Page 1

Technician          

monday october

24 2011

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Student groups avoid discrimination in entrance rules Groups aim to avoid incident similar to UNC-Chapel Hill’s. Jessie Halpern Staff Writer

Earlier this school year, a Christian a cappella group at UNC-Chapel Hill, Psalm 100, faced a legal problem when they expelled a member from their group due to his identification as a homosexual.

While Chapel Hill ultimately determined the group’s reasoning for their actions was justified, the issue brings to light certain practices at N.C. State among selective campus groups based on religion or ethnicity. Joanne Woodard, vice provost for Institutional Equity & Diversity, said she’s not concerned with a similar issue occurring at N.C. State. “Groups at State focused around religion do not have bars to those who

do not share their religion,” Woodard said. “Also, take our Women’s Center, they would not bar males from participation in events unless there was a gender-specific activity.” With these policies in mind, religious and ethnic campus groups that select their members walk on a thin line between valid entry requirements and discrimination. John Jones, former member of Chi Alpha Omega, a Christian fraternity

whose chapter recently became inactive due to loss of membership, said the shared faith groups are not meant to be discriminatory. “The purpose of the fraternity is to build up fellow believers in our faith, so someone who does not share our beliefs would not be able to receive or give those intangible benefits that come from our faith, because they do not believe the same fundamentals that we do,” Jones said.

When asked how this practice of selection by faith escapes N.C. State’s discrimination policy, Jones replied with the following: “We have never, and I pray we never will, discriminated against anyone who wants to attend open events. Nearly everything we did, from Bible studies to root beer keg parties, were open,” Jones said.

religious continued page 3

Obama announces end of troop presence in Iraq President Barack Obama tells nation and world Iraqi war will soon be over.

American deaths in Iraq: •

Will Brooks & Jessie Halpern

Staff Writers

Since Obama inauguration– Jan. 20, 2009: 250 Since war began – March 19, 2003: 4,478 Since “Mission Accomplished” – May 1, 2003: 4,338

President Barack Obama addressed the nation Friday to announce he Americans wounded: 33,169 would be sending home the remaining U.S. troops from Iraq by the end Information as of Oct. 18 of December. President George W. Bush anSource: Antiwar.com nounced in 2003 he would be sending troops into Iraq to search for weapons ship between sovereign nations, an of mass destruction. These weapons equal partnership based on mutual interests and were never found, yet mutual respect,” troops have remained Obama said. in the area for nearly a T hou g h t he decade. troops will be “Today, I can report leaving Iraq, the that, as promised, the Un ited St ate s rest of our troops in will still hold Iraq will come home a presence in by the end of the year,” the country, atObama said. “After tempting to help nearly nine years, Iraq strengthen America’s war in Iraq its economy and will be over.” establish its sovIn his press release, ereignty. Obama continued to President Barack Obama “I think [deexplain what future parture] is a good relations will be like outcome for the United States,” between the United States and Iraq. “As of Jan. 1, and in keeping with Michael Struett, associate profesour Strategic Framework Agreement with Iraq, it will be a normal relation Troops continued page 3

“Today, I can report that, as promised, the rest of our troops in Iraq will come home by the end of the year.”

Campus committees join fight against breast cancer Student Government committees throw fundraising event for research.

a third time,” Sopher said jokingly. Community Service Commission Co-chair Camille Smith said collaboration with organizations across campus was key to planning the event. John Wall “We got a lot of our stuff for free. News Editor Theta Chi provided us our platIn hopes of spreading the word for form. Source, IRC and UAB let us Breast Cancer Awareness Month, borrow the speakers. We really aptwo Student Government commit- preciate the collaboration that has tees worked together to host Pack 4 happened between different organizations on campus,” Smith said. Pink, Friday. Smith said the event ended up The Community Service Commisraising around sion and the Diver$170, all of which sity Commission inwent to the Susan tended to raise $300 G. Komen for the at the event. Money Cure Foundation was raised through to fund cancer sa les of pink Tresearch. shirts for $5 and the It was very imchance to sign a banpressive Sopher ner with the name of Devon Day, senior in survived cancer a cancer victim for criminology four times, ac$0.50. cording to Smith. Apart from a talk “It’s incredible. I love Ms. Soby faculty member Mindy Sopher, who has beaten breast cancer four pher. Everyone loves her,” Smith times, attendees were entertained by said. Kornelius Bascombe, a senior on-campus musical acts and performin sociology, emceed the event, ers. Sopher said the key to living with which was not his first on Harris cancer, and to helping those affected, Field this semester. “My mission out here is to raise is the right attitude. Positivity trumps all in the fight against cancer, accord- breast cancer awareness, and to ing to Sopher. She was surprised when show people that you can have a she found out she had contracted the good time and at the same time disease a third and then a fourth time. learn about breast cancer,” Bas“I only have two, but for some reason [cancer] decided to come back for Awareness continued page 3

“I had an aunt that had breast cancer; she won her battle.”

Oliver Sholder/Technician

Zach Johnson, casting director for Real World interviews a potential member of the Real World in the Raleigh Downtown Sports Bar and Grill. "I look for people who are diverse, interesting and expressive," Johnson said.

MTV seeks stars at bar Casting directors of the Real World set up shop off Glenwood Avenue.

“find out what happens when people stop being polite and start being real.” Based on Saturday’s turn out, season 27 of the show could potentially house a Raleigh-based cast member. Robert Stapleton, co-owner of the Downtown Anna Riley Sports Bar and Grill, said between 200 Staff Writer and 300 people came out for the castAt the Downtown Sports Bar and ing call. “There was a pretty steady flow of Grill Saturday, Bunim/Murray Productions held an open casting call for people coming in all day,” Stapleton MTV’s hit reality show The Real World said. According to Stapleton, the audiSeason 27 hopefuls. The auditions were held from 10 tions brought out Raleigh’s more eca.m. to 5 p.m. for budding reality centric and eclectic scene. “I def i nitely stars over the age of saw some weird 19 who were eager to people come share their stories with out. Or let’s just the world. Groups of say… interesting potential new cast people,” Staplemembers were asked ton said. to fill out a questionRaleigh resinaire and subsequently dent, Ashleigh interviewed by MTV Ba nnow, went casting directors. early to guaranThe MTV series, The Real World famously Robert Stapleton, co-owner of the tee her spot in Downtown Sports Bar and Grill line for the aupicks seven strangers ditions. Bannow to live and work together in a pre-determined city for said she was up at 7 a.m. to be ready roughly three months. For nearly 20 and in line at 9 a.m. “I wasn’t really sure how many peoyears, the quip of the show has been,

“I definitely saw some weird people come out. Or let’s just say… interesting people.”

real world by the numbers: Season: 27 Must be: 20 years old Must appear to be: 20-24 years old Source: bunim/murray press release

ple would show up so I didn’t want to take any chances by going late. Early bird gets the worm,” Bannow said. A self-proclaimed out-going girl who is eager to step into the world of reality TV, Bannow said she thinks she would be a real asset to The Real World cast. “Well I would certainly bring some spice to the show—that’s for sure. I think it would be a lot of fun,” Bannow said. For the upcoming season, Bunim/ Murray Productions searched for new “roommates” who have strong personalities and unusual life stories. The casting directors were primarily looking for applicants with diverse backgrounds who found challenges

Casting continued page 3

insidetechnician

Dining In brings Air Force ROTC together

Cadets join cadre to celebrate the ‘ancient’ tradition of dining in with commander of Air Force ROTC. See page 6.

Teacher by day, horror filmmaker by night

Computer science lecturer pursues his passion for horror. See page 5.

Hoos afraid of the Big Bad Wolf See page 8.

viewpoint features classifieds sports

OC TOBER 26-31 ncsu.edu/bookstore

Regularly priced apparel, accessories, gifts and novelties

While supplies last, not valid with any other offers or coupons. Excludes textbooks, yearbooks, computers and computer accessories, software, diploma frames, class rings, ClassWatches, gift cards, stamps, special orders. See store for details

4 5 7 8


Page 2

page 2 • monday, october 24, 2011

Corrections & Clarifications

Technician POLICe BlOTTER

Through Michael’s lens

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Laura Wilkinson at editor@ technicianonline.com.

Thursday 1:42 a.m. | Suspicious Person Talley Student Center Report of subject attempting to gain entry to construction site. Officers did not locate subject or any problems at site.

Weather Wise

4:15 a.m. | Suspicious Person Daniels Hall Officers conducted search of building due to reports of unauthorized subjects. Officers located non-student who was trespassed from NCSU property.

Today:

6:54 a.m. | Trespassing Pullen Road Bridge Non-student was arrested for trespassing in this area.

73/46 Partly cloudy.

9:28 a.m. | Larceny College of Textiles Staff member reported theft of copper device.

