tennessee Williams, let’s go see!’ and it wasn’t your ordinary play, so people are interested.” The speculation of Kennedy-

McIlwee Studio Theatre being relatively small didn’t persuade Harwood. “I mean it is a smaller theatre but I don’t know if that’s why it sold out though because it sold so far in advance,” Harwood said. Harwood and Varner believed it could be chalked up to the presence of the featured guest artists. “Lynda Clark and Jan Morgan could be why it has sold out. Since they’re so well known that they must have a following as well,” Harwood said. Varner said, “I think it helps that they have two professional actresses in the show. I think that’s kind of a draw because it’s great to see students but it’s kind of cool to see professionals.” Regardless, Garden District’s final showing proved a success after the cast was showered with applause. “I’m sad to see it go; it’s kind of bittersweet,” Harwood said. “But if you’re not good with goodbyes, then you shouldn’t be doing theatre.”

The celebration included traditional performances, exhibits and decorations. Rawal said that the event also included traditional Indian food. “Maitri celebrates this festival every year and encourages artistic expression through vibrant traditional performances, unique exhibits and colorful decorations. Each year, this event dazzles the crowd with a colorful and energetic cultural program combined with exotic Indian food,” said Rawal. According to Malladi, fire regulations limited the use of fireworks for the celebration. Additional problems

with scheduling arose due to Halloween and the football game, but Maitri was still able to make the event a success. “Strict fire hazard regulations in USA make it very difficult to use even consumer fireworks (with good reason). So the event couldn’t showcase exactly what Diwali is like back in India. Clashes with Halloween and the N.C. State-UNC game prevented any flexibility in dates. Continuous rain and cold wind made matters worse as all indoor venues were booked solid. Despite this we managed to pull people out into the cold in their traditional attire and dance into the cold till 9 p.m.,” Malladi said. She said that change in the way of celebration did not affect the zeal and spirit of those who attended the event.

“With the change in lifestyle being in a different country, the way Diwali is celebrated may have changed, but the zeal and the spirit of the celebration was still the same,” Rawal said. Haritha Malladi said that many Americans turned up and enjoyed the food, dance and Bollywood tunes. “There were also many Americans and other international students who also stopped by,” Malladi said. Kyle Ray O’Donnell, a senior in textile technology who was present at the event, said he enjoyed the event with his friends. “I really enjoyed coming out here to celebrate Diwali festival with my Indian friends, and after a hard day at college, it is great to have such a cultural experience,” O’Donnell said.

OPENING AUGUST 2012

MIKE LITTLE PRESENTS

Bringing awareness to local talent through the live music experience.

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November 15: Steven Compton w/ William Seymour at The Pour House Music Hall - Raleigh - 9 pm - Free

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Viewpoint

page 4 • monday, november 7, 2011

Technician

{Our view}

N.C. State and UNC deserve flagship status T

The Facts:

N.C. State defeated longtime rival UNC-CH 13-0 for the fifth-straight year last Saturday. The rivalry between the two Universities encompasses both athletics and academics.

Our Opinion:

UNC and N.C. State are both necessary for North Carolina’s collegiate prestige and both serve a need for the state. Therefore, N.C. State and UNC both deserve flagship status.

{

he term “flagship” has evolved over the years to include the best and most important members of various industries and institutions. In the educational institution, a flagship is the primary University associated with each state. After N.C. State’s fifthconsecutive win over UNCCH at football, N.C. State will be the name associated with North Carolina in the near future. However, N.C. State and UNC share flagship status in North Carolina. Flagship status isn’t just about athletics, though this is often the criteria used due to extensive athletic publicity. Even if flagship were about athletics, there would still be dispute. N.C. State may have proved

Following the trends

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

its superiority in football, but UNC basketball continuously ranks higher. In academics, the Universities prevail in different domains. UNC is known for its health sciences and law school, and quality of education in the humanities continuously ranks higher than N.C. State every year. But N.C. State holds its place in engineering and agriculture, two areas in which UNC cannot compete. The starting median salary right out of N.C. State, according to PayScale, is $46,500, while Chapel Hill’s starting median salary sits at $42,100.

The median salary mid-career from N.C. State is $83,200 and the mid-career salary from UNC is $79,200. Though both statistics show N.C. State sitting at a higher median salary, the stats mostly reflect the fact that engineering majors receive a higher average salary than humanities majors. Regardless, the starting salaries and mid-career salaries at both schools are high. No other North Carolina schools come close to these numbers, especially when it comes to midcareer salaries. When it comes down to it, N.C. State and UNC are ul-

timately rivals because it is difficult to determine which school is better. In fact, neither school is better than the other. The state needs both schools to maintain its high level of educational and athletic prestige, and both institutions have assets which, together, make North Carolina one of the greatest states in terms of collegiate quality. Neither school would maintain its flagship status without the other, and both universities serve different but equally important needs to the state. When one thinks of North Carolina, both UNC and N.C. State are guaranteed to come to mind.

