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monday october

4

2010

Raleigh, North Carolina

technicianonline.com

Police investigate student deaths The deaths of N.C. State student Ray Ausbon and Gardner-Webb student Zac Tigner are under investigation after police found their bodies Saturday morning. Kali Mallory Staff Writer

The bodies of 21-year-old Ray Ausbon and 19-year-old Zac Tign-

er were found Saturday morning at 817 Hillsborough St., Apt. 203, the home of Ausbon, according to Jim Sughrue, director of public affairs for Raleigh Police Department. The police were responding to a 911 ‘suspicious persons’ call about two people near the 2nd floor fire escape landing at 9:26 a.m. Saturday morning when they found the bodies, Sughrue said. According to Sughrue, the cause of death remains unclear.

“The bodies were given to medical examiners for autopsy results. Toxicology results could take several weeks,” Sughrue said. “It’s inappropriate to speculate if it’s a drug overdose. There did not appear to be any signs of foul play.” Ausbon was a senior in accounting. Tigner attended Gardner-Webb University. Both students graduated from Apex High School.

Merely a flesh wound

Marisa Akers/Technician

Parks Harrington, a freshman in turfgrass management, shovels mulch with his dad, Randy Harrington, from Taylorsville, N.C. “I think it’s a good experience,” Parks said. “It’s a good way to spend time with family, instead of going home to see them.”

11th annual planting service project a success Families and student volunteers mulched and planted 130 plants to beautify the campus this weekend as part of the University’s Parents and Families Weekend. Joanna Banegas Staff Writer

As a part of Parents and Families Weekend, Office of Parents and Families Services held their 11th StudentFamily Planting Project yesterday morning on Central Campus. The service project was sponsored by the Center for Student Leadership, Ethics, & Public Service, University Housing and Grounds Management. Laci Weeden, assistant director of Parents and Families Services, said approximately 40 people came to the

Sunday morning service project. “This is our eleventh year of doing the planting project,” Weeden said. “We always pick a location around campus which is usually near one of the residential halls to beautify the campus and let the families give back by planting flowers, plants and trees.” The families and student volunteers mulched the area and planted 130 plants, which took them about an hour to complete, said Weeden. “The CSLEPS office talked about the importance of service at the University, because it is such a core value of who we care,” Weeden said. “We gave the families and students instructions and education on the plants that we were planting today and then we started planting.”

Service continued page 3

Brooke Wallig Staff Writer

Six students were referred to the University following a kidnapping incident on Sept. 29 at Avent Ferry Complex, according to the campus police blotter. One of the students also received a judicial referral for 6 counts of weapons violation. According to the case report, the seized weapons include two pendent knives, one cane sword, and three pairs of brass knuckles. While the weapons charge has been

Tools, like ‘Go Explore,’ are helping make virtual tours available to off-campus students. Staff Writer

The University’s Admissions Office is taking campus tours to a whole new dimension. The University is providing a

closed, according to Campus Police Public Relations Manager John Barnwell, the kidnapping case remains under investigation and is under the jurisdiction of the Raleigh Police Department. “There was an incident involving six students that could be considered kidnapping,” Barnwell said. “That’s a Raleigh Police Department case, so I can’t provide much information because it came off campus. Among the six individuals was a student who had weapons with him and was in violation of University policy.” Representatives for the Raleigh Police Department were unavailable for comment. Susan Grant, director of University Housing, was also unavailable.

insidetechnician Pack unable to put away Hokies

Virginia Tech erases 17-point deficit to hand Pack its first loss of the season. See page 8.

viewpoint campus & capital classifieds sports

Virtual campus tours not to replace Pranay Deshpande

Six students referred for kidnapping at Avent Ferry Raleigh Police Department is investigating a kidnapping incident involving six students.

Alex Canoutas/Technician

Mike Jones, an N.C. State Alumnus, combats a fellow Society for Creative Anachronism member on Harris field. The two were amongst others in the society to help spark interest in the campus and recruit new members. “We were doing a representation of medieval tournament fighting. I fought without a shield to give my opponent an advantage because I’ve been doing this since 1983 and she’s only been doing it for a year,” Jones said.

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new virtual college open house experience to students unable to visit campus through GPS-based tools and a new website. Thomas Griffin, director of undergraduate admissions, said the virtual fair was conducted using www.collegeweeklive.com services and also that students could attend the session simply by logging in online. According to Griffin, the program had a virtual attendance of approximately 700 students.

“We hosted a virtual open house; students who couldn’t make it to campus could login using a service and attend the session,” Griffin said. Griffin said the virtual open house focused on the University, and online presentations were part of the program while hosting this event. “It had five sections focusing on different aspects of campus life and it was free to all the students interested in

tours continued page 3

Bar brawl leaves man in critical condition A fight at the Jackpot Bar on Hillsborough Street left a 23-year-old man in critical condition at Rex Hospital. Shivalik Daga Staff Writer

The Jackpot Bar on Hillsborough Street had an eventful closing Thursday night. According to reports, Evan Lawrence, a 23-year old man, barely managed to survive following a late night brawl that left him with a blood clot in the brain. The injury forced him to undergo surgery at Rex Hospital. He remained in critical condition as of Sunday evening. Jenny Johnson, marketing coordinator at Rex Hospital, said Lawrence has not been discharged and remains under observation. “He’s in critical condition,” Johnson said. According to an Oct. 3 News and

courtesy of the lawrence family

Evan Lawrence remains in critical condition at Rex Hospital after a bar brawl left the 23-year-old requiring surgery.

Observer report, Lawrence was partying with friends at the bar at 1303 Hillsborough St. near downtown Raleigh, when the incident took place. Lawrence stepped outside to smoke a cigarette, accidently f licking the cigarette onto someone. This led the attacker to retaliate, which ballooned into a full-scale brawl which left the bar’s window panes smashed. Residents living near the bar said approximately 50 pounds of glass—

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from bottles, glasses and windows were smashed during the fight, and are still lying across the road from the bar. Arthur Perry, who lives close to the Jackpot Bar on Hillsborough Street, said he was not aware of how the fight started. “There was glass strewn all over the place. I don’t know how it all actually started, but they must have had a big fight,” Perry said. Perry said the Jackpot Bar was planning on closing down after that night, and this was just incidental. It was a crowded night and the lot was packed with cars, Perry said. The bar’s window now has a gaping slit, wide enough for a thin person to enter. According to Perry, the Jackpot Bar has always been a place for miscreants. “They were a bunch of drunken revelers,” Perry said. “It’s good that they are closed now, they were always very loud and rowdy.” No N.C. State students were found to be involved in the incident. Lawrence’s family was unavailable for comment Sunday night.


Page 2

PAGE 2 • MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2010

CORRECTIONS & CLARIFICATIONS

TECHNICIAN

THROUGH ALEX’S LENS

CAMPUS CALENDAR October 2010

In Friday’s “Spencer Shell slowly recovering after collapse on Harris Field,” Shell was taken to Rex Hospital.