Tomorrow:

73 47

10:30 a.m. | Follow Up Investigation Public Safety Center NCSU PD obtained warrants on two non-students for possession of tools for breaking and entering into vehicles.

Mostly cloudy.

Running on autopilot

Wednesday:

75 51

E

Partly cloudy.

source: Drew Day, Joseph Taylor, Patrick Devore

Campus CalendaR

October 2011 Su

M

T

W

Th

F

Sa

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

1

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

Monday Kirk Adam – Modern Abstracts All Day Crafts Center An exhibition of acrylic paintings by local artist and Crafts Center instructor Kirk Adam. Intramural Sports Registration All Day Online Registration is open for wiffleball, 3-on-3 basketball and NFL Pick’M. Sign up online at http://ncsu. edu/stud_affairs/campus_rec/ intramural/.

11:18 a.m. | Larceny Carmichael Gymnasium Student reported theft of wallet.

photo By Michael Pratt

rik Gutekunst, a senior in mechanical and aerospace engineering, Michael Yenik, a sophomore in computer engineering, and Jared Dremann, a freshman in engineering, repair a broken power connector in the N.C. State Aerial Robotics Club’s plane at a flight test Sunday. The Aerial Robotics Club competes in a national competition each June and, in preparation, test flies their plane at least once a month at N.C. State’s Perkins Field, outside Butner, N.C. “Today’s flight test focused on making sure our autopilot still performs as expected as well as testing a new camera for feasibility in a new plane design,” Gutekunst, club president, said.

The Urge to Draw, the Cause to Reflect: Drawings, Sketchbooks, Provocations All Day D.H. Hill Library Gallery The exhibit features drawings and sketchbooks by College of Design Dean Marvin J. Malecha, FAIA. Women Empowered: Inspiring change in an emerging world All Day African American Cultural Center Gallery Pink Ribbon Bagel Campaign All Day, Multi-Day Event Panera Bread locations in Wake County Throughout the month of October, our Wake County bakery-cafes will donate 10 cents from the sale of each Pink Ribbon Bagel to the Kay Yow Cancer Fund. Also, throughout the month of October, we will donate $1 from the sale of each Baker’s Dozen.

FIVE

DOLLARS

NCSU students pay only $5 for ARTS NC STATE performances

this week Garden District

Wed-Sun, Oct 26-30; 7:30pm, 2pm Sunday Kennedy-McIlwee Studio Theatre Limited seats! University Theatre presents two one-act plays (Suddenly, Last Summer and Something Unspoken) from one of America's best known playwrights, Tennessee Williams. Adult themes.

Earth With Meaning: Photographs of Alan Cohen Noon-8 p.m. Gregg Museum Alan Cohen “makes visible the unseen” in places marked by history or the processes of natural events. Instead of sweeping views, he aims his cameras downward to record the exact spots that permeate memory. Speaking Skills for Success Noon-2 p.m. Walnut Room, Talley Student Center For more than 20 years, Professor Nielsen has taught a one-day short-course on communication skills to professionals in the U.S. Forest Service. He has concentrated that course into a two-hour block addressing the needs of graduate students and postdocs, focusing on speaking skills. Specific topics covered include general principles, choosing the content and style, organizing for optimum impact, practicing before a presentation, performing at your best and preparing effective visual aids. Come learn the tools of the trade from an accomplished public speaker. Student Centers Board of Directors Meeting 6-7 p.m. Talley Student Center Boardroom Join the Student Centers Board of Directors as they discuss matters regarding the campus student centers. Learn more about the Talley Student Center project. All students and facult are invited to attend. Alpine Kick Off Season Fundraiser 6 p.m. - midnight Alpine Ski Center, 6315 Glenwood Avenue We will be kicking off the winter season with a special event at

Alpine Ski Center. Alpine will be discounting prices on tons of winter gear including skis, snowboards, jackets and other winter necessities. N.C. State’s Ski and Snowboard club will receive 20 percent of the profits to go towards the club. This is a great opportunity to get discounted gear before the winter starts and get to know your local ski center. Door prizes and raffles for gift cards and gift certificates will be given away. Tuesday Kirk Adam – Modern Abstracts All Day Crafts Center An exhibition of acrylic paintings by local artist and Crafts Center instructor Kirk Adam. The Urge to Draw, the Cause to Reflect: Drawings, Sketchbooks, Provocations All Day D.H. Hill Library Gallery The exhibit features drawings and sketchbooks by College of Design Dean Marvin J. Malecha, FAIA. Pink Ribbon Bagel Campaign All Day, Multi-Day Event Panera Bread locations in Wake County Throughout the month of October, our Wake County bakery-cafes will donate 10 cents from the sale of each Pink Ribbon Bagel to the Kay Yow Cancer Fund. Also, throughout the month of October, we will donate $1 from the sale of each Baker’s Dozen. Lunch & Learn: “Making Music with iPhones & iPads” Noon-1 p.m. 216 Scott Hall Nowadays, both amateurs and seasoned musicians alike consider their iPhone and iPad an essential tool for both composition and

JOIN US SPRING 2012!

Goodnight Moon & The Runaway Bunny

Saturday, October 29 at 3pm • Stewart Theatre The acclaimed Mermaid Theatre of Nova Scotia brings its whimsical puppetry, dreamlike imagery, and original music to two best-loved childhood stories. Kidstuff Series: best for grades PreK-2.

Raleigh Civic Chamber Orchestra

Sunday, October 30 at 4pm • Stewart Theatre RCCO presents “High Classical.” Two works by Mozart: Overture to The Magic Flute, and Concerto in C Minor for Piano and Orchestra, with Dr. Olga Kleiankina as guest pianist. The program includes Haydn’s Symphony No. 104 in D Major.

Ticket Central 919-515-1100 2nd floor, Talley Student Center ncsu.edu/arts

The Host 7-9 p.m. Witherspoon Cinema A monster emerges from Seoul’s Han River and focuses its attention on attacking people. One victim’s loving family does what it can to rescue her from its clutches. Korean with English subtitles. Admission to this event is free. Friends with Benefits 9:30-11:30 p.m. Witherspoon Cinema While trying to avoid the cliches of Hollywood romantic comedies, Dylan and Jamie soon discover however that adding the act of sex to their friendship does lead to complications. Admission is $1.50 with a valid college student ID and $2.50 for the general public.

Talley Information Day:

Wednesday, Nov. 9 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. Talley Student Center

Wednesday, October 26 at 7pm • Stewart Theatre For those with an appreciation of all things Scottish... spirited bagpipe marches, dance tunes, and Highland and Scottish Country Dancers. Thursday, October 27 at 6pm • Gregg Museum of Art & Design A stellar panel of expert photo-conversationalists will discuss the ideas and philosophical issues stirred up by one of the most unusual photographic installations to hit the Triangle in years. FREE

Fidelity Investments “Leadership in Technology” Series 6-7 p.m. 1231 Engineering Building II “Overcoming the Challenges of Young Entrepreneurship: How to Start a Successful Company in Your 20s.” The Department of Computer Science and the Fidelity Investments “Leadership in Technology” Executive Speakers Series proudly present Jud Bowman, Founder & CEO of Appia, Inc.

“State of the Union”

NCSU Pipes & Drums

An Evening of Thinking and Talking about Photography

performance. Join Tom Karches of OIT Infrastructure, Systems and Consulting for a whirlwind tour of possible uses for these tools. You don’t need to bring an iPhone and iPad to this workshop, but it might be more fun if you do. To register, visit Classmate.

s to create a safer NCSU

PEH 335  3 credits Wed. 3:00-5:30 pm This course is designed to educate, empower and provide leadership training to women and men who want to help others make informed and positive choices on reducing their risk of sexual assault and relationship violence. The class also prepares peer educators to present the Women’s and Men’s Program outreach on campus. Room 2301, Student Health Counts toward the Physical Education Health Minor http://pe.ncsu.edu/health_minor.html If you have questions, contact Marianne_turnbull@ncsu.edu

Learn more about what’s happening at Talley Student Center and provide your input. Table Talk 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. Town Hall Meetings 3-4 p.m. and 6-7 p.m. See the latest interior designs, learn about the dining options planned, learn more about construction progress and plans for spring 2012, ask questions and give your feedback. source: Campus Enterprises

12:25 p.m. | Follow Up Investigation Tompkins Hall Officers located student from earlier welfare check. Student was removed from missing person database. 2:17 p.m. | Larceny D.H. Hill Library Student reported theft of phone charger. 2:17 p.m. | Suspicious Person Fraternity Court Report of subject causing disturbance on Wolfline bus. Subject left and vacated area prior to officer’s arrival. 3:16 p.m. | Information University Wade Avenue It was reported that a student was involved in traffic accident off campus and transported for treatment. Appropriate personnel notified. 8:59 p.m. | Suspicious Incident Tucker Hall Report of water balloons being thrown from second story window. Officers searched area but did not locate suspects involved. 10:00 p.m. | Assist Another Agency Dan Allen Drive/Western Boulevard RPD investigating traffic accident. Student driving vehicle struck pedestrian who was a student. Victim was transported for treatment. Appropriate personnel notified. 10:42 p.m. | Suspicious Vehicle Brickhaven Officers located non-student sleeping in vehicle. All file checks were negative. No action taken. Friday 4:20 a.m. | Assist Another Agency Brooks Lot RPD was dispatched to vehicle accident at Brooks Avenue and Hillsborough Street. Vehicle is owned by student.