{

}

in your words

}

Do you consider NCSU to be a flagship university? Why or why not?

collected By Josh Lucas

T

he N.C. State v. UNC football game occurred last Saturday. This Tweet Timeline encompasses the collegiate rivalry via Twitter.

by Alex Sanchez

@Mark_Gottfried - Mark Gottfried (1 p.m.) 1st taste of our rivalry against UNC #carterfinley is electric go beat em@PackFootball @theMTbrain - Mark Thompson (1 p.m.) N.C. State gets the touchdown. It’s 7-0 NCSU here. Glennon just picked apart UNC’s secondary. @mattmilli15 - Matt Millington Unc > n.c. state

@accnowACC Now (2 p.m.) Best stat of the day so far: #NCSU has 10 points on the scoreboard while #UNC has 9 total yards on offense. @HeelIllustrated - Adam Powell Continuous punts in the high 20’s in terms of yardage has really made it tough for UNC. Field position has been all N.C. State so far

@davidlreynolds - David Reynolds (2 p.m.) N.C. State taking UNC’s brownies for the fifth year in a row. 10-0 Wolfies at the half. Excuse me while I go kick some puppies @BraxtonRoss_619 - Braxton Ross (2 p.m.) Carolina pick it up!!!!!!! I’m getting tired of these N.C State fans infront of me talking crap!!!!

@pyamada126 - Pamella Yamada @KButter5 State is like a sadly deranged high school girl who thinks she’s in a relationship with UNC #notrivals @RCorySmith - Cory Smith (3 p.m.) AMERSON SETS THE N.C. STATE SCHOOL RECORD WITH HIS 9TH INTERCEPTION OF THE SEASON! @ScottMichaux - Scott Michaux (3 p.m.) N.C. State leading Tar Heels 13-0. UNC can take consolation in the fact that at least they can count that high. @PackPride - Pack Pride Daniel Evans (1), Russell Wilson (3), Mike Glennon (1)-the 3 NC State qb’s against UNC during the 5 game streak @PackAthletics NC State Athletics Football blanks UNC for a 13-0 win. The shutout is the 1st against the Tar Heels since 1960, and the sixth for NC State in 101 matchups. @ACCSports - ACC Sports (4 p.m.) TOBing.

@k_leonik - Kate Leonik (4 p.m.) Raleigh will be painted red today.... with tarheel blood.

Have an opinion? We want to hear it. HOW TO SUBMIT Letters must be submitted before 5 p.m. the day before publication and must be limited to 250 words. Contributors are limited to one letter per week. Please submit all letters electronically to viewpoint@

technicianonline.com. The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write for news, features, sports and viewpoint. Visit www.ncsu.edu/sma for more information.

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695 Editorial Advertising Fax Online

515.2411 515.2029 515.5133 technicianonline.com

UNC and N.C. State are on the same platform.

Rachel Jordan, junior in architecture

Austerity is no longer a luxury

E

ven though it has been nearly four years since the recession, economic recovery is nowhere in sight. Discussions on the economy rarely interest people any more. People now realize that this downturn has been different f rom the troughs of the regula r business cycle, a nd may Shivalik just come Daga Staff Columnist to def ine a period of lost opportunities for this generation. The past decade was spent in the shadows of terrorism and pyrrhic victories in far flung lands, but this time the battle seems to be within, and without any end in sight. Though GDP grew by 2.5 percent this quarter, debt concerns in Europe have not improved moods. Couple this with stubbornly high unemployment, rising budget deficits, rating downgrades and the now viral ‘Occupy’ protests and a picture of great anguish appears. Yet despite all this, the biggest reason to worry for the American citizens could well lie elsewhere. Student debt, which recently crossed the $1 trillion mark, roughly 7 percent of the GDP, is a very serious concern facing a lot of students at N.C. State as well. Recently one of my classmates said that he was seriously considering living out

of his car next semester. He said he would sleep in the library, take showers at the gym and keep all his belongings in his car. On Fridays and Saturdays when D.H. Hill library closes for the night, he said he would simply go home every weekend. At first, I thought he was just fooling around and laughed it off. But a few days later he again raised the topic, saying this would help him save around $5,000 on his student loan, and give him something to brag about to his kids. While I seriously hope he reconsiders this arrangement, I could not help but think how serious this problem is. Given the severity of the problem, I think the only solution to this is simply to study harder and make yourself more employable. Now, good grades have always been fairly important, but now they are critical to your future. This is not to say that employers tolerated mediocrity in the good old days, but when an employer can only hire 3 people instead of 12, it is natural for you to become more selective and set higher standards for acceptance. Right now the biggest help you could do yourself would be to push yourself harder. Push yourself to meet higher expectations, not only because it’s smart, but because that is now a requirement. The recession has hit the country hard, and we simply can not wish it away—or we would have done that long ago. Coming back to my friend, I do not advocate taking such an extreme action, but the fact is that we do need to reexamine our lifestyle and realistically adjust to the current situation.