Su

Send all clarifications and corrections to Editor-in-Chief Amanda Wilkins at editor@ technicianonline.com

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WEATHER WISE

Today WOLFPACK INTERCOLLEGIATE GOLF COURSE TOURNAMENT Day 1 Lonnie Poole Golf Course

Today:

INVISIBLE CHILDREN: MOVIE AND SURVIVOR 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Witherspoon Cinema

67/46

HISTORY: THE WALK OF THE IMMIGRANT 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Witherspoon Cinema

Mostly cloudy.

Tomorrow:

64 44

Takin’ down the man

Mostly sunny and clear.

Wednesday:

65 46 Mostly sunny and clear.

SOURCE: WWW.NOAA.GOV

THIS DAY IN HISTORY On October 3 in 1972, the D.H. Hill Library North Tower was dedicated. The original eleven-story bookstack tower, now the North Tower, also allows the bookstacks to be opened to all users. Previously, the library had had closed bookstacks.

“EXPOSED” THE IMPLICATIONS OF HIV/AIDS 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Riddick Hall 325 ACCESS 2007 LEVEL 1 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. McKimmon Center

PHOTO BY ALEX CANOUTAS

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ndrew Finegan, a freshman in mechanical engineering and Kate Braswell, a freshman in polymer color chemistry, fight one another in the Gladiator blow-up activity at West Fest held on Lee Field. The two duked it out in a long, dramatic battle. “Kate whooped my butt because she has such great color guard skills. I wasn’t prepared to defend against such an onslaught,” Finegan said.

POLICE BLOTTER

12:51 A.M. | FIRE ALARM Owen Hall Officer responded to alarm caused by cooking. System reset.

Sept 28 1:11 A.M. | ILLEGALLY PARKED VEHICLE Hillsborough Building Lot Due to citizen complaint, NCSU Transportation Parking Ticket was issued for having valid permit. 12:22 A.M. | TRAFFIC STOP Dan Allen Drive/Sullivan Drive Student was issued citation for stop sign violation.

2:21 A.M. | FIRE ALARM Partners III Deck Units responded to alarm caused by system malfunction. Electronics notified. 6:30 A.M. | MEDICAL ASSIST Holladay Hall Units responded and transported staff member in need of medical assistance.

2:32 P.M. | CONCERNED BEHAVIOR REPORT Avent Ferry Complex Concerned Behavior Report was completed regarding comments made by student. 4:41 P.M. | SUSPICIOUS INCIDENT Centennial Middle School Report of suspicious incident involving juvenile. Incident will be handled by Wake County School System. No further action taken by officers. 9:24 P.M. | SAFETY PROGRAM Wood Hall Officer conducted Alcohol Safety Program.

Sept 29 2:06 A.M. | SUSPICIOUS PERSON Hillsborough Street Report of subject urinating in public. Officers checked area but did not locate subject. 3:11 A.M. | FIRE ALARM Winston Hall Officers responded to alarm. 4:17 A.M. | MEDICAL ASSIST Hillsborough Street Units responded to nonstudent in need of medical assistance. Transport was refused.

PC INTRODUCTION 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. McKimmon Center GLBT LUNCH AND LEARN Noon to 1:30 p.m. SUSTAINABILITY THROUGH INNOVATION: 2010 BORLAUG LECTURE & ROUNDTABLE 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. South Center, Talley Student Center TEACHING PHILOSOPHY PEER REVIEW WORKSHOP 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Walnut Room, Talley Student Center Tuesday CARIBBEAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION MEETING 8:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Daniels 232 GENERAL FACULTY MEETINGOPEN TO THE CAMPUS 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Walnut Room, Talley Student Center

BRIAN SHULTZ|CHEW FIRST

SOURCE: HISTORICAL STATE

EXCEL 2007 LEVEL 1 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. McKimmon Center

GET INVOLVED IN TECHNICIAN

ENGINEERING CAREER FAIR 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. McKimmon Center AUDITION ORIENTATION FOR INSPECTING CAROL, BY UNIVERSITY THEATRE 5 p.m. Thompson Hall

Technician is always looking for people to write, design, copy edit and take photos. If you’re interested, come to our office on the third floor of Witherspoon (across from the elevators) Monday to Thursday 9 a.m. to midnight and Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., or e-mail Editor-inChief Amanda Wilkins at editor@ technicianonline.com

Ongoing Events WRITING LEARNING OUTCOMES Online

IN THE KNOW

Benefit Concert for Haiti Food Aid International, Inc. is holding a benefit concert to raise funds for feeding people in Haiti. The concert is free and is headlined by local artist Elizabeth South, along with Michelle Williams and Josh Pepper. The concert will be Saturday, November 13 from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at the Hope Cafe on 201 Tryon Road

“IN SEARCH OF A STATE TREASURE” All Day The Crafts Center, Street Gallery

in Raleigh. Donations accepted at the concert and also online at http://www. food-aid.org. SOURCE: MARK PROKOP, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FOOD-AID INTERNATIONAL, INC.

Fall Break Fall break officially begins at midnight on October 6 and classes resume Monday, October 11.

“QUILTING IS ART” EXHIBITION All Day The Crafts Center DELTA FALL WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS REGISTRATION All Day ITTC Labs in DH Hill Library SOUTHERN ROOTS OF MIDCENTURY MODERN Noon to 8 p.m. Gregg Museum of Art and Design

SOURCE: NCSU CAMPUS CALENDAR

career

Consider a in

Pharmacy UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy Admission Information Session Wednesday, October 6

4:00 to 6:00 p.m. Kerr Hall Room 1001 The UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will host an admission information session on October 6 in the W. Seymour and Rheta Holt Auditorium of Kerr Hall (room 1001). The session will cover admission criteria and the application process for the doctor of pharmacy program. Current pharmacy students will be on hand to answer your questions about the program. We invite you to come and learn more about one of the top-ranked pharmacy schools in the nation. www.pharmacy.unc.edu/events


News

Technician

service

continued from page 1

The service project was located at Owen and Tucker Residential halls, according to Weeden. “We chose Tucker beach, but the service project was originally located at Turlington and Alexander Halls, but because of the rain we had to move locations to the Owen and Tucker residential halls area,” Weeden said. The Parents and Families Weekend service project has been a planting service project each year. “We pick a different side of campus and beautify it,”

Weeden said. “We clean out the trash; we plant new plants and remove any damaged plants or trees.” Weeden said Universit y Housing is one of the partners that works with IRC, and thanks families for community service and provided refreshments at the service project. “We got there and had some coffee and Krispy Kreme doughnuts,” Weeden said. According to Weeden, three families returned from last year and several new families said they planned to come back next year. “Some of them were alumni from the University and who were also horticultural majors who just wanted to do the ser-

vice project so that was very exciting to them,” Weeden said. Weeden said the entire planting service project was great and the families were excited to give back to the University. “We thanked the returning families with a gift and we thanked the new families with a spade that they could use for gardening and all the families left with N.C. State gardening gloves,” Weeden said.