Get involved

in technician

Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copy edit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday to Thursday 9 a.m. to midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or e-mail Editor-inChief Laura Wilkinson at editor@ technicianonline.com.

on the Web See exclusive audio/photo slideshows. Answer the online poll. Read archived stories. There’s something new every day at technicianonline.com. Check it out!


News

Technician

religious continued from page 1

Megan Farrell/Technician

Monique Bonds, a junior in nutrition science, recites her poem, "Mirror," at Friday's Pack 4 Pink event. Pack 4 Pink was a diversity benefit show held on Harris Field and presented by the Community Service Commission and Diversity Commission as a way to bring breast cancer awareness to campus.

Awareness

While Chi Alpha Omega did not choose to discriminate against non-members because of their faith, other issues could arise regarding one’s way of upholding that faith. Jones said all sins are equal in the eyes of his faith, as represented by the brothers of his fraternity. “All men are sinners, and to reject one because of a particular sin would be against our faith. We would not accept a man who thought homosexual actions were not a sin, just like we would not accept a man who thought drinking too much alcohol was not a sin,” Jones said. Rachel Yon, a senior in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, offered

monday, october 24, 2011 • Page 3

“All men are sinners, and to reject one because of a particular sin would be against our faith.” John Jones, former member of Chi Alpha Omega

her opinion on the balance between entry requirements and discrimination as a member of Zeta Phi Beta, an international, historically black sorority. “As of now, I would say that my sorority’s lack of cultural diversity is really just a result of our shared values. We haven’t sought to include or disclude others based on ethnicity or culture,” Yon said. She added that her sorority selects its members by looking at GPA and campus involvement, not gender, sexuality or religion. According to Woodard, these selection practices are acceptable under N.C. State’s dis-

crimination policy because it does not differentiate between specific actions. “At N.C. State, we do have campus regulations that deal with non-discrimination based on sexual identity. If someone said they felt discriminated against because of their sexual or gender identification, our office might look into that to see if that was actually the basis of the discrimination,” Woodard said. Woodard added that in her tenure at the University, she has not encountered an issue of discrimination involving campus groups.

Casting

continued from page 1

continued from page 1

combe said. Bascombe has been balancing his on-campus volunteer work with his new TV talk show. Called “Born to Shine,” it premiered on Time Warner Cable’s Entertainment on Demand Oct. 18. The show is viewed nationally. “It’s cool to be a student volunteering here at N.C. State, while also having the opportunity to host a talk show that can be seen across the country,” Bascombe said. Senior in criminology Devon Day was in attendance to support one of his fraternity brothers playing in a band. “I had an aunt that had breast cancer; she won her battle. I’m glad that the University as a whole is actually taking action toward awareness and trying to go along with other organizations of the same size. I’m glad

Troops

continued from page 1

sor in the department of political science, said. Struett said he believes now is the right time for the United States to leave Iraq. “The good news is that the sovereign government of Iraq thinks that it is strong enough to get by without us,” Struett said.

we can be a part of it,” Day said. Michael Atkins, a junior in political science and sociology, was at a Student Government tent helping with the logistical side of event operation. “We made the shirts ourselves. They are really cheap. We used tie-dye and put the logo for the event on front,”

Atkins said. Atkins said he hoped the event would be a jumpingoff point for similar actions around campus. When Sopher passed around a leaflet called “Helpful hints for helpers: Caring for people with cancer,” it began simply with a single word—“Listen....”

in living a normal life. Parampreet Sekhon, a senior in mechanical engineering, said he went to the casting call to observe the hopeful applicants. Sekhon said he never planned to audition, but just wanted to see how the process worked and who would come out to audition. “It was interesting to see how many people took [the auditions] very seriously,” Sekhon said. Of the mass of people that showed up, the mix of males and females was about equal. “I thought there would be a lot more girls than guys but that wasn’t the case. There were just as many guys as girls. I guess some guys really want to be fa-

Struett explained that although troops will be coming home, America will still be putting money into Iraq. “The U.S. State Department and other government agencies are going to be there for a long time trying to help the Iraqi government do what it wants to do,” Struett said. “There will be a couple hundred U.S. soldiers there.” As Obama celebrated the removal of American troops

from a more stable Iraq he addressed the remaining occupation in Afghanistan. “Now, even as we remove our last troops from Iraq, we’re beginning to bring our troops home from Afghanistan, where we’ve begun a transition to Afghan security in leadership,” Obama said. Jessica Koennecke, sophomore at Wake Technical Community College, is an active member of Raleigh’s political

community. “We’ve been at war long enough; I’m glad Obama is starting to send home some troops, it’s time,” Koennecke said. Staff Sergeant Erew Koch spent roughly 30 months in Iraq over three separate tours. He said he was pleased with the war’s end. “Do I feel what it did was worthwhile? Yes,” Koch said. “Do I feel that what I did was

Megan Farrell/Technician

Information pamphlets and pink ribbons provided by the Susan G. Komen For the Cure Foundation were passed out on Friday at the Community Service Commission and Diversity Commision's "Fall Color Explosion: Pack 4 Pink" event.

CareFirst Animal Hospital is your local source for exceptional customer service, trusted client education, and quality medicine. Visit a location nearest you.

mous too,” Sekhon said. Past seasons of The Real World have taken cast members to various locations including

New York, Miami, San Diego, Cancun, and even as far as Paris. Season 27’s location is yet to be determined.

necessary? To an extent.” Koch explained that he agreed with the mission to help instill democracy in Iraq. “I’ve never lived under a dictator so I can’t say what life is like under one, but I can say that I’m very thankful that I’ve never had to,” Koch said. While Struett explained that it is in America’s interest to leave Iraq, the Iraqi government received the notion positively.

“To some extent he is doing it because the Iraqi government has announced that they don’t want to have American troops there,” Struett said. According to Struett, the timing of this mutual agreement could not have worked out better. “That is about the best ending the U.S. could have hoped for with its occupation of Iraq,” Struett said.

2 0 11 - 1 2 F I D E L I T Y I N V E S T M E N T S Carmen, Owner: Andrew Kocha

It Begins With Caring...

Oliver Sholder/Technician

Devin Wright fills out her application for the Real World. She believes her interesting personality will be a great addition to the show. "I'm in AA because I took the initiative to get help and control my drinking, unlike many other people on reality shows."

LEADERSHIP IN TECHNOLOGY EXECUTIVE SPEAKERS SERIES Presents

Jud Bowman

Founder & CEO, Appia, Inc.

October 25, 2011 1231 EB2 - 6 pm Talk is free & open to the public!

“Overcoming the Challenges of Young Entrepreneurship: How to Start a Successful Company in Your 20s”

Oberlin Falls Pointe Glenwood Grace Park 832-3107 841-4211 783-7387 462-1212 Present this certificate for a FREE Comprehensive Examination at initial visit. Code: NCSU11

Not to be combined with other offers, no cash value, certificate must be presented at the time services are requested.

www.CareFirstAnimalHospital.com

w w w. c s c . n c s u . e d u

indie rock / hip-hop / dance / electronica / metal / folk / post rock / local / soul / a capella


Viewpoint

page 4 • monday, october 24, 2011

Technician

{Our view}

The Facts:

Young adults aged 1824 make up the lowest voting demographic by age at each election. News sources often attribute this low voting rate to political apathy.

Our Opinion:

College students are not politically apathetic, and low voter turnout can be explained by other factors. However, it is true that many college students often know the headlines but neglect to learn the whole story. Students should take responsibility for knowing what’s going on in the world and what these events mean to them.

{

Campus Dirt

T

}

his column is dedicated to highlighting those times where professors show us they are real people. This being the inaugural issue, I have submitted one of my own. If you have similar stories, send them to viewpoint@ technicianonline.com and we will publish the best stories we get.