Editor-in-Chief Laura Wilkinson

News Editor John Wall

Sports Editor Josh Hyatt

editor@technicianonline.com

news@technicianonline.com

sports@technicianonline.com

Managing Editor Taylor Cashdan

Features Editor Mark Herring

Viewpoint Editor Trey Ferguson

Photo Editor Alex Sanchez

managingeditor@technician online.com

features@technicianonline.com

viewpoint@technicianonline.com

photo@technicianonline.com

Hard times call for cutbacks in luxuries and expenditure, and crying foul over the matter will not help. My friend currently lives on campus, which as we all know is more expensive compared to an off-campus apartment. For saving money, you could simply shift to an apartment at any of the close off-campus locations like Avent Ferry or Gorman. I read an interesting survey in the British magazine The Economist a few days back, in which Americans were polled on what they spend their income on. The survey showed a steep decline, close to 40 percent, compared to 2010 values, in the amount of money people now spend on alcohol and beverages. This shows that people are really sobering up, or at least that it was always possible, but there was no incentive for it. The survey also showed a rise of nearly 15 percent in the amount of money people spent on reusable goods and repair services. These facts bare the truth that cutting wasteful expenditure is a need of the times, not just for students, but for people in general. For students it holds greater importance simply because they will be starting their careers with higher debt in highly uncertain times. Everyone is concerned about the budget deficit, and politicians are busy searching austerity measures for the country. It is high time we did the same for ourselves.

Design Editor design@technicianonline.com

Advertising Manager Ronilyn Osborne advertising@sma.ncsu.edu

“For engineering maybe, but outside that I wouldn’t consider us a flagship school.” Derek Nicholson junior, aerospace engineering

“For engineering yeah, but I think it’d be tied with UNC.” Chris Robinson sophomore, computer science

“I think it is. People from around the country and world come here and it’s in the capital city.” Emily Bailey freshman, First Year College

“Yes. I just hate Carolina. I don’t know why.” Elizabeth Stacks freshman, textiles

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2011 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features Campus & Capital

Technician

monday, november 7, 2011 • Page 5

Fighting stereotypes through film The Lebanese Film Festival shows a different angle of the Middle East. Story By Eric Rizzo

W

ith America i n a post9/11 world, the image of the Middle East has confronted ma ny misconstrued views. This is exactly what Akram Khater, director of the Middle East Studies program, is trying to prevent through a Lebanese film series he developed. “After 9/11, we found that people’s ideas and impressions about the Middle East, including Lebanon, tended to be fairly negative,” Khater said. “We have been working very hard, as part of the Middle East Studies P rog r a m to change that.” Akram Khater The K hay- Professor of Middle Eastern ra lla h Club, Studies and which “serves film festival to resea rch, organizer document, preserve and publicize the history and culture of the Lebanese community in North Carolina,” according to Khater, is organizing the event. The club is particularly interested in showing Lebanese culture, through the film festival, in a way that doesn’t involve violence and conflict, according to Khater. The film festival is a product of a new and emerging film industry in the Middle East, according to Khater. “What you’re finding today in the Middle East and North

Africa, is there’s a new generation of filmmakers, there’s a revival of cinema,” Khater said. “There’s more funding for filmmaking, the filmmakers, themselves, are better trained, many of them are being trained in Europe and there are a lot more film festivals.” The three films chosen are the best of their genre—documentaries. According to Khater, documentaries are a new style of film for Middle Eastern film writers and cinematographers. Khater traveled to Lebanon and attended film festivals to choose the best three documentaries for the film festival. “We chose these filmmakers partly because they are focusing on Lebanon but also because they are representing the best of this emerging genre of documentary filmmaking,” Khater said. After the showing of each of the three films, there is a question and answer session with the director of the film. According to Khater, when he went to the Lebanese film festivals, he interviewed potential filmmakers for the N.C. State film festival. After choosing the filmmakers he thought were best, Khater invited them to come to N.C. State. The first film of the festival was shown Thursday, the Erdahl-Cloyl Theater was packed, with 200 students and members of the community. According to Khater, they actually had to turn people away. “I thought it was amazing, so heartening,” Khater said. The purpose, according to Khater, of the Khayrallah Club is not only to educate the students of N.C. State, but also the surrounding community,

Photo courtesy of jawad metni

which was well represented by the crowd for the first film. After the screening of 12 Angry Lebanese: The Documentary, which reported on the use of drama therapy in an overcrowded, Lebanese prison, Jocelyne Abi Gebrayel, director of photography, answered questions about the film. Abi Gebrayel did all of the filming for free and did not get paid for her work until the film began winning awards. According to Abi Gebrayel, the film wasn’t meant for the public at first, but as proof that drama therapy in prisons was working, for the funders of the program. Drama therapy is a new technique to engage in-

mates in thespian productions to keep them occupied and as a way for them to express themselves. “There are a lot of things you can put,” Abi Gebrayel said, “and a lot of things you can’t put in a film [in Lebanon].” According to Abi Gebrayel, she actually had to sneak out of the room they were allowed to film in to get shots of the prison. “I definitely liked how it showed the different people that participated in the play and the transformations of the prisoners, that it helped them find hope,” Kayla Squicciarini, a junior in international studies, said. Likewise, Kaila Stout, a se-