monday, october 4, 2010• Page 3

Honors Village festival commemorates grass reseeding Joshua Chappell Staff Writer

Sunday afternoon in the University Honors Village was filled with music, sidewalk chalk, corn-hole boards, Frisbee, cotton candy, hot dogs and grass. Grass Day was started four years ago to celebrate the reseeding of the Quad, and it caught on as an annual occurrence each fall. According to Michael Cope, a sophomore in aerospace engineering and Resident Advisor in Becton, no one was allowed in the area while it was

being reseeded. As a means of celebration, there were many games and activities that occurred on the lawn. The celebration begins every year with a storming of the Quad. The entire area is taped off and at the beginning of the celebration students sprint onto the lawn. The event, which was sponsored by the Quad Area Council and the Resident Advisors in Becton, Bagwell and Berry Halls, occurred at the same time as West Fest, a similar festival on West Campus. “The turnout for Grass Day was less than expected,” Cope

said, “but there were still a good number of people there.” For Paula McDonald, a sophomore in electrical engineering, Grass Day provided an opportunity for the Honors Village to relax and have a bit of fun. “I thought it was really interesting to see people chalking the sidewalk,” McDonald said, “because people usually associate science and engineering with the Honors Village.” “It was fun to see everyone being artistic,” McDonald said.

hula hooping on hargett

Tours

continued from page 1

N.C. State,” Griffin said. E. Carroll Joyner Visitor Center provides students with a GPS-based application called Go Explore for campus tours. Stacy Fair, director of E. Carroll Joyner Visitor Center, said Go Explore provides students with an audio visual tour of the campus. “The tool serves two purposes: to visit campus when we are not holding an official campus tour and students who can’t make it to the campus can also use it,” Fair said. According to Fair, these tools will help out-of-state and international students take virtual tours without needing to visit the campus. “We are having minor improvements in Go Explore. We are branding it with N.C. State’s logo,” Fair said. Griffin said such tools and virtual open houses will encourage students who cannot visit the University to apply as well. “Using Learnhub environment, we hope to do it for international students. This will help us engage with them at a more personal level,” Griffin said.

Fair also said the new pro- opment of this application as gram works in a virtual en- well,” Fair said. According to Griffin, the vironment will certainly help attract the attention of students University’s Admissions Office is planning to extend their who cannot visit the campus. “We just want to spark their efforts in virtual tours. “We definitely plan to have interest to bring them to cammore of them and also participus,” Fair said. According to Griffin, virtual pate in virtual college fairs. We open houses will not be a per- also plan to host international open manent house replacefor interment to national traditionstudents,” a l open Griffin houses, said. but are Griffin simply also said for those such iniin which tiatives campus is help creinaccesate a posisible. Thomas Griffin, director of tive senti“It’s not undergraduate admissions ment for a replacestudents ment for traditional open house; we planning to come to the Uniprovide opportunity for people versity and that current student who can’t make it. University involvement cannot be ruled open house is schedule to take out when it comes to attractplace on Oct. 16,” Griffin said. ing new students to campus. “Our students are always the Fair said student involvement, when it comes to devel- best people to inform about the oping such applications, is very University to others. Student’s positivity attracts other stuimportant. “N.C. State is always look- dents,” Griffin said.. ing to inspire students in stem areas and this application is one of many ways to show it. Students are involved in devel-

“It’s not a replacement for traditional open house; we provide opportunity for people who can’t make it.”

ww

Alexander Nitt/Technician

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Viewpoint

PAGE 4 • MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2010

TECHNICIAN

{OUR VIEW}

Can’t complain until you’ve done the time T THE FACTS:

As a land grant institute funded mostly by the state of North Carolina, N.C. State’s tuition increases are determined by state appropriations. As appropriations go down, tuition goes up. While this was explained at the town hall meeting on Thursday, not many students showed up to the forum.

OUR OPINION:

Students have no right to complain about tuition increases if they are not informed and do not go through the motions to change anything. To get anything done, students need to empower themselves and make informed decisions as they try make changes.

hursday’s town-hall style meeting on tuition lent insight into how tuition increases are determined, but had a poor student turnout. Many students may have made excuses not to go, but if they did not go, they have no right to complain. Just as it is with voting, one only gains the right to complain if they take action and initiative to change something. This low participation does not make the point students want to make with the administration. It only tells the administration that students don’t care, don’t believe they have a voice or that every thing is fine. This doubtfully represents the tuition-payers community. Students always harp on the

The unsigned editorial is the opinion of the members of Technician’s editorial board, excluding the news department, and is the responsibility of the editor-in-chief.

government and administration to be transparent and be held accountable for their actions. This does not mean making misinformed, lazy statements after something goes wrong. This means following the administration’s actions and staying informed. Only by knowing the facts can students know the truth. There is only one solution to this problem: empowerment. Students cannot expect the tuition changes, good or bad, to reflect their feelings if they do not go out and tell someone. The chancellor and Student Government have made the motions to call students

out, now it is the students’ turn to answer the call. Students should get involved by asking questions and demanding answers when something doesn’t seem right. Go to Student Government meetings or read the minutes and e-mail them your questions. The chancellor, Interim Provost Warwick Arden and Patrick Devore, the chair of the Student Government Tuition and Fees committee, should be available for questions. If there is something not provided, demand the answers and services to make it right, or demand a reason why they cannot. If students have solutions, make sure they are known.

You cannot say you were not listened to if you never speak out. The lacking student turnout does not say, ‘I don’t have a voice,’ it says, ‘I don’t care to have a voice.’ Finding a voice starts with empowerment. This is the beginning of making decisions, and decisions are the beginning of change. Students are in charge of making their own decisions, but things are not going to come together without staying informed or making a stand. Next time there is a problem with the administration or something doesn’t seem right, be informed and speak out. Don’t hang back and make gross assumptions that don’t help make the situation better.

Think outside the brick

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ave you ever had a brilliant idea that you felt would make a positive change on campus? Well, get out your pen and paper, because here’s your chance to have your voice heard. The “The Think Outside the Brick Competition” is an annual competition sponsored by Student Government’s Sustainability Commission. It gives students at North Carolina Chris State University the opCioffi Guest Columnist portunity to submit ideas that make campus a more sustainable place. Once submitted, a committee of students, faculty and staff will review these ideas and choose two finalists and a winner. This year, the winner will receive a $1000 grant to start their project, and the two finalists will each receive $500. After starting last year, the competition chose the Students for Organic United Living (S.O.U.L.) Garden as the first winner. Submitted by the Wolfpack Environmental Student Association, the garden has started to grow in a clearing behind the Lake Raleigh dam on Centennial Campus. Thanks to a successful growing season this summer, the garden

has yielded radishes, turnips, jalapenos, beans, pumpkins and more. As the summer turns to fall, the garden is already making plans for next year. By spring, they should have a fence built, and they will begin selling three by four foot plots for $10. While the S.O.U.L. Garden was the ultimate winner of last year’s competition, many other ide a s we re submitted. There was an idea to tint windows in the library reducing their energ y bill. One g roup advocated planting more trees on campus. Not all of the ideas were simply facility enhancements either — there was a plan to create basketball style backboards affixed to bins to encourage recycling, and there were others advocating for fruit trees on campus. Get ready to be creative and think big. The possibilities are endless, and anyone can submit as many ideas as they want. It’s easy to enter too. All you need to do is submit a one-page pro-

“The best ideas come from passionate students who want to make a difference.”