Professors are people too One day my English professor announced that we were beginning a unit on poetry. The class collectively groaned. In response, he said, “Poetry is important. Poetry has a real tangible function: it will get you laid. I look around and well, guys, y’all are going to need all the help you can get. Ladies, you should learn it too so you can avoid these guys if they try to use it.” ~Josh I was sitting in one of my classes listening to the professor go over a new concept, when a student raised his hand to ask a question. The student wanted the professor to re-explain how he got from Point A to Point B in the problem. The professor agreed, and calmly wrote out the words “high school” underneath Point A. He then informed the student that if he did not understand such a simple concept, he needed to go back to high school. The entire class went silent, and I don’t remember

Stay politically informed Y oung people, particularly college-aged students, are the smallest voting demographic by age group. However, recent elections have illustrated a rise in young voters’ attendance, with 47 percent of voters aged 18-24 voting in the 2004 presidential election, according to Fox News. Many news sources have attributed this low voter turnout to political apathy. The issue is not political apathy, because many college students remain informed about current events. Voter turnout reflects more on individual belief in our type of government and whether an individual has a voice in our society. However, it is true that some students in college undoubtably fail to stay informed about international news. College places the bulk of the responsi-

bility of obtaining news on the student because information, for the most part, can no longer be obtained through parents and older siblings. A certain degree of information is passed from peers, Facebook, Twitter and other outlets for discussion. However, the information reported is often mere outcomes and the whole story is sometimes lost. For example, the news of Moammar Gadhafi’s death spread like wildfire on social media sources as well as through the general student population. By the end of the week, his death was common knowledge and most knew this event occurred. But many did not know who

Gadhafi was, past the fact he was a Libyan dictator. They didn’t know the details surrounding his death and how to separate these from rumor. Thousands of N.C. State students knew a man named Gadhafi was dead but many of those had no concept of the circumstances and implications of his death. Another recent news event, potentially more relevant to students, emerged a few days ago when President Obama made the historic announcement to withdraw remaining troops in Iraq and bring them home. Most college students are educated about the war in Iraq; they lived through it and were

old enough to understand the circumstances surrounding its initial invasion. There are many students with parents, siblings, other relatives or friends still abroad. Other students are involved in ROTC or plan to join the military after college. Obama’s decision impacts all of these individuals and the bare knowledge he plans to pull troops out by the end of the year does not suffice. College students are not politically apathetic. Students generally do know what is going on but there is a fine line between knowing the headlines and actually knowing the event. Because of the important effects these events can have on students, they should take responsibility for knowing what’s going on and researching the true story.

{

seeing that kid ask a question ever again. ~Jim I’m taking a class called social deviance. On the first day, instead of asking for the standard-lame introductions, our professor said, ”I’m pretty sure every one of you has been deviant. Let’s go around, and each of you introduce yourself and tell us a story of your deviance. ” The discussion culminated with one guy opening up about a time where he peed off the balcony of a third story building onto someone by accident. No group introduction will ever beat that one. ~Sam

There exists a notoriously difficult nuclear professor. Tests for this class are four hours long; mental abuse most purely refined. Before one of these tests, the professor noticed a green New Testament that had been left in the room. Without skipping a beat, he said, “Uh oh, I better not move that, rumor is if I touch it I’ll go up in flames.” Selfactualization at its finest. ~Levon

We want to hear it! Have a funny story about something that happened around N.C. State? Did your boyfriend do something so dumb it made you question why you are together? Did your professor insult a student so badly they had to drop a class? Are you so broke all you own are Ramen noodles and duct tape? If you answered yes to any of the above questions please send your 50-100 word story to viewpoint@technicianonline. com. Please include your first name with the story. If you’re story is truly amazing we will run it in one of our upcoming segments: Why am I dating you? Centered on the absurdity of your collegiate relationships, we will examine the moments where you doubt your, or your friends, relationships the most. Sick of the animal noises echoing down your hallway or have you tired of the nauseating nicknames you’ve been subjected to? We want to know. We are not looking for anything sentimental here; all we’re looking to do is be amused at someone else’s expense.

323 Witherspoon Student Center, NCSU Campus Box 7318, Raleigh, NC 27695 515.2411 515.2029 515.5133 technicianonline.com

in your words

}

Which sources do you use to keep on top of current events? by Tejas Umbarkar

So, it’s the last day of new material before our test. The professor comes in and says, “OK class, I was reading your book and was going to try to explain [that day’s subject] like they did, but at the last minute I decided not to. So bear with me, I’m winging it.” A complete look of terror took over the room. Worst lecture ever. ~Troy

Got relationship dirt?

Editorial Advertising Fax Online

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

“Mostly online papers and TV.” Amanda Briggs senior, mechanical engineering

Students should keep up with global events.

Rachel Jordan, sophomore in architecture

T

Rape is not a joke

he evolution of language is something which I find incredibly interesting, specifically the evolution of slang and colloquialisms. However, sometimes slang proves detrimental to our societal structure. The word ‘’gay” has gone from meaning “happy,” Jonathan to “homoLewis sexual,” to Staff Columnist “stupid.” Those transitions have put a great deal of strain on the gay community, which has had to cope with being called stupid. Another example is the liberal use of the word “rape.” The use of this word in jokes and metaphors has become very common in our generation. After a tough test, have you ever caught yourself saying “That test totally raped me,” or, when exchanging trash talk during a game, told those you were competing against that you were “going to rape them?” Until very recently, I said things like this all the time to my friends. I thought nothing of it, because of how desensitized I had become to the word. However, we need to be careful about what words we let ourselves get desensitized to. Rape is a serious problem and mention of it should still carry a significant weight. To put things into a little perspective, let’s look at some stats here at N.C. State.

Statistics from the US Department of Justice show that 3.5 percent of women in college will be raped or be in an attempted rape situation. This translates to approximately 480 women per academic school year who are either involved in an attempted rape or rape. After four years attending N.C. State, it is projected that nearly 3500 women will be in the same situation. These numbers seem huge when compared to the cases of reported rape over the past few years. From the N.C. State Police crime statistics, in 2007 there were three reported cases of rape, three in 2008, two in 2009 and no cases reported in 2010. This huge discrepancy stands as proof that rape is the most underreported crime out there. 75 percent of female rape victims personally know the assailant. Rape is already a hard enough thing for victims to deal with and to report, due to its traumatic nature. Iimagine how much harder it must be for those 75 percent to turn in people they know. People whom they may have considered their friends and maybe even family. Admitting to yourself that people you may have trusted and had good opinions of are monsters capable of rape, cannot be easy and it cannot be easy to turn them in because of how scared you probably are. Another serious issue to consider is how people perceive rape victims. While perusing one of my friend’s Tumblr posts, I came across an interesting thread on the topic of

Editor-in-Chief Laura Wilkinson

News Editor John Wall

Sports Editor Josh Hyatt

editor@technicianonline.com

news@technicianonline.com

sports@technicianonline.com

Managing Editor Taylor Cashdan

Features Editor Mark Herring

Viewpoint Editor Trey Ferguson

Photo Editor Alex Sanchez

managingeditor@technician online.com

features@technicianonline.com

viewpoint@technicianonline.com

photo@technicianonline.com

rape. There was a picture of an attractive girl dressed up in pretty average “going out” clothes who had been raped. User “hurrdurralex” had this to say about the girl “What do you think is going to happen when you have whore makeup on, a short skirt, a midriff top and all that? You’re making yourself a target to men and one of those men might be a rapist”. Essentially, he is claiming that girls who like to look good are asking to be raped. For the sake of my belief in humanity, I was hoping he was being sarcastic, so I checked out his Tumblr. He was not being sarcastic. If one person can have such ludicrous thoughts, then other people probably agree. Being attractive is not asking to be raped. No one asks to be raped. Ever. Rape fantasies are just that, fantasies. Fantasies are not actual rape. If a woman decided to walk around naked, that would still not count as an invitation to rape her, because there is no such thing as an invitation to rape someone. The definition itself prevents that since it is defined as nonconsensual sex. So I ask you, the creators of the evolution of our language, to take a step back and think about what you are about to say. Is it really necessary to use a word with so many real problems and real victims, with people you may know, even as a colloquialism?

Design Editor design@technicianonline.com

Advertising Manager Ronilyn Osborne advertising@sma.ncsu.edu

“I read New York Times.” Michael Simon sophomore, criminology

“I use the Moodle site for my class stuff, the college website and there is always stuff going on around the expression tunnel.” David Fuhrer freshman, management

“Basically Internet, newspaper, mags and talking to people.” Leo Godfriaux sophomore, forensic science

“I mostly use Internet, and not really any other sources.” Sarah Junkins freshman, visual arts applications

Technician (USPS 455-050) is the official student newspaper of N.C. State University and is published every Monday through Friday throughout the academic year from August through May except during holidays and examination periods. Opinions expressed in the columns, cartoons, photo illustrations and letters that appear on Technician’s pages are the views of the individual writers and cartoonists. As a public forum for student expression, the students determine the content of the publication without prior review. To receive permission for reproduction, please write the editor. Subscription cost is $100 per year. A single copy is free to all students, faculty, staff and visitors to campus. Additional copies are $0.25 each. Printed by The News & Observer, Raleigh, N.C., Copyright 2011 by North Carolina State Student Media. All rights reserved.