Photo courtesy of med screen films

nior in criminology, said the documentary ref lected the irony of the inmates situation. “I liked that their play was related to their situation; and I learned that even though these prisoners were convicted of heinous crimes, they could still act civilized.” Despite one’s interest in Lebanese culture, the films educate students on issues in the Middle East that go beyond preconceived notions on the region. However, according to Khater, the films address very specific issues, making the feature a double benefit.

Remaining films in the series Nov. 10 at 7 p.m. Remnants of a War Nov. 17 at 7 p.m. The One Man Village All films are shown in Erdahl Cloyd Theater, in the D.H. Hill Library. Source: Akram Khater

New hit comes from Sweden

WKNC Pick

of the week Hearts

I Break Horses Bella Union

I Break Horses produces record just in time to lift the spirits for winter. Mark Herring Features Editor

A

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T IME B

When many people think of Swedish music in America, the infamous 1970 Stockholm sensation ABBA comes to mind. However, Sweden has more to offer than IKEA and the cultural experiment of Dancing Queen. I Break Horses brings more to the table with a new album that balances playful electronics, dreamy vocals and modest Scandinavian wit. Hearts, which came out in the end of August, reached the States in time for the approaching winter. As experts in staying upbeat despite crumby temperatures and weather, the Swedish duo brings forth a nostalgic sound of childhood playfulness and echoing vocals of Maria Lindén. The top song of the LP has to be Winter Beats; with a contagious rhythm and a simple and cyclical chord progression this song, just like the album, transcends the simple foundation it’s rooted in. This debut album f lows from song to song and despite the band’s youth, the duo has established a characteristic sound based in dreamy simplicity. The electronic and synth beats accent the overall simplicity of the album. Each song presents a moderate background of pop and off-beat indie surrealism.

B

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2011 8:00 PM A

L O C AT I O N B

REGAL CINEMAS CROSSROADS 20

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PA S S E S AVA I L A B L E AT B

TICKET CENTRAL

TALLEY STUDENT CENTER (HOURS MON-FRI, 12PM-6PM) NC001

Photo courtesy of bella union

This balance of pep and nostalgia and lack of in-your-face pretension is representative of the Swedish concept of lagom. This culturally defining aspect of everything Swedish comes from the Viking origin of “enough, sufficient, adequate, just right,” referring to the fair sharing of mead in the ancient civilization, according to the Lexin Scandinavian language dictionary. Although some of the band’s pensive songs that feel like they’re floating may be influenced by the inspiration of honey liquor, I Break Horses embraces lagom exceptionally well. Each song is modest, not over the edge, but not boring. Just like a traditional Smörgåsbord dinner—never rowdy, never boring but in the middle—lagom. Lindén and band partner Fredrik Balck have created a sound for indie enthusiasts around the world to enjoy and their inspiring and uplifting sound transcends cultural boundaries. The fact that they sing in English helps American

You’ll like this band if you like: Sigur Rós Telepopmusik War on Drugs Pallers Smog Gauntlet Hair

audiences too. But lyrics are irrelevant. The echoing and drawn out vocals hypnotize listeners rather than preach to them. This is comparable to fellow Scandinavian band Sigur Rós. This Icelandic band, with similar ethereal style like I Break Horses, relies on the use of atmospheric instrumental soundscapes to carry the message of the song rather than the lyrics. After listening to Hearts, the drudgery of the inevitable winter isn’t so bad. This music is a true soul lifter and will definitely be on my exam-week study playlist. Hopefully it will inject some well needed logam into that week.


Features Campus & Capital

page 6 • monday, november 7, 2011

Technician

Occupiers trudge on despite cold, adversity, police Occupy Raleigh protesters claim they will not stop until Raleigh wakes up.