{ I am baffled by Student Government and the administration’s surprise at the dismal turnout for the Tuition Town Hall. Kelly Hook “honestly [didn’t] know.” Why wouldn’t students want to “partake in opportunities to provide feedback”? Let’s see‚ It’s not like SG and the Administration didn’t just tell the entire student population to screw themselves at last year’s “opportunity” with the Talley Student Center renovation. Who decided that we needed a $744 mandatory health insurance fee this year? And what consultation was there about the $750 “because it’s easier” tuition hike? And why did the administration wait until the end of the workable summer to put it all together and enact it? And other situations like SG’s last minute

CAMPUS FORUM

Chris Cioffi is a senior in English and an intern for the Office of Sustainability’s.

}

funding of the Ludacris concert. This leads to a very stretched and disenfranchised student population. I’m really not surprised by the turnout. The administration and SG can’t seriously expect students to just forget history (this isn’t Texas). Trust was destroyed last year, it takes time to build it back and we’re not off to a good start. The way I see it, the administration and SG are going to do whatever they want at the end of the day, why should I spend my evening being ignored? Matt Johnson senior, mechanical engineering

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We didn’t see it coming.

Christian O’Neal, sophomore in mechanical engineering

Democratic Responsibility

T

his election season is the most interesting seasons that I can remember. Our country is still not where it should be economically or politically. Many people are frustrated with t h e g o vernment — both Democrats and Republicans. RepubliChad c a ns w i l l tell you that Rhoades extending Senior Staff Columnist government power is far from being a problem solver and should be a last resort. Democrats believe that the government should be more responsible for our needs as Americans, but the circumstances and disappointment in the current leadership has them concerned about losing both houses of Congress. The Tea Party movement is going to make this November an interesting one. This neoultra-conservative movement has actually started to look like a third party instead of a rally against government. They believe in a constitutionally-limited government with responsible government spending and a fair or flat tax for all Americans.

Editor-in-Chief Amanda Wilkins

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posal. The proposal should include an outline of the project, as well an explanation of its impact. Its budget should not exceed $1000, and should include how it would be implemented if chosen. All ideas must be submitted by a current or former N.C. State student, and must be sent before 11:59p.m. on Nov. 15. All applications will be reviewed, a nd ever y idea will be evaluated, so don’t hesitate to share your idea. For more information, go to: http:// students. ncsu.edu/ exec/sustainability/ or email any questions you have to NCSUSustainabilityCommission@gmail.com. The best ideas come from passionate students who want to make a difference. Don’t delay making your voice heard.

Viewpoint Editor

Advertising Manager Andrea Mason advertising@sma.ncsu.edu

Features Editor Laura Wilkinson features@technicianonline.com

Design Editor design@technicianonline.com

It is clear that the majority of Americans are not happy with the current status of our country, but it is even more clear that no one party or ideology is going to have answers that will please everyone. However, there is one way that you can make sure to have your opinions expressed, and that is through the ballot. The power to vot e i s something that should not be taken lightly. I am not going to sit here and tell you to go vote, because quite frankly I don’t want all of you voting. In 2008, MTV and other popular organizations ran their own type of campaigns to get everyone to vote. They were stressing the wrong point about the process. It is not important to go vote, it is important to be informed first and then go vote. I think everyone has the right to vote, but unless you are informed, it is a waste of your time and dangerous. In 2008, over 60% of the total U.S. population voted. It was the biggest turnout for an election in over 40 years. However, the knowledge of the candidates and their issues was

atrocious. There were countless radio and Youtube clips of people saying things such as Sarah Palin would make a great vice president for Barack Obama. It is comical that people would say that, but it is also frightening. A n u ni nformed electorate can be just as dangerous as an evil t y rant. I u rge t he members of the N.C. State community as well as anyone else who reads this to start informing yourself now. If you are not informed about your candidates, I do not feel like you are doing your democratic duty. Please do not wait until election day and just vote for the people with the D or the R beside their names; that is how people like Bev Perdue get put into office. Give those votes to the people who can help you, your state, and your country the most. Make them earn their spot, and don’t vote for them because of the success or shortcomings of the parties that they represent.

“Please do not wait until election day and just vote for the people with the D or the R beside their names.”

Send Chad your thoughts on voting to letters@technicianonline.com.

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Features CAMPUS & CAPITAL

TECHNICIAN

MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2010 • PAGE 5

International Festival draws Spotted in the Brickyard students, volunteers to help PHOTO & STORY BY MEGAN FARRELL

The International Festival had opportunities for students to volunteer or experience a variety of cultures at the Raleigh Convention Center. Nasir Khatri Staff Writer

The 25th  Annual International Festival of Raleigh was held Friday through Sunday at the Raleigh Convention Center. The program featured several exhibition stalls, performances, how-to cooking lessons, and food booths from hundreds of different nations across the world, ranging from Egypt and Bangladesh to Switzerland and France. Although the event was extremely popular amongst the entire Raleigh population, the festival garnered a large amount of N.C. State students, as well. Whether coming just to watch or to volunteer a booth, University students were treated to a wide array of cultures. When first walking in, patrons were introduced to a red carpet on which they could walk and

see several stalls, all represent- of nations set up stalls along ing different nations. Amongst the strip to sell their foods, these nations were Bangladesh, with nations such as Pakistan, Switzerland, Pakistan, India, Egypt, Kenya, France, Italy, and Afghanistan all being repreand Nepal. Kaaenaat Mustafa, a junior in sented. The food was a big atbusiness administration, vol- traction at the festival, as well. Shafiq Zaib, a junior in biounteered at the festival helping logical sciences, volunteered at her mother’s Indian stall. her family’s “It’s a refood boot h ally nice sight and was atwhen people tracted to that from all difaspect of the ferent walks festival. of life and “People backgrounds from all difcan come ferent walks together and of life came to educate othZain Akhter, senior in the Pakistani ers on their mechanical engineering food booth, cu lture. I wa nt i ng to t h i n k t h at experience fact is what brings most people to the in- our culture through the food ternational festival, and that is and I felt proud to help them. what the purpose of our stall It’s also worth noting that is,” Mustafa said when asked several booths donated their about her views about the fes- proceeds to charitable organizations in order to help those tival. On one end of the red carpet, devastated by the recent floods however, was a long chain of in Pakistan,” Zaib said. Zain Akhter, a senior in food booths, from which festival patrons could purchase mechanical engineering, exfoods from all different cul- pressed how much he enjoyed tures for a small price. Dozens the food when asked about the

“Honestly, I like seeing all the different nations represented...”