Features Campus & Capital

Technician

monday, october 24, 2011 • Page 5

Teacher by day, horror filmmaker by night Computer science lecturer pursues his passion for horror. Story By Anthony Romano | photos By TYler Andrews

Alan Watkins demonstrates how to apply zombie makeup to volunteer R. Cory Smith, senior in English, Tuesday Oct. 18.

A

ccording to computer science lecturer Alan Watkins, gel blood is the best stuff ever. “It’s basically just gelatin that you can buy at the store, some glycerin, and some water, and a bit of food coloring,” Watkins said. “And that’s the big secret revealed of the perfect fake blood.”

You might find yourself talk- movies is other people enjoying ing about subjects like this, if the finished product,” Watkins you ever run into Watkins. He said. “If you make a film and has taught classes in computer nobody ever sees it, it’s almost science, Java, HTML, discrete like you wrote a book and nomath and Perl, but not every- body ever read it.  It’s definitely one knows that Watkins has a an art form and you want to get passion for making good old- it out there for other people to see.  Film festivals are a great fashioned horror B-movies.  Watkins has dedicated a way to get your films out there.” Throughout the years, Watsignificant amount of time to making independent horror kins’ films have been featured movies while teaching for the in numerous local film festipast 15 years. His first short vals, including ConCarolinas film, Halloween Nightmare, was in Charlotte, Film Spark and the start of what would become the Ava Gardner Film Festival. Horror is one of the most a major hobby for a B-movie entertainenthusiing genres ast.  Today, in f ilm, nearly all with many of Watkin’s fans loving short films youtube.com/alaninraleigh the frightcan b e Lecturer Alan Watkins uploads all his ening exfound on short films onto YouTube. If you are a horror film or B-rated film fan, check out periences YouTube his channel. generated under his by sca r y account movies.  Watkins can certainly “AlanInRaleigh.” With a passion for horror, attest to this notion as he is a Watkins has not held back on true horror fanatic himself.   Bhis desire to create new stories movies are Watkins’ primary for all to see.  In fact, having forte—they allow him to crehis stories filmed for audiences ate stories that do not have to to enjoy is Watkins’ greatest be questioned. Audiences can satisfaction with each film he watch his movies and enjoy them without dwelling on plot makes. “My favorite part of making points.

view more

Alan Watkins poses with various movie props. Watkins, a computer science lecturer, has made films that have been featured in numerous local film festivals.

“When you’re watching a horror movie, you don’t really have to think too much. You don’t have to analyze the plot, or why the dumb blonde fell down, you just accept that she did.” Alan Watkins, computer science lecturer

“When you’re watching a horror movie, you don’t really have to think too much,” Watkins said. “You don’t have to analyze the plot, or why the dumb blonde fell down, you just accept that she did.  In horror, it’s not just the plot that people are going for, it’s the effects, the action, things like that.” As far as Watkins’ involvement in his films, he does anything and everything.  As an independent filmmaker, Watkins is responsible for nearly everything having to do with the

project. He produces, writes, directs, acts and even does the horror make-up in almost all of his films. Independent filmmakers generally take charge in all aspects of their films, and Watkins is no exception. When casting for his movies, Watkins has actually used his own children in the past. For Watkins, it makes shooting much easier since cooperating with children on set is not always so easy. Many kids are frightened on horror sets and can be hard to handle, but luckily for Watkins, he can easily

handle and discipline his children during filming. Location and expense are another challenge. Most of the time, Watkins shoots on locations that do not require a permit, so as to minimize cost. Locations for Watkins’ films have been anywhere from ambulances to storage lockers. Costs for the films are generally low, with some of the expenses being made up in DVD sales.  At film festivals, Watkins has actually manufactured DVDs of his films for interested viewers to buy at a low price. There are certainly many people who have a passion for horror similar to how Watkins enjoys the art form. It may be a lot of work, but Watkins sincerely loves what he does and pursues his passion for both himself and others’ enjoyment. “If there are people that want to make a short film, then that’s exactly what they should do, because the longer that you try to make something, the more

Watkin’s most popular movies include: • • • • •

Blood Clown—Playtime is over There’s a monster in my room Halloween Nightmare Campfire Massacre The Hit Source: youtube.com/ alaninraleigh

problems you’re going to run into,” Watkins said. “Try and start off with something that’s no more than five minutes.  My advice for any aspiring horror filmmakers is to get out there and do it.” Young filmmakers should take note of Watkins’ work since he has proved himself a reputable, talented horror master.  Whether it’s gruesome horror, fake blood, or computer science, Watkins certainly knows what he’s talking about and loves what he does.

Business-minded artists prove to be the best of both worlds Local series gives artists advice to manage money. Josephine Yurcaba Correspondent

Telling your parents you want to be an artist can be quite the challenge, but figuring out how to make money doing it can be an even bigger one. Being a successful artist in any community or economy can prove to be tough, even brutal, as seen in Knut Hamsun’s Hunger or James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, with many artists portrayed as “starving,” or bound for eternal struggle. According to U.S. News and World Report, the College of Design is among the top seven graphic design programs nationally, and is ranked second among public universities. With statistics like this, graduates of the program have a hopeful future when it comes to making it in the competitive world of art. Jeanna Young, a sophomore in international studies, is an artist aware of the struggles

that emerging artists can face. “I think I would have to be really creative as far as how to present my work today, because now artists have to adapt to make their work presentable or sellable, it’s no longer about talent, but being able to know who your audience is,” Young said. According to Young, a problem is also created when not enough people appreciate art and even become intimidated by it. The art scene in downtown Raleigh is actively working against this notion. There are many non-profit art galleries and festivals where artists can showcase their work. The Visual Art Exchange is a non-profit gallery that works to support artists. According to its mission statement, the VAE “supports and educates emerging, professional and student artists and aims to increase community awareness, appreciation, and support of North Carolina artists.” VAE also organizes SPARKcon, the art and design festival held in downtown Raleigh.

Twice a year, the VAE holds artists of any medium. Corpron said there are three a lecture series specifically designed to teach local and main themes that the lectures emerging artists how to show- will follow: creating and precase and profit from their senting a series, alternative inwork. According to the VAE come options for artists, such Program Director Sarah Cor- as festivals and grants and pron, the goal of the series is to managing an art business. The help emerging artists develop a third theme includes a discussion about taxes and deducbusiness minded perspective. tions that small “[We want business can artists to] know receive. that there is a The lecture difference beseries, tit led tween hav ing “The Business passion for art, of Bei ng a n a nd k now ing A r t i st,” wa s how to market h e l d S a t u rand sell that artday from 8:30 work,” Corpron a.m. to 4 p.m. said. at Peace ColCorpron said lege and cost she often finds $10 to attend. that there is a Shana Dumont Garr, The first three assistant to the director of gap between a the Ackland Art Museum speakers gave business-type artists tips on person and a how to crecreative-type person, and that this series ate artwork that galleries will aims at closing that gap. The want to display and sell. The series is not designed only for first speaker, Shana Dumont two-dimensional artists, Cor- Garr, assistant to the director pron said, but is also aimed at of the Ackland Art Museum, clothing designers, potters and gave a lecture on how to build

“Successful contemporary art should surprise you, or make you feel uncomfortable.”

a cohesive series, a collection of art with a similar medium or theme. “Successful contemporary art should surprise you, or make you feel uncomfortable,” Garr said. “[And there can often be] a connection between art and social change.” The next speakers, Mary Kay Kennedy, manager of the Mahler Fine Art Museum and The Collector’s Gallery, and Marty Baird, a successful local artist, spoke about working with a local gallery, to display and sell art. Jim Dunne, a local artist who graduated from the Manhattan School of Visual Arts 40 years ago and specializes in a type of art called “photorealism,” said this step to marketing art proved to be the most difficult for him. “I have trouble with how to send and transfer artwork to galleries for display,” Dunne said in regards to changes in technology. The next speaker lectured on alternative art income options such as art festivals and markets. The last two speakers gave specific talks on small art

Visual Art Exchange support network: VAE Mission: “To foster the advancement of and provide opportunities for all visual artists, particularly emerging, and to increase community awareness, appreciation, and support of North Carolina artists.” In addition to the business forum, the VAE supports First Friday events, Spark Con and it’s own gallery on 309 W. Martin Street in downtown Raleigh. Source: visualartexchange. org

businesses and taxes, as well as how to get grants and residencies as an artist. The lecture series will be provided again in the spring, with hopes to continue assisting local artists in fighting the “starving artist” stereotype, by educating them in ways to sell their creativity in the competitive art market.