“I know too many people who are suffering from that and I believe that Occupy Wall Street in general represents the view of 99 percent of the population that don’t have as much Frances Ellis as the 1 percent,” Cronmiller Staff Writer said. “I heard of Occupy Wall The intersection of Fayette- Street online through some foville and Morgan Street in rums when it was first getting downtown Raleigh became the organized and my husband and home for Occupy Raleigh four I were thinking about doing it weeks ago. Sometimes there in Raleigh, but someone orgawas a crowd; sometimes only nized it first.” Powell is no stranger to aca meager number of people. But regardless of time and tivism. In college, she started day, there have been people participating in gay rights acpassionate enough about the tivism, which resulted in her cause to spend their time on going on the 2006 Soulforce Equality Ride—a bus ride the sidewalk. The demographics of the ac- through the country to 20 diftivists and curious visitors vary ferent schools that had antigay policies. She later became dramatically. “Every kind of person comes active in women’s rights after here,” Jess Cronmiller, a moth- working at a women’s health er who has lived in Raleigh for center. When she moved to 10 years and has been involved Raleigh, her interest shifted with Occupy Raleigh from its to animal rights and class and inception, said. “I’ve met doc- equality. “What motivated me was betors. I’ve met homeless guys. I’ve met teachers, teenagers, ing a sociologist and knowing a college students, all races, all lot of about inequality, having creeds, Republicans, Demo- followed the economic crisis, crats, tea partiers, liberals, and really understanding it anarchists—everyone is here.” in a way that most people are Rachel Powell, a doctorate not equipped to understand it student in sociology, said the because of my sociology backmovement has incorporated ground,” Powell said. “Also being a sociology grad student, people of all walks of life. “We have people who have having very limited resources degrees with people who never myself, it was a dove tailing got a chance to go to college,” of my personal and academic Powell said. “There are people life.” Cronmiller called the atmowho work next to people who don’t. Minimum wage laborers sphere a “big family” and said next to professionals. You see the surroundings of the base all different types of ethnicities of Occupy Raleigh are friendly and nationalities. What’s inter- and safe. “People are so willing to just esting is the demographic shift depending on the time of day. talk and hang out and offer During the day we have a big- whatever resources they have to ger homeless population and do,” Powell said. “That’s been at night, when the people who one of the most awesome parts. work are off work, we have a People honk their horns at us more middle class population.” and let us know they’re happy The reasons for joining the that we’re there. Total strangOccupy Raleigh movement do ers drop off donuts or coffee. have a variety of backgrounds People have been really generjust like the diverse crowd of ous to us.” The days at Occupy Raleigh occupiers. Most activists don’t share similarities in their mo- are relatively calm and peaceful. Powell described the avertivations. “I want to help America re- age day with people coming in alize that many Americans and out of downtown, going to work and a re su f ferreading ocing from cupier signs. inequality,” Passersby Keith Everett, frequently a 23-year-old stop to talk Southern to protesters Polytechnic and drivers State Univerhonk their sit y graduhorns in ate, said. “I support or became inscream out volved with i n su lt s at Occupy RaKeith Everett, Southern occupiers, leigh in the Polytechnic State University according latter part of graduate to Powell. October af“There’s ter I learned more about the economy, always sign making and pobanking system and govern- litical conversations going,” ment. I was motivated to come Powell said. “It’s getting colder,” Everett out and talk to those who said, “because the seasons are shared my views.” Cronmiller has views similar changing, but there are a lot of to Everett’s.  She said she was friendly people in Raleigh supmotivated to come out because porting us. There’s sometimes of inequality in opportunity coffee, food and clothes and we and wealth in the United States. talk to people that are open to

“I want to help America realize that many Americans are suffering from inequality.”

Alex Sanchez/Technician

Tony Dackren, a book seller from Mebane, lectures a group of protesters on economics and finance at Occupy Raleigh outside the North Carolina state Capitol building Sunday, Oct. 16.

listening to us.” However, nighttime tells a different story. According to Powell, the nights spent at the Capitol are up in the air. “The cops have a little more leeway to do what they want with us since we’re fewer in number,” Powell said. “Sometimes it’s just a few people struggling in the cold and the wind, sometimes people have a dance party and they play music and dance.” Police crackdowns have become part of Occupy Raleigh’s largest struggle. “At night, it gets cold and a little scary because we get raided,” Cronmiller said.  “The cops come out and tell us to do things. That’s usually when the action happens.  They tell us to move our stuff here, move our stuff there, you can do this, stand up, sit down, don’t lay down, do lay down. There’s a lot of inconsistency.” Powell said she hopes the changing rules and inconsistent jurisdiction will soon change.   “The mayor has picked up on what’s going on and has brought to the city council a question of why we have been arrested and making sure our first amendment rights haven’t been completely trampled,” Powell said. “Our biggest struggle has definitely been inconsistent police and lack of supplies.” Last week, while Powell was protesting, police arrived at 8 a.m. and ordered protesters to rid of their supplies by 9, according to Powell. “The other morning was the first in quite a few days where they did not say that, and I think it’s because we had more people and they thought we weren’t as vulnerable,” Powell

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Alex Sanchez/Technician

Protesters line Morgan Street outside the North Carolina state Capitol building Saturday, Oct. 16 for the second day of Occupy Raleigh protests.

said. Even though many of the protestors have given up sleep, warmth, health and time, in addition to dealing with the police, they believe it’s worth it in the end.

“Right now, we’re kind of waking Raleigh up,” Cronmiller said. “People haven’t been paying attention. You’re comfortable or you’re not and if you’re comfortable you don’t pay attention to who’s not, and

now maybe you do. We’re looking at growth. We’d like to get bigger—get more attention and more people out here. We’ll be here as long as it takes.”