Rules to live or die by

ZOMBIE

continued from page 6

GAME OBJECTIVE: The object of the game was to get from the starting point in Wolf Village, to the ending point at the Bell Tower. But there were four other checkpoints players had to go to before going to the Bell Tower. It did not matter what order players went to these, so players needed to be strategic to avoid getting captured.  The first wave of zombies were played by the N.C. Parkour and NCSU Parkour/free running clubs, along with some of their Free Running/Parkour friends from Virginia Tech and other schools in the state. They only started out with about 25 people, but they had an edge on everyone considering they are conditioned and know this campus better than most, as well as how to move through it with ease. The Zombies started at the Bell tower and spread out through the playing field as soon as the game started.

BOUNDARIES: Do your best to stay inside of these boundaries. As a rule of thumb, stay on the inside sidewalks of Gorman Street, Hillsborough Street, Western Boulevard and Pullen Road.  Players are allowed to walk the sidewalk along Gorman Street, to Hillsborough Street. But that is it, players must stay on this sidewalk... so if you get confronted by a zombie, well, you are pretty much screwed.

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entire row of booths dedicated to selling food. “Honestly, I like seeing all the different nations represented at the exhibition booths but the food stalls are the best. You actually get to experience a different culture, by eating their food and that’s what draws me to this festival every year. The different cultural performances on stage are also a big attraction for me,” Akhter said. On the other end of the red carpet was a big stage on which groups representing different nations took turns dancing and performing for a lively audience. These performances included that of African drumming, Indonesian ballroom dancing, Hawaiian dancing, and Korean percussion. Juwareyah Abdus-Saboor, a junior in social work, said she enjoyed the performances very much. “I think the best dance was the Bhangra team’s from the Natya Academy. It’s always nice seeing their performances, since teams from this academy perform at many different programs,” Abdus-Saboor said.

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CHECKPOINT INFORMATION: At each checkpoint, there will be a bottle with a glow stick in it. The bottle will either contain a symbol, or something inside of it. The player must copy the symbol, or write down what item is in the bottle so the creators know the player has been to each checkpoint.

Ending Point: “NCSU Bell Tower” Each check point will have a safe zone. Here is a rough breakdown of each of them: Checkpoint 1: “Dan Allen Parking Deck” - The check point will be on the bottom floor inside the oval-shaped opening in the middle of it. The safe zone will be the area inside the oval shaped opening once you step out you are fair game. Checkpoint 2: “Wood Residence Hall” - The check point is the picnic/benches area between the two buildings. The safe zone is the circular and flat area surrounding the benches/tables. Checkpoint 3: “The Brickyard” - This checkpoint is in the grass area that contains the “Wolf Ears.” As long as you are in this grass island, you are safe. Checkpoint 4: “The Greenway” - This is the most remote checkpoint, and it will be where the two paths converge to form one. The safe zone will be a 30-pace radius around the checkpoint itself. We realize this one is up to individual judgment, but please, just have fun with it and try to respect the rules. BONUS #1: For additional bragging rights to the brave, there is an optional check point inside the Free Expression Tunnel. There is no safe zone in this tunnel, so enter at your own risk! BONUS #2: For even more bragging rights, challenge yourself by entering “The Room,” the cube-shaped room near the outside lecture pit. Once again, no safe zone here.

SOURCE: SURVIVE RALEIGH FACEBOOK GROUP

Technician was there. You can be too.

WANTED:

Applications available at: 1008 Harris Hall or http://www.ncsu.edu/registrar/graduation

Brigitta Dewell, a sophomore in art and design, sports a colorful and feminine look outside of The Atrium. Dewell proves that style can be affordable with a dress from Charlotte Russe ($5), a pair of flip flops from Old Navy ($2), and a cardigan and belt from a consignment store ($3 and $5, respectively). Dewell enjoys shopping at stores such as Goodwill and H&M. “My style is very girly,” states Dewell. “I wear a lot of pink, but I also like to be comfy.”

-Starting point: “Wolf Village Parking lot” - This is where the players get ribbons, marking the players as Humans.

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Jameelah Henderson, a senior in biochemistry, poses on her way to class. Henderson flawlessly pulls off this season’s trend of menswear as womenswear in a men’s button-up shirt from Nordstrom ($30) and striped pants from H&M ($20). Her bag ($5) and jewelry ($2) were both purchased from vintage stores, and her sandals were found at Urban Outfitters ($20). Henderson loves buying clothes at vintage and consignment stores and redesigning them. “My style is versatile,” Henderson says. “One day, I’ll have on a kimono, and the next day, I’ll wear a conservative look with Sperrys.”

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The Technician staff is always looking for new members to write, design or take photos. Visit www. ncsu.edu/sma for more information.

If so, you may be eligible to participate in a research study. Healthy, drug-free participants are needed for a physical screening and 3 study visits. Quitting not required. Compensation up to $410!

Application Deadline: Monday, October 18, 2010

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Features CAMPUS & CAPITAL

PAGE 6 • MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2010

Zombie takeover leads to campus mayhem Laura Wilkinson

SURVIVE RALEIGH GAME PITTED STUDENTS AGAINST ONE ANOTHER IN A RACE TO THE BELL TOWER.

Features Editor

Campus became a war zone dominated by zombies chasing after human flesh Friday night during Survive Raleigh. The Survive Raleigh game began with hundreds of students ready for battle at Wolf Village and a small horde of zombies at the Bell Tower. Once the game began, it was every human for himself as people tried to outrun the zombies and make it to different checkpoints -- and ultimately the Bell Tower -- to claim the title of Last Human Standing. Chloe Schigoda, one of the event creators, said the event was based off a larger version that happened in Washington, D.C. “We wanted to do it here. We thought it might be fun to do some-