Features Campus & Capital

page 6 • monday, october 24, 2011

Technician

Dining In brings Air Force ROTC together Cadets join cadre to celebrate the ‘ancient’ tradition of dining in with commander of Air Force ROTC. Story By Mark Herring

F

ood fights, poetic duals and drinking chocolate-wasabi concoctions would be forbidden during a military banquet under normal conditions. But every year the Air Force ROTC detachment lets loose to celebrate the quirky traditions of Dining In. The 105 Air Force cadets joined together Friday evening, from 4:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. to take part in an exclusive event that has been a military ritual since Roman times, according to detachment commander Lt Col Chris Froeschner. “Dining in originated with Roman legionaries as a way to celebrate military victory and it’s evolved throughout the ages,” Froeschner said. “We picked it up through the British. There are rules to the mess [dinner portion] and different things the cadets do, but it’s to learn military traditions. When I was a cadet, I learned the same way.” Unlike formal Dining Ins, the Air Force cadets participated in a combat Dining In, and instead of wearing dress uniforms throughout the night, cadets dawned their physical training uniforms. The combat format allowed cadets to organize field activities and humorous skits which aren’t necessarily part of a traditional formal Dining In, according to Froeschner. The detachment met at Reynolds Coliseum and made its way to the Court of North Carolina for a game of Down Range, a mix between capture the flag and dodgeball. Cadet William Stephenson, a junior in sport management, organized this year’s Dining In and according to Froeschner, this exercise was a prime opportunity for Stephenson to grow into a leader. “He’s [Stephenson] is coordinating this event and learning about leadership and flexibility,” Froeschner said. “Planning and executing this event with 100 other people definitely takes leadership. This event makes you pay attention to every detail so your peers and commanders won’t call you out, which is what we do in the force—we have to be attentive controlling an airplane or a $2 billion budget.” According to Stephenson, the preparation of Dining In keep him awake many late nights, but as the events unfolded Friday, he calmly enjoyed the orderly flow of events. After their field exercise, cadets joined their appropriate flights to partake in skits that lampooned current political issues, intra-detachment affairs and military traditions. Fifteen to twenty cadets comprise a typical flight, and flights are divided among seniority. After skits, the detachment left the Court of North Carolina and headed back to Reynolds Coliseum, where cadets and cadre shared a meal in the gymnasium. During this time, flights compete for dominance through a series of heated verbal exchanges all in rhyme. “There are rules to the mess and if you are caught violating those rules, people will

Michael Pratt/Technician

Col Jefferson Dunn looks on as students in N.C. State's Air Force ROTC play games on the Court of North Carolina Friday. The group held their annual Dining In Friday night, with the event culminating in a speech by Col Dunn, national commander of the Air Force ROTC.

Dining In: a military tradition Dining In originated in Roman Times after legionaries victories. American’s inherited Dining In from the British. Ceremonies include a drawn out dinner, a guest speaker, and strict rules for the mess. Soldiers or cadets that break the rules of the mess are sent to the grog, a bowl of punch with several edible but unpleasant additives. Source: Lt Col Chris Froeschner

confront you, or call you out, speaking in rhymes,” Captain Tony Baczkiewicz, education flight commander, said. “Sometimes you can rebut or retort some of those infractions and try to bring people with you or get out of your violation all together.” Violators of mess rules or cadets who tripped on their tongues while calling out other were sent to “the grog,” a toilet bowl full of mixed beverages from each f light and cadre. This year’s recipe included chocolate syrup, soy sauce, wasabi and marshmallows. For two hours, cadets exchanged “calling out” rhymes and by the end of the night the contents of the grog ran low. “There was fruit punch, horseradish, barbeque sauce and body paint in the mix,” Keith Gregorcyk, a sophomore in civil engineering, said after taking a drink at the grog. “It really didn’t go down smooth at all.” After being sent to the grog and accepting their punishment, cadets and cadre alike had to tip their cups over their head to symbolize the cup was empty. However, in Gregorcyk’s case, the brown viscous libation stuck in his buzzed hair. Dinner concluded when distinguished speaker Colonel Jefferson Dunn, commander of the nation’s Air Force ROTC Program, talked to cadets

Thomas Obarowski/Technician

Alex Young, senior in aerospace engineering, crawls with a flag, during an activity held in the Court of North Carolina, during field events of the annual Air Force ROTC Dining In, with a banquet later held in Reynolds Coliseum, Friday evening.

“There are rules to the mess and if you are caught violating those rules, people will confront you, or call you out, speaking in rhymes.” Captain Tony Baczkiewicz, education flight commander

about their uncertain future and challenges to come. Dunn compared the events of Dining In to the experiences cadets will face once commissioned. “I spend a lot of time talking to cadets on how to prepare to lead in the current military climate,” Dunn said in an interview outside of his speech. “Looking back at the game [Down Range], there was a lot of chaos and there is a lot of chaos in our world and a lot of challenges for leaders these days, so how do you deal with that?” Dunn reminded cadets to remain calm, composed and confident to lead effectively in the future. “Keep calm, carry on,” Dunn said. “Take a deep breath and do your duty. Dunn spoke about his experi-

ences leading in spite of confusion and uncertainty. As a former B-52 pilot, Dunn awaited nuclear attack alert as Operation Desert Storm began and after the events of 9/11, he spent 36 straight hours in command center of his base in Ramstein, Germany. After Dunn gave his closing remarks, Cadet Stephenson and his partners were able to enjoy their Friday as the event ended and stress subsided. However, according to Stephenson, he receives his final feedback on his performance Tuesday. “The evening went well and mostly everything followed the plans,” Stephenson said. “I am pleased, but we will all see what happens on Tuesday.”

Michael Pratt/Technician

Lt Col Chris Froeschner pours his ingredient into the grog. Cadets brought up infractions on each other during the banquette of Dining In, making their arguments in the form of rhyme. If students could not form an adequate rhyme in response, they were required to drink from the grog.


Sports

Technician

UVA

“As soon as I caught it, I said ‘I’m going to dive in here,’” Amerson said. continued from page 8 “I knew it was going to be “It was just a great individual pretty tough to get in there, effort on his part to stay in,” but it worked.” Wit h early defensive O’Brien said. “He’s about an inch in bounds and goes right struggles plaguing the Pack in front of me and then he’s a in 2011, the Greensboro nalittle faster than people give tive has been one of the few him credit for. When he gets bright spots on defense. State, ranked No. 10 in the running, he can take off.” The Ohio native came into ACC in terms of scoring Saturday’s contest with five re- defense, hopes the nation’s ceptions in five games, but took leader in interceptions confull advantage of an abnormal tinues to make plays. “We came up big in the opening by posting 41.7 yards per catch. Underwood’s first second half and made plays touchdown of the day and of when we had to,” Amerson his collegiate career, a 33-yard said. “Not just me, but evhook up right in front of the erybody. It was a good team ef for t a nd State marching we definitely band, came imne e de d to mediately after a win.” David Amerson The Wolfinterception.  pack, now “Our offense at 4-3, will is pretty good need to win right now,” Unthree out of derwood said. “Mike is a great Cornerback David Amerson its final five games to quarterback and of course the bye week gives us reach a postseason bowl. a chance to practice plays hard Before hosting North Carall week and to execute them olina (5-3, 1-3 ACC), State well. If we mind our ‘p’s and will travel to Tallahassee next weekend to face Florida ‘q’s we’re going to score.” The only other individual State (4-3, 2-2 ACC). Also performance which would awaiting the Pack in the compete with Underwood’s home stretch will be a road breakout day was Amerson’s - test at lowly Boston College the sophomore field corner also (1-6, 0-4 ACC) and home cemented his place into State’s games against No. 6 Clemrecord book with his seventh son (8-0, 5-0 ACC) as well and eight interceptions of the as Maryland (2-5, 1-3 ACC).  If Doak Campbell Staseason. The last Wolfpack player to accomplish the feat was dium looks as empty and Art Rooney back in 1937 and dejected as the Pack made Scott Stadium look in the again in 1938.  “David [Amerson] just comes dy ing moments of the into the game with complete fourth quarter, it would be confidence,” Underwood said. a vital upset.  “Well (when the stands “It’s something we would like to see in all our players, but are empty) it means that Dave is a man of his own. Our we’re doing a good job,” whole defense just stepped up Amerson said. “That’s a good feeling because the one play after another.” And as Amerson sealed the fans are talking and cheergame by picking off Hoos’ ing and we just want to shut quarterback David Watford, them up so they’re quiet the his leap over defenders into the whole game.” end zone put that confidence on full display. 

“It was a good team effort and we definitely needed to win.”

Policy

The Technician will not be held responsible for damages or losses due to fraudulent advertisements. However, we make every effort to prevent false or misleading advertising from appearing in our publication.