Sports

Technician

Amerson

monday, november 7, 2011 • Page 7

flagshiP

David Amerson’s Cornerback Stats

continued from page 8

continued from page 8

Interceptions: 9 Yards: 122 Avg: 13.6 Touchdowns: 1 Long: 47 Points: 6

bit.” The pick not only breaks the school record, but puts Amerson in an earshot of matching, or even breaking, the singleseason ACC record for interceptions, which, ironically, is held by former UNC player Dre Bly with 11. The NCAA record is 14. Amerson has already drawn attention from the conference, earning two conference defensive player of the week honors, from the Jim Thorpe Award voting committee, given to the top defensive back in the nation, and from his coach, Tom O’Brien. “He has great instincts and I think he has very good ability,” O’Brien said. “He’s a kid that has only been playing with us for two years, so he’s learned it from the ground up. From day one he’s come in and been coached to do what we want to

Source: gopack

do. “When the ball’s in the air, David has a knack for going and finding it.” With three games remaining on the year, the Greensboro native has a chance to reach, if not exceed, the conference record – if quarterbacks keep throwing his way, that is.

Kevin cook/Technician

Sophomore cornerback, David Amerson, yells after the N.C. State victory of the N.C. State – UNC football game in Carter Finley Stadium on Saturday, Nov. 5.

Swoosh

proach to running Gottfried’s fast break off of a rebound. According to Leslie, he has UCLA offense. While Johnson ran with placed emphasis on his midrange game this offseason the White Team, he scored 18 and Gottfried has given him points and dished out four asthe vote of confidence when it sists. According to Johnson, Gottcomes to handling the ball. “I’ve been working on this fried brought him into the program to be a a lot and just scoring force continuing for the team. to i mprove “Coach on it,” Leslie Gottfried said. Coach and his staff wants a fastbrought me in p a c e g a me to be aggresand he besive,” Johnson lieves in me said. “It’s my in starting his last year so fast break. He I’m just trytrusts me and ing to bring I’m just doing some aggresit.” siveness and Alex JohnCoach Mark Gottfried some attenson, a gradution to this ate student who transferred to State from program.” When he switched over to CSU Bakersfield, has also brought a new dimension to the Red Team, he played the the Pack on the offensive end. off guard with sophomore Johnson took an aggressive ap- Lorenzo Brown staying as the

continued from page 8

“You turn the lights on, put people in the stands and you want to see how people respond,” Gottfried said. “Especially for some young guys, it’s their first time to get into this environment and also for the older players it’s the first time in this environment with a new system. “Overall, I thought the answer to that question was just okay. The cream always rises to the top and in environments like this you want to see who plays well.” Some of the players also got to display the strides they’ve made in the offseason and the new elements they’ll bring to the Wolfpack this season. Sophomore forward C.J. Leslie has shown improvement in his jump shot from midrange as well as the ability to start the

“The most important thing today was to turn this into a learning environment for our players today.”

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lead guard. During that period, he added another five points to his total, bringing it to 23 for the game. According to Johnson, him and Brown have already had experience playing off of each other, so this game was another opportunity to build on this chemistry. “During the summer time we played on the same Pro-Am team and we have this thing where if he gets it he’ll go and if he gets it I’ll go, so we’re just trying things out right now,” Johnson said. According to Gottfried, the most important aspect of the Red & White game was to get his team to learn from the experience of playing under the lights. “We have to get a lot better,” Gottfried said. “The most important thing today was to turn this into a learning environment for our players today.”

sity’s back,” he said. “He’s not even an alumni of our school and he took it pretty personally. I think it definitely added some fire for us and it was out of character for him so we understood how much it meant to him. “We definitely took it to heart.” Unlike in past games for the Pack, the defense was the story throughout the game. UNC couldn’t get the offense going against a stout front seven for the Pack led by senior middle linebacker Audie Cole and Manning. Bryn Renner was sacked three times in the first half alone and was picked off by redshirt junior safety Earl Wolff at midfield. Cole’s sack was on the first drive of the game for the Heels and set the tone for the Pack defense, as he took Renner down 19 yards behind the line of scrimmage. Cole said the performance by the defense was needed after a tough game against Florida State last weekend. “This was a big one to have,” Cole said. “I think the defense showed what we could do today.” While Cole was the story of the first half, Manning put the clamps on the UNC offense in the second half. Manning had a sack in the third quarter for a loss of 12 yards that forced a punt and kept the ball in State territory. Then, in the waning moments of the game, Manning secured a shutout for the Pack with a tipped pass on a crossing pattern with UNC in the red zone. Manning said he wanted to get the tipped pass for