thing that involved exercise and meeting new people. Since it’s getting close to Halloween, the zombie thing seemed appropriate,” Schigoda said. Sonum Nerurkar, a junior in environmental technology, found out about the event through friends and said it was a cool way to start off October and Halloween. Unfortunately, Nerurkar didn’t last as a human. “ I made it to two checkpoints, and then this guy started chasing me. I thought I lost him and then he came out of nowhere and killed me and he bit me. A little blood came out, but it’s OK, it’s not too bad. I had to go to the ER but I’m back,” Nerurkar said. “Then I became a zombie, and now I’ve been biting people and eating them.” Nerurkar said she had killed about two humans as a zombie and her victims struggled a little bit. “I’m a little hungry so I’ve been trying to really get some juicy ones, but everyone’s dead. And dead isn’t as good as alive. It’s not as tasty,” Nerurkar said. Chris Collins, a freshman in First Year College, said he was doing Calculus homework when he got a text from a friend saying there was a “zombie thing” meeting at Wolf Village. “I barely made it there on time and I just got started. It was really spontaneous,” Collins said. “Dan Allen was a horrible idea. It was the closest [checkpoint], but it was definitely swamped by the time we got there.” After crossing the train tracks thinking they were ninjas, Collins said he and his friends emerged from the tracks to see a line of people standing just outside the safe zone. Collins was tagged soon afterwards by zombies. “It didn’t last very long; it was very shortlived,” Collins said, but noted his kill count of seven. While most students participated as humans, groups such as N.C. State Parkour and Virginia Tech Parkour decided to put their skills to use as zombies. Andrew Fellner, a freshman in aerospace engineering and member of NCSU Parkour, said the group had an edge over the humans. “We train movement and we condition so much that [the creators] figured we’re only starting with a few people versus hundreds of people so we kind of had an edge over everybody due to our conditioning. That’s how we became the zombies,” Fellner said. “We also got a few people from Virginia Tech who are really good at parkour.” Jacob Robeson, a sophomore in engineering, science and mechanics at Virginia Tech and a member of the school’s parkour club, said the group was originally just going to do parkour Saturday. “We figured Zombieland sounded cool so we came tonight. We didn’t really know what was happening until we got here and we found we could either be a zombie or a human and if we were a zombie we would go hunt humans. We thought that sounded cooler, so we started out as zombies,” Robeson said. Robeson only had one kill, but he said it was difficult not knowing any of the campus. “We started down where the humans start – I don’t know where that is – and we found out

they were all trying to get to the Bell Tower and we were just running around asking random people ‘Do you know where the Bell Tower is?’ A lot of people were like “uh… that way?” and they just kinda pointed,” Robeson said. Victims were chosen based merely on first come, first served basis, according to Robeson. “For us it was just who we saw. I feel like the campus is really big so we didn’t see that many people and when we did we just shouted “ZOMBIE” and if they didn’t yell ‘Zombie’ back we would chase them,” Robeson said. Fellner said his kill count was at seven, but there were others still out there to be destroyed. “I heard three people have made it so far,” Fellner said. “Maybe it’s just a rumor; maybe they’re just trying to instill hope within themselves.” Erin Morton, a senior in bioarcheaology, was stuck with two friends at the checkpoint in the Brickyard by the Wolf Ears. “There’s lots of running and it’s really tiring but it’s really fun to play strategy. We started off at Wolf Village –there was a ton of people,” Morton said. “We went over to Wood Hall first and came at it from the back – there was a hole in the Western Boulevard fence and we snuck through some stuff. That’s where we met our first zombies. They were running after some other people so we ran the other way, we tried to figure out how to get through the railroad tracks, there were tons of zombies at the parking deck. Then we went up on Hillsborough and sprinted down here behind the library.” Morton had been stuck at the Wolf Ears for about 10 to 15 minutes trying to figure out a strategy. “We have to go to the Greenway and there are a lot of zombies around here who have told us there are a lot of zombies over there. We don’t really know what we’re going to do,” Morton said. Andrew Smith, brother of a Virginia Tech Parkour club member, came from Washington, D.C. as part of Urban Evolution, a gym started by parkour advocates. Smith said his main technique for killing humans was by asking which side people were on. “My main technique was walking up to people who looked like they may have been participating and then being like ‘are you guys playing? Are you human or zombie?’ and surprisingly enough, I got a lot of responses,” Smith said. “If they said Zombie, I let them go; if they said Human, I chased after them.” Smith said he focused on Hillsborough Street to find his prey. “My favorite method was I hung out with the capture-the-flag people. I just talked to them for a little bit,” Smith said. “When I saw people heading across I walked across the road to [Hillsborough Street] and they basically just walked along it. So I would just walk out to it, ask them and they had nowhere to go because the limits of the boundaries -- you couldn’t cross the road and there were buildings so you couldn’t cut back in, so I would just chase them down.” Fellner said if the turnout is big enough, the creators may look to go downtown for a bigger game. “That would be epic, but there’s a lot of factors involved in that. We’d probably have to notify the police to make sure it’s allowed,” Fellner said. “Even here, you’ve got people bolting in the middle of the street in front of cars. With so many people, you’re going to get some morons.”

ZOMBIE continued page 5

CHECKPOINTS: 1- Beginning 2- Checkpoint- Dan Allen Parking Deck 3- Checkpoint- Wood Residence Hall 4- Checkpoint- The Brickyard 5- Checkpoint- The Greenway 6- The End Car- Campus Police Department“Keep the chaos to a dull roar nearby.”

TECHNICIAN


Sports

TECHNICIAN

son’s debacle. Blosser was one of the few players who gave herself a scoring opportunity, as she recorded three of the Pack’s six shots on the night.  “Last year we went there and we were so intimidated,” Blosser said. “This game, we came out strong, played our butts off and it just came out the wrong way. We need to start scoring and we need to start working on finishing.”

Although Blosser and Kern were two of the best individual performers for State in this year’s contest, both of them fully appreciate how much selfless effort the other gives for a program that has slowly started turning the corner after not recording a winning season since 2002. Blosser said the roommates know exactly how much they mean to Steve Springthope’s team. 

“Ever since the ODU game, she’s came out and kept us in games,” Blosser said. “I tell her every night that she’s amazing and that I’m playing with the best keeper in the world.”  As the Wolfpack moves forward in conference play, coach Steve Springthorpe knows he will need the experience of Kern and Blosser to help a team that has played six freshman in each of the last two games versus top-five competition. Springthorpe also said that although his team came into the UNC game with virtually the same record the past two seasons, the likelihood of being able to translate solid efforts into ACC victories is much greater this time around.  “I think our team’s better,” Springthorpe said. “We defended better, and I still think we are a good attacking team. We need to get some players back a little healthier so we can get some more of those opportunities. But compared to where we were last year as opposed to this year, I think we’re way ahead.”  After falling to 1-2 in conference play, Thursday night’s game against Wake Forest could prove to be one of the most imperative matchups of the year. The start time is scheduled for 7 p.m. from Winston-Salem, N.C. 

said. “There was no doubt in our mind. We knew that we were going to win this. I think it’s a good feeling to know that we’re all on the same page. “  State also jumped out to an early lead in the second set. The Pack kept Miami at bay by jumping out to a 13-5 lead, but the Canes made a run at the tail end of the set. They came

within one point of State with a 23-22 score, but another kill from Salata, and a bad set from Miami’s Katie Gallagher gave the Pack the set, 25-22.  Sophomore Megan Cyr, who registered 31 assists in the match, said the key to victory was believing the team could win, even when the score became close.

“I think what we really focused on this game was believing that we could win no matter what,” sophomore Megan Cyr said. “If we were down or it was tight, we knew that we were [going to] win. We truly believed that and that helped.”  The third set did not go as smoothly as the opening two sets for State. Miami broke out

KEVIN COOK/TECHNICIAN

Freshman defender Randi Soldat fights a North Carolina player for the ball during the N.C. State’s match against the Tar Heels at Dail Soccer Field on Aug. 1. Despite Soldat’s efforts, the pack ended the game scoreless, losing 0-3.