Deadlines

Our business hours are Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Line ads must be placed by noon the previous day.

monday, october 24, 2011 • Page 7

Amerson continued from page 8

as one of the most prolific playmakers in college football. Already racking up eight interceptions, he leads not only the ACC but the NCAA in takeaways, as well.  “So far, I think I’m doing a pretty good job,” said Amerson. “I have a lot of things that I need to work on to get better at. But right now, I think I’m doing pretty good.” Mike Reed, the defensive backs coach for State, remained very straightforward when expressing his satisfaction with Amerson’s production.  “He has worked hard,” said Reed. “That’s what happens when you work hard. You get interceptions and you get plays. And I’m glad he’s making plays.” Originally recruited as a safety while attending Dudley Senior High School, Amerson was able to successfully transition to corner during his freshman year at State. Having acquired immense experience playing both positions in the secondary, Amerson has undoubtedly sharpened his defensive IQ. “I try to mix it up a lot,” said Amerson. “Last year, coming from safety; it was a big adjustment playing corner and learning how to get used to it. This year, I feel a lot more fluent”. In NCSU’s victory over Central Michigan just two weeks ago, Amerson recorded two interceptions thrown by the Chippewa quarterback, Ryan Radcliff. His second takeaway was perhaps the more significant of the two. With 5:48 left in the fourth quarter and the Chippewas’ threatening to score while in the red zone, Amerson dropped back into zone and ultimately prevented Central Michigan from narrowing State’s lead down to only seven. When asked about his late game interception, Amerson said he attempted to bait the quarter-

photo courtesy of Jed Gammon, n.c. state media relations

Sophomore cornerback David Amerson leaps into Virginia’s end zone at Scott Stadium Saturday after his second interception of the game.

back in making an ill-advised pass by disguising his coverage. “They tried to hit us with a star route that we went over all week in practice,” Amerson said. “I acted like I was jumping the flat route. Then, I ran back to the seven and it was right there.” Not surprisingly, Amerson would later be recognized as

Classifieds

games left on the 2011 schedule, the prospect of Amerson breaking the school record is beyond feasible. In the past year and a half, Amerson has been able to mature into a well-polished, premier cornerback and will only continue to improve during his career at State.

the ACC’s defensive back of the week following the Central Michigan game. On Saturday, A merson proved to be “Johnny on the spot” yet again, tallying in his seventh and eighth interception of the year. He has now tied State’s single-season interception record, set by Art Rooney in 1937. With five

Rates

For students, line ads start at $5 for up to 25 words. For non-students, line ads start at $8 for up to 25 words. For detailed rate information, visit ­technicianonline.com/classifieds. All line ads must be prepaid.

To place a classified ad, call 919.515.2411, fax 919.515.5133 or visit technicianonline.com/classifieds

Help Wanted

EmploymEnt Help Wanted A Great Place to Work! Learn­in­g Express Toy Store has open­ position­ for hard workin­g person­ with great attitude. Located a few miles from campus. Apply in­ person­ in­ Cary (859-1989) or Raleigh (881-4141).

Sudoku Level:

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Real estate

Marketin­g wordsmith n­eeded! Write daily motivation­al message for heavier people lookin­g to lose weight. Email sample to Jim at plam@n­c.rr.com.

Movie extras to stan­d in­ the backgroun­d for a major film. Earn­ up to $300 a day. Experien­ce n­ot required, call 877-491-5153

Parking For rent

Help Wanted

BARTENDERS ARE IN DEMAND! Earn­ $20-$35/hr. in­ a recession­proof job. 1 or 2 week classes & weeken­d classes. 100% job placemen­t assistan­ce. Raleigh’s Barten­din­g School. HAVE FUN! MAKE MONEY! MEET PEOPLE! Tuition­ rates as low as $199 (limited time on­ly!). CALL NOW!! 919-676-0774, www.cocktailmixer.com/n­cstate.html

Immediate employment op­ portunity at Gole’s Furniture in Apex.Perfect for full-time college studen­t.Work on­ly with other college studen­ts.Clean­ an­d pleasan­t work con­dition­s con­sistin­g of light furn­iture delivery an­d warehouse duties.Must have good character an­d work ethics.$8-$10/hr dpen­din­g on­ experien­ce. Able to drive mid-sized truck is helpful. We work aroun­d studen­t class schedule for a 10-20 hr/week. If in­terested in­ a great PT opportun­ity while in­ college.Call Ed Gole 387-1890 Mon­-Fri.11:­ 00am-5:­00pm. By The

Sudoku

By The Mepham Group

Level:

1 2 3 4

GUARANTEED, ASSIGNED PARKING! 1/2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS! $350/semester. Call VALPARK 919-821-7444

Maxim Healthcare n­eeds staff to work w/developmen­tally disabled clien­ts in­ Wake Co. Flexible hours in­ aftern­oon­s, even­in­gs an­d weeken­ds. $9-$10/hr. Need own­ tran­sportation­. 919-6763118.

Mepham Group

1 2 3 4 FOR RELEASE OCTOBER 24, 2011

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

Level 2

Level 1

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Solution to Saturday’s puzzle

10/24/11

Solution to Tuesday’s puzzle

Do you want FREE tickets? Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

11/5/08

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

“Like” NC State Student Media Promotions Facebook Page

to find out how to recieve these special student media offers! © 2011 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

© 2008 The Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

323 Witherspoon Student Center, Raleigh, NC 27607 • advertising@sma.ncsu.edu • (919)515-2411

ACROSS 1 Use a rotary phone 5 Common movie theater name meaning “jewel” 10 Cheat (out of) 14 Regarding 15 Accustom (to) 16 Cad 17 Armstrong who took a “giant leap for mankind” 18 1966 Tommy James and the Shondells hit 20 Release 22 Comes up, as the sun 23 Not working 24 Knock for a loop 26 1958 Connie Francis hit 30 Printer’s widths 33 Is wearing 34 First application line to fill in 35 Sheep sound 36 “My turn to bat!” 37 Untrue 39 List of choices 40 Fed. pollution monitor 41 Rani’s wrap 42 Gave a hoot 43 Mineo of “Rebel Without a Cause” 44 1956 Little Richard hit 47 Puts on 48 1982 Disney sci-fi film 49 Wedding site 52 Dinner alternative, on a 39-Across 56 1965 Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs hit 59 Cat that roars 60 Auditorium 61 Remark between actor and audience 62 Aware of 63 Nothing but 64 Do a lawn job 65 Mellows, as wine DOWN 1 Pioneer Boone, folksily 2 “Understood” 3 Working busily

10/24/11

By Michael Wiesenberg

4 Sweet sucker 5 “Look!” 6 “Right away!” 7 Popular wedding month 8 Comedic TV alien’s planet 9 Turn you hang, in slang 10 Scarecrow’s lack 11 Electrified particles 12 Gospel writer 13 Islets 19 Bluenose 21 Thor’s father 24 Luxury hotel bathroom features 25 Clock readout 26 Acts skittish 27 Florida city on its own bay 28 Pub order, with “the” 29 Dark 30 Thumbs-up reviewer 31 “Olympia” painter Édouard 32 Riyadh resident 37 Goat-man of myth 38 Painting and sculpture, e.g.

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

Lookin’ for the answer key? Visit technicianonline.com

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

39 Hawaiian volcano 41 Building level 42 Swamp beast 45 “That’s good enough” 46 On edge, as nerves 47 Dawdle 49 Dr. Seuss’s “Horton Hears __” 50 Bank offer

10/24/11

51 Bridge crossing charge 52 Father-daughter boxers 53 Workplace for the 52-Down 54 Handy bag 55 Grandson of Adam who reputedly lived to 905 57 Place for a drink 58 Consume


Sports

COUNTDOWN

• 12 days until the football team takes on the UNC Tar Heels at Carter-Finley Stadium.

INSIDE

• Page 7: More on sophomore cornerback David Amerson.

Technician

Page 8 • monday, october 24, 2011

Football

Men’s soccer

Deacons rout Wolfpack Wake Forest defeats N.C. State 5-2 at Dail Soccer Stadium Saturday.

Women’s soccer downed by Eagles N.C. State (10-7-2, 1-6-2 ACC) lost a closely contested match Sunday afternoon against Boston College (10-4-2, 5-4 ACC) at Newton Soccer Field. Eagles forward Stephanie Wirth scored the lone goal of the match in the 14th minute, the one shot out of nine put on goal by BC that senior goalkeeper Kim Kern was unable to keep out of the net. Kern’s save tally is now up to 92, the 10th highest for a season in school history. State returns to play for their senior game on Thursday at Dail Soccer Stadium against Duke. Source: n.c. state athletics

athletic schedule October 2011 Su

M

T

W

Th

F

Sa 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

photo courtesy of Jed Gammon, n.c. state media relations

Redshirt freshman Bryan Underwood catches a pass at the football game against Virginia Saturday. Underwood scored his first two touchdowns for the Wolfpack, who won 28-14.