more than just himself or the shutout, but rather for his team. “It was big for me, but I felt like it was crucial for everybody on my team,” Manning said. “Everybody was fired up and I guess I was just the one that did it.” While Manning and Cole, along with several others, played shut down defense for the Pack, the other story of the game was one that doesn’t get as much attention – field position. Freshman punter Wil Baumann pinned the North Carolina offense behind its own 10-yard line four times, the same amount of times that State started in UNC territory. O’Brien said Baumann’s performance was crucial for the Pack, but that it’s just a continuation of his effectiveness against Florida State. “You have to give [Baumann] a lot of credit,” O’Brien said. “Last week he played in a similar position and I think he did a great job. When you play, it’s not always offense versus defense. Field position certainly is part of it.” When one reporter asked O’Brien about the importance of this game to him personally, the response he gave was one of a coach not looking back, but forward. “I’m already worried about Boston College,” O’Brien said. “That’s just the way I am. I never play this for me. My job is to make sure I do everything to get them prepared for the football game. With that being said, I’m certainly going to enjoy this one tonight.” The Pack will be traveling up to Chestnut Hill, Mass. next Saturday to take on the Eagles at 12:30 p.m. Though State beat Boston College last year, 4410, it has never beaten them at Alumni Stadium since O’Brien left the Eagles for the Pack.

Team Stats UNC

State

First downs

13

16

Net rushing yards

3

126

Net passing yards

162

164

Total offense

165

290 Source: gopack

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Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Level 2

Level 1

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Solution to Saturday’s puzzle

FREE AND

11/7/11

Complete the grid so each row, OPEN TO THE PUBLIC! column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) anything with contains a cord every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on centennial campus at the corner on how to solve of partners way and main campus drive Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

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up to 8 boxes at 50 lbs each © 2011 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved. Tuesday, Nov. 15

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AMERICA

RECYCLES COMPOSTS DAY!

11/9/11

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. WASTE REDUCTION & RECYCLING

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Campus Farmers Market in front of DH Hill Library in the Brickyard

For more information visit ncsu.edu/recycling

ACROSS 1 Magician’s bird of choice 5 Seattle’s Best product, slangily 9 Fall faller 13 Pub picks 14 Special Forces cap 15 Fairy tale starter 16 Strike gold 18 Give __ to: approve 19 Canadian coin nicknamed for the bird on it 20 Hand-waving or finger-pointing 22 For each 23 Mythical Egyptian riddler 25 Cornfield bird 27 Smallest prime number 28 27-Across plus one, in Italy 29 Lines of theater seats 30 Goes down in the west 32 Debatable point 36 Encouragement for a matador 37 Lane straddler 39 LAX hrs. 40 Welsh dog 42 Screwball 43 Dalai __ 44 A bit amiss 46 “Milk” director Van Sant 47 Oval segments 48 Guy “nipping at your nose,” in a holiday song 52 Inquire 53 Rand McNally references 54 Takes home from the pound 57 Yogi, for one 58 Singer of the 1961 #1 song found in the starts of 16-, 23-, 37and 48-Across 61 Can of worms, e.g. 62 “Drat!” 63 Brooks’s country music partner 64 Sources of immediate cash: Abbr.

11/7/11

By Jeff Chen

65 Mends with thread 66 FBI personnel DOWN 1 Author Roald 2 Assortment 3 President’s weapon 4 Station with game reports and highlights 5 Clampett patriarch 6 Onassis patriarch 7 Brink 8 Declare to be true 9 Despises 10 Boredom 11 Piece of the sky, to Chicken Little 12 Shipping giant 14 “Sayonara!” 17 It’s roughly 21% oxygen 21 Unit of parsley 23 Tinker with 24 Franks 25 Hook nemesis, for short 26 Cylindrical caramel candy 27 General of Chinese cuisine 31 Loud call

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

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33 Auto tune-up item 34 Camp Pendleton letters 35 LAX incoming hrs. 37 Jazz licks 38 Approves 41 Amusement park racers 43 Longtime Dodger skipper Tommy 45 Brittany brothers 48 Sluglike “Star Wars” crime boss

11/7/11

49 Persistently bothered 50 Allegation 51 Missouri river or tribe 52 Cavity filler’s org. 54 Blissful sighs 55 Camping shelter 56 9-digit IDs 59 Deviate from a course 60 DJ’s stack


Sports

INSIDE

COUNTDOWN

• Page #: A story on something

• # of days until some game

Technician

Page 8 • monday, november 7, 2011

Football

Volleyball swept by Hurricanes The women’s volleyball team was swept by Miami on Sunday in three straight sets at Knight Sports Complex in Coral Gables, Fla. The Wolfpack (17-11, 5-10 ACC) was defeated by small margins in their three sets, (27-25, 25-19, 25-20). Senior middle blocker Margarat Salata tied her careerhigh record with 19 kills and 22 points. Salata also averaged .467 on hits, producing a season best. Volleyball returns Reynolds Coliseum on Friday when they host Clemson at 7:30 p.m. Source: n.c. athletics

athletic schedule November 2011 Su

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Monday men’s soccer vs. virginia tech Chapel Hill, 1 p.m. Brent Kitchen/Technician

Freshman wide receiver Maurice Morgan (19), senior linebacker Calvin Forbes (50) and sophomore defensive back Milton Hall celebrate the Wolfpack's 13-0 victory over UNC at Carter-Finley Stadium Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011.

men’s basketball vs. Flagler (exhibition) RBC Center, 7 p.m.