SOCCER

continued from page 1

we did [those things]. I know it’s a 3-0 loss, but we’re proud of how we played.”  Echoing the same statements from Kern, last season’s leading scorer Kara Blosser also said she acknowledges the team has come a long way after last sea-

VBALL

continued from page 1

and nine for the match. Junior Becah Fogle had five kills in the first set and led all Pack players with ten in the match. “I think it feels good to have that mentality that we’re working,” junior Luiciana Shafer

MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2010• PAGE 7

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difference-maker out there tonight,” O’Brien said. “We couldn’t get him on the ground. There were other times when we did miss tackles and we blew a few things where we didn’t get lined up on defense, which obviously we have to get back and work on.” But all of the blame cannot be placed squarely on the shoulders of the defense. The offense looked just about as much out of sync as the defense, getting outscored by Tech 34-13 in the second half. Playing a part in that was the adjustments the Tech defense made, relying on the blitz to try and stop Wilson and the offense. “They continued to keep bringing the house and we didn’t capitalize on some of the opportunities we had to make,” Williams said. “We knew they were going to keep fighting and it was going to be a dog fight. But they just outplayed us.” No matter where the blame is placed, the obvious fact about the game was the Pack’s inability to finish the contest and put the Hokies

to a 10-6 lead over the Pack. After coach Bryan Bunn called a timeout, the Pack was back in business as it regained the lead 15-14 on a kill from freshman Brie Merriwether. Miami held the lead only one more time before another kill from Merriwether pushed the score to 19-17. The Pack never looked back, winning the final

away. “They just finished the game better than we finished the game,” O’Brien said. “There is no excuse for us not finishing the football game. That is where you want to be, up by three with four minutes to go in the game. We spent a whole scrimmage practicing those situations during preseason camp so you are ready for those things.” However, even though the players know they gave the game away, they understand there is still a long way to go in the season and needs to learn from this game, while setting their focus on the next game against Boston College. “I definitely believe we should have won that game and could have won that game,” Wilson said. “But at some point you have to move on and look back at it and realize we have something coming up next weekend and it’s another opportunity for us.”

set 25-22. The victory moves the team to 12-5 overall and 2-3 in the ACC. “Oh it was excellent,” coach Bunn said. “We were up ahead and they made a little run on us and we took care of the ball.“  The next challenge for the Pack will come from the hands of Wake Forest on Friday in Winston-Salem.

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Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 1

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

Solution to Saturday’s puzzle

10/4/10

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

6/2/10

SOLUTION TO TUESDAY’S PUZZLE

Enter to Win

Complete the grid so each row, to receive a FREE copy of column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit, 1 to 9. Trivia Question: For strategies on originally cast as Jackie Q but pulled out how to solve Sudoku, visit to be replaced by Rose Byrne?

Get Him to the Greek!

Who was

www.sudoku.org.uk

© 2010 The your Mepham Group. Distributed Turn in your answer to the trivia question with name and numberby to Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved. the Technician Office, 323 Witherspoon Student Center, between 9 am & 5 pm. A winner will be chosen at random from all correct entries. Entry deadline is Tuesday, October 5th. Thank you and good luck.

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ACROSS 1 Self-confident to a fault 6 Dealt with fallen leaves 11 Donkey 14 Sneeze sound 15 Vine-covered, as college walls 16 ROTC school WSW of Washington, D.C. 17 Sources of rowdy criticism 20 He-sheep 21 The Carpenters and Sonny & Cher 22 Jazzy Fitzgerald 23 Mother of Don Juan 25 Turkey brand 29 Turkey-carving machine 31 Mine, in Metz 32 Recline, biblically 33 Play your poker hand without drawing 37 Commotion 38 & 41 Computer program suffix 42 1997-2003 game show host who put up his own money for prizes 44 How stop signs are painted 46 ABA members 47 Oration 49 Colorful plastic footwear 53 “Huh?” 55 Nike rival 56 Stumble 58 Santa __ winds 59 Hawaii once comprised most of them 64 Poem of praise 65 Game show host 66 Remus or Sam 67 Actor Beatty 68 Cowpoke’s pokers 69 Beef source DOWN 1 Bay of Naples isle

10/4/10

By Lila Cherry

2 Aptly named California coastal city 3 Lizard that can change colors 4 __-Tiki 5 “__ be amazed” 6 Severity, in Soho 7 Seagoing “Cease!” 8 About .62 mi. 9 Slithery fish 10 Pres. before JFK 11 Walled Spanish city 12 Use one’s nose 13 Rope-making fiber 18 Boob __: TV 19 Opener’s next call, in bridge 24 Pimple 26 Actor Jacques 27 Online zine 28 Country music’s Milsap 30 Talkative 32 Experiment site 33 Nine-digit ID 34 “To sleep, __ to dream”: Hamlet 35 Chopping tool grip

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36 CNN founder Turner 39 Circus safety gear 40 Dinner plate 43 Dinner course 45 Original 47 Baseball’s World __ 48 Omega preceders 49 Leader of the Argonauts

10/4/10

50 Deftly escape from 51 Like many winter jackets 52 None of the above 54 Stun gun 57 + 60 All-Pro Patriots receiver Welker 61 Pesky kid 62 Hosp. heart ward 63 Aardvark’s tidbit


Sports

COUNTDOWN

• 5 days until the football team takes on Boston College

INSIDE

• Page 7: A continuation of the Virginia Tech recap

TECHNICIAN

PAGE 8 • MONDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2010

FOOTBALL

Men’s Golf to host Wolfpack Intercollegiate The men’s golf team will play host to the Wolfpack Intercollegiate Monday and Tuesday at Lonnie Poole Golf Course on Centennial Campus. The tournament will be played in the Fall for the first time after the inaugural tournament was held this past April. Competitors will play 36 holes on the first day, followed by 18 holes on the final day. The Pack has gotten off to a hot start, winning the Invitational at Kiawah and placing second at Golfweek’s conference challenge. The team will be looking to continue its fast start in the 17-team tournament. SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

Cross country places second at Great American meet The women’s cross country team had a strong second place finish Friday at the Great American Cross Country Festival. The Pack was led by redshirt freshman Ryanna Henderson, who finished in fourth place with a time of 18:37.1. Marika Walker (18:47.1) and Bona Jones (18:53.3) also put together excellent performances for State, finishing in sixth and eighth place, respectively. Five of the top eight finishers were Wolfpack runners, but Jordan Jenkins and Tiayonna Blackmon did not factor into the team’s finish because they ran unattached. In addition to the women’s race, the Great American meet featured an 8k men’s race, but State opted not to field a team.