Hoos afraid of the Big Bad Wolf

Monday women’s tennis at ITA Indoor Regionals Chapel Hill, All Day Thursday Women’s soccer vs. Duke Raleigh, 7 p.m. Friday landfall tradition Wilmington, All Day

Underwood, Amerson clutch in Pack’s first victory at Virginia since 1994.

Men’s soccer at north carolina Chapel Hill, 7 p.m. women’s volleyball vs. maryland Raleigh, 7 p.m.

Sean Fairholm Deputy Sports Editor

Saturday Cross country at acc championships Clemson, S.C., TBA

In a game mostly bereft of picturesque moments, the scene of Cavalier faithful spilling out of Scott Stadium with several minutes remaining might as well have been a masterpiece. Despite the two teams combining for 17 punts, five turnovers and a completion percentage of 43 percent, N.C. State (4-3, 1-2 ACC) broke away from Virginia (4-3, 1-2 ACC) for a pivotal 28-14 victory which gave the Pack its first conference win on the season. In coach Tom O’Brien’s tenure, State is now 6-1 when play-

Men’s golf at bridgestone golf collegiate Greensboro, All Day women’s golf at landfall tradition Wilmington, All Day football at florida state Tallahassee, Fla., 12 p.m. Women’s volleyball vs. Boston College Raleigh, 7 p.m. Sunday men’s golf at bridgestone golf collegiate Greensboro, All Day

Sophomore cornerback providing substantial lift on defense.

Sophomore cornerback David Amerson increased his interception tally to eight on Saturday against the Virginia Cavaliers, tying the school’s record for interceptions made in a season. The record was set by Art Rooney in 1937 and repeated again in 1938.

Vincent Grady Staff Writer

Plagued by countless injuries throughout the duration of the season, State currently sits on a precarious but nevertheless a re-

spectable 4-3 record. This unit ated all over campus as State has been playing exceptionally fans witnessed the Wolfpack suffer their well as of late; third loss of but like any t he sea son other team, to Georg ia State has exTech. perienced its Following share of ups t he game, a nd dow n s Cornerback David Amerson ma ny fa irdu r i ng t he weather fans course of the year. Just three short weeks even became apathetic with ago, disillusionment perme- the remainder of the year,

“So far, I think I’m doing a pretty good job.”

implying that the season was a lost cause. However, this resilient N.C. State football team has been able to head back in the right direction ever since. Much of the team’s credit is due to a young man by the name of David Amerson. A merson, a sophomore from Greensboro, has quickly emerged as a shutdown cornerback for State and is making a name for himself nationwide

Amerson 2011 season stats: Interceptions: 8 Interception Yards: 89 Longest Int. Return: 47 Total Yards: 118 Touchdowns: 1 Source: goPack.com

Amerson continued page 7

Randy Woodson

Chandler Thompson

Tom Suiter

Laura Wilkinson

Josh Hyatt

Sean Fairholm

R. Cory Smith

Molly Matty

Mr. Wuf

Charles Phillips

46-34 8th

53-27 3rd

53-27 3rd

51-29 5th

57-23 1st

56-24 2nd

44-36 10th

46-34 8th

50-30 6th

49-31 7th

Chancellor

North Carolina at #7 Clemson

UVA continued page 7

Wideouts stranded on Amerson Island

Did You know?

N.C. State at Virginia

game after starter Tobais Palmer suffered a head injury during pregame warm-ups. Leading the team in receiving, T.J. Graham was benched for the first half after being involved in the incident. “Tobais [Palmer] is out there messing around and runs into Jay Smith and has a head injury,” O’Brien said. “You can’t make this stuff; you just can’t. T.J. was disciplined, but Bryan Underwood certainly stepped up with three catches, two touchdowns and 125 yards.” Leading 14-7 in the third quarter, Mike Glennon connected with Underwood on a third-and-10 for a 79-yard touchdown strike. Fighting to stay in bounds, Underwood acrobatically avoided a tackle and raced down the sideline for the longest touchdown catch by a freshman in school history. 

“We have to take advantage of our chances and put our heads up...”

Football

women’s golf at landfall tradition Wilmington, All Day

#15 West Virginia at Syracuse

ing Coastal Division opponents on the road. Holding the Hoos to just 249 yards of total offense, a far cry from the over 400 yards of offense Virginia blitzed Georgia Tech with last week, State rebounded from an early 7-0 deficit and did not relinquish the lead for the rest of the afternoon. The Pack, using its fourth defensive line combination in six games, held the Cavs’ formidable rushing attack to just eight yards on seven carries in the third quarter. The two major story lines during Saturday’s victory in Charlottesvile were both results of game-changing performances. The first—freshman wide receiver Bryan Underwood stepping up with two touchdowns catches and 125 yards—keyed the offense with explosive playmaking ability. Underwood was unexpectedly asked to fill a bigger role in the

The Pack didn’t give up as sophomore forward Nazmi Albadawi scored after showing some neat footwork and unleashed an unstoppable shot that the Deacon keeper had no Rishav Dey answer to. That lead was shortStaff Writer lived as Wake Forest rebounded In a game in which the with two goals in two minutes Pack (6-8-2, 2-4 ACC) after some sloppy defending by squandered numerous op- the Pack to make the score 5-1. Albadawi, who later added a portunities, Wake Forest (76-2, 4-3 ACC) made the best consolation goal and had anof theirs to hand the Pack a other one hit the crossbar and bounce off the goal-line, felt resounding defeat. The Deacons, coming off the score-line wasn’t an actual a 2-0 loss to Elon, started representation of the game. “The scoreline was worse the game fast and went up on a free-kick in the 23rd than the actual game. I thought minute when midfielder we played just as good as we Teddy Mullin stepped up have played all season, pretty much. There were little moand shot past the keeper. The Pack was pegged back ments that killed us in the again in the 44th minute game like the [penalty kick],” after a quick breakaway Albadawi said. “We made missaw Deacon forward Luca takes that we need to cut out, Gimenez slot past Pack especially with the ACC Tourkeeper Fabian Otte to put nament coming up.” Albadawi felt done-in by the them ahead 2-0 going into referees but admitted that the the second half. tea m had Coach to focus on Kelly Findthe job at ley felt the hand rather Pack was than worry unlucky about the to concede calls made r ig ht beby the reffore the half eree.  ended. Senior Defender Justin Willis “Wheth“I was diser we are appointed we didn’t start a little bit happy with the ref or not, you stronger, even though we can’t really affect what the ref came in a little bit but then is doing,” Albadawi said. “You giving in a goal with only a just got to try and play your minute left in the half was game because once he makes frustrating after missing his decision he won’t change his so many chances,” Findley mind no matter how much you agree with him or not.” said. Senior defender Justin WilThe second half started brightly with both teams lis, who was playing his last getting close shots but it ever game at home, felt it was was again Wake Forest who an emotional moment for him seized the initiative when on the occasion of Senior Day. “It was kind off a bittersweet one of the Deacon forwards dove in the Pack 18-yard thing coming in as a senior, just box, resulting in a penalty playing at N.C. State,” Willis kick that led to a three-goal said. “It was just a great opportunity playing on this field. The Deacon lead. The game was marred upgrades to the stadium have by numerous questionable been tremendous and the fans decisions by the referee that have been amazing all year.” Willis admitted to his disincluded a penalty-kick not awarded to the Wolfpack af- appointment at the result but ter a Deacon defender han- admitted that the team had to look forward and work hard dled the ball in their box. Findley felt the refereeing and try and get a result in the decisions might have cost upcoming games. “We want to keep on grindthe Pack the game. “I was very disappointed; ing, we have two games left in at that point we deserved the ACC, those are key games the penalty kick. It could for us,” Willis said. “We have to have been 1-1 at that point take advantage of our chances and it could have changed and put our heads up and start the whole momentum of the grinding again on Monday.” game,” Findley said.

WRAL Sports Anchor

Student Body President

Editor in Chief of Technician

Sports Editor of Technician

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician

Deputy Sports Editor of Technician

WKNC General Manager

Wolfpack Mascot

Student off the Street

N.C. State

N.C. State

Virginia

Virginia

Virginia

Virginia

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

West Virginia

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Clemson

Cincinnati at South Florida

South Florida

Cincinnati

Cincinnati

South Florida

Cincinnati

Cincinnati

South Florida

South Florida

South Florida

South Florida

Wake Forest at Duke

Wake Forest

Wake Forest

Wake Forest

Wake Forest

Wake Forest

Wake Forest

Wake Forest

Duke

Wake Forest

Wake Forest

#20 Auburn at #1 LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

LSU

#22 Georgia Tech at Miami

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech

Georgia Tech

Southern Cal at Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Notre Dame

Stanford

Stanford

Stanford

Stanford

Stanford

Stanford

Stanford

Stanford

Stanford

Stanford

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Michigan State

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

#25 Washington at #8 Stanford #6 Wisconsin at #16 Michigan State

Technician - October 24, 2011  

MTV seeks stars at bar