Wolfpack defense sinks Withers’ ‘flagship’

Friday Rifle at Army West Point, N.Y., All Day

Defense records a shutout against rival to hand UNC fifth straight loss in rivalry.

women’s basketball vs. southeast missouri state Reynold’s Coliseum, noon men’s basketball vs. unc asheville RBC Center, 7 p.m.

R. Cory Smith Deputy Sports Editor

women’s volleyball vs. clemson Raleigh, 7:30 p.m.

Ask a Wolfpack fan, any fan, which game is the most important each year to win? The response is an easy one: any game against UNCChapel Hill.

Saturday Cross Country at NCAA Southeast Regional Louisville, Ky., TBA Rifle vs. Nebraska West Point, N.Y., All Day

R. Cory Smith

women’s volleyball vs. georgia tech Raleigh, 1 p.m.

Deputy Sports Editor

In 73 years, the Wolfpack football team has had 30 All-Americans named, won 13 bowl games and went through 13 different

men’s basketball vs. morehead state RBC Center, 6 p.m.

flagship continued page 7

Pack makes debut in Red & White game

head coaches, but has not had a player intercept more than eight passes in a season. In Saturday’s game against rival UNC-Chapel Hill, sophomore cornerback David Amerson broke Art Rooney’s interception record in the fourth quarter. “It’s amazing,” Amerson said. “I still just can’t believe it, but it’s definitely an honor.” Amerson’s ninth interception

Fans get their first sneak peek at the 2011-2012 men’s basketball team.

not only cemented his place in the program’s record books, but kept the Tar Heels out of the end zone and maintained a shutout for the Pack. “Anytime we can get a turnover on a drive that they are getting first downs on is big,” Amerson said. “It shifts momentum back to our offense and gets the team up a little

Jeniece Jamison Senior Staff Writer

Following the conclusion of football’s domination over Carolina, the fans got a glimpse of the men’s basketball team for the first time this season with the Red &

amerson continued page 7

White scrimmage game. The Pack played t hree 12-minute periods in which the score was reset and the teams tipped off after each period. The White Team won each of the three games, 26-22, 30-25, and 30-29. According to coach Mark Gottfried, this game served as measuring stick for where the team is now.

Swoosh continued page 7

Randy Woodson

Chandler Thompson

Tom Suiter

Laura Wilkinson

Josh Hyatt

Sean Fairholm

R. Cory Smith

Molly Matty

Mr. Wuf

Charles Phillips

58-46 9th

65-35 4th

67-33 3rd

63-37 5th

69-31 2nd

71-29 1st

54-46 10th

59-41 7th

63-37 5th

59-41 7th

Chancellor

Virginia at Maryland

junior linebacker Terrell Manning said. “Anytime you have a coach come out and say something like [Withers] did, the team really rolls off of that.” Redshirt junior quarterback Mike Glennon said O’Brien’s statements leading up to the game displayed his love for more than just the football program. “He showed our team that he has our back and the Univer-

basketball

Sophomore cornerback sets school record for interceptions.

Sunday Wrestling at Wolfpack Open Raleigh, All Day

#15 Michigan at Iowa

to get fans, players and coaches excited before the kickoff, but that didn’t stop UNC interim coach Everett Withers from making offensive comments towards N.C. State as a whole. Though O’Brien was a little more mild-mannered in his postgame interview, his players said that the comments from Withers and their coach’s response helped fire them up for this game. “I give all the credit to [UNC] for firing us up for this game,”

David Amerson picks way into N.C. State record books

Swimming & Diving vs. College of Charleston & Campbell Raleigh, 2 p.m.

Texas Tech at #21 Texas

urday. When asked to explain his dominance over the past five seasons against the Heels, O’Brien kept his explanation close to the chest. “I don’t know if we’ve been dominant,” O’Brien said. “Three of the previous four games went right down to the last play. Other than the turnover game over there, 13 to nothing is probably the largest victory we’ve had.” This rivalry has enough fuel

Football

Football at boston college Chestnut Hill, Mass., 12:30 p.m.

North Carolina at N.C. State

Saturday afternoon, coach Tom O’Brien did what only one other coach has done in program history – defeat the Heels five times in a row. Former football coach Dick Sheridan took down UNC five straight years from 1988-92 and set the mark for excellence against the Pack’s rivals. What makes O’Brien’s run against the Heels different? O’Brien capped his streak with the first shutout over the Heels since 1960 in the 13-0 win Sat-

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Technician - November 7, 2011  

Remember, remember...the fifth of November

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