KEVIN COOK/TECHNICIAN

Senior wide receiver Owen Spencer catches a pass and gets tackled late in the fourth quarter of the N.C. State’s 30-41 loss to Virginia Tech at Carter-Finley Stadium on Oct. 2. Spencer led the Wolfpack in receiving yards with a total of 145 on six catches. Despite Spencer’s performance, N.C. State was not able to contain the Hokies’ running attack, losing its first game of the season.

Pack unable to put away Hokies Virginia Tech erases 17-point deficit to hand Pack its first loss of the season. Taylor Barbour Deputy Sports Editor

SOURCE: N.C. STATE ATHLETICS

With 1:30 remaining in the fourth quarter, Russell Wilson and Co. were looking at a 34-30 deficit. The team jumped out to a 17-point lead in the first half, but saw its lead shrink and shrink until it found itself in this predicament. But there was still time. Carter-Finley Stadium was jam-packed with the third largest crowd in stadium

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Today MEN’S GOLF @ WOLFPACK INTERCOLLEGIATE Lonnie Poole Golf Course, All day MEN’S TENNIS @ ALLAMERICAN CHAMPIONSHIPS Tulsa, Okla., All day

WOMEN’S TENNIS @ ITA ALLAMERICAN Pacific Palisades, Calif., All day

No. 7 Florida at No. 1 Alabama

FOOTBALL VS. VIRGINIA TECH

34

second half points allowed by N.C. State defense

253

second half yards allowed by N.C. State defense

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combined rushing yards by Virginia Tech’s Tyrod Taylor and Darren Evans

362 3 91

passing yards by Russell Wilson interceptions by Wilson rushing yards by Mustafa Green SOURCE: ESPN.COM

VT continued page 7

Wolfpack upends Miami for first time ever in shutout.

Women’s soccer drops second straight game with loss to No. 3 North Carolina. Sean Fairholm Staff Writer

MEN’S TENNIS @ ALLAMERICAN CHAMPIONSHIPS Tulsa, Okla., All day

By the numbers:

Heels prove too much for Pack

The Pack bounced back from its loss against Florida State to sweep Miami in three straight sets by the final scores 26-24, 25-22, and 25-22.   “Its always good to win,” coach Bryan Bunn said. “It’s very satisfying. We needed a win before we go on the road. We got four matches coming up when we’re out of town so it’s very good to finish with a win at home. “   In the first set, State jumped out to a 3-0 lead and maintained its  momentum throughout the opening set. Miami began

MEN’S GOLF @ WOLFPACK INTERCOLLEGIATE Lonnie Poole Golf Course, All day

No. 16 Miami at Clemson

way.” Some of the mistakes O’Brien was talking about included three interceptions by Wilson, one of which came when the Pack was in the red zone and had a chance to at least walk away with three points. “The interceptions hurt there at the end,” O’Brien said. “We didn’t get any points and those are the kind of things we can’t do if we are going to be successful.” The Pack completely failed to close out the game against Virginia Tech in the second half. The defense gave up 253 yards and 34 points in the second half and looked a lot like last season’s porous unit, missing tackles left and right. “He [Tyrod Taylor] was the

Volleyball bounces back Senior Staff Writer  

Tuesday MEN’S SOCCER VS. GEORGIA SOUTHER Dail Soccer Field, 7 p.m.

Virginia Tech at No. 23 N.C. State

“We made too many mistakes to give ourselves a chance to ultimately win the football game.”

Jeniece Jamison 

WOMEN’S TENNIS @ ITA ALLAMERICAN Pacific Palisades, Calif., All day

Standings

history, and every fan was on chance to ultimately win the football game,” coach Tom the edge of their seat. At this point we all know O’Brien said. “That was the what happened —Wi l son difference.” Wilson echoed O’Brien’s dropped back on the first play comments, of the drive, but believed lofted a ball the main difup to senior ference was receiver Jarthe fact that vis Williams, when it came and the ball down to it, wa s picked t he Hok ies of f, sea ling made more t he v ictor y big plays for the Hokthan the ies, while Pack when it end i ng t he counted. Pack’s shortcoach Tom O’Brien “That is lived stay in what we have t he top -25 to do to win games, close it out and its undefeated season. “Obviously a tough after- and step up and make a play noon, we lost to a good football here and there,” Wilson said. team but we made too many “They made one or two more mistakes to give ourselves a plays than us and it went there

DANIELLE NEUJAHR/TECHNICIAN

Diving for the ball, sophomore Alexa Micek, a defensive specialist , saves a spike against Florida State at Reynolds Coliseum.

to charge back with a 4-0 run, leaving the score at 15-14, but a kill from junior Margaret Salata helped State regain its

composure. She also had two other kills in the set

VBALL continued page 7

Five days removed from a 1-0 loss to the top-ranked Boston College Eagles, N.C. State (7-5, 1-2 ACC) dropped its second straight decision with a 3-0 home loss to No. 3 North Carolina (10-1-1, 2-1) Friday night in front of a season-best crowd of 2,023 people. It was State’s first loss of the 2010 campaign in which it was defeated by more than one goal.  The scoring commenced when North Carolina’s Kealia Ohai nailed her seventh goal of the season on a shot from a tough angle at the 31:19 mark of the first half. Despite a

courageous eight-save performance out of junior keeper Kim Kern, the Wolfpack could not hold off the Tar Heels’ offensive pressure as Courtney Jones and Rachel Wood each scored midway through the second half to give the Tar Heels a 3-0 cushion. For Kern, who started the season off strong with four shutouts in her first 12 games, the defeat at the hands of State’s chief rival was a difficult one to take. However, the Raleigh native said that looking back at the progression of her team after they were outshot 22-1 in a 5-0 embarrassment in Chapel Hill a season ago, offered some encouragement.  “We couldn’t put anything together last year,” Kern said. “We couldn’t even pass the ball. We didn’t play hard and there was just no intensity. This year

SOCCER continued page 7

Randy Woodson

Kelly Hook Student Body President

Tommy Anderson

Mark Thomas

Julius Hodge

Debra Morgan

Tyler Everett

Tucker Frazier

Sean Klemm

Chancellor

Deputy sports editor

Deputy sports editor

43-7 T-1st

42-8 3rd

37-13 10th

41-9 T-4th

40-10 6th

39-11 T-7th

39-11 T-7th

38-12 9th

43-7 T-1st

41-9 T-4th

WKNC General Manager

Co-host of 620 The Buzz’s “The Insiders”

Former Wolfpack basketball star

WRAL TV anchor

Sports editor

Deputy sports editor

Taylor Barbour

N.C. State

N.C. State

N.C. State

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Miami

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N.C. State Clemson

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No. 9 Stanford at No. 4 Oregon

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No. 21 Texas vs. No. 8 Oklahoma

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No. 22 Penn State at No. 17 Iowa

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East Carolina at North Carolina

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No. 11 Wisconsin at No. 24 MSU

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Tennessee at No. 12 LSU

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Technician - October 4, 2010